Each friend represents a world in us, a world possibly not born until they arrive, and it is only by this meeting that a new world is born. - Anaiis Nin
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 153, 12 August 1994

                              RUSSIA

RUSSIA SUPPORTS ENDING SANCTIONS AGAINST RUMP YUGOSLAVIA. On 11
August Interfax reported that the Russian foreign ministry has now
officially gone on record as advocating an end to the sanctions
applied against rump Yugoslavia for its role in fomenting the war
throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina. Ministry spokesman Grigorii
Karasin told the agency that Belgrade's recent decision to sever
all political and economic ties with the belligerent Bosnian
Serbian leadership was a tremendously "courageous" act, and one
that deserved to be rewarded with a removal of the sanctions.
Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN TACITLY ADMITS CREATING CHECHEN OPPOSITION. In an
interview with Russian television on 11 August, Russian President
Boris Yeltsin ruled out military intervention to suppress the
Chechen drive for independence from Russia. However, Yeltsin
tacitly admitted creating the puppet Provision Council that seeks
the ouster of Chechen President Dzhokhar Dudaev. Asked how he
proposed to solve the Chechen deadlock without the use of force,
Yeltsin pointed to the "emergence" of opposition to the Dudaev
administration, and added: "therefore, it cannot be said that
Russia does not interfere [into the Chechen affairs]" Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

MORE ON THE SITUATION IN CHECHNYA. Chechen President Dudaev issued
a decree on the mobilization by 16 August of most of the men in
his republic, ITAR-TASS reported on 11 August. (On 10 August the
Congress of the Peoples of Chechnya threatened to declare a holy
war in the event of Russian military intervention.) On 11 August
Dudaev also imposed a state of emergency in the Nadterechnyi
region, where the opposition Provisional Council has its
headquarters. He also ordered that broadcasts of Russian
Television be halted in Chechnya. Meanwhile, the chairman of the
Russian State Duma's Committee on Security, Viktor Ilyukhin,
suggested that the Duma should help in mediating between Moscow
and Groznyi, ITAR-TASS reported on 11 August.  Vera Tolz, RFE/RL,
Inc.

RUTSKOI INTENDS TO RUN FOR PRESIDENCY. At a press conference in
Moscow, Aleksandr Rutskoi told journalists that he still considers
himself to be Russia's vice president. He was quoted by Reuters on
11 August as saying that the results of the December referendum on
the new Russian constitution, which abolishes the post of vice
president, were falsified. (This has been argued most intensively
by members of the reformist Russia's Choice bloc, whose special
commission earlier this year publicized information showing that
less than 50 percent of eligible voters took part in the
constitutional referendum, which therefore was not valid.) At the
press conference, Rutskoi, who has recently set up a new
nationalist movement, said he intended to run as a candidate in
the 1996 presidential elections. He said his main goal remains the
recreation of a single state on the territory of the former USSR.
Vera Tolz, RFE/RL, Inc.

GORBACHEV DISPUTES VARENNIKOV'S ACQUITTAL. The acquittal of
General Valentin Varennikov, a key figure in the August 1991
attempted coup d'etat, creates a dangerous precedent and paves the
way for further such putsches in the future, former Soviet
President Mikhail Gorbachev told RFE/RL on 11 August. Earlier that
day, the Military Collegium of the Russian Supreme Court declared
Varennikov not guilty of any crime, saying that the coup was
justified because its organizers were motivated by a noble
intentioni.e., to preserve the Soviet Union from collapse.
According to Gorbachev, Varennikov visited his Crimea resort in
the company of other coup organizers on the eve of the coup, 18
August 1991. In the course of the conversation, Varennikov
personally issued an ultimatum to Gorbacheveither to declare the
state of emergency or to resign. After Gorbachev rejected both
options, Varennikov did not leave for Moscow with the rest of the
visitors but remained in Crimea to ensure the isolation of the
USSR president, telling local military commanders that Gorbachev
was seriously ill and issuing orders to shoot at everyone trying
to help the Gorbachevs escape house arrest.  Julia Wishnevsky,
RFE/RL, Inc.

QUESTION MARKS HANG OVER IRAQ-RUSSIAN OIL DEAL. Reports out of
Moscow suggest that a group of Russian firmsincluding Lukoil,
Rosneftegazstroi, and the Mashineimport trading companyis
currently negotiating a major deal with Iraq to modernize Iraq's
oil industry, but details of the talks remain unclear. According
to RFE/RL's Moscow correspondent, Russian Foreign Ministry sources
say that the Russian consortium signed a protocol with the Iraqi
government in Baghdad in July that involved a $2.5 billion
contract for the modernization of Iraq's largest oil wells, for
the drilling of new wells, and for the supply of machinery to
Iraq's oil industry. Officials of Russia's Ministry of Foreign
Economic Relations, meanwhile, confirmed that negotiations are
taking place but said that the signing of an agreement would be
"excluded" until international sanctions against Iraq are lifted.
Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

US OFFICIALS ON RUSSIAN CHEMICAL WEAPON PROGRAM. Testifying on 11
August before the US Senate Armed Services Committee, the chairman
of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, General John Shalikashvili, and
Deputy Defense Secretary John Deutch both said that the US remains
concerned over what they suggested was a failure by Moscow to
provide reliable information on Russian chemical weapons
production and storage. According to an ITAR-TASS account of the
hearing, Deutch said that accusations that Moscow has "lied" about
its chemical weapons program may be overstated; he suggested that
the problem is more one of insufficient information. ITAR-TASS
also said that Deutch had urged that Moscow be given financial aid
for the liquidation of its chemical stockpiles. Both men
recommended ratification of a treaty banning chemical weapons,
currently under consideration, and Shalikashvili said that among
its benefits would be an improved capability to monitor related
developments in Russia.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

PROJECT FOR MODERNIZATION OF RUSSIAN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL. The New
York Times reported on 11 August that Texas-based Rockwell
International Corporation has received $4.7 million in US Defense
Department funds to launch a joint project with the Russian State
Research Institution of Aviation Systems that is aimed at
modernizing Russia's air traffic control system. Describing the
effort as an "example of defense conversion at its very best," a
top Rockwell official said that the project calls for integrating
a 24-satellite US navigational system, called the Global
Positioning System, with a 14-satellite Russian system, called
Glonass, to upgrade air traffic control over Russia. Ten more
satellites are to be added to the Russian system, and Rockwell,
builder of the US system, will develop technology to make the two
systems compatible. As part of the effort, Hughes Aircraft Corp.
will reportedly build a ground station either in Khabarovsk or in
Vladivostok. Once operational, the system should improve flight
safety in Russia and shave considerable amounts of time off
flights between the US and the Far East, officials said.  Stephen
Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

RUSSIAN-MOLDOVAN AGREEMENTS ON TROOPS. Besides initialling the
main "Agreement on the legal status, procedure, and timetable of
the withdrawal of Russian military units temporarily located on
the territory of Moldova" at the tenth round of talks (see RFE/RL
Daily Report, 11 August), the sides announced in a joint press
release issued in Chisinau on 10 August that they had also
initialled eight agreements on: ferrying Russian military units
and cargos to Russia; Russian military aviation activity and use
of Tiraspol airport pending the withdrawal; Moldova's
participation in building accommodation in Russia for the troops;
and guaranteeing the social benefits and pension rights of
demobilized servicemen residing in Russia or Moldova and their
dependents. The documents will be submitted to the two governments
for approval and signing. Moldova's chief delegate, First Deputy
Foreign Minister Nicolae Osmochescu, told a news conference in
Chisinau on 10 August that Moldovan experts had visited the
ammunition and ordnance stockpiles guarded by the 14th Army in
Transdniester and accepted Russia's thesis that the large
quantities necessitate a term of three years for the Army's
withdrawal after the main agreement enters into force.  Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

IS THERE A CATCH ? The most controversial clause in the main
agreement, as cited by the joint press release, says that
"practical steps toward the withdrawal . . . within the agreed
time period will be synchronized with the political settlement of
the Dniester conflict and the determination of the special status
of the Dniester region of Moldova." Although it has offered
Transdniester autonomy, Moldova had resisted the linkage to the
Russian troop withdrawal and had received international support
against that linkage. Asked at the news conference in Chisinau
what form of special status for Transdniester would satisfy
Russia, its chief delegate Vladimir Kitaev told the news
conference in Chisinau as cited by Basapress that it will be "any
form that will be accepted on both banks of the Dniester," which
could imply de facto veto power for Transdniester.  Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

TRANSDNIESTER WALKS OUT. Transdniester's delegation, attending the
Russian-Moldovan talks as observers and headed by two generals,
withdrew in protest. In a statement widely reported by Russia's
media, it complained that its attendance was formal and that
Transdniester's interests were being ignored. The delegates
insisted that "any decision on the Army's withdrawal is
unacceptable before the determination of Transdniester's status,"
and implied that Transdniester would assert its already stated
claim to the 14th Army's equipment in the event of the army's
withdrawal.  Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

ADAMISHIN FEARS RESTART OF TAJIK CIVIL WAR. Russia's First Deputy
Foreign Minister Anatolii Adamishin told Interfax on 11 August
that Tajikistan is on the brink of a second civil war, because the
Tajik opposition, prevented by the Tajik government from achieving
its goals by political means, is turning to military action.
Adamishin echoed Russian commanders in Tajikistan in warning that
the political conflict in the Central Asian state will not be
solved by military means; he appealed to the Tajik opposition to
seek the help of the UN, the West and Russia to achieve its goals
of democratization and power-sharing. He pledged that Russia would
try to restart talks between the Tajik government and opposition
as soon as possiblea third round of talks has already been
deferred to an as yet undetermined date in Septemberand criticized
UN officials for appearing to favor the Tajik opposition.  Bess
Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

IRAN CRITICIZES TAJIK ELECTION. The Tehran Times, considered to
speak for Iran's Foreign Ministry, has criticized Tajikistan for
having set a date in September for a presidential election,
Reuters reported on 11 August. According to the Tehran newspaper,
the election interferes with efforts to mediate an end to the
conflict between the Tajik government and opposition. Opposition
groups will apparently not be allowed to nominate candidates, and,
as the Iranian publication pointed out, the thousands of Tajik
refugees who fled to Afghanistan in 1993 will not be able to vote
in the election.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN GOVERNMENT AGREES TO DEMILITARIZATION OF SARAJEVO. News
agencies on 11 August quoted Bosnian Vice President Ejup Ganic as
saying that his government welcomes the plan by UN commander Gen.
Sir Michael Rose to demilitarize the capital. The Serbs have,
however, yet to respond to the proposal that would remove all
armed forces from the city and a 20 km-wide belt around it. Rose
also called for free access in and out of Sarajevo, which would
mean ending the new Serb roadblocks. On 11 August relief flights
were stopped again after small arms fire of undetermined origin
hit at least two planes. Meanwhile, The New York Times on 12
August reports that the Bosnian government is continuing to press
its attacks on the Serbs on the line between Visoko and Olovo,
which controls the northbound route out of Sarajevo. One Bosnian
official said "we have to maintain military pressure on the Serbs
at least until they sign the peace plan. We have the right as the
legal government of Bosnia to fight to retake our land." Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

US SENATE SENDS MIXED SIGNALS OVER THE ARMS EMBARGO. International
media report on 12 August that the Senate the previous day
approved two measures that would affect the US stance on the arms
embargo against the Bosnian government. One follows President Bill
Clinton's own proposal that would authorize him to seek UN
approval to lift the embargo by the end of October if the Serbs do
not accept the partition plan by the 15th of that month. The other
measure, introduced by Senator Robert Dole, mandates a unilateral
American lifting of the embargo by 15 November. Clinton is
reluctant to take any such step without coordination with US
allies but added in a letter to Congress that "it has been my
long-held view that the arms embargo has unfairly and
unintentionally penalized the victim in this conflict, and that
the Security Council should act to remedy this injustice." Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE BATTLEFIELDS. International media said
on 11 August that the Bosnian government's Fifth Corps continues
to close in on Bihac kingpin Fikret Abdic's stronghold of Velika
Kladusa. Abdic had previously offered to negotiate only with
Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic, but the Sarajevo government
regards Abdic as a traitor and will only talk to him on a lower
level. The Bihac tycoon has now accepted this position, but
insists that negotiations be held in Velika Kladusa. Reuters
quotes a French mediator as doubting that Sarajevo will agree to
this. Meanwhile in Croatia, the head of the General Staff, Gen.
Janko Bobetko, met with UNPROFOR commander Gen. Bertrand de
Lapresle to discuss the continuing blockade of some UNPROFOR posts
by Croatian civilians, Novi list reports on 12 August. The
protesters are refugees from Serb-held areas who demand that
UNPROFOR carry out its mandate and help them return to their homes
in safety. The UN has made clear it feels it is in no position to
do so, despite the agreements it has signed. Bobetko told the
French commander that if the UN wants to prevent an escalation of
the conflict, it must control Bosnia's and Croatia's borders with
each other and with Serbia, not those of the Serb-held areas of
Croatia.  Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

"IN SERBIA THE MAJORITY SUPPORTS CONTACT GROUP PLAN" is how a
headline run in the 12 August issue of Politika reads, dealing
with survey results made public by the "Partner" agency the
previous day. According to the group's most recent findings, based
on telephone interviews of 500 residents of Serbia (excluding
Kosovo), some 70 percent of respondents now wholeheartedly endorse
the international community's current peace proposal for Bosnia
and Herzegovina. This finding seemingly represents a dramatic
public about-face from 16 July, when only 20.6 percent of
respondents found the idea of an internationally mediated peace
plan palatable. The new survey also indicates that Radovan
Karadzic remains the most popular Bosnian Serb political leader
with Serbs in the rump Yugoslavia, although only 22.7 percent of
respondents expressed support for him this month, down from 42.6
percent the previous month.  Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

CHURCH BACKS SOLIDARITY CONSTITUTION? Cardinal Jozef Glemp met
with Solidarity Chairman Marian Krzaklewski on 10 August to
discuss the union's constitutional draft, Gazeta Wyborcza reports.
Solidarity is attempting to gather the 500,000 signatures required
to submit a "citizens' draft" to the parliament by the 5 September
deadline. Despite support from several bishops, Solidarity has so
far collected only 160,000 signatures. The Solidarity draft is
backed by Poland's extreme anticommunist fringe but is opposed by
the more mainstream right-wing parties, which argue that the
current parliament lacks the legitimacy to adopt a constitution.
The center-right parties also object to the extensive social and
economic guarantees included in the union's draft. In a statement
issued after the meeting, Glemp indicated that he is favorably
disposed toward the draft because of the "Christian and national
principles" on which it is based. The draft includes a passage on
the "defense of life from the moment of conception" and says that
the concordat should govern Church-state relations. Other members
of the Church hierarchy have ruled out any explicit backing for
the Solidarity draft.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

TOUGH TALK ON CRIME IN POLAND. During a visit to Gdansk on 11
August, Internal Affairs Minister Andrzej Milczanowski said that
highway robbery and crime in Warsaw and the Gdansk-Gdynia-Sopot
tri-city area are his three priorities, PAP reports. Milczanowski
indicated that police will try to limit organized crime by using
methods that stop short of outright arrest, such as repeated
48-hour detentions, identification checks, and rigorous auto
inspections. He stressed, however, that the police force is short
of funds and manpower. Still, he argued that the level of crime in
Poland is no worse than in the average European country, and he
urged reporters to use the phrase "highly organized crime" rather
than "mafia," as the latter implies that politicians collaborate
with the criminal underworld. Meanwhile, police released 18 of 20
suspected members of the "Pruszkow mafia" after questioning on 11
August. Officials denied that the detentions were a publicity
stunt designed to prove to the public that the police are taking
action against organized crime.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLISH CENTRAL BANK: NO INTEREST RATE CUTS. Polish National Bank
(NBP) Vice President Witold Kozinski told Rzeczpospolita on 12
August that a huge increase in the money supply in Julyby 2.8
percent in real termswill prevent the bank from lowering interest
rates for several months. In August and September, Kozinski said,
the NBP will take action to limit the amount of money in
circulation, though without moving to raise interest rates.
Kozinski attributed the surge in the money supply to the sudden
emergence of a trade surplus of $70 million in the first half of
July. He predicted that annual inflation will amount to just under
30 percent in 1994, well above the 23 percent set in the budget.
Kozinski also revealed that the NBP had proposed reducing the
monthly rate by which the zloty is devalued from 1.6 percent to
1.5 percent, because foreign trade results have improved. The
ministers of finance and foreign trade vetoed this suggestion,
Kozinski said. Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECHS TO PAY BACK IMF LOANS AHEAD OF SCHEDULE. The board of the
Czech National Bank decided on 11 August to repay a $471 million
loan to the International Monetary Fund which was originally due
in 19961999. A spokesman for the bank told journalists in Prague
that the board had made its decision in light of the fact that the
Czech Republic's hard currency reserves had reached $5.3 billion
by 1 August and keep growing. As a result of the early repayment,
the Czech Republic will be the first East European country to
clear itself of its debts with the IMF.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

CHANGES IN THE HUNGARIAN POLITICAL ELITE. According to studies
conducted by the Central Statistical Office and the Academy of
Sciences, spectacular changes have taken place in the composition
of the political elite since 1990, MTI reported on 10 August. A
significant proportion of present government members,
parliamentary deputies and state and local government officials is
under fifty, with the vast majority holding a university degree.
More than 90 percent of all parliamentary deputies in the 19901994
parliamentary cycle had university education, and more than half
held doctoral degrees. This is similar to the level of education
of the current parliamentary deputies. The pattern of occupation
of parliamentary deputies has also significantly changed. While
the 19851990 legislature was dominated by party, state, and
economic leaders with university education, in the next cycle
"classical white collar workers," such as historians and teachers,
were in the majority. The ratio of the latter group declined
somewhat in the new parliament in favor of agricultural experts
and former office-holders of the Kadar era.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL,
Inc.

BULGARIAN COURT UPHOLDS LAW ON JUDICIARY. The Bulgarian
Constitutional Court ruled on 11 August to throw out a lawsuit of
the Prosecutor General demanding that the law on judiciary be
declared unconstitutional. The main argument of the suit was that
the law, passed by parliament on 14 July, violates an interim
clause of the 1991 constitution, stating that such legislation
cannot be enforced unless it is accompanied by a new criminal code
and other acts regulating the procedures and organization of the
judicial system. While six of the judges accepted this line of
argument, another six rejected it, thereby upholding the law.
Since the law introduces additional requirements for persons
holding top positions in the Bulgarian judiciary, the ruling seems
to mean that Prosecutor General Ivan Tatarchev and Supreme Court
Chairman Ivan Grigorov will have to resign. In an editorial on 12
August, Demokratsiya of the Union of Democratic Forces predicts
that Tatarchev's and Grigorov's replacement will lead to the
dropping of all charges against former communist leaders. Kjell
Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALBANIAN RIOT POLICE BREAK UP HUNGER STRIKE. Reuters reports from
Tirana on 12 August that club-carrying riot police broke up a
hunger strike of former political prisoners in the wee hours of
the morning. Strike leader Kurt Kola said the officers asked to
enter the building where 100 persons had been fasting since 4
August. The police said they were looking for weapons, but once in
the building they damaged the place and forced the former
political prisoners to leave. No one was injured, but the strikers
had wanted to continue their protest. They seek compensation for
some 5,000 people or families in a package worth over $200
million, but the government says it can afford only a fraction of
that and accuses the strikers of destabilizing the country's young
democracy. A court had given the Tirana strikers until 6 p.m. on
11 August to end their protest. It is not clear what has happened
to similar strikes elsewhere across the country.  Patrick Moore
and Fabian Schmidt, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN GOVERNMENT REJECTS ROMANIAN ATTACK ON CONSTITUTION. In a
statement issued on 9 August, the Moldovan government rejected the
Romanian government's statement of 1 August which had attacked
Moldova's new constitution and encouraged the pro-Romanian
opposition in Moldova to press for revisions (see RFE/RL Daily
Report, 2 August). Moldova's government replied that Romania "does
not wish to understand the political situation in Moldova" and has
"no right to impugn the domestic policies and reforms in another
society." Romania's thesis that Moldova is "another Romanian
state" is meant to give Romania the role of "elder brother
entitled to instruct, dictate, and play boss." Having achieved
independence from one power center, Moldova will not subordinate
itself to another power center, the statement said. Romanian
support for Moldovan circles "which are not reconciled to
Moldova's independence can only harm relations between our
countries." Romania should let Moldova "be master in its own home"
and "strictly respect the right of [Moldova's] people to determine
their own future." Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

US DELEGATION IN UKRAINE. On 10 August a delegation led by Jason
Collins, head of CIS affairs at the US State Department, met with
head of the Ukrainian parliamentary commission on foreign and CIS
affairs, Borys Oliinyk, Ukrainian radio reported. The US
delegation assured the Ukrainians that aid towards disarmament
would start arriving soon. US Assistant Secretary of Defense
Ashton Carter said that $135 million in equipment to help
dismantle Ukraine's SS-19 strategic missiles would arrive in the
next few months. The delegation also said they hoped the speedy
aid would encourage Ukraine to join the NPT this year.  Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MARKET REFORMS IN BELARUS. On 11 August the price of bread and
dairy products was liberalized in Belarus, Reuters reported. As a
result, milk cost 20 times more than it had the day before, while
bread shot up 10 times. A week earlier prices on meat were
decontrolled, causing beef prices to triple. It was also reported
that the government has increased the cost of housing, heating and
electricity for non-commercial users. Belarusian TV reported that
Belarusian National Bank Chairman Stanislau Bahdankevich said that
prices of consumer goods had to be left up to the market so that
the value of the Belarusian ruble may be preserved. The National
Bank of Belarus also recommended that the rules governing access
to hard-currency be changed for enterprises, Belarusian radio
reported on 10 August. Experts from the bank have worked out a
wide-ranging project which will allow enterprises to participate
in the buying and selling of hard currency on the Inter-Bank Hard
Currency Exchange in Minsk by 1 July 1995. In other news, Reuters
reported on 11 August that Belarus's harvest will be 20 percent
lower than last year's because of the summer drought. Last year
the country had suffered a reduced harvest because of floods.
Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

LOWER GRAIN PRODUCTION IN BALTIC STATES. Due to a severe drought
and a reduction in land planted, the grain harvest in the Baltic
States is expected to fall from 5.77 million tons in 1993 to 3.2
million tons in 1994, Interfax reported on 10 August. Lithuania's
output will drop from 2.7 million tons in 1993 to about 2 million
tons this year. Latvia will harvest 800,000 tons, only a third of
the 2.4 million tons in 1993. Estonia's production will decrease
from 700,000 tons in 1993 to 400,000 tons in 1994.  Saulius
Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

NEW LATVIAN CABINET PROPOSED TO THE PRESIDENT. Latvian Prime
Minister-Designate Andrejs Krastins presented his list of
candidates for the cabinet of ministers to President Guntis
Ulmanis on 11 August. Although Krastins did not reveal the names
of the nominees, Diena reported that according to reliable
sources, the nominees represent a wide spectrum of society,
including members of Krastins' own political party, Latvia's
National Independence Movement, as well as members of other
political parties and intellectuals not aligned with any political
organization. Reportedly, Krastins would like to have three
ministers act a his deputies, should his candidacy be approved by
the parliament: Maris Budovskis (nominated for welfare minister),
Viesturs Karnups (nominated for state reform minister), and
Aristids Lambergs (nominated for transportation minister). The
nominees for the new cabinet of ministers are expected to be
considered by the Saeima on 18 August.  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL,
Inc.

LATVIAN CITIZENSHIP LAW TAKES EFFECT. The new Latvian law on
citizenship and naturalization, adopted by the Saeima on 22 July,
was endorsed by President Guntis Ulmanis on 11 August and has gone
into effect, Diena reported. Although some sections of the law
were criticized by parliamentarians of Latvia's National
Independence Movement and For the Fatherland and Freedom political
association, the two organizations have not yet started a campaign
to revise the law because they have not reached an agreement among
themselves on just what should be done.  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL,
Inc.

  [As of 1200 CET]
  Compiled by Liz Fuller and Sharon Fisher

  NOTICE:
  The RFE/RL Daily Report will not appear Monday,
  15 August 1994.
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
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