The trouble with being punctual is that nobody's there to appreciate it. - Franklin P. Jones
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 127, 8 July 1994

                              RUSSIA

YELTSIN TO NAPLES FOR G-7 SUMMIT; RUSSIA RESURGENT? Russian
government spokesmen and media organs sympathetic to the president
are describing President Boris Yeltsins participation at the G-7
Summit in Naples, the first in which Russia will enjoy a formal
status, as the latest in a series of diplomatic breakthroughs for
Moscow. Yeltsins formal status extends only to the political
discussions being conducted in Naples and, as quoted by the
Christian Science Monitor, spokesmen such as Deputy Prime Minister
Aleksandr Shokhin admit that summit participants will not soon
raise the question about the economic widening of the G-7. Yet
Russias elevation in the G-7, coming on the heels of its entry
into the NATO Partnership for Peace Program and the signing of a
cooperation agreement with the EU, is being presented as the
culmination of a long effort by Russian diplomats to integrate
Russia into the international community on an equal footing with
the worlds leading powers. The Christian Science Monitor of 7 July
reported that, rather than seeking aid, Yeltsin intended to
request the repeal of discriminatory tariffs on Russian goods and
the granting to Russia of wider access to Western markets and to
IMF resources. Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

DUMA POSTPONES PRIVATIZATION DEBATE. In an acrimonious exchange,
the State Duma on 7 July spurned a request from Privatization
Minister Anatolii Chubais to vote immediately on the governments
post-voucher privatization program, and instead postponed debate
until 13 July. Demanding a review of the results of voucher
privatization, hostile deputies accused Chubais of attempting to
dismantle the economy. Chubais retorted that no parliamentary body
can reverse the progress made in Russias economic transformation,
and no political party can wrest private property from 40 million
new shareholders. Chubais noted that over 84,000 small businesses
(74% of the total) had already been sold to private owners, and
21,000 larger firms (70% of the total) had been transformed into
joint-stock companies. He argued that the post-voucher program
will limit the rights of works councils in firms, in part to make
firms more attractive to investors. This measure will not be
popular, he admitted, but it is more rational in economic terms.
Duma Speaker Ivan Rybkin reminded the deputies that their consent
is not essential to implement privatization; the government can
bypass the parliament if it wishes, he said. Louisa Vinton,
RFE/RL, Inc.

GORBACHEV TESTIFIES AT VARENNIKOVS TRIAL. Former Soviet President
Mikhail Gorbachev denied that he collaborated with the organizers
of the August 1991 attempted coup, Russian and Western media
reported on 7 July. Gorbachev was testifying at a trial of General
Valentin Varennikov, the only coup organizer who refused to accept
the amnesty granted in February by the State Duma. Varennikov and
other participants in the coup maintain that Gorbachev initially
supported their plans and that, contrary to the claims of the
former Soviet President, he had never been isolated at his dacha
in Foros. At Varennikovs trial Gorbachev also denied the coup
organizers claim that they acted to preserve the Soviet Union. He
said they just wanted to seize power. Gorbachev said he regretted
the disintegration of the USSR and expressed hope that some new
form of a union would emerge on the territory of the former USSR.
Near the court building about 50 people demonstrated against
Gorbachev. They carried slogans, accusing the former president of
having sold out the now defunct Soviet Union, Interfax reported.
Vera Tolz, RFE/RL, Inc.

GORBACHEV CALLS FOR JOINT DEMOCRATIC OPPOSITION TO YELTSIN.
Nezavisimaya gazeta on 6 and 7 July published a long interview
with Gorbachev in which he called for the creation of a joint
democratic opposition to the Yeltsin administration. Gorbachev
rejected the often heard assertion that the only alternatives to
Yeltsin are such dangerous extremists as Vladimir Zhirinovsky; he
argued that such assertions are voiced merely as a pretext to deny
the Russian people the right to vote. He also cited various
examples aimed at suggesting that Russia under the present regime
has become less free and less a democratic country then it was in
the Gorbachev era. Apart from censorship in the state-controlled
broadcasting media, these examples included recent suggestions
from some of Yeltsins close associates not to call parliamentary
and presidential elections in 1996. Although Gorbachev is
unpopular and has virtually no chance to win elective office in
the foreseeable future, many democratic politicians--including
former political prisoners of the Brezhnev era and human-rights
activists from the respected Memorial society--have publicly
declared themselves to be Gorbachevites and opponents of Yeltsin.
Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOSCOW GOVERNMENT RE-CREATES PEOPLES DETACHMENTS. The decision by
Moscow mayor Yurii Luzhkov to re-create so called Peoples
Detachments (narodnyi druzhiny) in Support of the MVD is a
violation of Russian law, according to Rossiiskaya gazeta of 6
June. (Under the Communist regime, the voluntary Peoples
Detachments were an element of the Soviet law-enforcement system;
in view of the recent campaign against organized crime, Luzhkov
decided to re-activate these units and granted them the same
prerogatives as the MVD). In accordance with Luzhkovs directive,
the Peoples Detachments will be subordinated directly to him and
will have the right to search any public or government premises.
Rossiiskaya gazeta argued, however, against allowing such actions
to be carried out by volunteers and asserted that re-activation of
Peoples Detachments constitutes a continuation of Communist
practices of law enforcement. Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

NEW AMENDMENTS TO CRIMINAL CODE. Rossiiskaya gazeta on 7 July
published amendments to the Criminal Code of the Russian
Federation adopted by the Russian parliament and approved by
President Yeltsin. The revised Criminal Code drops the old
provisions based on so-called socialist law and guarantees instead
equal protection for all forms of property. Other new provisions
include articles dealing with political terrorism and
assassination, the maximum punishment for which is the death
sentence. The adoption of the new Criminal Code is part of the
recent campaign against organized crime and banditism. The Russian
parliament also has adopted a law on the protection of law
enforcement officers, according to ITAR-TASS on 7 July, which is
aimed at ensuring physical and social security for officers of the
MVD, the Federal Counterintelligence Service, Tax Police, judges ,
prosecutors and members of their families. The law permits the
possession of personal weapon for all of these categories of
officials. Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOSCOW-BASHKORTOSTAN TREATY NEARLY READY? Bashkortostans President
Murtaza Rakhimov told Interfax on 7 July that work on the
power-sharing treaty between Moscow and Bashkortostan was nearing
completion. He said that only the title of the treaty and clemency
and amnesty issues remained to be finalized. According to
Rakhimov, Moscow is insisting that it be called a power-sharing
treaty, whereas under the provisions of the Bashkortostan
constitution it should be designated an interstate treaty. It can
safely be forecast that Moscow will not give way on this issue as
even its treaty with Tatarstan is described as a power-sharing
treaty. Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUBLE FALLS TO OVER 2,000 TO DOLLAR. The US dollar exchange rate
on the Moscow interbank currency exchange climbed above 2,000
rubles for the first time on 6 July, Interfax reported. Acting
Finance Minister Sergei Dubinin said the ruble is expected to fall
to 3,000-3,500 by years end. The ruble is still overvalued, he
indicated, and continued devaluation is needed to bolster exports.
The dollar was quoted at 2011 rubles on 7 July. Louisa Vinton,
RFE/RL, Inc.

KOZYREV MEETS IRAQI DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER. RFE/RLs Moscow
correspondent reported on 7 July that the Deputy Prime Minister of
Iraq, Tariq Aziz, was in Moscow on an unofficial visit and that he
was conducting talks with Russian officials concerning the lifting
of international sanctions against Baghdad. Quoting Russian
diplomatic sources, the correspondent reported that Aziz had
suggested a formula whereby Iraq would offer to recognize Kuwait
as a sovereign state in exchange for Moscows support in the UN
Security Council for the lifting, or easing, of the sanctions. The
correspondent, and other Western sources, report that Aziz then
traveled to St. Petersburg where he met on the evening of 7 July
with Foreign Minister Kozyrev, who was returning from Belgrade.
ITAR-TASS quoted Kozyrev as saying only that his visit to the city
was associated with an assignment by President Boris Yeltsin.
Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

ALIEV MEETS WITH TURKISH CHIEF OF STAFF. Dogan Gures, Chief of
Staff of the Turkish armed forces, flew to Baku on 7 July at the
personal invitation of Azerbaijani President Heidar Aliev,
together with a group of senior Turkish army officers, ITAR-TASS
and Interfax reported. Gures was quoted by Interfax as affirming
on his arrival in Baku that Turkey was prepared to send as many
troops as Azerbaijan requested to participate in an eventual
peacekeeping operation in Nagorno-Karabakh under the auspices of
the CSCE or the UN, provided that the peacekeeping force was
multi-national; he denied reports in the Armenian press that
Turkey is supplying Azerbaijan with arms. No details were released
of the strictly confidential talks between Gures and Aliev. Liz
Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA TO GIVE ARMENIA 110 BILLION RUBLES CREDIT. Under the terms
of an inter-governmental agreement signed on 4 July, Russia is to
grant Armenia 110 billion rubles credit, of which 60 billion is
earmarked for preparatory work for reactivating the nuclear power
station at Medzamor and 40 billion for reconstruction in the area
devastated by the 1988 earthquake, Interfax reported. Liz Fuller,
RFE/RL, Inc.

KYRGYZSTAN GETS LOAN FOR SOCIAL ASSISTANCE. RFE/RL learned on 7
July that the International Development Association, an affiliate
of the World Bank which assists countries designated as very poor,
has approved a loan of $17 million to Kyrgyzstan to be used in
developing a social safety net. An Association statement said that
a third of the population of Kyrgyzstan is below the poverty line.
Kyrgyzstan has been one of the Newly Independent States most
severely affected by the collapse of Soviet-era economic
relations; earlier in 1994 the countrys industry was reported to
be virtually at a standstill. Kyrgyzstans President Askar Akaev
has said on many occasions that development of a social safety net
is one of the top priorities of the government. Bess Brown,
RFE/RL, Inc.

US TO HELP TAJIK REFUGEE RETURN. The US government has pledged
$2.85 million to speed up the repatriation process for Tajik
refugees wanting to return home from Afghanistan, ITAR-TASS
reported, citing sources in the Tajik foreign ministry and at the
US embassy in Dushanbe. The money is to be given directly to the
UN High Commissioner for Refugees special mission to Tajikistan.
There are still over 20,000 officially registered refugees in
northern Afghanistan, though opposition representatives believe
the true number of refugees to be close to 60,000. In recent
weeks, a growing number of Tajiks have been returning to
Tajikistan; Interfax reported that 710 refugees returned on 7 July
alone. 1500 others are waiting at the Sakhi border camp for
immediate repatriation. Government and opposition officials have
repeatedly pleaded for international aid, as the situation of
refugees in Afghanistan and the Tajik province of Gorno-Badakhshon
remains extremely difficult. Keith Martin, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

CLINTON ON NATO: NOT IF BUT WHEN. In an address to the Polish
parliament on 7 July, US President Bill Clinton said that NATO
expansion is no longer a question of whether, but when and how.
Clinton indicated that Poland would likely be one of the first new
members admitted to the alliance. He also stressed the importance
of Polish security to the US. No democracy in this region should
ever be consigned to a gray area, or buffer zone, he said, echoing
a phrase that Polish politicians have used to express their
security concerns. In a mild reprimand to Russia, Clinton added
that no country should have the right to veto, compromise or
threaten democratic Polands--or any other democracys--integration
into Western institutions, including those that ensure security.
Urging civil courage in pursuing democratic and market reforms
throughout the region, Clinton said that we will not let the Iron
Curtain be replaced with a veil of indifference. He also warned
against would-be dictators and fiery demagogues. Clinton offered
Poland a new $210 million package, including $25 million for
adaptation to the Partnership for Peace. Clinton pledged $100
million in such aid for NATOs 21 new partners. Louisa Vinton,
RFE/RL, Inc.

POLANDS RESPONSE: TIMETABLE ESSENTIAL. Polish President Lech
Walesa said he was not disappointed with Clintons speech, and
Foreign Minister Andrzej Olechowski said the visit had bolstered
Polish security. But muted disappointment was the more prevalent
response. Former Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka told Polish TV the
major shortcoming of the Clinton speech was the lack of a firm
timetable for NATO expansion. Polish membership had been a more
realistic prospect when she first visited NATO headquarters in
1992 than it seems now, Suchocka said. All political forces echoed
this statement. Even Democratic Left Alliance leader Aleksander
Kwasniewski told reporters he was very disappointed that there was
no timetable set. Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

EASTERN FOREIGN MINISTERS CONVENE IN WARSAW. Opening a meeting of
nine foreign ministers in Warsaw on 7 July, US Secretary of State
Warren Christopher said that there cannot--and will not--be a gray
sphere of instability in Central and Eastern Europe. The
ministers--from Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary,
Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia--endorsed a
continued US military and economic presence in Europe. Christopher
pledged continued US assistance, particularly in reducing the
social costs of reform. Hungary sent both current and future
foreign ministers to the meeting, a gesture that Polish Foreign
Minister Olechowski praised as a sign that parties come and go;
consensus remains. Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

BALTIC LEADERS PLEASED WITH CLINTONS VISIT. Latvias President
Guntis Ulmanis told the press that Clintons visit to Riga was a
highly significant event for the Baltic States. After meeting with
Clinton, Ulmanis felt that Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania would
eventually gain NATO membership through the Partnership for Peace
program. Lithuanias President Algirdas Brazauskas expressed
satisfaction over the understanding shown for Lithuanias energy
problems and the transit of goods and military supplies through
Lithuania. Estonian Prime Minister Mart Laar said that Clintons
visit gave Estonia and Latvia confidence that Russia would carry
out a timely withdrawal of its troops from the two countries,
Baltic media reported on 7 July. Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN PROTESTS LATVIAN CITIZENSHIP LAW? On 7 July Russian
ambassador to Latvia Aleksandr Rannikh delivered a letter from
Yeltsin to Latvias President Ulmanis in which Yeltsin outlined his
countrys views on the law on naturalization and citizenship
recently adopted by the Latvian parliament but not yet endorsed by
Ulmanis. Specific details were not revealed. The Russian Duma
recently charged that implementation of the law would foment
aggressive nationalism in Latvia, Reuters and BNS reported on 7
July. Jeri Laber of Helsinki Watch expressed objections to the
law, especially its quotas on naturalization. The law was also
criticized in a press conference in Riga on 5 July by spokesmen
for Latvias Committee on Human Rights and the League of Stateless
Persons, which distributed materials with the heading Welcome to
the Country of Apartheid, ITAR-TASS reports. Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL, Inc.

BOSNIAN MUSLIMS ACCEPT PARTITION PLAN . . . The Washington Post on
8 July reports that Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic and Prime
Minister Haris Silajdzic have said that the proposal contains more
good than bad and that they will endorse it. Silajdzic added that
the return of peace would benefit the Bosnian government side,
noting that the people who [destroyed] Bosnia prosper only in
conflict. . . . A war can be won or lost, but the peace we will
win for sure. Izetbegovic noted that the Serbs would be required
to give up a third of their conquests, and that the constitutional
unity of Bosnia would be preserved. The New York Times adds that
returning Brcko, which lies astride the Serbs northern supply
corridor, to the Muslims would enable the UN to monitor the
resupply of the Serbian military. The Post, however, also writes
that the Muslims may simply be employing a new negotiating tactic
designed to put pressure on the Serbs. Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

. . . WHILE THE SERBS BALK. The provisions regarding Brcko have
not been lost on the Serbs, and the New York Times quotes their
parliaments speaker, Momcilo Krajisnik, as saying that this
proposal for Brcko does not suit us at all. Serb nationalists also
fear that provisions to return parts of eastern Bosnia to the
Bosnian government would help solidify Allahs Road, which is what
they call the transversal running from Kosovo through the Sandzak
and into Bosnia-Herzegovina. The population there is mainly of
Islamic heritage, although their outlook today is quite secular.
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic was quoted by Reuters on 7
July as saying that the take-it-or-leave-it plan could provide the
basis for further talks, but we dont have a constitutional vision
yet. He also charged that Izetbegovic was trying to put the Serbs
at a tactical disadvantage by accepting the proposal. Elsewhere,
the New York Times says that Russian Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev told Serbian President Milosevic that there is no
alternative to a positive response to the plan. Patrick Moore,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SESELJ CONDEMNS BOSNIA PEACE PROPOSAL. Ultranationalist leader of
the Serbian Radical Party Vojislav Seselj is among the first in
the rump Yugoslavia to criticize vehemently the current peace
proposal for Bosnia and Herzegovina. In remarks reported in the 8
July issue of Borba, Seselj, while ironically describing himself
as a proponent of peace, maintains that only a plan recognizing
the Bosnian Serbs conquest of roughly 70% of Bosnia and
Herzegovina will satisfy sincere Serb nationalists. Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

LONDON TIMES: UN COVERING UP FOR SERBS. The 7 July edition of the
respected British daily reports that recent incidents have
highlighted what amounts to a UN policy partly to shield the Serbs
from further international condemnation. Taken as a whole, the
incidents show a pro-Serb bias in statements by the UN and raise
questions about its credibility. The issue arose earlier in the
year when UN officials were charged with all but ignoring Serb
violations of the Sarajevo cease-fire, and when UN staff in
Gorazde accused the UN commander of deliberately down-playing the
threat posed by the Serb offensive against the Muslim enclave.
Meanwhile in the Bihac, where Bosnian government troops are
fighting soldiers loyal to local kingpin Fikret Abdic, government
forces sealed off the town and confined foreign aid workers to
their quarters. Reuters quoted a source in the area as calling the
developments bizarre but significant, adding that it was unclear
whether high politics were involved or simply control of the local
black market. Finally, the New York Times reports that Russia is
blocking efforts to start up the UNs tribunal for prosecuting war
crimes. Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLL SHOWS KRAVCHUK EDGING OUT KUCHMA. The last of five polls
conducted by the Kiev International Institute of Sociology (KIIS)
between 2 and 4 July 1994 shows Leonid Kravchuk receiving 51% to
Leonid Kuchmas 44%. The poll of over 1,000 respondents also
indicated that participation in the 10 July presidential election
is expected to range between 61% and 67 %. Jaroslav Martyniuk,
RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUSIAN CANDIDATES HOLD TELEVISED DEBATE. On 8 July Reuters
reported that the two Belarusian presidential candidates, Prime
Minister Vyacheslau Kebich and the anti-corruption crusader
Alyaksandr Lukashenka, held a televised debate in which they tried
to outdo each other in displaying their pro-Russian credentials.
Lukashenka charged that Kebich contributed to the break-up of the
USSR. Kebich replied that his goal is to restore those ties.
Lukashenka then accused Kebich of being too slow in implementing
monetary union with Russia. Lukashenka said his program was to
stop inflation, fight corruption, crush crime, and restore ties
with the republics of the former Soviet Union, but avoided
specifics, saying only that he had agreed with the Russians that
they will buy Belarusian products. For his part Kebich told voters
that the government had decided to lower prices on staple goods
and increase social benefits. As for Lukashenkas earlier threats
to throw the top-ranking fifty government officials into jail for
corruption, he appeared to soften his line saying he had no
intention of dismissing anyone in government who moved under his
banner. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MORE AGREEMENTS SIGNED ON MONETARY UNION. On 6 July Belarusian
television reported that Russian Deputy Prime Minister Aleksandr
Shokhin stated that the presidential election results will have no
effect on the implementation the Russian-Belarusian monetary
union. The terms agreed so far stipulate that only 200,000
Belarusian rubles in cash and 1 million in bank accounts per
person can be exchanged for Russian rubles at a 1:1 rate. The
Belarusian ruble now stands at about 25,000 to the dollar meaning
that Belarusians will be allowed to exchange fewer than $10 in
cash and $50 of their savings for rubles. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL,
Inc.

PARLIAMENT REJECTS ILIESCU IMPEACHMENT. Romanias parliament on 7
July rejected by a 242 to 166 vote an opposition motion to impeach
President Ion Iliescu for meddling in property disputes, Radio
Bucharest reports. The motion, initiated by the National Peasant
Party-Christian Democratic, demanded Iliescus removal for having
urged local authorities not to implement recent court rulings that
restored property rights on homes nationalized by the Communists.
Iliescu maintains that he was only trying to protect tenants from
illegal evictions. Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

WORKERS PROTEST IN BUCHAREST. Tens of thousands of workers joined
a rally and march in Bucharest to protest a government proposal to
freeze state-sector wages, as well as plans to restructure
state-owned industries. Reuters, which described the meeting as
the biggest street protest this year, said that the protesters
were carrying banners reading freeze prices, not wages and
shouting thieves, thieves. A union delegation was received by the
cabinets Secretary General Viorel Hrenbenciuc, to whom they handed
a memorandum warning of possible strikes if workers demands are
not met, Radio Bucharest reported. Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

ETHNIC HUNGARIANS PROTEST IN CLUJ. On 7 July some 3,000 ethnic
Magyars from Transylvania staged a rally at a monument to Hungarys
mediaeval King Matthias Corvinus in Cluj, Radio Bucharest and
Budapest report. The protest was directed at plans approved by
Gheorghe Funar, the towns ultra-nationalist mayor, for
archeological digs at the site of the statue. There were scuffles
as the crowd tried to break through police lines ringing an area
around the monument. The situation in Cluj remains tense, with
members of the large Hungarian minority fearing that the
excavations might offer an excuse to the authorities to remove the
statue. Funar, who had ordered a Romanian inscription placed on
the statue, has been accused of favoring its move to another
location. According to MTI, the outgoing Hungarian government
expressed its grave concern that Funars actions could deepen
ethnic tensions and jeopardize democratic progress in Romania. Dan
Ionescu and Judith Pataki, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN PRESIDENT FIRES MEDIA BOSSES. Effective 8 July,
President Arpad Goncz dismissed the heads of state-owned Hungarian
Radio and Television, Laszlo Csucs and Gabor Nahlik. The two
figures were controversial and had been accused of catering to the
Hungarian government. After the defeat of the ruling Hungarian
Democratic Forum in the May elections, Prime Minister Peter Boross
agreed to dismiss the two as a gesture to the new government. The
signature of the president is needed to make the dismissals valid,
but Goncz, for reasons unknown, did not immediately sign the
dismissals. Only at the special request of Hungarian Socialist
Party (HSP) leader Gyula Horn and Alliance of Free Democrats
Chairman Ivan Peto did Goncz finally sign the dismissals. Since
the coalition partners have still not yet decided on replacements,
the economic directors will be put into charge of the media, with
limited authority, as of 9 July. Judith Pataki, RFE/RL, Inc.

STOLEN JEWISH ART RECOVERED IN BUCHAREST. Hungarian National
Police Headquarters told MTI on 6 July that most of the art
treasures stolen from the museum of Budapests main synagogue on 12
December 1993 has been recovered. In cooperation with Romanian,
Austrian, and German police, the art treasures were recovered near
Bucharest. Suspects with German and Romanian citizenship were
arrested. The value of the treasures was estimated at $60-80
million. Hungarian police praised the cooperation with the police
forces of the other countries involved. Judith Pataki, RFE/RL,
Inc.

CZECH PARLIAMENT PASSES LAW ON INTELLIGENCE SERVICES. Under a new
law passed by the Czech parliament on 7 July, the Czech Republic
will have three intelligence services: the Bureau of Intelligence
and Security (BIS); the Office for International Contacts, which
will be part of the Ministry of Internal Affairs; and Military
Intelligence, which will be subordinated to the Ministry of
Defense. All three services will be accountable to both the
government and the parliament. The original draft law would have
made the services accountable only to the government. Each
intelligence service will have to submit an annual report on its
activities to the government and the president. Under the law, the
BIS can use the services of citizens over 18 years; these services
can be provided only on a voluntary basis and the BIS must protect
the identity of such people. It is also entitled to keep secret
files on individuals and organizations. Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

ZIELENIEC DEFENDS IRAQI MINISTERS PRAGUE TRIP. Speaking to
journalists in Warsaw on 7 July, Czech Foreign Minister defended
the Czech government and himself against criticism in the Polish
media and from President Vaclav Havel for having held talks in
Prague with Iraqi Foreign Minister Muhammad Said Kazim Al-Sahhaf.
Zieleniec argued that there was no hidden agenda behind Sahhafs
visit and that it was the duty and the right of the Czech
Republic, which is currently a member of the United Nations
Security Council, to know Iraqi views. Meanwhile, speaking at a
press conference before his departure from Prague on 7 July,
Sahhaf said that Iraqs negotiations with Kuwait on the question of
their common border are finished. Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK PREMIER IN INDIA. On 7 July, Slovak Prime Minister Jozef
Moravcik arrived in New Delhi for a two-day visit aimed at
strengthening political and trade ties with India. Moravcik and
Indian Prime Minister P. V. Narasimha Rao held official talks and
signed several bilateral agreements on 7 July. Moravcik and the
members of his delegation are scheduled to meet representatives of
the Confederation of Indian Industry for talks on possible trade
links between the two countries. The Slovak premier is to travel
to Vietnam and Indonesia after his Indian visit. Jiri Pehe,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIA RELUCTANT TO ACKNOWLEDGE BORDER WITH MOLDOVA. The
Bucharest correspondent of Basapress on 6 July cited Romanian
officials as telling the press that Romania has been unable to
sign a draft treaty with Moldova on border-crossing rules and
related arrangements on their common border. The reason for the
failure is Moldovas insistence that the word border should figure
in the treaty, whereas the Romanian side wishes to avoid that
word. The row reflects second thoughts in Bucharest about the
wisdom of full recognition of Moldovas independent statehood in
the absence of progress toward unification. Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Stephen Foye and Louisa Vinton
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Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
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Updated: 1998-11-

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©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole