Some things have to be believed to be seen. - Ralph Hodgson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 127, 7 July 1994

                              RUSSIA

RUSSIA PROPOSES ENHANCED ROLE FOR CSCE . . . Russia has formally
proposed that NATO, the CIS, and other European security
organizations be subordinated to the CSCE (Conference on Security
and Cooperation in Europe), an RFE/RL correspondent reported out
of Vienna on 6 July. The proposal, which has long been mooted
informally by Russian diplomats, was contained in a letter sent
one week earlier to the CSCE chairman, which, according to the
report, means that it will automatically be included on the agenda
of the CSCEs upcoming three-month conference, scheduled to begin
in October in Budapest. NATO leaders have consistently rejected
the idea of being subordinated to the CSCE, which they consider
too unwieldy a body, and the report quoted officials from NATO
countries as suggesting that the Russian proposal is aimed either
at manipulating the CSCE security system to Moscows advantage or
at obtaining a recognized international framework and financing
for Russian peacekeeping activities in the former USSR. Stephen
Foye RFE/RL, Inc.

. . . SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH NATO DENIED. RFE/RL also reported
out of Vienna remarks by NATO Assistant Secretary-General
Gerbhardt Von Moltke on 6 July reiterating that, in acceding to
the NATO Partnership for Peace plan, Russia had been granted no
special privileges or influence in NATO. Von Moltke, who suggested
that Moscow itself has been guilty of fostering the perception
that it had won special concessions from the alliance, said that
Russian acceptance of the NATO partnership plan did not mean there
would be joint Russian-NATO military operations and did not give
Russia a right to be consulted over the admittance of Central
European States into NATO. Stephen Foye RFE/RL, Inc.

POST-VOUCHER PRIVATIZATION TO DUMA. Privatization Minister
Anatolii Chubais on 6 July urged the State Duma to show its
commitment to economic reform by giving quick approval to
legislation governing the next stage of privatization, Interfax
reported. Post-voucher privatization, which is to involve the sale
of 20% of state assets, was initially to have been enacted by
presidential decree. But Chubais said the government had chosen
the legislative path to give deputies an opportunity to show that
real political interaction between the parliament, the president,
and the government exists in Russia. The first auctions are to
take place by August; the government expects to collect revenues
of 2.5 trillion rubles ($1.25 billion) from such sales in 1994.
The Duma opens debate on post-voucher privatization on 7 July.
Chubais added that President Yeltsin is expected soon to sign a
decree extending the validity of unused privatization vouchers,
permitting their use in the purchase of shares put up for auction
between 1 September and 1 December. Louisa Vinton RFE/RL, Inc.

LAW ON COVERAGE OF GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES ADOPTED. The State Duma
adopted on 6 July the controversial Law on the Order of Covering
the Activities of Bodies of State Power in the State-owned Mass
Media. According to the law, the state-owned media must provide
full coverage of the activities of the Russian president,
government, and both houses of the parliament. The law also
stipulates that broadcasting journalists are not to comment on
such activities in the news. Although these provisions do not seem
to depart from the norms of journalistic ethics commonly accepted
in the West, many Russian journalists have viewed the law as an
infringement on freedom of the press. Julia Wishnevsky RFE/RL,
Inc.

GORBACHEV TO TESTIFY IN THE COUP TRIAL. Former Soviet president
Mikhail Gorbachev is to testify at the trial of General Valentin
Varennikov in the Russian Supreme Court on 7 July, Russian
television newscasts reported a day earlier. Varennikov is the
only defendant in the case of the August 1991 coup against
Gorbachev to have refused to accept the amnesty declared for those
involved in the case by the State Duma this past February.
Varennikov believes that Gorbachev and his close political ally,
Aleksandr Yakovlev, rather then the coup organizers, should be
tried for high treason because their policy of liberalization
brought about the collapse of the Soviet Union. Gorbachev, in
turn, told Nezavisimaya gazeta on 6 July that the coup had
prevented adoption of a new treaty between the then Soviet Unions
republics and had brought instead the seizure of supreme power by
Yeltsin and other radical politicians who subsequently dissolved
the USSR in December of the same year. Julia Wishnevsky RFE/RL,
Inc.

KGB GENERAL DENIES GORBACHEVS ISOLATION. Testifying on 6 July at
Varennikovs trial, the former Chief of the KGBs Ninth
Administration, Yurii Plekhanov, said that during the August 1991
coup Gorbachev was not severed from lines of communication at his
dacha in the Crimea as had been believed at the time, ITAR-TASS
reported. According to Plekhanov, the government communication
lines were disconnected for short period, in order not to disturb
Gorbachev and the leaders of the coup during a meeting on 19
August. Plekhanov said that the disconnection was ordered by KGB
Chairman Vladimir Kryuchkov and that the other plotters were
unaware of it. Gorbachev was fully able to use the lines of
communication as he pleased, Plekhanov was quoted as saying.
Victor Yasmann RFE/RL, Inc.

GORBACHEV ACKNOWLEDGES ROLE IN BAKU MILITARY INTERVENTION. In an
interview published in Nezavisimaya gazeta on 6 July and
summarized by Reuters, former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev
admitted that he had taken the decision to send Soviet troops into
Baku on 19 January, 1990. The intervention followed a week of
pogroms against the citys Armenian population and cost the lives
of up to 150 Azerbaijanis, mostly innocent civilians. Gorbachevs
role in the Soviet troop actions against demonstrators in Tbilisi
in April, 1989, and in Vilnius in January, 1991, remains to be
clarified. Liz Fuller RFE/RL, Inc.

COUNTERINTELLIGENCE DISCOVERS STOLEN URANIUM-238. The Russian
Federal Counterintelligence Service (FSK) has recovered a 5.5
kilogram cache of uranium-238 stolen from the National Nuclear
Center near Chelyabinsk, ITAR-TASS reported on 6 July. The uranium
was discovered in the house of a Center employee, who had earlier
been arrested for an attempted illegal sale of platinum. Prior to
the recent visit of US FBI Director Louis Freeh, the FSK had
generally dismissed US concerns about leaks of radioactive
materials in Russia. During his stay in Moscow, Freeh said that
preventing the proliferation of nuclear materials and related
technologies in cooperation with Russian law enforcement agencies
is a top priority of his agency. Although the case reported above
occurred in April, ITAR-TASS did not explain why it was reported
only now. Victor Yasmann RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA TO IGNORE NEW TURKISH SHIPPING REGULATIONS. On 6 July
Interfax cited a legal expert within the Russian Foreign Ministry
as stating that Russian vessels will ignore the new restrictions
on shipping through the Turkish straits introduced by Turkey on 1
July, which he termed groundless and contrary to international
treaties. He further stated that if the Turkish authorities detain
a Russian vessel, Russia would claim damages and lodge a
diplomatic protest. Liz Fuller RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

BATUMI--PARIS ON THE BLACK SEA? Aslan Abashidze, the
tennis-playing chairman of the Adzhar Supreme Soviet, has come
closer to realizing his ambition of transforming his autonomous
republic, an oasis of stability within war-torn Georgia, into a
major tourist zone. Despite high ticket costs of US $25 (the
minimum wage in Georgia is currently US $0.05), Paris cabaret
stars from the Folies Bergeres and the Moulin Rouge played to a
packed house at Batumis summer theater on 5 July, Interfax
reported. Security measures--a triple cordon of police with
dogs--were described as unprecedented. Batumi already has a rival
to the Eiffel Tower in the form of the 45 meter minaret of the
local mosque. Liz Fuller RFE/RL, Inc.

KAZAKHSTANS PARLIAMENT VOTES TO MOVE CAPITAL. Kazakhstans Supreme
Soviet voted on 6 July to move the countrys capital to Akmola,
Russian and Western news agencies reported. The legislature
approved the move after an appeal by President Nursultan
Nazarbaev, who for several years has promoted the idea of moving
Kazakhstans capital from Almaty in the southwestern corner of the
country to the former Tselinograd. Some observers have said that
Almatys proximity to China is a major factor in the move;
Nazarbaev told the Supreme Soviet that Almaty is overcrowded and
unable to expand. Kazakh intellectuals have suggested that moving
the capital to the northern part of Kazakhstan would reinforce the
countrys possession of the largely Russian northern oblasts. Bess
Brown RFE/RL, Inc.

KAZAKHSTAN COSSACK GROUP GAINS OFFICIAL RECOGNITION. In the wake
of severe friction between Kazakh authorities and two Cossack
villages in Taldy-Kurgan Oblast earlier in the year, Kazakhstans
Ministry of Justice has registered an Assistance Society of the
Cossacks of Semirechiye, which represents Cossacks in Alma-Ata and
Taldy-Kurgan Oblasts, ITAR-TASS reported on 6 July. The
registration coincided with a gathering of some 572 Cossacks in
Almaty. State Counselor Kairbek Suleimenov was quoted as saying
that Cossacks could serve in the countrys armed forces and might
even form a special unit of the Republican Guard. Previously,
Kazakhstani authorities tried to restrict the activities of
Cossack groups, which were strongly opposed by many Kazakhs. Bess
Brown RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

CSCE FORUM CALLS FOR RUSSIAN WITHDRAWAL FROM MOLDOVA. At its
regular annual session, the Parliamentary Assembly of CSCE passed
on 6 July in Vienna a resolution calling for a most rapid,
continuing, unconditional, and full withdrawal of Russias 14th
Army from Moldova, RFE/RLs correspondent reported. This is the
strongest language yet to appear in a CSCE document on this issue.
The resolution further calls for a peaceful settlement of the
Dniester conflict based on respect for Moldovas independence,
sovereignty, and full integrity, and on CSCE principles concerning
human rights and the rights of national minorities. The Assembly
voiced hope that the 28 April meeting and joint document between
Moldovan and breakaway Dniester leaders will allow progress toward
a political settlement with the assistance of the CSCE Mission [to
Moldova]. The preceding day, Moldovas prominent Agrarian
politician Andrei Diaconu had told the Assembly that Russia was
advancing unacceptable conditions for a military withdrawal and a
Transdniester settlement, including Moldovas confederalization, in
order to prolong Russias troop presence in Moldova. Diaconu also
reaffirmed Moldovas wish, which Russia has repeatedly rejected,
that CSCE observers attend the Moldovan-Russian troop talks.
Vladimir Socor RFE/RL, Inc.

DNIESTER SAID TO SEND PARAMILITARY AID TO CRIMEA. Colonel Mikhail
Bergman, the Russian 14th Armys commandant of the city of
Tiraspol, told the Ukrainian news agency UNIAN on 25 June that 28
officers-instructors of the Dniester republics Ministry of State
Security-had just left for the Crimea in an operation coordinated
by the Minister, Colonel Oleg Gudyma. Bergman added that
deliveries of weapons and ammunition from the Dniester republic to
Crimea have increased recently, transport being routed via Odessa.
The same Dniester ministry sent commandos in 1993 to fight on the
Russian-backed Abkhaz side against Georgia and on the
Rutskoi-Khasbulatov side against Yeltsin in Moscow. The Tiraspol
leaders are also known to maintain political contacts with the
separatists in Crimea and Odessa. Vladimir Socor RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

CLINTON CHEERED IN LATVIA. As the first US president to visit
Latvia, Bill Clinton was received with great public enthusiasm on
6 July. While in Riga, he signed three cooperation accords between
the US and Latvia and met with Baltic leaders. After placing
flowers at the foot of Latvias Statue of Liberty, Clinton
addressed a huge crowd. He said that the Baltic States had
inspired the world in their quest for freedom. As they return to
Europes fold, we will stand with you, we will help. [ . . . ] And
we will rejoice with you when the last of the foreign troops
vanish from your homelands. Clinton rejected President Yeltsins
region be linked to the treatment of Russian minorities living
there. At the same time, Clinton urged the Baltic States to assume
a tolerant and inclusive approach toward minorities and added that
Freedom without tolerance is freedom unfulfilled, Western media
reported on 6 July. Dzintra Bungs RFE/RL, Inc.

  BALTIC PRESIDENTS ISSUE STATEMENT. In the
  statement issued on 6 July after meeting with
  Clinton, the presidents of Estonia, Latvia,
  and Lithuania expressed their satisfaction
  with the state of relations between the US
  and their countries. The Baltic heads of
  state commended the US postwar policy of
  non-recognition of the incorporation of
  Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania into the
  Soviet Union and said that it provided a
  source of hope for the Baltic peoples. They
  emphasized the importance of 31 August as the
  final date for Russias withdrawal of its
  forces from Estonia and Latvia and expressed
  the conviction that Russia will carry out
  this obligation which it assumed in Helsinki
  in 1992. They also urged that the Kaliningrad
  region not become a source of tension in the
  region. Expressing the desire to deepen
  Baltic cooperation within NATOs Partnership
  for Peace (PFP) program, they noted their
  countries wish also to become NATO members.
  They welcomed the Baltic Enterprise Fund that
  the US has established to foster development
  of the private sector in the Baltics, and
  reiterated their support for the continuation
  of Estonian, Latvian, and Lithuania language
  programs by both RFE and VOA.  Dzintra Bungs
  RFE/RL, Inc.

CLINTON ON NATO IN WARSAW. At the start of his 26-hour visit to
Warsaw on 6 July, US President Clinton stressed his enthusiasm for
NATOs expansion but said that eventual Polish membership depends
on the stance of other NATO partners. Clinton did note, however,
that Poland will be the site of the first PFP military exercises,
to be held in September. Welcoming Clinton, President Lech Walesa
stressed the need for an American presence, both economic and
military, in Europe. Initial talks focused on the economy, and
Gazeta Wyborcza reports that Walesa chose not to raise the issue
of Polands impatience with NATO, a courtesy that was apparently
appreciated by the US delegation. The two presidents reportedly
agreed that a democratic and market-oriented Ukraine is essential
to European stability. The Polish press took a skeptical view,
emphasizing the visits importance as a public relations gesture.
During an address to the parliament on 7 July, Clinton is expected
to announce an assistance program designed to help build a Polish
social safety net. A meeting with nine East European foreign
ministers is also planned. Polish TV has provided live coverage of
all aspects of the Clinton visit. Louisa Vinton RFE/RL, Inc.

CLINTON TOPS POLISH POPULARITY POLL. A CBOS opinion poll reported
by PAP on 5 July put Clinton, with 75% approval, at the top of
Polish popularity rankings for both foreign and domestic
politicians. In a sign of the depth of the Polish-German
reconciliation, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl was close behind,
with 69%. Russian President Boris Yeltsin scored high in the
distrust rankings, with 42% disapproval; Vladimir Zhirinovsky had
71% disapproval. Walesa had 48% disapproval. Louisa Vinton RFE/RL,
Inc.

WE HAD TO JUMP OVER THE MORAL BRIDGE. This is how US special envoy
Charles Redman described aspects of the Bosnian peace plan
presented to the Serbs, Muslims, and Croats on 6 July by US,
Russian, and EU diplomats. Redman told the 7 July New York Times
that the moral compromises were in the interests of wider peace
and of keeping Bosnia together. The proposal firms up the Muslims
position in eastern Bosnia, linking some hitherto isolated
enclaves and returning some lost areas like Visegrad. But it also
allows the Serbs to keep their northern supply corridor as well as
numerous towns they not only captured but also ethnically cleansed
by driving out or killing the Muslim inhabitants, such as Zvornik,
Rogatica, and Prijedor. Patrick Moore RFE/RL, Inc.

SKEPTICAL REACTION TO THE BOSNIAN PEACE PLAN. Even if the
international community has been willing to jump certain bridges,
it is still not clear whether the Serbs will meet them even
half-way. The Serbs would have to surrender about a third of their
conquests and apparently renounce their intention to join a
greater Serb state. Muslim Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic told the
VOA on 6 July that the key issue here is whether the Serbs will be
allowed to change internationally recognized borders by force.
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic called the plan an American
dictate, while Muslim President Alija Izetbegovic indicated that
his side probably would accept it only because it knows that the
Serbs would torpedo the project anyway. Enthusiasm seemed limited
to the Croats, whose position in the Posavina region, central
Bosnia, and western Herzegovina apparently is assured. Tanjug
quoted their leader Kresimir Zubak as saying that Croats can even
be very satisfied by the map. The Washington Post on 7 July
reports from Sarajevo, however, that ordinary citizens there
remain unimpressed by the Geneva song and dance. Patrick Moore
RFE/RL, Inc.

SERBIAN ULTRANATIONALIST ON TRIAL. On 7 July Serbian dailies
report on the trial of Serbian Radical Party leader Vojislav
Seselj and four other SRS members charged with attempting to
incite a brawl in the rump Yugoslav parliament on 18 May. On 7
July Borba reports that a key piece of evidence, a video recording
of the incident, has simply disappeared without a trace. In
related news, Politika reports on 7 July that ultranationalist
paramilitary leader and accused war criminal Zeljko Raznatovic,
alias Arkan, is filing a private slander suit against Seselj. Stan
Markotich RFE/RL, Inc.

MACEDONIAN CENSUS EXTENDED. The deadline for the Macedonian census
has been extended for five days until 10 July, agencies reported
on 5 and 6 July. The census began on 21 June and so far only about
60% of the population has registered. It is likely that a large
part of the ethnic Albanian population failed or refused to
register, because most Albanians boycotted the last census in
1991. This time Macedonian authorities have assured them that
their claims to citizenship would be recognized, but the Albanians
are wary because they are barely represented on the bodies that
will tally the results. The Albanians need an impressive showing
in the census to back up their demands for increased political
clout. The head of the state census commission, Risto Ivanov, said
that Albanian leaders had called for a boycott in Debar, even
though a joint committee made up of the two biggest ethnic
Albanian parties urged the Albanians to register. In any event,
speakers of both parties, the Party of Democratic Prosperity and
the Democratic Peoples Party, urged Albanian participation in the
tally. Observers from the European Union, which is financing the
census, praised the extension of the deadline. Fabian Schmidt
RFE/RL, Inc.

LITTLE FOREIGN INTEREST IN BELARUS ELECTIONS. The international
communitys lack of interest in Belarus is evident in the tiny
number of foreign observers applying for accreditation for the
second round of presidential elections. On 5 July Belarusian radio
reported that only 13 foreign observers have extended their
accreditation for the second round. Ten times that number were
present during the first round. In contrast, 600 foreign observers
were present for Ukraines parliamentary elections and 300 observed
the first round of presidential elections there. This
international indifference is particularly disturbing because many
analysts believe the second round of elections will likely be
invalidated on technicalities if the prime minister, Vyacheslau
Kebich, loses to Alyaksandr Lukashenka. Ustina Markus RFE/RL, Inc.

FORECAST ON BELARUSIAN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. In an interview with
Interfax on 6 July, deputy chairman of the Supreme Soviet, Ivan
Bambiza, said he believes that less than 50% of voters will take
part in the second round of the presidential elections. If this is
the case, the Central Electoral Commission would have 10 days to
set a new date for another, final round. If there is still no
winner then, the Chairman of the Supreme Soviet, Mechyslau Hryb,
would automatically take over as head of state. In the past week
Hryb has stated that he is prepared to take over the executive
duties of the president if there is no winner. Ustina Markus
RFE/RL, Inc.

UKRAINIAN COSSACKS SUPPORT KRAVCHUK. The Hetman of the Ukrainian
Cossacks, Maj. Gen. Volodymyr Mulyava, has announced that the
Cossacks support President Leonid Kravchuk in the presidential
elections, Ukrainian television reported on 5 July. According to
Mulyava, Kravchuk commands authority in international political
circles and has shown that he can guarantee peace in Ukraine.
Run-off elections between Kravchuk and Leonid Kuchma are scheduled
for 10 July. Ustina Markus RFE/RL, Inc.

CRIMEA OVERRULES KIEV DECREE ON MILITIA. The Crimean parliament
adopted a resolution on 6 July invalidating Kievs decree which
placed the Crimean militia under the jurisdiction of the Ukrainian
Ministry of Internal Affairs, Russian television reported. Local
militiamen have been instructed to carry out only the instructions
of Crimean authorities. This is the latest move in the struggle
between Kiev and Simferopol over control of the Crimean police.
The crisis began in April when Crimean President Yurii Meshkov
replaced the chief of the Crimean internal affairs ministry with
his own man, Valerii Kuznetsov. In May, Ukrainian President Leonid
Kravchuk ordered that Kuznetsov be removed from his post and
replaced by a Kiev man, but Ukrainian officials were unable to
enforce the order. Compromise was reportedly reached when it was
decided to have both a Crimean and Ukrainian internal affairs
ministry presence on the peninsula. On 28 June, the Ukrainian
parliament again tried to assert control over the Crimean militia
by subordinating all police units to the Ukrainian government. The
Crimean parliament responded by approving a resolution to repeal
all Ukrainian acts which contradicted the Crimean Constitution or
previous resolutions of the Crimean parliament and president. No
resolution of the conflict is in sight. Ustina Markus RFE/RL, Inc.

CONSTITUTIONAL COURT ON ILIESCUS IMPEACHMENT. Romanias
Constitutional Court on 6 July issued a statement on the
impeachment procedures launched by the opposition against
President Ion Iliescu, Radio Bucharest reports. The Court
unanimously ruled that the allegations against Iliescu are not the
grave violation of the constitution required to impeach a
president. The communique was signed by the Courts president
Vasile Gionea, a member of the National Peasant Party--Christian
Democratic, who was disavowed by his own party in 1992 after
Iliescu appointed him to his current position. The Court has only
a consultative role. On 4 July Romanias parliament opened a
special session to debate the possible suspension of Iliescu over
remarks on the issue of property confiscated by the Communists.
The opposition maintains that they amounted to a violation of the
Constitution and of judicial independence. The debate is expected
to end on 7 July. Dan Ionescu RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN CONCESSIONS TO GAGAUZ DEEMED EXCESSIVE. A panel empowered
by the Political Commission of the Council of Europe at Moldovas
request to examine Moldovas autonomy plan for the Gagauz has found
it too far-reaching, Moldovan parliamentary leaders told the
RFE/RL Research Institute on 6 July. The assessment, which has
just been received in Chisinau, objects in particular to
provisions which would seem to establish an inner border between
the Gagauz region and the rest of Moldova and which would delegate
to the regions authorities certain functions which the panel feels
properly belong to the central government. The panel also objects
to the absence of provisions on the rights of persons of other
than Gagauz ethnicity in the future autonomous region. Last year
another Council of Europe panel had also found excessive some of
Moldovas offers to the Gagauz. If adopted, Chisinaus plan would
set a precedent in terms of ethnic-territorial autonomy in Eastern
Europe and the former USSR. Vladimir Socor RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN FINANCE MINISTER IN BONN. Outgoing Hungarian Finance
Minister Ivan Szabo, parliamentary caucus leader of the defeated
Hungarian Democratic Forum, made a one-day working visit to Bonn
on 6 July, MTI reports. Szabo met with the CDU-CSU faction leader
Wolfgang Schauble. The purpose of the visit--unusual in the case
of a lame-duck cabinet--was not revealed. But Nepszabadsag of 2
July offers a possible explanation. The Hungarian daily claims
that the rotating capital of the state budget has been completely
used up. The outcome of the elections undermined a government bond
issue in June. Gyula Horn will take over as prime minister in
about a week; his first visit is planned for Bonn as well. Both
the outgoing and the incoming governments may well be asking
Germany for loans. Judith Pataki RFE/RL, Inc.

WEU PARLIAMENT CHAIRMAN VISITS SLOVAKIA. On 6 July Sir Dudley
Smith, chairman of the parliamentary assembly of the West European
Union, visited Slovakia at the invitation of Foreign Minister
Eduard Kukan. His visit focused on European security issues and
cooperation between Slovakia and the WEU. President Michal Kovac
assured Smith that Slovakias foreign policy will not change after
the parliamentary elections. Stressing the importance of Central
European stability, the president said that the improvement of
bilateral relations with Hungary through the signing of a
bilateral agreement is a priority for Slovakia. Kovac also
mentioned interest in establishing a training center in Slovakia
for UN peacekeeping troops, TASR reports. Smith also met with
Kukan and Premier Jozef Moravcik. Sharon Fisher RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK CABINET ON ECONOMY AND MINORITIES. During its session on 6
July the Slovak cabinet agreed to release 500 million koruny from
the National Property Fund for apartment construction, 245.5
million for defense industry conversion, and 3.5 billion for
development programs. The cabinet also discussed a bill on
privatization of the power and gas industry, which will be
submitted to the parliament for approval. According to the
resolution, 51% of the property of power companies and 67% of the
gas industry will remain under state control. These firms will be
transformed into joint-stock companies, and the National Property
Fund will hold the states shares. The cabinet also approved a bill
on road signs in ethnically mixed areas, which will now be sent to
the parliament. Speaking before a public gathering of more than
5,000 supporters from around Slovakia on 6 July, Movement for a
Democratic Slovakia Chairman Vladimir Meciar said he is against
the proposal to privatize the energy industry. If necessary, he
said, a petition would be organized to stop the action. Sharon
Fisher RFE/RL, Inc.

ZHELEV MEETS DEMIREL, EX-GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL LOSES APPEAL. On 6
July Reuters reported that Bulgarian President Zhelyu Zhelev met
with Turkish President Suleyman Demirel in Ankara where the two
leaders discussed bilateral relations and broader regional issues.
In a post-meeting statement Demirel said that developments are
making our closer cooperation necessary, but reports do not
clarify the remark. Zhelev arrived in Ankara on 6 July, and is in
Turkey for an official three-day visit. In other news, on 6 July
AFP reported that a former Bulgarian communist government
official, former Deputy Prime Minister Grigor Stoichov, lost a
final appeal before the supreme court and now faces a two-year
jail term. Stoichov, who was originally sentenced to three years
in prison in December 1991 after being convicted of misleading the
public over the real and potential health risks associated with
nuclear fall-out from Chernobyl, had the sentence reduced at a
previous appeal hearing. Stan Markotich RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Stephen Foye and Louisa Vinton
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU.  This report is also
available by postal mail, as are the other publications of the
Institute, and by fax.  RFE/RL NEWS BRIEFS, an edited compendium
of items first published in the Daily Report, is distributed
along with the RFE/RL RESEARCH REPORT, a weekly journal
providing topical analyses of political, economic and security
developments throughout the Institute's area of interest.
Longer analyses are available in a monograph series, RFE/RL
STUDIES, and brief analytic summaries appear monthly in the
RESEARCH BULLETIN.

Requests for permission to reprint or retransmit this material
should be addressed to PD@RFERL.ORG and will generally be
granted on the condition that the material is clearly attributed
to the RFE/RL DAILY REPORT. Inquiries about specific news items
or subscriptions to RFE/RL publications should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

In North America:

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907
Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783
Internet: RI-DC@RFERL.ORG

Elsewhere:

Ms. Helga Hofer
Publications Department
RFE/RL Research Institute
Oettingenstrasse 67
80538 Munich
Germany
Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2632
Fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648
Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole