There is always one moment in childhood when the door opens and lets the future in. - Graham Greene
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 119, 24 June 1994

                             RUSSIA

YELTSIN AT EU SUMMIT. Russian President Boris Yeltsin arrived at
the Greek island of Corfu on 23 June to attend sessions of the
European Union summit and sign a cooperation agreement long in
the works between Russia and the EU. Yeltsin hailed the
agreement, which is to be signed on 24 June, as a "document
[which] opens new possibilities for the construction of a
genuinely integral, prosperous, and safe Europe." Following the
signing, Yeltsin will remain in Greece for a short vacation,
ITAR-TASS reported.  Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA'S EU AGREEMENT. Unlike the association agreements signed
with East European countries, Russia's "partnership and
cooperation" agreement stops short of setting full EU membership
as an eventual goal. (In this, it resembles the accord signed
with Ukraine on 14 June.) The agreement lifts some trade
barriers, but talks on Russia's inclusion in a free trade zone
are set only for 1998, and only on condition that Russia
continues market reforms. The agreement declares Russia's economy
to be "transitional" rather than state-controlled. Russia agrees
to allow EU firms to invest freely and repatriate profits, and to
apply to them the same rules used for domestic firms. The banking
sector is to be opened gradually to EU participation. The EU
agrees to lift quotas on Russian imports (with the exception of
steel, textiles, and uranium) and lower tariffs; but imports of
"unfairly subsidized or dumped products" can be halted. Russia is
given leeway in lifting its tariffs on EU imports, and is
permitted to impose temporary quotas if domestic industries are
endangered. The EU ran a $4 billion deficit in trade with Russia
in 1993. PAP reported that diplomats from Ukraine and other
Eastern European countries privately accused the EU of "double
standards," as Russia's agreement does not contain a clause
specifically requiring the protection of minority rights. Such
clauses were included in all EU agreements signed with Eastern
states since 11 May 1992.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

CHERNOMYRDIN WRAPS UP PRODUCTIVE US VISIT. Following several days
of talks in Washington that included a meeting with President
Bill Clinton, on 23 June Russian Prime Minister Viktor
Chernomyrdin and US Vice President Albert Gore announced the
signing of some 22 documents aimed at advancing cooperation
between the two governments in a variety of areas. Among the most
important of the documents signed were a $10 billion deal to
develop and exploit several oil and gas fields off the coast of
Sakhalin, an agreement on cooperation in space and the
development of a joint space station, and an agreement on the
gradual halting of Russian weapons-grade plutonium production.
RFE/RL's Washington correspondent reported that Chernomyrdin
would also be returning to Moscow with approval of an $820
million World Bank loan and, perhaps of equal importance, with an
enhanced personal standing among US leaders. The same report
quoted US officials as characterizing Chernomyrdin as an able and
persuasive leader; others recognized his importance in Russian
politics and the fact that he could one day succeed President
Yeltsin.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

VORONTSOV TO BECOME AMBASSADOR TO US. On 23 June, the Russian
parliament's foreign affairs committee expressed its approval of
Yulii Vorontsov as Russia's ambassador to the United States,
Interfax reported. (Boris Yeltsin submitted the names of
Vorontsov and other prospective ambassadors to the committee for
approval. The Russian constitution stipulates that diplomatic
personnel are named at the discretion of the president following
consultation with the relevant legislative committee.) Vorontsov,
currently Russia's permanent representative to the United
Nations, was a protege of Anatolii Dobrynin, long-time Soviet
ambassador to the United States. Vorontsov served as deputy
foreign minister during the Gorbachev period, and since his
appointment as ambassador to the UN has simultaneously acted as a
special adviser to Boris Yeltsin on foreign policy matters.
Vorontsov was mooted as a possible replacement for Foreign
Minister Andrei Kozyrev in 1992, but Russian sources suggested
Vorontsov preferred to keep his distance from Moscow politics and
remain abroad. The post of Russian ambassador to the US has been
vacant since Vladimir Lukin departed in December 1993. Suzanne
Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

CONTROVERSY OVER NOMINATION OF COURT CHAIRMAN. A disagreement has
arisen between the State Duma and the Council of the Federation
of Russia's Federal Assembly over the procedure for nominating
the chairman of the Constitutional Court. (The court's activities
were suspended by President Yeltsin last year, and the court has
not yet started functioning.) A new draft law on the
Constitutional Court, approved by the State Duma in its first
reading in May, stipulates that the court's chairman is to be
elected by judges of the court, but on 23 June the Council of the
Federation demanded the right to name the court's chairman,
Interfax reported. The State Duma is expected to discuss the
proposal of the upper chamber on 24 June. The chairman of the
State Duma Committee on Legislation and Judicial Reform, a member
of the Communist faction, Vladimir Isakov, told Interfax his
committee would recommend that the Duma turns down the proposal.
Vera Tolz, RFE/RL, Inc.

SAKHA PRESIDENT SAYS REGIONS AGAINST EXTENDING POWERS OF
PARLIAMENT. The President of Sakha (Yakutia) Mikhail Nikolaev and
a deputy of the Federation Council told Interfax on 23 June that
the republics of the Russian Federation would not support the
proposal by the chairman of the Federation Council Vladimir
Shumeiko that the life of the present parliament should be
extended from two to four years. He said the republics were also
against giving the Federation Council the right to adopt federal
constitutional laws independently. Nikolaev argued that they
should not start talking of amending the constitution when they
had hardly begun to work under it.  Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

CENTRAL BANK REPORT ON UNEMPLOYMENT. The number of unemployed
registered by Russian employment agencies increased by 50 percent
in 1993, reaching 7.8 million or 10.4 percent of the able-bodied
population, according to the Russian Central Bank's report to
parliament as cited by Interfax on 22 June. Even so, the bank's
report stated, the rate of growth of unemployment was lower than
the rate of decline in industrial production. The bank blamed the
retention of excess labor for the decline in industrial
efficiency. The rate of unemployment is highest in the Ingush
republic, and in the Ivanovo, Pskov, Yaroslavl, and Volga-Vyatka
regions, with the latter accounting for more than 10 percent of
the total of unemployed.  Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

AGREEMENT ON PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION HALT. The US and Russian
governments signed an agreement on 23 June under which the
remaining plutonium production reactors at Tomsk and Krasnoyarsk
will be shut down. The agreement, announced by Vice President
Albert Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin at a
press conference in Washington, apparently includes provisions
calling for the US to compensate Russia for costs involved in the
shutdown. It remains unclear exactly when the plants will be
closed, as the reactors also produce heating for neighboring
towns and to replace them new power plants will be required. An
agreement in principle on the shutdown was reached in March 1994,
see the RFE/RL Daily Report of 18 March 1994.  John Lepingwell,
RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

BLACK SEA FLEET NEGOTIATIONS. ITAR-TASS on 23 June carried a
statement issued by the Russian Navy which claimed that recent
comments by the commander of the Ukrainian Navy, Vice Admiral
Volodymyr Bezkorovainy concerning the "temporary basing" of the
Russian portion of the fleet at Sevastopol for 15-20 years
represented a "maximalist position" and had prevented further
progress in negotiations. The statement expressed the hope that
Bezkorovainy's views were "personal" and did not reflect the
Ukrainian government's position. Interfax reported on the same
day that Ukrainian Defense Minister Vitalii Radetsky had refused
to comment on suggestions made by parliamentary speaker and
presidential candidate Oleksandr Moroz to the effect that a
"unified command" for the fleet might be established. Radetsky
noted that it was up to politicians to make agreements, and the
military to execute them.  John Lepingwell, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIAN TROOPS SAID TO STAY IN MOLDOVA FOR THE MONEY. In an
interview for Sovetskaya Rossiya, reported by RFE/RL's
correspondent on 23 June, "Dniester republic" president Igor
Smirnov said that the command and personnel of Russia's 14th Army
are keen on staying in Moldova because they receive inordinately
high pay in an area of relatively low prices, and would forfeit
those advantages by relocating to Russia. Smirnov reaffirmed
Tiraspol's readiness to host the 14th Army but also claimed the
lion's share of the equipment in the event of the army's
withdrawal. Smirnov, a citizen of the Russian Federation, was in
Moscow to defend Russian peacemaking at an international
conference organized for the purpose by the Russian government.
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA CONSIDERS LEASING SARY-SHAGAN TEST SITE. Discussions of a
Russian lease of the Sary-Shagan missile test site in Kazakhstan
are underway and sources in Dzhezkazgan Oblast, where the huge
Sary-Shagan complex is located, have told ITAR-TASS that
Kazakhstani authorities will agree to the lease if the Russian
side agrees to clean up the site, the news agency reported on 23
June. Fragments of missiles and a variety of pollutants are
scattered over some 165,000 square kilometers, and neither local
authorities nor those in Almaty have the money to finance a
cleanup of the site. Kazakh intellectuals have been deeply
disturbed over reports that the Kazakhstani government is
negotiating for a long-term Russian lease on the site.  Bess
Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                 TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

KARIMOV IN TURKEY. Uzbekistan's President Islam Karimov arrived
in Turkey on 23 June for an official visit that is to include the
signing of a number of cooperation agreements between the two
countries, Russian and Western sources reported. Upon arrival
Karimov thanked Turkey for its political and financial support,
which is reported to have totaled $340 million in credits, loans
and humanitarian assistance since Uzbekistan gained independence.
Turkish sources noted that there has been a recent cooling of
relations between the two countries, with Uzbekistan withdrawing
its ambassador after Uzbek opposition leader Muhammad Salih
sought asylum in Turkey.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

TAJIK TALKS GOING NOWHERE. Negotiations in Tehran between Tajik
government and opposition representatives have been underway
since 18 June without producing any positive results that would
lead to an end of hostilities in Tajikistan, Russian agencies
reported on 23 June. According to opposition sources, the
government side has proposed unilateral disarmament of the
opposition's armed groups, and the opposition has suggested
bilateral disarmament supervised by the UN, CSCE, Russia, Iran,
Afghanistan and Kazakhstan. Opposition leader and former head of
Tajikistan's Muslims Akbar Turadzhonzoda told Interfax that the
opposition side is also demanding legalization of all political
parties, the right to publish newspapers, and release of
political prisoners.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                   CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN UPDATE. Reuters reported on 23 June that Bosnian
government forces are closing in on Bihac warlord Fikret Abdic's
stronghold of Velika Kladusa. Abdic predicted he would hold off
the attackers, but added that "the number of victims will be
horrific." Meanwhile, UNPROFOR headquarters said it is having
difficulties contacting Bosnian Serb commanders and does not
expect the meeting of military leaders slated for 25 June to come
off. Elsewhere in Sarajevo, the Bosnian parliament, acting in its
capacity as interim parliament for the new Croat-Muslim
federation, approved the new government that will formally assume
power once an overall Bosnian settlement is reached. Prime
Minister Haris Silajdzic told legislators, however, that the
Serbs are not ready for peace and so the Muslims and Croats must
be prepared for war. Finally, the Bosnian army and the Croat
militia are expected to sign an agreement on 24 June to withdraw
their respective forces from their former battle lines. Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

IS A NEW WAR IN THE OFFING IN CROATIA? The Washington Post on 24
June runs an article suggesting that Croatia and the Balkans
stand on the brink of a major conflict that could go beyond the
scope of the previous clashes in the Wars of the Yugoslav
Succession. It could well break out in the Serb-held areas of
Croatia, since, as one diplomat put it, the Serbs "simply are not
interested in negotiations." US Ambassador to Croatia Peter
Galbraith noted that he considers "war a very real danger. If
there is another Serb-Croat war, it is going to be unlike what
we've seen so far. It could escalate to air raids on cities,
rocket attacks, and large-scale tank and artillery assaults. Such
a war could lead to the direct involvement of the [rump] Yugoslav
army. It is precisely such a catastrophe that our negotiating
efforts have sought to forestall." Meanwhile on 23 June, Reuters
reported that the UN accused the Serb rebels of "a clear and
direct violation of the March 19 cease-fire agreement" by
bringing troops into a buffer zone.  Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

SERBIAN MINISTER WARNS OF INFLATION. On 24 June Politika reports
under the headline: "Government of Serbia Is Not For Increasing
the Price of Wheat," that Serbia's Agriculture Minister Ivko
Djonovic has said for the record that state compensation to
farmers for their grain surpluses should remain relatively
modest. Djonovic cautioned that government expenditures on
agricultural purchases should not exceed federal spending targets
projected last March, hinting that any such increases may help
drive up prices for other commodities, an eventuality that could
in turn result in the destabilization of the dinar. Djonovic's
remarks appear to signal that rump Yugoslav authorities may be
concerned about having to brace for another bout of
hyperinflation. Belgrade is preparing to compensate farmers with
a gold-coin currency, which is to have its value pegged to the
price of gold on world markets.  Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUS PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS. On 23 June about 79% of eligible
voters participated in the presidential elections. The
expectations that no one would win since there were six
candidates proved true. Preliminary election results indicate
that the clear leader was Alyaksandr Lukashenka, former chairman
of the parliamentary anti-corruption commission, who received
about 45% of the votes, the RFE/RL Belarusian Service reports. In
the second round on either 7, 10, or 17 July he will face Prime
Minister Vyacheslau Kebich who won about 17% of the votes.
Popular Front Chairman Zyanon Paznyak was third with 13%,
followed by former parliament chairman Stanislau Shushkevich with
10%, Agrarian Party Chairman Alyaksandr Dubko with 6%, and
Belarus Communist Party Central Committee secretary Vasil'
Novikau with 5%.  Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLISH SEJM DEBATES ECONOMIC POLICY. The long-term economic
strategy drafted by Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister
Grzegorz Kolodko received a lukewarm reception during Sejm debate
on 23 June. The Freedom Union was clearly torn between applauding
the promarket goals reflected in the program and criticizing the
"wishful thinking" or "hypocrisy" they seemed to reveal, given
the coalition's past election promises and current spending
practices. Leftist deputies, both from the coalition and the
Labor Union (the loyal opposition), also showed mixed feelings,
criticizing Kolodko's apparent determination to give priority to
reducing inflation (to under 10% in 1997) rather than
unemployment (from 16% to 14% in 1997). The mood was calmer,
however, than when Kolodko first presented his program; on 9 June
the opposition staged a walkout when the coalition voted to hold
the debate only after the local elections. Kolodko appealed to
the opposition parties to help build a broad national consensus
behind the program. The Sejm voted, 244 to 87 with 13
abstentions, to approve the program on 24 June, PAP reports.
Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLISH ECONOMY ROLLS ON. Statistics on Poland's economic
performance in May suggest that the absence of wage controls has
not prompted a surge in salaries, PAP reports. Gross wages rose
only 0.1% from April to May; net real wages dropped 1.8%.
Moreover, the Main Statistical Office reported on 22 June that
wages generally rose only in firms that would be unaffected by
wage control legislation awaiting the president's signature.
Economic growth remained strong: industrial production was up
11.5% over May 1993 and 1.9% higher than in April 1994.
Enterprise finances continued to improve, and the contribution of
the private sector to total turnover rose from 29.4% a year ago
to 33.6% in May. Prices rose 1.9% in May, down from the
disturbing 2.9% reported in April. Unemployment continued to
decline from its peak of 16.1% in February, reaching 15.5% in
May. Poland's trade balance, though still negative, improved as
well; the deficit dropped from $1.4 billion a year ago to $885
million in April. Exports grew 12.2% in the first fourth months
of 1994, while imports were up only 0.5%. Five months into 1994,
the budget deficit amounts to only 21.2% of the sum planned for
the entire year.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN GOVERNMENT DEBT FAILED TO ATTRACT INVESTORS. MTI
reported on 21 June that a 10 billion forint, or $100 million,
domestic government debt issue package drew only about 20% of the
total. The financial setback came just weeks after Hungary's
first forint-nominated debt issue for foreigners also failed to
attract investors, indicating the magnitude of the financial
problems the new Socialist-Liberal coalition government will
face.  Karoly Okolicsanyi, RFE/RL, Inc.

NATO PROJECT IN EX-SOVIET BASE IN HUNGARY. NATO scientists
proposed during a three-day meeting in Budapest that a former
Soviet army base in Komarom, in northern Hungary, be used to test
ways of cleaning up environmental damage left behind by Soviet
troops, Western media reported on 20 June. The coordinator of the
project on behalf of a NATO science committee advisory panel,
Peter Richter, said that the Komarom base will be used as a
testing ground for new technologies to help clean up such bases
in a cheaper, faster, and safer way. The project is expected to
cost between $1 to 2 million, and will be managed by Hungary's
National Technological Development Committee. The meeting marks
the first time NATO scientists have met in a former East bloc
state now eager to build stronger ties to NATO.  Edith Oltay,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK PREMIER ON DIVISION OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA. Speaking at a press
conference in Bratislava on 23 June, Slovak Premier Jozef
Moravcik said that the division of Czechoslovakia is "only
temporary" in that both the Czech Republic and Slovakia will
probably become members of the European Union by the year 2000
and "will again have the closest possible contacts." Moravcik
pointed out that before the parliamentary elections in June 1992,
no Slovak political group, with the exception of the Slovak
National Party, had advocated the split of Czechoslovakia and
that more than half of Slovak citizens had been opposed to a
split. According to Moravcik, the division was a compromise
solution to "the permanent crisis" caused by endless Czech-Slovak
debates on the forms of future coexistence. He said that the
Czechoslovak federation was built on the principles of "communist
federalism" and, as a result, Czech-Slovak relations were
unhealthy. The premier emphasized that he himself voted for the
split. Moravcik defended the need for building Slovak national
identity but, at the same time, strongly advocated Slovakia's
future EU membership and closer Czech-Slovak cooperation based on
European values. The fact that both states will be part of "the
great European community" will not undermine their national
identity, said the premier.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

FOREIGN OWNERSHIP OF CZECH PRESS. According to a survey published
by the Czech daily Denni Telegraf on 23 June, more than 50% of
the Czech press is currently owned by foreign companies. Foreign
media companies with the biggest share of the Czech media market
are Ringier of Switzerland, which has a majority share in Lidove
Noviny and several other periodicals; Socpresse of France which
backs Mlada Fronta Dnes and several regional newspapers; and
Passauer Neuer Presse of Germany, which controls a majority of
regional newspapers.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECH REPUBLIC SUFFERS DECLINE IN FOREIGN INVESTMENT. According
to the 20 June issue of the Journal of Commerce, the Czech
Republic suffered a 43% decline in direct investment by foreign
firms in 1993. Quoting a report of the Czech National Bank, the
paper said that the plunge from $1 billion in 1992 to $568
million in 1993 places the Czech Republic third in the region
behind Hungary and Poland.  Jan Obrman, RFE/RL, Inc.

ZHELEV APPROVES CHANGES IN PRIVATIZATION LAW. On 23 June
President Zhelyu Zhelev formally approved a series of amendments
to the law on privatization, paving the way for ordinary citizens
to participate in the selling off of state enterprises. The mass
privatization scheme, as elaborated by a team under Prime
Minister Lyuben Berov, is widely regarded to have significant
weaknesses, but Zhelev said he signed the law because its
implementation will be of critical importance for the country's
further economic development. Addressing a press conference
together with Czech President Vaclav Havel, who is on a one-day
visit to Sofia, he spoke of the need to benefit from the rich
experience of the Czech Republic, since that country was the
first to launch a mass privatization program based on vouchers.
Elsewhere in Sofia, the Czech minister of National Economics and
Privatization held a lecture in which he emphasized that
privatization needs to take place quickly even if this means the
prices of companies will not reflect their real value.  Kjell
Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

COUNCIL OF EUROPE MEMORANDUM STIRS CONTROVERSY IN BULGARIA. A
memorandum discussing Bulgaria's fulfillment of its obligations
under Council of Europe conventions and agreements has been
received very differently by the country's leading political
parties, BTA reported on 23 June. The parliamentary Committee of
Foreign Policy, which is dominated by the Bulgarian Socialist
Party and the Movement for Rights and Freedoms, issued a
statement stressing that, while Bulgaria's transition to
democratic rule has prompted "serious problems," these do not
constitute a violation of the country's commitments as a member
of the CE. The committee specifically rejected criticism of the
recently adopted law on the judiciary--which contains a
requirement that all top jurists need to have served five years
as judges or prosecutors--and said the memorandum reflects
exclusively the views of the opposition. In protest, the deputies
of the Union of Democratic Forces demonstratively walked out of
the proceedings. Later, UDF representatives to the CE met and
issued a separate statement in which they explicitly agreed with
the observations of the memorandum. Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL,
Inc.

ROMANIAN OPPOSITION FILES NO-CONFIDENCE MOTION. Romania's main
opposition parties announced on 23 June that they had formally
filed a motion of censure in Nicolae Vacaroiu's left-wing
minority cabinet. The motion was presented by the Democratic
Convention of Romania, the country's main opposition alliance. It
charges the government with corruption and worsening the economic
crisis. The motion will probably be debated during a joint
session of the two-house parliament on 27 June. In a separate
development, opposition leaders rejected an offer by the
president's office to discuss a campaign to impeach President Ion
Iliescu for alleged violation of judicial independence on
property disputes. Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES PASSES EDUCATION BILL. Radio
Bucharest reported on 23 June that the Chamber of Deputies
approved the draft of a new education bill by a 206-39-16 vote.
The Hungarian Democratic Federation of Romania, which feels that
the law discriminates against ethnic minorities, voted against
it. They were supported by deputies from the Liberal Party 1993
and by some members of the Parliamentary Group of National
Minorities (other than the Magyar one). The ultra-nationalist
Party of Romanian National Unity expressed satisfaction with the
new law and the vote's outcome. The law still has to be approved
by the Senate.  Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN INDEPENDENT TV STATION SHUTS DOWN. Soti TV, Romania's
first independent TV station, shut down after 30 months of
operation, Western media reported on 23 June. Soti managers said
the main reasons for the closure are financial woes, including a
lack of advertising revenues, as well as competition from a
number of private satellite TV systems and red-tape restrictions
imposed by the National Audio-Visual Committee. Soti was
generally seen as an opposition voice in competition with the
pro-government national TV programs.  Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

EUROPEAN UNION TOWARD CLOSER TIES WITH BALTICS. On 22 June the
Executive Commission of the European Union signed in Brussels a
preliminary free trade accord with Latvia, BNS reported. The
commission said it expects to finalize the agreement with Latvia
by 1 January on setting up a free trade zone for industrial goods
within four years. During those years, Latvian products will
freely enter the 12-nation trade grouping. Latvia may retain some
export and import restrictions on some industrial products and
farm goods. Furthermore, negotiations with Estonia on
establishing a free trade zone there by 31 December are nearing
completion. That would overcome a difficulty created by Finland's
plans to join the EU on 1 January, as Finland already has a free
trade accord with Estonia. These agreements are part of a wider
EU effort to expand links and improve relations with the formerly
communist-dominated states of Eastern Europe.  Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL, Inc.

LITHUANIAN PRIME MINISTER'S PRESS CONFERENCE. On 23 June Adolfas
Slezevicius noted that the free trade agreement with the EU that
Lithuania would initial on 27 June would actually be more like a
most favored nation trade agreement, the RFE/RL Lithuanian
Service reports. Lithuania would impose duties on some imports
from the EU which in turn would impose quotas for some Lithuanian
exports. He noted that his new government program would be
presented to the Seimas next week. The program would not differ
substantially from his previous program although more attention
would be paid to the "family and woman, youth, and national
minorities." In an effort to increase foreign investment he would
recommend that the constitution be amended to allow foreigners to
purchase land in Lithuania.  Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

UKRAINE TO VOTE FOR PRESIDENT ON 26 JUNE. On 26 June seven
candidates will compete in elections for Ukraine's president. It
appears likely that no one will win a majority so that a second
round will be held on 10 July between the two top finishers.
According to all polls they are likely to be President Leonid
Kravchuk and former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma. The other
candidates are president of the Center for Market Reforms in Kiev
Volodymyr Lanovyi, parliament chairman Oleksandr Moroz, former
parliament chairman Ivan Pliusch, president of the Ukraine
Financial Group stock company Valerii Babych, and Minister of
Education Pyor Talanchuk.  Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

UKRAINE'S FOREIGN DEBT IS $6 BILLION. Deputy Finance Minister
Boris Sobolev reported that his country's debts to Western
creditors and former Soviet republics is $6 billion, Interfax
said on 22 June. The debts to CIS countries slightly exceeds $4.3
billion. While the debts to the West are repaid on time, those to
the CIS countries are not repaid regularly, in part due to
problems in settling the division of former Soviet Union assets
and liabilities.  Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET]

  Compiled by Liz Fuller and Patrick Moore
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