To live is so startling, it leaves little time for anything else. - Emily Dickinson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 103, 1 June 1994

                              RUSSIA

RUSSIAN-US MILITARY EXERCISE POSTPONED. A small-scale, joint
Russian-US military exercise, scheduled for July in the Orenburg
region of Russia, has been postponed and its venue tentatively
shifted to the US. The announcement of the change was made by US
Senator Sam Nunn, who is heading a Senate delegation currently
visiting Moscow. According to The New York Times and The
Washington Post, Nunn attributed the postponement to nationalist
opposition in the Russian parliament and objections said to be
coming from residents near Totskoye, a training area about 100
miles northwest of Orenburg in the southern Urals, not far from
the border with Kazakhstan. The New York Times reported that
Nunn, who had been told in Washington that the exercises were
"back on course," had been surprised to find how politically
charged the issue had become in Russia. Western diplomats were
quoted as saying the Russian government had requested the
postponement and the US side had agreed. Even shifting the
exercises to the US may prove problematic, however. Sergei
Yushenkov, chairman of the Russian parliament's Defense
Committee, suggested that Moscow could balk at the cost of
transporting men and equipment to the US and might ask the US for
financial help.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL Inc.

KOZYREV ON ARMS SALES, KARABAKH. Meeting with the US Senate
delegation, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev complained
about what he alleged was the West's attempt to restrict Russian
arms sales to third countries; he suggested that such actions
were contrary to the spirit of partnership that should rule
relations between Russia and the West. Referring to the issue of
Russian arms sales to Iran, Interfax on 31 May quoted Kozyrev as
saying, "Russia has no intention of unilaterally giving up arms
exports to third countries without preliminary consultations with
the West. Let's work together on general rules for arms exports."
Kozyrev rejected Western charges of "neo-imperialism" on the
issue of sending peacekeeping forces to Nagorno-Karabakh and
accused the West of trying to drive a wedge between Russia and
the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) Minsk
Group in their efforts to resolve the conflict.  Stephen Foye,
RFE/RL Inc.

NATO HESITANT TO ENDORSE SPECIAL TIES WITH RUSSIA. Reuters on 31
May quoted NATO officials as saying that the alliance is likely
to reject Moscow's demands for regularized formal consultations
on major security issues and to propose instead a much looser
"gentlemen's agreement" that would envision seeking Moscow's
views on issues that NATO thought appropriate. The Russian
proposals were submitted to NATO during Russian Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev's visit a week earlier. The diplomats said that the
alliance was not prepared to commit itself to talks with Russia
on the issue of expanding NATO to include Eastern European
states. A second Russian demand that NATO is said to be unwilling
to accept is Moscow's concept of a hierarchical European security
structure that would subordinate NATO to CSCE. Alliance officials
view CSCE as unwieldy, and prefer to maintain NATO's autonomy,
the report said.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIA, US DETARGET STRATEGIC MISSILES. The US Defense Department
announced on 31 May that the US had "detargeted" all its
strategic missiles formerly aimed at Russia and other places
around the world. The announcement followed by one day similar
official statements in Moscow and reflected an effort by both
countries to lower the nuclear threshold after the Cold War. The
UK has also detargeted its nuclear weapons. Reuters quoted US
Pentagon spokeswoman Kathleen de Laski as calling the move a
"significant milestone." She pointed out that it is in many ways
a symbolic step because the missiles can be quickly retargeted
using computers.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL Inc.

YELTSIN ENDS VISIT TO TATARSTAN. Russian President Boris Yeltsin
and Tatarstan President Mintimer Shaimiev met with journalists in
Kazan on 31 May at the end of Yeltsin's two-day visit to the
republic, ITAR-TASS reported. Both agreed that the implementation
of the recent treaty between Russia and Tatarstan was their most
important bilateral task. A bilateral commission headed by
Russia's First Deputy Prime Minister Oleg Soskovets (and not
Sergei Shakhrai as Shakhrai has earlier suggested) and the
Tatarstan prime minister has been set up to supervise
implementation. Yeltsin said it was now time to move towards
decentralization on the scale of the whole country, but that the
treaties with other republics and regions would not be the same
as that with Tatarstan, nor would they necessarily be signed this
year. Asked about the possibility of using the Russia-Tatarstan
treaty with respect to the CIS countries, Yeltsin said it was too
early to talk of that; the model must first be developed within
Russia.  Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL Inc.

STATE OF EMERGENCY EXTENDED IN NORTH OSSETIA/INGUSHETIA. The
Federation Council approved on 31 May Yeltsin's decree extending
the state of emergency in parts of North Ossetia and Ingushetia
until 31 July, ITAR-TASS reported. The latest decree extends the
state of emergency to a number of villages in the Malgobek and
Sunzha raions of Ingushetia. Reports of the extension of the
state of emergency to these two raions, parts of which are
claimed by Chechnya, aroused a hostile reaction on Chechnya's
part, but Movladi Udugov, a spokesman for the Chechen government,
said on 31 May that Chechnya agrees that the villages affected
are part of Ingushetia and the decree does not pose any immediate
threat to Chechnya. Udugov added, however, that Chechnya still
thinks the state of emergency is unjustified.  Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL
Inc.

                               CIS

CIS OFFICIAL IN CENTRAL ASIA. The executive secretary of the CIS,
Ivan Korotchenya, has completed a tour of Central Asia
(Turkmenistan excepted), and arrived in Georgia on 31 May,
Russian media report. Visiting Almaty on 28 May, Korotchenya met
Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbaev, who reportedly agreed to
send troops to Abkhazia as part of a CIS peacekeeping force.
Korotchenya was quoted as saying that Nazarbaev's Eurasian Union
idea would be the main item on the agenda at the CIS summit
scheduled for September; Nazarbaev's aides had downplayed the
idea after it received little support from other CIS leaders.
According to Interfax, Korotchenya also met with UN Deputy
Secretary General Marek Goulding in Dushanbe on 29 May; the two
held talks on coordinating CIS and UN efforts to resolve the
civil conflict in Tajikistan. Goulding, who is in Dushanbe to
help prepare the next round of Tajik peace talks this month,
invited Korotchenya to New York for discussions on granting the
CIS observer status in the UN.  Keith Martin, RFE/RL Inc.

                 TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

RUSSIAN OFFICER ASSASSINATED IN DUSHANBE. A lieutenant-colonel of
the Russian border troops in Tajikistan is the latest victim in a
wave of assassinations of prominent persons that has taken place
in Dushanbe in recent weeks. Russian and Western news agencies
reported on 31 May that Vladimir Borisenkov had been shot on his
way to work at the headquarters of the border troops. Other
victims in the assassination wave, which Tajik government
authorities are blaming on the hard-line opposition, have
included Tajik officials and a prominent journalist. On 29 May a
Russian border guard was killed in the town of Khorog, capital of
Gorno-Badakhshan, which has been a stronghold of the Tajik
opposition.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

KAZAKH RESPONSE TO SOLZHENITSYN. When Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's
proposals for Russian renewal, including a suggestion that
Kazakhstan's borders be redrawn, were first published in the
Soviet press, infuriated Kazakhs burned the newspapers.
Antagonism to the Russian writer remains high in Kazakh
intellectual circles. Nezavisimaya gazeta reported on 31 May that
activists of the Kazakh-nationalist Azat movement, the
influential Kazakh Language Society, and the Republican Party
intend to hold demonstrations in Pavlodar if Solzhenitsyn visits
that city as planned. A group of well-known Kazakh scholars,
including historian Manash Kozybaev and demographer Makash
Tatimov, told RL's Kazakh Service the same day that Solzhenitsyn
is "an extreme Russian chauvinist." Bess Brown

TURKEY SETS UP KARABAKH MONITORING CENTER. Addressing the
parliamentary faction of her True Path Party in Ankara on 31 May,
Turkish Prime Minister Tansu Ciller stated that Turkey is to
establish a logistical center east of Erzerum for international
monitors of an eventual Karabakh ceasefire, Reuters reported.
Ciller reiterated that CSCE should play a prominent role in
monitoring a settlement of the Karabakh conflict. The Turkish
government has consistently opposed any attempt by Russia to
monopolize peacekeeping in the region.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

ARMENIA DENIES INVADING NAKHICHEVAN. On 31 May Interfax quoted an
Azerbaijan Defense Ministry source as claiming that a contingent
of 500 Armenian troops backed by armored vehicles attacked a
village in Nakhichevan's Sadarak raion on 30 May, killing four
Azerbaijani troops and taking several others hostage. An Armenian
spokesman denied the report, which he described as intended to
sabotage peace talks (whether Russian- or CSCE-mediated was not
specified), and claimed that the situation along the
Armenian-Nakhichevan border was quiet.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

TWO OPPOSITION DEPUTIES EXPELLED FROM AZERBAIJAN PARLIAMENT. On
31 May, at the prompting of Azerbaijan parliament speaker Rasul
Guliev, former foreign minister Tofik Gasymov and Azerbaijan
Popular Front first deputy chairman Ibrahim Ibrahimly, both of
whom had criticized the policies of the Aliev regime, were
expelled from parliament by a majority of votes, Interfax
reported. Interfax further quoted conflicting predictions by
sources reportedly close to Aliev, one of whom stated that the
parliament would be dissolved in the immediate future and
presidential rule introduced, while the second denied that any
such measures would be taken.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

GEORGIA, ABKHAZIA AT ODDS OVER RETURN OF REFUGEES. The most
recent round of the quadrilateral talks in Sochi on the return to
Abkhazia of Georgian refugees displaced during last autumn's
fighting ended in deadlock on 31 May because of the Abkhaz side's
insistence that all potential repatriates sign a declaration that
they will abide by the laws of the Republic of Abkhazia,
ITAR-TASS reported. Abkhazia had previously demanded that any
Georgians who had participated in last year's fighting be barred
from returning, and that applications for permission to return be
limited to 200 per month. The two sides also disagree on the
total number of refugees; Georgia estimates it at 290,000,
Abkhazia at no more than 185,000.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

UZBEKISTAN INCREASES WAGES, PRICES. The Uzbek government
announced on 30 May that prices for basic goods and energy will
go up by as much as 300 percent, effective 1 June, Interfax
reported. As a result, bread and flour prices will triple, while
the cost of public transport will double. The announcement was
made just three days after Uzbek president Islam Karimov signed a
decree increasing wages by an average of 50 percent, also
effective 1 June, according to Radio Liberty's Uzbek Service. As
a result, the minimum wage is to be fixed at 70,000 som-coupons
(Uzbekistan's new currency; officially one US dollar trades for
4000 som-coupons, but the unofficial rate is now over 20,000).
Students' stipends and pensions are also being raised. By
announcing the wage increases first, the Karimov regime seems to
be trying to avoid a repeat of the events of January 1992, when
students rioted in Tashkent, initially in response to drastic
price hikes; two students were killed during the rioting.  Keith
Martin, RFE/RL Inc.

                   CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

ZUBAK, GANIC ELECTED. On 31 May RFE/RL's South Slavic Language
Service reported that the Bosnian parliament had officially voted
Bosnian Croat leader Kresimir Zubak president of the Bosnian
Muslim-Croat federation, while making Ejup Ganic vice-president.
The vote, which provided Zubak and Ganic with a unanimous
endorsement, was taken at a special constitutional meeting of the
parliament. Zubak and Ganic will hold office for an interim term
of six months, when national elections are slated. On 31 May
Reuters added that Zubak will not displace Bosnian President
Alija Izetbegovic, who is to "remain at the head of the Bosnian
state's collective wartime presidency." In related news, on 31
May AFP reported that the Bosnian parliament took a step to make
the federation a functioning reality by formally asking Prime
Minister Haris Silajdzic to form a cabinet which will have
jurisdiction over both Bosnia and Herzegovina and the
Muslim-Croat federation.  Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

RENEWED FIGHTING IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA. On 1 June
international media report that fighting has erupted between
Bosnian Serbs and government forces throughout north and west
Bosnia. According to Sarajevo Radio, Serb artillery pounded the
northeastern town of Gradacac all day on 31 May. In another
development, on 31 May Reuters reported that UN officials suspect
that Bosnian Serb troops are responsible for removing a heavy gun
from a UN collections depot near the Bosnian capital, Sarajevo.
It is hoped that representatives from all three warring sides
will attend the 2-3 June talks in Geneva aimed at producing a
ceasefire, but Bosnian Serb and Muslim officials have already
said they feel that little can be resolved in Geneva.  Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

CHURKIN VISITS FORMER YUGOSLAVIA. On 30 May an RFE/RL
correspondent reported that Russian envoy Vitaly Churkin left for
Ljubljana and Zagreb for meetings with Slovenian and Croat
officials. On 31 May Churkin arrived in Belgrade where, according
to Tanjug, he met with Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic for
talks focussing on the prospects for a ceasefire in Bosnia. The
state of relations between Zagreb and Croatia's rebel Serbs in
the self-proclaimed republic of Krajina was also evidently high
on Churkin's list of concerns during his visit throughout former
Yugoslavia, and on 1 June Politika covers the Churkin visit under
the headline "There is a Possibility that Knin and Zagreb Will
Continue Talks." Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.


DEMOCRATS SCORE VICTORY IN ALBANIAN ELECTIONS. On 31 May ATA and
leading Albanian dailies reported that the Democratic Party
scored major victories over the leading opposition Socialist
Party of Albania (former communists) in elections held in five of
the country's communes. According to Rilindja Demokratike, the DP
secured 47% of the vote against 32.7% garnered by the Socialists.
Rilindja Demokratike observed that the Democrats' win represented
a severe blow to the Socialists' demands which have revolved
around calls for early national elections. Zeri i Popullit, the
Socialists' main daily, alleged electoral improprieties, but
provided no evidence to back its claims.  Stan Markotich and
Louis Zanga, RFE/RL Inc.

ATHENS THREATENS "DRASTIC MEASURES" TO PROTECT ALBANIAN GREEKS.
Foreign Minister Karolos Papoulias told Western agencies on 31
May that Greece is ready to take "drastic measures" to defend the
rights of the Greek minority living in Albania. Speaking to
journalists before departing on a trip to Moscow, Papoulias
refused to detail the warning, but on the previous day he had
mentioned the possibility of Greece closing the border if ethnic
Greeks continue to be "persecuted" by Tirana. While Prime
Minister Andreas Papandreou in an recent interview ruled out any
military action at this stage, a tour by Defense Minister
Gerasimos Arsenis to postings at the Greek-Albanian border seemed
intended to underline the seriousness of Athens' position.
Albania has consistently rejected charges that interrogations and
arrests of individual leaders of the ethnic Greek Omonia movement
are signs of a less tolerant minority policy and has, for its
part, accused Athens of "warmongering" in the southern Balkans.
Omonia leader Sotir Qiriazati on 30 May called on both
governments to show "maturity" and stop issuing recriminatory
statements which only serve to reflect negatively on the
situation of Albanian Greeks.  Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAKIA TO RECEIVE STAND-BY LOAN? On 31 May, during the final
day of his visit to Slovakia, the executive director of the IMF
Belgian Group, William Kiekens, told TASR that the prospects were
good for approval of a stand-by loan for Slovakia by the IMF
Board of Directors in mid-July. He noted that his talks with
Slovak officials were "very constructive" and called the
government program "courageous." The cabinet approved its
Memorandum on Economic Policy on 31 May. Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL
Inc.

PINOCHET HOLDS TALKS WITH CZECH ARMS TRADERS. On 31 May Chilean
Army Chief and former President General Augusto Pinochet
continued his visit to the Czech Republic, beginning negotiations
with the private arms trading firm Omnipol, which invited the
general to the Czech Republic to discuss the possibility of the
Chilean army buying Czech military equipment. Omnipol spokesman
Antonin Tomecek said the negotiations with the Chilean military
delegation headed by Pinochet are taking place near Prague, CTK
reported. Czech officials have refused to receive Pinochet.
Although it has been rumored that Pinochet will also visit
Slovakia, Slovak officials said on 30 May that they had no
knowledge of the trip and that they had not received a visa
application, TASR reported.  Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIA AGREES TO REPAY ITS DEBTS TO THE CZECHS. In negotiations
in Prague on the evening of 30 May, Russian and Czech officials
reached agreement on the settlement of the Russian debt to the
Czech Republic, CTK reports. Czech Deputy Finance Minister
Vladimir Rudlovcak and Russian First Deputy Finance Minister
Andrei Vavilov signed an agreement stating that Russia will pay
the Czech Republic the equivalent of $3,500 million. The Czech
side wanted Russian oil and gas as payment, but the Russians
refused; the Czechs might instead be offered shares in Russian
enterprises. Russia will begin paying debts owed to the Czech
government in 1996. The final agreements are expected to be
signed within three weeks.  Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

POLAND PLANS CURRENCY REFORM. The Polish government approved
draft legislation on 31 May that would cut four zeros from the
national currency, starting 1 January 1995, PAP reports. At
current exchange rates, this would make a five-zloty coin worth
roughly $2. Five new bank notes--worth 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200
zloty--are to replace the sixteen notes now in circulation. The
grosz will return as the smallest denomination; one zloty will be
worth 100 grosz. The old currency will remain valid for two years
as it is gradually withdrawn from circulation. The legislation
has an "urgent" tag to ensure speedy consideration by the
parliament. The printing of new bank notes is expected to cost
100 billion zloty ($4.5 million) less than would new printings of
existing notes. The reform has been in preparation for several
years but was repeatedly postponed until inflation is securely
under control. Deputy National Bank Chairman Witold Kozinski told
reporters that the currency reform is expected to have a
deflationary impact. Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH BROADCASTING COUNCIL TUG-OF-WAR CONTINUES. Citing a recent
ruling by the Constitutional Tribunal, President Lech Walesa
refused on 31 May to accept the resignation of Ryszard Bender as
chairman of the National Broadcasting Council, PAP reports. At
the urging of fellow council members, Bender offered to resign
only as chairman and not as a member, in order to deny Walesa a
chance to appoint a hostile "outsider" to the body. Walesa has
been at war with the broadcasting council since it awarded the
single national private TV license to the PolSat company owned by
Zygmunt Solorz. The president dismissed the council's first
chairman, Marek Markiewicz, on 1 March and appointed Bender to
take his place on 31 March. The Constitutional Tribunal ruled on
11 May that the president's dismissal of Markiewicz was unlawful.
Rather than allow Markiewicz to resume the chairman's position,
however, Walesa asserted that the tribunal's ruling does not have
retroactive effect. The tribunal may rule on this issue as well.
Polish TV reports that all council members will henceforth sign
all decisions to avoid potential legal challenges.  Louisa
Vinton, RFE/RL Inc.

ENERGY PRICES RISE IN POLAND. Electricity will rise 10% in price
and gas, 12% on 1 June, PAP reports. The finance ministry said
the price hikes are necessary to cover the increased costs of
producing and distributing energy, above all, higher coal prices.
The 1994 budget initially planned two price increases for
electricity (in sum 23%) and gas (37%), to take place in February
and July. After consultations with the trade unions, however, the
government revised these plans, opting to impose three increases
on a smaller scale. Gas and electricity prices rose 10% in
February. Further hikes are planned for September.  Louisa
Vinton, RFE/RL Inc.

UDF TO BOYCOTT MOST PARLIAMENTARY SESSIONS. Otechestven vestnik
reports that the leadership of the Union of Democratic Forces
decided on 31 May that the UDF caucus from now on will not
participate in the plenary sessions of parliament unless there is
a vote on amendments in the constitution or the election law, or
changes in the cabinet. UDF Chairman Filip Dimitrov told a press
briefing that the decision of the National Coordinating Council
should be regarded as a protest against Prime Minister Lyuben
Berov, who the coalition thinks should have stepped down after he
failed to garner majority support in two crucial parliamentary
votes on 19 and 20 May. Berov's cabinet was then rescued by the
parliamentary majority in a narrow confidence vote on 27 May.
Dimitrov added that the deputies will continue to participate in
the work of parliamentary committees.  Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL
Inc.

ROMANIAN PARLIAMENT APPROVES IMF-LINKED BUDGET. After weeks of
debates, the Romanian parliament approved on 31 May an austerity
budget for 1994, Radio Bucharest reported on the same day. The
budget was passed by a vote of 227 for, 72 against, and 31
abstentions. It was drawn by the minority Party of Social
Democracy in Romania government, with advice from the
International Monetary Fund. The IMF has made approval of a tight
state budget a condition for loans to Romania. The government has
also agreed to other IMF suggestions for implementing market
reforms. Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

CONTROVERSY OVER NEW ROMANIAN LAW ON EDUCATION. The chairman of
the Hungarian Democratic Federation of Romania, Bela Marko, told
Foreign Affairs Minister Teodor Melescanu that the Hungarian
community considers the draft law on education, which has been
submitted to parliament, as "unacceptable in its present form"
and added that this matter is viewed by the Hungarian community
as being of "vital importance" Rompres said on 31 May. The new
law will be discussed in parliament next week. Education Minister
Liviu Maior obliquely criticized the HDFR position on the law at
a press conference on 31 May. He said that "separation" of
teaching in Romanian and the languages of the national minorities
"had only led to conflicts," Radio Bucharest reports. Two
versions of a draft law on the minorities, one submitted by the
HDFR and the other by members of other national minorities, will
soon be discussed in the legislature.  Michael Shafir, RFE/RL
Inc.

FUNAR DOES IT AGAIN. Romanian Education Minister Liviu Maior has
criticized a proposal made by the controversial mayor of Cluj,
Gheorghe Funar, to change the name of the city's university and
drop all Hungarian references from it, an RFE/RL correspondent
reported on 31 May. Funar has recently said he wants the Cluj
Babes-Bolyai University to be changed into "University of
Superior Dacia." Earlier, local authorities in Cluj announced
that they plan to remove the statue of Mathias Corvin, a
Hungarian medieval king, from the city's main square. The
Cluj-based Association for Ethnic Dialogue called these plans
"absurd" and warned that such measures could lead to
"unpredictable results." Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

DEMIREL IN MOLDOVA. Turkish President Suleiman Demirel is paying
an official visit to Moldova from 1 to 3 June, accompanied by a
delegation of more than 100 officials and businessmen. The sides
are to upgrade their reciprocal diplomatic representation to
embassy level and to sign an interstate treaty. Demirel is
scheduled to visit the Gagauz region in southern Moldova in the
company of President Mircea Snegur. Turkey has exercised a
moderating influence on Gagauz leaders in their negotiations with
Chisinau for autonomy. Turkish companies represented in Demirel's
delegation are exploring investment opportunities in food
processing, construction, and telecommunications projects in
Moldova. Turkey has also expressed interest in the construction
of a highway from Chisinau to the Danube, which would enable
Moldova to trade with the outside world via the Black Sea.
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIA GIVES LATVIA TEMPORARY MOST FAVORED TRADE STATUS. Sergei
Zotov, the head of the Russian delegation negotiating with
Latvia, said that from 1 June Russia will give Latvia the status
of a most favored nation temporarily, Interfax reported on 31
May. The status was envisioned in bilateral agreements signed in
November 1992. It will go fully into effect only if the Latvian
parliament ratifies the agreements on the withdrawal of Russian
troops from Latvia that were signed by the Latvian and Russian
presidents on 31 April 1994. Latvian Prime Minister Valdis
Birkavs welcomed the Russian action which he expected to help
Latvian industrial enterprises and farmers to sell more goods in
Russia.  Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

OPINION POLLS IN LITHUANIA. An opinion poll conducted from 11 to
18 May by Baltic Surveys among 1, 178 Lithuanians showed that,
although the positive rating of President Algirdas Brazauskas
dropped 9 points to 53%, he remained the most popular political
figure, BNS reported on 31 May. Leaders of the Center Party,
Egidijus Bickauskas and Romualdas Ozolas, both dropping 4 points
to 49% and 42%, respectively, were next. Opposition leader
Vytautas Landsbergis gained 1 point to 34%. Both parliament
chairman Ceslovas Jursenas and Foreign Minister Povilas Gylys
dropped 5 points to 30% and 18%, respectively. 51% of the
respondents favored the opposition's initiative to hold a
referendum on unlawful privatization by the current authorities
and compensation of savings, while 24% opposed the initiative.
Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

SEVEN CANDIDATES QUALIFY IN BELARUSIAN PRESIDENTIAL RACE. The
Belarusian Central Electoral Commission announced that seven
candidates succeeded in collecting enough signatures to be placed
on the 23 June slate, Belarusian radio reported on 31 May. They
were: Prime Minister Vyacheslau Kebich; former chairman of the
Supreme Soviet Stanislau Shushkevich; head of the Republican
Union of Collective Farms Aleksandr Dubko; head of the former
anti-corruption committee Aleksandr Lukashenka; head of the
Belarusian Popular Front Zyanon Paznyak; head of the Party of
Popular Accord Henadz Karpenka; and head of the Party of
Communists of Belarus Vasil Novikau. Kebich and Karpenka were the
only two candidates to collect over 70 signatures from
parliamentary deputies. Karpenka was the only one failing to
collect 100,000 signatures from the electorate; his tally was
86,000. Moreover, several deputies, who had initially signed up
to support Karpenka, announced that they were retracting their
support. The Central Electoral Commission has not ruled yet
whether the deputies have the right to withdraw their signatures
at this late date.  Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

                             NOTICE
The RFE/RL Daily Report will not appear Thursday, 2 June 1994
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU.  This report is also
available by postal mail, as are the other publications of the
Institute, and by fax.  RFE/RL NEWS BRIEFS, an edited compendium
of items first published in the Daily Report, is distributed
along with the RFE/RL RESEARCH REPORT, a weekly journal
providing topical analyses of political, economic and security
developments throughout the Institute's area of interest.
Longer analyses are available in a monograph series, RFE/RL
STUDIES, and brief analytic summaries appear monthly in the
RESEARCH BULLETIN.

Requests for permission to reprint or retransmit this material
should be addressed to PD@RFERL.ORG and will generally be
granted on the condition that the material is clearly attributed
to the RFE/RL DAILY REPORT. Inquiries about specific news items
or subscriptions to RFE/RL publications should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

In North America:

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907
Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783
Internet: RI-DC@RFERL.ORG

Elsewhere:

Ms. Helga Hofer
Publications Department
RFE/RL Research Institute
Oettingenstrasse 67
80538 Munich
Germany
Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2632
Fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648
Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole