In the effort to give good and comforting answers to the young questioners whom we love, we very often arrive at good and comforting answers for ourselves. - Ruth Goode
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 100, 27 May 1994

                           RUSSIA

KOZYREV AT EUROPEAN STABILITY CONFERENCE.  Russian Foreign
Minister Andrei Kozyrev said at the Conference on Stability in
Europe in Paris on 26 May that Russia supported the use of the
CSCE for solving interethnic and border conflicts rather than the
creation of new bodies for this purpose.  The conference proposed
creating roundtables for problems related to troop withdrawals and
the rights of ethnic Russians in Latvia and Estonia.  It also
called for a roundtable to discuss how minority problems affect
stability of borders in central Europe.  The aim of the conference
was to produce a stability pact which will tame such problems
among potential EU members.  Kozyrev did not show confidence in
the idea of roundtables and warned against the "duplication or
weakening of existing international institutions and negotiating
mechanisms." Kozyrev added: "Discussion of issues related to state
borders as well as to national minorities should take place
exclusively in the framework established by CSCE documents," AFP
reported. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

CRUCIAL DEBATE ON DEFENSE EXPENDITURE ANTICIPATED.  The State Duma
was scheduled to hold a closed-door session on 27 May to debate
the explosive topic of planned defense expenditures in 1994, an
RFE/RL correspondent reported on 25 May, but Reuters reported on
27 May that the debate had been postponed until 8 June. The
current draft of the consolidated budget for 1994 provides for a
defense allocation of 37.1 trillion rubles, well down from the
Defense Ministry's initial bid of over 80 trillion rubles and also
below the 55-trillion figure that defense lobbyists assert is the
absolute minimum to provide for the defense of Russia and to cover
the social costs of withdrawal from the near abroad and from more
distant outposts.  However, during the early infighting over
planned expenditures, the agro-industrial complex has already
secured most of what it wanted--18.1 trillion rubles--from what
limited discretionary funds were left, and projected budgetary
revenues have been diminished by the unexpected slump in output
during the first four months of the year. The president and his
cabinet are said to be supportive of increased defense spending to
something like the 55 trillion rubles claimed to be the defense
minimum subsistence level.  Keith Bush

RUSSIA'S GOLD RESERVES.  Acting Finance Minister Sergei Dubinin
told the Financial Information Agency on 25 May that Russia's
aggregate gold stocks, including the state and the Central Bank's
reserves, currently amount to an estimated 350-400 tons, Interfax
reported.  The state and Central Bank reserves were reported to be
an estimated 315 tons in 1993. Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

DUMA, YELTSIN, WRANGLE OVER AIRTIME.  On 27 May, Presidential
spokesperson Vyacheslav Kostikov blasted the Duma for its attempt
to reserve daily radio and television airtime so that it could
broadcast coverage of parliamentary proceedings.  Kostikov noted
that the Duma's move could "damage the process of social
reconciliation" according to a Reuters report of the same day.
Despite the president's opposition, however, the Duma went ahead
and passed a resolution in favor of the slots and establishing a
parliamentary TV company that would prepare the broadcasts. While
clearly an attempt to gain wider social support for the Duma, the
move could backfire if it displaces genuinely popular TV shows
such as "Santa Barbara" or "Prosto Maria." John Lepingwell,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SOLZHENITSYN GOES HOME.  Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and his family
left Anchorage on 26 May en route to Vladivostok, Western agencies
reported.  At a half-hour refueling stop at Magadan he spoke
briefly with former labor camp prisoners still residing there and
paid homage to the hundreds of thousands of victims who died in
the camps in the Kolyma region.  He plans to travel by train
across Russia to Moscow. The writer told reporters that he will
not seek or accept any elected or appointed government position in
Russia, but hoped to participate in a "spiritual and moral"
recovery of the country comparable to that which occurred in
Germany after the war. Keith Bush and Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL,
Inc.

ANNIVERSARY OF ENDING OF CAUCASIAN WAR COMMEMORATED. The 130th
anniversary of the ending of the Caucasian war was marked on 22
May in Moscow, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachaevo-Cherkessia, and
Chechnya, ITAR-TASS reported.  In Cherkessk, where 22 May has been
declared an annual non-working day of mourning, a public meeting
addressed an appeal to Yeltsin calling on him to recognize that
the war led to the genocide of the Adygeis (Cherkess) and the
turning of those forced to emigrate into exiles.  In the
Kabardino-Balkar capital, Nalchik, the ceremonies were attended by
a delegation of the Russian State Duma, representatives of the
North Caucasian republics and krais, as well as foreign
delegations, and the new Russian Minister for Nationalities
Affairs and Regional Policy, Nikolai Egorov spoke.  In Grozny
there was a march past of units of the new Chechen army to whom
Dudaev handed standards and banners before the parade.  Ann
Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

UKRAINE TO APPEAL TO UN OVER BLACK SEA FLEET.  On 26 May Reuters
reported that Ukraine plans to appeal to the UN Security Council
over the deployment of the Black Sea Fleet on its territory.
Following the failure to reach an agreement over the division and
basing of the fleet, Ukrainian officials have said that the
continued presence of the fleet on Ukrainian territory was
illegal.  According to a statement issued after the breakup of the
talks, "the status of the Russian part of the fleet is in no way
different from the status of Russian troops in the Baltic states.
Russian troops must leave the Baltic and Ukraine." Previously it
had appeared that Ukraine had reconciled itself to a prolonged
presence of the Russian part of the Black Sea Fleet on its
territory.  Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

UN BODY ENDORSES REVISED SHIPPING REGULATIONS.  The UN's
International Maritime Organization has endorsed the new proposals
drafted by Turkey imposing restrictions on the passage of
shipping, specifically vessels carrying oil or nuclear waste,
through the Turkish straits, Reuters reported on 25 May. The new
regulations, which had been opposed by the Russian government on
the grounds that they contradict the 1936 Treaty of Montreux, will
come into force on 1 November; Turkey had originally intended to
enforce them as of 1 July. The possibility of extending a
Russian-Georgian oil pipeline to Turkey, which would provide an
alternative export route for oil from Russia and other CIS states,
was discussed at a meeting in Moscow between Russian first deputy
premier Oleg Soskovets and the Turkish Ambassador to Moscow,
Aikhan Kamel, Interfax reported on 25 May.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL,
Inc.

               TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

ANTI-GOVERNMENT DEMONSTRATION IN TBILISI. On 26 May, the
anniversary of the declaration of Georgia's independence in 1918,
some 3,000 opposition deputies and Georgian refugees from Abkhazia
staged a demonstration in central Tbilisi to demand that Georgia's
membership in the CIS and all agreements on a settlement of the
Abkhaz conflict be invalidated; that Abkhazia be declared occupied
by Russia; and that parliament chairman Eduard Shevardnadze
resign, Interfax and ITAR-TASS reported.  Some 1,000 supporters of
deceased president Zviad Gamsakhurdia staged a separate
demonstration near his home.  Interfax quoted an opinion poll
conducted by a Georgian newspaper disclosing that 26.5 percent of
respondents believe the present Georgian leadership will be
removed as a result of pressure by opposition forces, 14.3
percent--under popular pressure and 10.9 percent--under pressure
from within the parliament.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIAN PEACEKEEPERS FOR ABKHAZIA?  Russian Deputy Foreign
Minister Boris Pastukhov and Deputy Defense Minister Georgii
Kondratev outlined Russian proposals for a peacekeeping force in
Abkhazia to UN officials in New York on 26 May, according to The
New York Times of 27 May.  Although UN assent to the proposal is
not expected before next week, a group of Russian officers under
Lieutenant-General Aleksandr Sokolov flew to Abkhazia on 26 May to
determine where the peacekeeping forces will be deployed, Interfax
reported.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

VOLSKY IN DUSHANBE.  Members of the Russian Union of
Industrialists and Entrepreneurs have been in Dushanbe signing
agreements on Russian investment in Tajik development projects,
including completion of the Rogun power station, Interfax reported
on 26 May.  The union's chief, Arkadii Volsky, met with Tajik head
of state Imomali Rakhmonov to discuss Russian-Tajik economic
integration and Russian investment in the Central Asian country.
Volsky favors Tajikistan's speedy entry into the ruble zone, an
enthusiasm not shared by all Russian economic officials.
Reporting on the eagerness with which Tajik officials are pressing
for economic integration with Russia because of the desperate
state of the Tajik economy, the 26 May issue of Nezavisimaya
gazeta noted that Tajikistan's Communist Party has organized a
movement to promote restoration of the USSR.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL,
Inc.

DZHUMAGULOV ON GOVERNMENT REFORM.  Kyrgyzstan's Prime Minister
Apas Dzhumagulov told the parliament on 26 May that the government
intends to reduce the number of ministries and overhaul its
management system in order to limit state interference in the
economy, Interfax reported.  Government officials have announced
earlier that state subsidies to unprofitable industries are to
reduced or ended.  Dzhumagulov also announced plans to abolish
oblasts in Kyrgyzstan in the interests of reducing layers of
bureaucracy, but not immediately because such a move would have
"unpredictable consequences." Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

NIYAZOV IN IRAN.  Turkmenistan's President Saparmurad Niyazov met
with his Iranian counterpart in Mashhad on 26 May for further
discussions on a planned pipeline across Iran to deliver Turkmen
gas to Europe, Western and Iranian news agencies reported.
Niyazov renewed requests for Iranian help in developing
Turkmenistan's considerable gas and oil reserves, and also in the
agricultural sector.  The Iranian news agency IRNA complained that
the US was trying to block construction of the gas pipeline.  Bess
Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                 CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIA TALKS CONCLUDE, FIGHTING CONTINUES.  On 26 May
international media reported that talks in Talloires, France,
involving Bosnian Croat, Muslim, and Serb leaders and
international mediators from the "contact group" consisting of
France, Germany, Great Britain, Russia and the United States
concluded after two days, without producing any agreements on
ending the conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Talks are slated to
resume in about ten days, but no date has yet been fixed.  In
other news, on 26 May AFP and Reuters reported that Bosnian Prime
Minister Haris Silajdzic is in Zagreb to meet with (as yet
unnamed) officials.  Silajdzic is to discuss the Bosnian Serb
offensives against the town of Bihac, situated in northern Bosnia.
These offensives were described by Bosnian Muslim officials as
"very serious." In addition, international media report on 27 May
that fighting between Bosnian Muslim forces, supported by Bosnian
Croat allies, and Bosnian Serbs, continues around Tesanj.  Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

CROATIA'S POLITICAL CRISIS DEEPENS.  On 27 May the Croatian media
continued reporting on the parliamentary crisis dividing the
ruling Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ) and opposition parties.
Vecernji list carries an interview with the newly selected
parliamentary speaker, Nedjeljko Mihanovic.  He vows that
opposition strategies such as parliamentary boycotts will not be
tolerated to the point where they will impede the work of the
Sabor or of "the functioning of the Croatian state." Croatian TV
reported on 26 May that the parliament is to reconvene next week,
following negotiations between the HDZ and the opposition. On 26
May RFE/RL's South Slavic Language Service reported that Croatian
President Franjo Tudjman had stated for the record that he had
intended to dissolve the parliament if speakers Stipe Mesic and
Josip Manolic had not stepped down.  Mesic, replaced by Mihanovic,
continues to regard himself as speaker.  Meanwhile, continuing to
exacerbate HDZ relations with the opposition is the perception
that the ruling HDZ intends to keep Mesic and Manolic out of all
official parliamentary posts. Finally, on 26 May Reuters observed
that reports that Prime Minister Nikica Valentic is also planning
to bolt from HDZ ranks are being categorically denied.  Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

SESELJ UNSATISFIED WITH BOSNIA SPLIT; KRAJINA TALKS ON HOLD.  On
27 May Borba reports on comments delivered by Serbian
ultranationalist Serbian Radical Party (SRS) leader Vojislav
Seselj at a press conference in which Seselj denounced recent
proposals to split Bosnia and Herzegovina along the lines of
51-49%. Seselj stated categorically that a split along any lines
except those which recognize the current, presumably military
frontiers, would lead only to further conflict. Bosnian Serb
forces presently control about 70% of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Meanwhile, on 26 May Reuters reported that UN mediator Kai Eide of
Norway said in Zagreb that he intends to suspend efforts to bring
Croatia and representatives from the breakaway Serb-controlled
republic of Krajina to the negotiating table.  According to
reports, Eide's two-month long efforts have proved unsuccessful at
bridging the parties' "irreconcilable positions." Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECHS AND SLOVAKS STRENGTHEN TIES.  On 26 May Czech President
Vaclav Havel paid a one-day official visit to Slovakia to meet
with his Slovak counterpart Michal Kovac, TASR and Reuters report.
The two presidents agreed that remaining issues concerning the
Czech-Slovak split have become technical rather than political in
nature, and they should be resolved by the end of the year.
Expressing concern about the decline of cultural and economic
ties, both Havel and Kovac said they would support joint art and
cultural associations, student exchange programs and an institute
for Czechoslovak studies.  Talks also focused on ways to revive
bilateral trade.  Concerning the upcoming Slovak elections, Havel
warned the Slovaks not to "play the anti-Czech card," saying "it
is not a good idea to build a political career on an anti-Czech
agenda." Havel also met with Slovak Premier Jozef Moravcik to
discuss the current situation in Slovakia and bilateral relations.
Slovak and Czech Cultural Ministers Lubomir Roman and Pavel
Tigrid, respectively, discussed the need to revive cultural and
spiritual relations between the two nations.  Sharon Fisher,
RFE/RL, Inc.

KINKEL CALLS FOR CZECH-SUDETEN GERMAN DIALOGUE.  German Foreign
Minister Klaus Kinkel said at a press conference in Paris that "it
would be good if the Czech side would start a dialogue with
Sudeten Germans," Czech dailies reported on 27 May.  Kinkel, who
attended the Pact for Stability conference, complained about the
fact that the Sudeten German issue tends to become very emotional
and stressed that it must not burden Czech-German relations.  The
German foreign minister added that the Czech-German friendship
treaty of 1992 failed to address certain problematic issues which
should be addressed in bilateral talks now.  Czech Foreign
Minister Josef Zieleniec who is also in Paris responded at another
press conference by saying that a dialogue is underway on various
levels; he added that the German government is the only partner
for the Czech government, however.  In another development, Czech
and Slovak Presidents Vaclav Havel and Michal Kovac told
journalists in Bratislava that the so-called Benes decrees, which
governed the expulsion of the German minority for Czechoslovakia,
will not be abolished. Jan Obrman, RFE/RL, Inc.

ATTEMPT TO REMOVE SLOVAK PRIVATIZATION MINISTER FAILS. On 26 May
Milan Janicina narrowly survived a vote of confidence in the
parliament.  The motion was brought forward by the opposition
Movement for a Democratic Slovakia, which accused Janicina of
corruption and conflict of interests, TASR and Reuters report. A
total of 71 deputies voted against the minister, with 63 voting in
favor, but the motion needed 76 votes in order to pass through the
150-member parliament. The MDS already attempted to remove Deputy
Premier Roman Kovac through similar methods.  Sharon Fisher,
RFE/RL, Inc.

WORLD BANK STATEMENTS CAUSE STIR IN SLOVAKIA.  A report by Reuters
on 25 May containing statements by World Bank representative
Ulrich Hewer has caused a stir in the Slovak banking sector.  The
statement said that four Slovak banks--Slovenska Statna
Sporitelna, Vseobecna Uverova Bank, Investicna a Rozvojova Bank
and Konsolidacna Bank--are troubled with bad loans and
inexperience. On 26 May Vseobecna Uverova Bank president Jozef
Mudrik said he was surprised by Hewer's statements since neither
he nor the author of the Reuters report had visited the bank.
Mudrik said that within the past four years his bank has provided
very few new loans, and he ensured that his bank was one of the
first in the former Czechoslovakia to have the quality of its
credit portfolio verified by Coopers & Lybrant, TASR reports.
Representatives of the three other banks in question also rejected
Hewer's claims.  The Slovak National Bank issued a statement
guaranteeing that deposits in Slovakia's largest banks are secure.
Representatives of the World Bank are presently visiting Slovakia
to discuss privatization, macroeconomic developments and the
development of the banking system.  Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN PRIME MINISTER ON ELECTIONS.  Speaking on Hungarian
television's electoral program on 26 May, Peter Boross warned that
the most dangerous outcome for Hungarian democracy would be if the
Hungarian Socialist Party, the former reform communists, and the
Alliance of Free Democrats attained a two-third majority in the
new parliament, MTI reports.  This would, according to Boross,
pose an even greater danger than an absolute majority for the HSP,
since it would enable the two parties to change the constitution
and give them an unhealthy concentration of power.  On the same
day, a statement issued by the largest governing party, the
Hungarian Democratic Forum, repeated Boross' warning, and called
on voters to assure with their ballots that the HDF can act as a
strong opposition party and help preserve the achievements of the
past four years.  The second decisive round of the Hungarian
elections will take place on 29 May when the distribution of 259
of the 386 parliamentary seats will be decided.  The election will
be valid if voter participation exceeds 25%. Edith Oltay, RFE/RL,
Inc.

HUNGARY TO RECEIVE AID FOR REFUGEES FROM EX-YUGOSLAVIA. The United
Nations High Commissioner for Refugees will give Hungary $3.3
million to help take care of refugees from former Yugoslavia,
UNHCR spokesman Mihaly Hardy told MTI on 26 May.  He said that
about $2.2 million will be used to buy food, and the rest will go
toward purchasing household products, aiding Hungarian families
who give shelter to refugees, and paying for medical care.  Hardy
reported that there are 6,663 refugees in Hungary, 4,375 of whom
are staying with Hungarian families.  He estimated that there are
an additional 20,000 to 30,000 refugees in the country who did not
register officially because they feared that their families would
be harassed by the authorities in rump Yugoslavia or that their
chances of returning home once the fighting is over would be
endangered.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLAND ON EUROPEAN "STABILITY PACT." Speaking at the "Conference
on Stability in Europe" convened at the suggestion of French Prime
Minister Edouard Balladur and under EU auspices in Paris on 26
May, Polish Foreign Minister Andrzej Olechowski stressed that
Eastern Europe cannot be held to special standards on ethnic
minorities that do not apply generally in Europe.  Olechowski also
warned against allowing deliberations on the proposed "stability
pact" to interfere with efforts of East European countries to join
the EU.  He also argued that the ten countries seeking admission
to the EU do not comprise the region most in need of stability in
Europe but said Poland will participate despite its reservations.
Poland's experience in settling border problems and minority
issues could be treated as a model, Olechowski said. He announced
that Poland will soon propose a series of bilateral military
measures to improve regional security.  The Paris conference is
expected to yield several "tables" to attempt to settle regional
disagreements, particularly in the Baltic.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL,
Inc.

ABORTION BACK ON POLISH AGENDA.  The Sejm voted unexpectedly on 26
May to consider legislation that would relax the abortion ban in
force in Poland since early 1993, PAP reports.  A final vote could
now take place on 23 June, four days after the local government
elections.  Amendments proposed by left-wing deputies would permit
abortion in cases where the pregnant woman faces material or
emotional hardship.  At present, abortion is permitted only in
cases of rape or incest, when the woman's life is threatened, or
when the fetus is damaged beyond repair.  The revisions have the
support of the Democratic Left Alliance (SLD) and the Union of
Labor, along with part of the Polish Peasant Party (PSL). The
opposition Freedom Union, traditionally too diverse to take a
stance on the issue, charged the ruling coalition with attempting
to manipulate the political climate in advance of the local
elections.  The SLD has consistently supported liberal abortion
provisions; it is pushing the issue now to convince voters that it
is fulfilling campaign promises, rather than simply taking a back
seat to its agrarian coalition ally, the PSL.  Cardinal Jozef
Glemp criticized the draft amendments on 27 May as "yet another
political game" that would legalize the "murder of innocent
children." Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLAND SKEPTICAL ABOUT NATO PARTNERSHIP.  During the defense
ministers' meeting in Brussels on 25 May, Poland alone among the
eighteen potential NATO "partner" countries criticized the
Partnership for Peace program as overly vague. Polish Defense
Minister Piotr Kolodziejczyk said the program fails to define
clearly how to move from partnership to membership.  He also
criticized the Western assumption that Eastern Europe should first
join the European Union, integrate economically, and only later
receive security guarantees.  The two processes need to take place
side-by-side, Kolodziejczyk said, because Poland does not have 50
years to spare.  Kolodziejczyk spoke informally with Russian
Defense Minister Pavel Grachev several times during the session.
Grachev reportedly proposed that Russia would take into account
Baltic concern over the concentration of Russian forces in
Kaliningrad if Poland and the Baltic States supported a Russian
proposal to increase forces in the north and the Caucasus.  Louisa
Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

ATHENS WARNS TIRANA OF MISTREATING ETHNIC GREEKS. Western agencies
report that Greek Foreign Minister Karolos Papoulias issued on 26
May a "strong warning" to Albania, urging the country to respect
the rights of ethnic Greeks. The statement came hours after a
spokesman of Papoulias' ministry said Albanian authorities had
arrested four ethnic Greeks and were searching the country to
apprehend other ten members of that community.  Papoulias said he
feared Tirana's ultimate goal could be to drive out Greeks from
the southern province of the country. In Albania, journalists came
up with somewhat conflicting information, with the Foreign
Ministry denying the reports and a Gjirokastra district prosecutor
saying that several Greeks had been called in for questioning,
though none were arrested.  Two days earlier, Greece protested
against the charges against six alleged secessionists and canceled
a meeting between the countries' foreign ministers.  Kjell
Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

BEROV WINS VOTE OF CONFIDENCE.  Prime Minister Lyuben Berov
survived by a small margin a vote of confidence in parliament on
26 May, Bulgarian and Western media report. The motion, introduced
by Berov himself in order to strengthen the cabinet's weakened
position after suffering defeat in two ballots one week earlier,
was backed by 125 votes against 95--four more than required.
Afterwards, Berov told the National Assembly he plans to go on
ruling for about three more months but would then resign to pave
the way for new elections.  On 27 May the dailies associated with
the opposition Union of Democratic Forces are sharply critical of
the mainly Turkish Movement for Rights and Freedoms, for having
acted as if it had finally withdrawn its support for Berov but
coming to his defense when the decisive moment arrived.  They also
speculate on what may have been agreed during the intensive
consultations which preceded the vote; those talks were held
between Berov and representatives of the caucuses except the UDF
and the Independence Parliamentary Union.  Duma reports that an
internal vote in the faction of the Bulgarian Socialist Party on
whether to support an extension of Berov's mandate also had been
narrow, with 55 votes to 40.  Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN POLICEMEN SENTENCED IN LANDMARK CASE.  Two policemen
found guilty of torturing and murdering a suspect in custody were
given 15-year prison sentences on 26 May, Romanian and Western
media report.  The two, Lt.  Gheorghe Branisteanu and Sgt.  Maj.
Cristian Dinca, were accused of having beaten to death the
37-year-old Constantin Barza at a Bucharest police station last
December, after the latter had been reported as an intruder by a
neighbor. The incident grew out into a landmark case after
Romanian media provided graphic details of the torture to which
the victim had been subjected.  Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVA ADVERTISES MIG-29 PLANES FOR SALE.  Moldova's Defense
Ministry announced on 26 May that it is holding an air show on 28
May, featuring demonstration flights by its MIG-29 combat
aircraft. Having inherited from the USSR an air force regiment
comprised of some 30 MIG-29s, based at Marculesti airport north of
Chisinau, Moldova seeks to sell the planes on the international
market or to exchange them for other types of military equipment.
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

LITHUANIAN PARLIAMENT CHAIRMAN IN FINLAND.  On 25 May Seimas
chairman Ceslovas Stankevicius, heading a delegation of five
parliament deputies of various factions, began a three-day visit
to Helsinki at the invitation of his Finnish counterpart, Rita
Ousukainen.  On 25 May the delegation met with representatives of
Finnish parliamentary factions, visited Finland's national TV, and
the Ministry of Trade and Industry.  On 26 May it traveled about a
100 kilometers from Helsinki to the town of Hamina, noted for its
processing industries.  On 27 May the delegation will visit the
Bank of Finland, attend a parliament session, and meet with
President Martti Ahtisaari before returning to Lithuania in the
evening, Radio Lithuania reports.  Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

LATVIAN GOVERNMENT TO LIBERALIZE REGULATIONS ON FOREIGN
INVESTMENTS.  In order to speed up Latvia's economic development
and changeover to a market economy, the government of Prime
Minister Valdis Birkavs announced on 24 May that foreign investors
will be allowed to buy real estate in Latvia.  This step, part of
a larger plan to foster Latvia's economic recovery, is taken in
order to increase foreign investments in the country.  The
government also intends to speed up privatization, expand exports
and trade, improve transportation and telecommunication networks,
as well as streamline the work of financial institutions, Latvian
media announced on 25 May.  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

BIDS ACCEPTED FOR DISMANTLING OF SKRUNDA RADAR STATION. The
Latvian Economic Ministry is accepting bids from entrepreneurs in
Latvia for the dismantling of the newer constructions of the
Russian radar complex at Skrunda until 1 August.  Russia turned
over to Latvia this section of Skrunda earlier this month, in
accordance with one of the provisions in the accords on the
withdrawal of Russian forces signed by Latvia and Russia on 30
April. The results of the competition are expected to be announced
around 20 October 1994, after a thorough evaluation of each
project and the estimated costs, Diena reported on 26 May.
Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

  [As of 1200 CET]
  Compiled by Saulius Girnius and Michael
  Shafir
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Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
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Updated: 1998-11-

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©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole