Upon the education of the people of this country the fate of this country depends. - Benjamin Disraeli 1804-1881
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 97, 24 May 1994

                               CIS

CRIMEAN PARLIAMENT PASSES CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT. On 20 May the
Crimean parliament voted 69 to 2 in favor of restoring Crimea's
1992 constitution. Under the constitution Crimea's relations with
Ukraine are to be governed by treaties between Kiev and Crimea. It
also gives Crimeans the right to dual citizenship and allows the
peninsula to have its own armed forces. In reaction to the moves
Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk said he would do everything
possible to protect Ukraine's territorial integrity and the
Ukrainian foreign ministry issued a statement calling the law
unconstitutional. That same day the Ukrainian parliament called on
Crimea to cancel its constitutional decision within 10 days which
the Crimean parliament has refused to do. Ukraine also wrote to
the UN and NATO saying it reserved the right to take all necessary
measures to safeguard its borders. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

CONFLICTING REPORTS OVER TROOPS IN CRIMEA. On 21 May, following
the Crimean parliament's vote, reports began appearing of troops
movements on the peninsula. Russian media reported that Ukraine
was concentrating troops in Sevastopol and Simferopol while the
Ukrainian navy alleged that the Black Sea Fleet was planning to
move tanks and anti-aircraft artillery to Sevastopol in the near
future. Ukraine has denied reports that it has brought in armored
vehicles or put its national guardsmen on alert. Ukrainian Deputy
Interior Minister Valentyn Nedryhailo said that 29 armored
vehicles did arrive in Simferopol, but their arrival was not
connected with the political events as they had been a planned
delivery and Kiev has stated that its national guardsmen would
patrol Crimea's streets unarmed. Russian Defense Minister Pavel
Grachev said that he does not believe the situation will explode
in armed conflict although tensions are high.  Ustina Markus,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ZVYAHILSKY MEETS CHERNOMYRDIN OVER CRIMEAN CRISIS. In an effort to
defuse the situation Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin
and Ukraine's acting Prime Minister, Efim Zvyahilsky, met in
Moscow on 23 May to discuss the Crimean problem. Ukraine's Deputy
Prime Minister Valerii Shmarov said the talks focused on the Black
Sea Fleet and did not touch on Crimea's status. The two are to
continue discussion on 24 May. Crimean President Yurii Meshkov had
appealed to Moscow to support his case in talks with Kiev and has
said it would be the "least desirable result" if Russia were to
refuse to do so. British Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd, who is
due in Kiev on 24 May for discussion with Kravchuk, had discussed
the Crimean situation with Russian Foreign Minister, Andrei
Kozyrev, in Murmansk on 22 May and said he did not believe Russia
would intervene to support Crimea in its efforts towards more
autonomy.  Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN, SHAKHRAI ON CRIMEA. In comments broadcast on Independent
TV's (NTV) Itogi program on 22 May, Russian President Boris
Yeltsin stated that Kravchuk had promised him that Ukraine would
not use force in Crimea. Yeltsin stated that, "Crimea is a
sovereign republic, and it has the right to make its own
decisions, and that is its business, whatever decisions it makes.
The main thing is that neither we, nor Ukraine, meddle [in those
decisions]." The comments seem to assert that Russia and Ukraine
have equal interests and rights in Crimea, raising questions
concerning Yeltsin's approach to the problem. Former Nationalities
Minister Sergei Shakhrai has called for the Crimea problem to be
resolved along the same lines as Russian relations with Tatarstan,
by concluding a special treaty with the republic, according to
ITAR-TASS of 23 May. John Lepingwell, RFE/RL, Inc.

                              RUSSIA

HURD ON BALTIC, G-7, EU, NATO, PEACEKEEPING. British Foreign
Secretary Douglas Hurd, on a three-day visit to Russia, called on
Russia to complete withdrawal of its troops from Estonia before or
by the end of August 1994 and to refrain from linking the
withdrawal to guarantees for military retirees wishing to reside
in that state. Speaking to reporters on 23 May, Hurd said the
Group of Seven should be interested in integrating Russia as a
member into its work. He said the cooperation agreement between
Russia and the EU will be an important step in bringing Russia
into the common market by boosting business contacts. Hurd pointed
out that the NATO Partnership for Peace program is a self-paced
one which offers an individual approach to every country. On
peacekeeping in the former USSR, Hurd said that Russia is within
its rights to carry out such operations in the former USSR as long
as these operations are requested by governments involved and
conducted in the spirit of UN and CSCE documents. On 23 May, Hurd
met with Yeltsin and gave him a letter from Queen Elizabeth II
accepting his invitation to make a state visit to Russia at some
point later this year, ITAR-TASS and Reuters reported.  Suzanne
Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUTSKOI'S PARTY HOLDS CONGRESS. The party of former Vice President
Aleksandr Rutskoi, the People's Party of Free Russia, transformed
itself at its second congress into the Russian Social-Democratic
People's Party, ITAR-TASS reported on 23 May. Rutskoi called for
the recreation of a Great Russia in the boundaries of the former
Soviet Union and urged the formation of a new opposition
"social-patriotic movement" directed to unite reform-minded
communists and nationalists. He stressed his aim to run for the
Russian presidency and attacked the present Kremlin leadership as
a "police regime." 149 delegates from 60 regional organizations
participated at the congress. Alexander Rahr, RFE/RL, Inc.

PRESIDENTIAL PACKAGE OF ECONOMIC MEASURES. On 23 May, Yeltsin
signed a package of six economic decrees, Russian agencies
reported. Five of the measures were aimed at stabilizing and
stimulating the economy, while the sixth established a fund to
finance road repairs and construction. Coverage was somewhat
conflicting but the five stimulation decrees, in order of their
listing by the president's economic adviser, appeared to provide
for: the scrapping of quotas and licenses for virtually all
exports, effective 1 July; the reduction of companies' tax burden
by 10-20 percent, and a conditional three-year tax holiday for
foreign investors; the partial restoration of state control over
enterprises that have not yet been privatized; a sequencing regime
for indebted enterprises; and measures to reduce tax evasion.
Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

INTRODUCTION OF BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS. After a prolonged debate
and preparatory period, it appears that concrete measures to
introduce bankruptcy proceedings are finally in sight. Deputy
Prime Minister Anatolii Chubais told a news conference on 20 May
that a government resolution has been drawn up establishing the
criteria for declaring an enterprise bankrupt, Interfax reported.
Under these criteria, more than half of Russia's industrial
enterprises would be classified as insolvent. However, according
to Chubais, only 5-6 percent of these would be liquidated, while
the remainder would be subject to reorganization, arbitration, or
change of management. An initial list of 1,150 insolvent
enterprises has been prepared. By 15 June, the government will
decide which of these will be declared bankrupt and which will be
subsidized.  Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA TO SIGN OECD ACCORD. The Russian Federation is scheduled to
sign an accord on technical cooperation with the Organization for
Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) at the end of its
annual ministerial meeting taking place on 7 and 8 June. The
accord establishes a formal framework for relations between Russia
and the 25-member OECD with the aim of extending contact and
broadening technical assistance. The agreement is similar to those
concluded between the organization and Hungary, Poland, the Czech
Republic, and Slovakia. The accord gives Russian government
officials observer status in OECD committees, AFP reported on 23
May.  Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN TO MEET CHECHEN PRESIDENT DUDAEV. The head of the
president's administration Sergei Filatov confirmed on 21 May that
Yeltsin would shortly meet Chechen president Dzhokhar Dudaev,
ITAR-TASS reported. Filatov told ITAR-TASS on 23 May that Yeltsin
had decided on this step out of concern for the "source of
heightened danger" that the situation in Chechnya represents both
for its own inhabitants and for the population of adjacent areas,
in particular Dagestan and Aatrakhan oblast. Filatov said that no
date had yet been fixed for the meeting. He also announced that a
new plenipotentiary representative would be appointed to conduct
bilateral talks with Chechnya. He confirmed that Sergei Shakhrai,
who had been nominated by Chernomyrdin to conduct the talks, had
been released from the post of Minister for Nationalities Affairs
and Regional Policy in part because of the need to improve
relations with Chechnya. Dudaev said he was ready to talk to
Yeltsin at any time, but the talks must be properly prepared.  Ann
Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIK REFUGEES RETURN. Despite continued friction along the
Afghan-Tajik border, considerable numbers of Tajik refugees are
returning from Afghanistan, ITAR-TASS and The Christian Science
Monitor of 19 May report. According to the head of the UN High
Commissioner for Refugees' (UNHRC) mission in Tajikistan, some
30,000 refugees have returned to southern Tajikistan, many to the
Kurgan-Tyube area, where some of the worst atrocities of the Tajik
civil war took place. Almost all of the returnees appear to be
women, children, and elderly men. The intense fighting between
ethnically Uzbek and Tajik militias in northern Afghanistan has
put refugees from Tajikistan in a difficult position; there have
been unconfirmed reports that Tajik refugee camps near Qunduz, in
northern Afghanistan, were bombed by the forces of Afghan general
Rafiq Dustam, an Uzbek.  Keith Martin, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALIEV HOLDS OUT AGAINST RUSSIAN PEACEKEEPERS. Some fifty people
were arrested in Baku on 21 May when police forcibly dispersed
would-be participants in a demonstration convened by opposition
parties to protest the proposed introduction of Russian or CIS
peacekeeping troops in the Karabakh conflict, Interfax and AFP
reported. In a televised address to refugees from Karabakh,
Azerbaijani president Heidar Aliev criticized the opposition's
actions and affirmed that he continues to consult with the CSCE
and the Russian leadership on a settlement to the conflict, and
that no Russian troops will be deployed in Azerbaijan, according
to Interfax. Meanwhile the Azerbaijani National Assembly is unable
to enact legislation since 15 deputies announced a boycott to
protest the signing of the Bishkek ceasefire protocol, making a
quorum impossible, ITAR-TASS reported.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

SHEVARDNADZE, OPPOSITION, CLASH OVER ABKHAZIA. On 18 May, Georgian
parliament deputies again called on the country's leadership to
disavow the agreement signed in Moscow on 14 May on a ceasefire in
Abkhazia and the disengagement of troops, Interfax reported on 19
May. Radical spokesman Irakli Tsereteli proposed a vote of no
confidence in parliament chairman Eduard Shevardnadze who, in his
weekly radio address on 23 May, defended his policy on Abkhazia as
"the most realistic solution." At a meeting in Moscow on 23 May it
was decided that Russian troops from the Group of Russian Forces
in the Transcaucasia will form the backbone of the 3,000
peacekeeping troops to be deployed in Abkhazia, according to
Interfax.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN CROAT, MUSLIM, SERB LEADERS MAY MEET IN FRANCE. On 24 May
international media report that leaders from the Bosnian Croat,
Muslim and Serb sides may meet in France within the next several
days in another attempt to bring an end to the fighting in Bosnia
and Herzegovina. Most recent efforts to establish peace hit a snag
when Serb forces reportedly failed to move militia from a
three-kilometer zone around Gorazde by 22 May, after agreeing to
do so on 21 May. Meanwhile, on 23 May Reuters reported that
Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic has categorically rejected a
51-49% split of Bosnia and Herzegovina, stating that his
government refuses to be a party to the surrender of its occupied
territories. Also on 23 May the Bosnian Serb news agency SRNA
reported that Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic has said his
objective is to negotiate a permanent cease-fire. This position
has been criticized by the Bosnian Muslim side, which advocates a
temporary cease-fire during which territorial disputes could be
resolved and which fears that a permanent cease-fire could have
the effect of allowing Serb forces to consolidate their grip over
the roughly 70% of Bosnia and Herzegovina they now control.  Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

SERBIAN OPPOSITION LEADERS MEET. On 23 May RFE/RL's South Slavic
Language Service reported that leaders from the four main
opposition parties in Serbia met, in part to discuss the
possibility of forging some common opposition strategy to the
governing Socialist Party of Serbia. On 24 May, both Borba and
Politika report that at a post-meeting press conference, attended
by ultranationalist Serbian Radical Party leader Vojislav Seselj
and DEPOS leader Vuk Draskovic, a consensus was established that
rump Yugoslav federal parliament speaker Radoman Bozovic ought to
be recalled and that the opposition parties would press for this.
Also attending the opposition meeting were representatives from
the Democratic Party (DS) and the Democratic Party of Serbia
(DSS); however, DS leader Zoran Djindjic and DSS leader Vojislav
Kostunica did not attend. Signs of an opposition rapprochement
were evident on 20 May, when Draskovic and Seselj, two long-time
political rivals, told a press conference they were prepared to
bury outstanding political differences in order to work to bring
down the governing Socialists. Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

SERBIAN PATRIARCH ENTHRONED; TUDJMAN ISSUES KRAJINA ULTIMATUM. In
other news from the former Yugoslavia, on 22 May Tanjug reported
that the Holy Synod of the Serbian Orthodox Church started its
annual meeting on 22 May in Kosovo by ceremonially enthroning
Patriarch Pavle. Also on the agenda was a closed-door discussion
on whether or not to approve a visit to Belgrade by Pope John
Paul. Meanwhile, on 21 May Croatian President Franjo Tudjman,
speaking on Croatian TV, issued what appeared to be an ultimatum
to Serbs in the breakaway republic of Krajina. Tudjman insisted
that all of Krajina be handed back to Zagreb within four months,
and restated that it was Zagreb's aim to reincorporate all its
occupied territories. Tudjman condemned what he dubbed Serb
efforts to integrate Krajina into a Greater Serbia. Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALBANIAN-MACEDONIAN TALKS. The Presidents of Albania and
Macedonia, Sali Berisha and Kiro Gligorov, met on 22 May in
Podgradec, Albania and Ohrid, Macedonia, both on their common
border. They said the discussions were useful. Among the issues
discussed were greater economic cooperation and dropping visa
requirements for nationals of both countries according to MILS and
AFP. Berisha urged the participation of Albanian political parties
in Macedonian government and hailed Skopje's decision to hold a
national census in June. For his part, Gligorov expressed the wish
to know the size of the Macedonian population in Albania.  Duncan
Perry, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLLS SHOW HUNGARIAN SOCIALISTS WITHIN REACH OF ABSOLUTE MAJORITY.
According to polls conducted by the Szonda Ipsos survey group and
published in Nepszabadsag of 20 May, the former reform communists,
the Hungarian Socialist Party, could win between 175 and 208 seats
after the second round of the national elections on 29 May. The
survey found that the HSP will most likely gain 193 seats in the
new parliament, which is half of the parliamentary seats. In the
first round of the elections on 8 May, the HSP took a third of the
votes for the regional party lists, won two individual districts,
and led in 158 of 174 others. The poll found that the liberal
opposition party the Alliance of Free Democrats, which placed
second on 8 May, will win between 67 and 86 seats, with 77 the
most probable total.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

NO FOUL PLAY IN HORN ACCIDENT. A communique issued by Hungarian
National Police Headquarters on 20 May stated that an
investigation of the preelection car accident of HSP chairman
Gyula Horn found no evidence of foul play, MTI reports. Horn
suffered a broken vertebra and severe concussion on 5 May when his
car crashed into a disabled truck. Police launched proceedings
against Horn's chauffeur for negligence.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL,
Inc.

SUDETEN GERMANS WANT "DIALOGUE" WITH CZECHS. High-ranking German
and Austrian politicians and spokespeople for various Sudeten
German organizations called for a dialogue between representatives
of the expelled Germans and Prague. At the annual Sudeten German
Congress in Nuremberg 21-23 May, German Interior Minister Manfred
Kanther stressed that Sudeten Germans should be allowed to
participate in solving Czech-German problems of the past, Lidove
noviny reported on 23 May. Bavarian Prime Minister Edmund Stoiber
and German Finance Minister Theo Waigel criticized the Prague
government for refusing to enter a "dialogue" with Sudeten Germans
and called for the abolition of the so-called Benes decrees on
which the expulsion of the estimated 3 million Germans from
Czechoslovakia and the confiscation of their property was based.
Austrian Foreign Minister Alois Mock, who was given the highest
Sudeten German award at the congress, again called on the Czech
government to "talk to elected representatives of the Sudeten
Germans." Mock again indirectly compared the expulsion with the
ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, although he was criticized for similar
statements by Czech officials last week.  Jan Obrman, RFE/RL, Inc.

REACTIONS TO SUDETEN GERMAN CONGRESS. Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus
said that the congress produced "nothing new" and did thus not
require a new political "counteroffensive" by the Czechs, Mlada
fronta reported on 24 May. Foreign Minister Josef Zieleniec
rejected all demands made during the meeting by German
politicians, saying that giving in to them would change the
results of World War II. According to Ladislav Spacek, the
President's spokesman, Vaclav Havel is opposed to abolishing the
"Benes decrees." Ivan Pilip, the chairman of the Christian
Democratic Party which belongs to the ruling coalition, said at a
press conference that he did not consider the invitation to attend
the congress a "provocation," as it had been termed by Klaus, but
as "an invitation to a dialogue," Rude pravo reported on 23 May.
Daniel Kroupa, the deputy chairman of the Civic Democratic
Alliance--another coalition member--complained that the ruling
coalition has failed to formulate a clear policy towards the
Sudeten Germans, Lidove noviny reported on 23 May. He said his
party favors the continuation of the dialogue between citizens,
but warned that talks on an official level would be "dangerous."
Jan Obrman, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK PARTIES GEAR UP FOR ELECTIONS. On 21 May the Democratic
Party and the Party of Entrepreneurs agreed to form a coalition
for the upcoming parliamentary elections, which will be held on 30
September and 1 October, TASR reported. On 23 May the DS-PE
offered a pre-election coalition to the Christian Democratic
Movement in an effort to unite non-leftist parties and to ensure
representation in the parliament. The CDM has offered parties of
the political right the opportunity to be included on the CDM
party list. On 23 May four parties of the political left,
including the Party of the Democratic Left, the Social Democratic
Party of Slovakia, the Slovak Farmers Movement and the Green Party
of Slovakia, signed a coalition agreement. Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL,
Inc.

SLOVAK DEFENSE DEVELOPMENTS. Slovak Defense Minister Pavol Kanis
and US Secretary of Defense William Perry signed a bilateral
agreement on defense and military cooperation on 20 May at the
Pentagon, TASR reported. The agreement entails exchanges of
military attaches and other defense leaders, assistance in reform
and modernization of the Slovak army and its transfer to civilian
control, as well as intensified cooperation within the Partnership
for Peace plan. US assistance in the conversion of Slovakia's
defense industry was also discussed. In other developments, on 21
May 300 Pakistani soldiers arrived in Slovakia to attend a
training session before taking part in the UN peace-keeping forces
in former Yugoslavia. Approximately 900 Pakistani soldiers are
expected in Slovakia before the end of June. Finally, on 22 May,
Lynn Davis, US Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and
International Security, arrived in Slovakia for a three-day visit.
On 23 May Davis met with Foreign Minister Eduard Kukan to discuss
Slovakia's upcoming elections and its participation in the
Partnership for Peace plan.  Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLAND DEBATES DEFENSE ORGANIZATION. At its inaugural meeting on
19 May, the Polish government's "committee on defense matters"
(KSORM) proposed maintaining the current constitutional
arrangement that subordinates the General Staff chief to the
defense minister, rather than putting the president directly in
charge of the military, PAP reports. (Clear civilian control over
the armed forces is viewed in Poland as a precondition for NATO
membership.) The committee also moved to set up a "crisis group"
to monitor threats to national security. Defense Minister Piotr
Kolodziejczyk said the concentration of Russian troops in the
Kaliningrad region is one of the biggest such threats. He told
reporters that Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev had pledged
to reduce forces there, with the eventual aim of stationing no
more than 25,000 soldiers. But Kolodziejczyk seemed skeptical that
this would actually happen. Kolodziejczyk said that Poland could
achieve Western military standards by 2010 if it devoted at least
3% of GDP per year to defense spending. Current spending is about
2.5%, Gazeta Wyborcza reports. He also noted that the Polish army
has no strategic reserves of fuel or foodstuffs. President Lech
Walesa told reporters on 19 May that he will continue to lobby for
direct presidential supervision of the army.  Louisa Vinton,
RFE/RL, Inc.

DELORS: POLAND IN EU BY 2000. European Commission Chairman Jacques
Delors made a three-day official visit to Poland on 19-21 May, PAP
reports. Delors told reporters that Poland could join the EU by
2000 but warned that membership entails risks, especially to an
economy still in transition. Speaking to parliamentarians, Delors
argued that "no one is closing doors" to Poland but admitted that
the European recession has slowed economic integration. President
Lech Walesa decorated Delors with the Polish national service
cross on 20 May.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLAND AGREES DEBT ARRANGEMENT WITH LONDON CLUB. Polish and London
Club negotiators have agreed on how the Polish debt reduction
agreement of 10 March is to be implemented, Polish negotiator
Krzysztof Krowacki told PAP on 23 May. The buy-back price was set
at 41 cents per dollar for the principal and unpaid interest, and
at 38 cents for revolving credits. The Polish side has also
proposed to the private creditor banks that part of the debt be
converted to shares in the Polish economy. The banks have until 29
June to decide whether to accept the proposed terms. Specific
agreements would be signed in September, enabling finalization of
the debt reduction procedure in October.  Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka,
RFE/RL, Inc.

BULGARIA HEADING FOR ELECTIONS DURING AUTUMN? Having failed to
gain sufficient parliamentary support for his planned government
reshuffle on 20 May, Prime Minister Lyuben Berov is reportedly
seeking to persuade the major political parties to agree on a date
for new elections in the autumn, but also to ensure that crucial
reform legislation is adopted in the coming weeks and months. On
23 May BTA quoted BSP and MRF leaders Jean Videnov and Ahmed Dogan
as saying that they have received a document in which Berov
proposes the signing of an agreement setting a date for early
general elections, establishing an interim government in which all
five parliamentary groups would have "observers," and committing
parties to help pass new legislation on bankruptcy, labor
relations and privatization. Videnov remarked that the document
serves to "eliminate old contradictions, though it creates new
problems." The idea of a political accord across party lines was
raised by President Zhelyu Zhelev on 20 May, in a statement
qualifying the political bickering around the reorganization of
Berov's cabinet as "a farce." Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALIA TRIAL OPENS; ALBANIAN GREEKS CHARGED. On 21 May former
Albanian President and Communist Party chief Ramiz Alia and nine
other previous top officials went on trial in Tirana, on several
counts of power abuse. Reuters reported that state prosecutor
Neshat Fana presented the court with several charges; that the
defendants while in office had upheld the 1967 ban on religion, a
shoot-to-kill order against people trying to cross the border, as
well as the practice of sending opponents into internal exile. He
also said they had misappropriated public funds. Alia, who ruled
the country between the death of his predecessor Enver Hoxha in
1985 and 1992, pleaded not guilty and said the accusations were
unclear. The trial was adjourned until 27 May. Meanwhile, Albanian
authorities have reportedly charged six Greeks and members of the
Omonia minority party with fomenting separatism, espionage and
illegal possession of weapons. Athens, which over past months
often has accused Albania of oppressing the rights of ethnic
Greeks, said on 21 May it has lodged protests with the UN, the EU
and the US.  Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIA AND THE WORLD BANK. The World Bank announced on 20 May
that it approved a $175 million loan to help Romania's fledgling
private sector, Western and Romanian media report. The program
will focus on boosting the private sector's share in industrial
production and exports. It will also help strengthen Romania's
banking system. On 21 May a WB delegation headed by Vice President
Wilfried Thalwitz arrived in Bucharest for talks on economic
reforms. Thalwitz, who was received by Romanian President Ion
Iliescu on the same day, praised the country's recent progress in
stabilizing its currency and cutting inflation. In a related
development, the WB staged on 22 May in Snagov a seminar on
accelerating Romania's privatization. The conference was attended
by members of Romania's cabinet and of organizations in charge
with privatizing the national economy, as well as by
representatives of international financial institutions.  Dan
Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVA TO BAN ROMANIAN FINANCING OF MOLDOVAN PAPERS. The chairman
of the Moldovan Parliament's Mass Media Commission, Valeriu Senic,
told Infotag on 20 May that the newly elected parliament is
preparing legislation to forbid foreign financing of newspapers
that oppose Moldovan statehood. The move targets Romanian
financing of such papers, Senic said. Official Bucharest has
recently acknowledged subsidizing several Moldovan political
weeklies and cultural periodicals. Moreover, Chisinau believes
that Bucharest also subsidizes the weeklies of Moldova's two main
opposition parties. All these publications promote Moldova's
merger with Romania.  Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

SIGNATURES COLLECTED FOR LITHUANIAN REFERENDUM. On 23 May
Gediminas Vagnorius, chairman of the board of the Homeland Union
(Conservatives of Lithuania), told a press conference that the
required 300,000 signatures had been gathered to hold a referendum
on unlawful privatization and compensation of people's savings,
BNS reports. He mentioned recent public opinion poll results
suggesting that 68.5% of the population disagree with the economic
and political policy of the present government and 72.5% of the
respondents oppose the privatization process and "property
division" carried out by the ruling Lithuanian Democratic Labor
Party. He called "groundless" the supposition that inflation would
soar if the people's savings were indexed and said that the
government would soon have to devalue the litas.  Saulius Girnius,
RFE/RL, Inc.

  [As of 1200 CET]
  Compiled by Saulius Girnius and Michael Shafir
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU.  This report is also
available by postal mail, as are the other publications of the
Institute, and by fax.  RFE/RL NEWS BRIEFS, an edited compendium
of items first published in the Daily Report, is distributed
along with the RFE/RL RESEARCH REPORT, a weekly journal
providing topical analyses of political, economic and security
developments throughout the Institute's area of interest.
Longer analyses are available in a monograph series, RFE/RL
STUDIES, and brief analytic summaries appear monthly in the
RESEARCH BULLETIN.

Requests for permission to reprint or retransmit this material
should be addressed to PD@RFERL.ORG and will generally be
granted on the condition that the material is clearly attributed
to the RFE/RL DAILY REPORT. Inquiries about specific news items
or subscriptions to RFE/RL publications should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

In North America:

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907
Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783
Internet: RI-DC@RFERL.ORG

Elsewhere:

Ms. Helga Hofer
Publications Department
RFE/RL Research Institute
Oettingenstrasse 67
80538 Munich
Germany
Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2624
Fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648
Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole