The salvation of mankind lies only in making everything the concern of all. - Alexander Solzhenitsyn
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 93, 17 May 1994

RUSSIA

KOZYREV OPTIMISTIC ABOUT SERBS. Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev
told reporters on 16 May that the response of the warring sides to
the results of the ministerial meeting on the Bosnian crisis held
13 May in Geneva was positive. Contacts with the Bosnian Muslim
side had shown that "considerable scope for work on a settlement
based on the adopted document emerged." As for the Bosnian Serb
side, Kozyrev claimed that "signals of a readiness to embark on
talks without preconditions are forthcoming." Unidentified
contacts at the Russian Foreign Ministry said another
ministerial-level meeting will be held on Bosnia after a map has
been drawn up, after which President Boris Yeltsin will push for a
summit on Bosnia, Russian media reported. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL,
Inc.

CHURKIN IN BELGRADE. Special envoy Vitalii Churkin met in Belgrade
on 16 May with Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic. Following
talks, Churkin told reporters that he had communicated the results
of the 13 May ministerial meeting in Geneva. He described the
Geneva document as one opening up "a real oppor-tunity" for the
completion of a political settlement of the crisis in Bosnia in
keeping with the interests of all sides. He also highlighted the
possibility of lifting the sanctions against rump Yugoslavia, a
move that the Russian State Duma supports. Despite the
disappointment Churkin had bitterly expressed with the Serbs only
recently, he voiced optimism that the Serbian side is ready to
immediately sign an agreement on ending hostilities in Bosnia,
Russian TV reported. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

MILITARY BUDGET A BLOW TO GRACHEV? Kommersant-Daily on 14 March
suggested that the State Duma's preliminary approval of a military
budget far lower than that requested by the Defense Ministry is
likely to undermine Defense Minister Pavel Grachev's authority
within the military bureaucracy. Noting that the Duma's decision
came while Grachev was abroad, the newspaper also claimed that
Defense Ministry representatives were attributing the "fiasco" to
Grachev's "strategic error" of failing to court the deputies, even
as he won public expressions of support for higher defense
spending from the President and Prime Minister. The newspaper also
suggested that Grachev had failed to take into account Yeltsin's
increasingly obvious efforts to avoid confrontation with the
parliament and the fact that Yeltsin's statements in favor of a
higher level of defense expenditures thus had little real
influence in the parliament.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

MILITARY BUDGET SAID TO IMPERIL STRATEGIC FORCES. ITAR-TASS on 16
May said defense officials continued to predict disaster if
defense spending is not increased. They claim that the
Duma-approved military budget would cover only 10% of the funding
needed by the nation's strategic nuclear forces and that it could
eventually deprive Russia of its strategic deterrent altogether.
The experts reportedly argued that under these conditions
discussion and ratification of the START-1 and START-2 Treaties
would be largely academic, because the reductions envisioned
therein would be exceeded "automatically." (This appeal seems
designed to exploit sentiment within the Duma against ratification
of the treaties). The same report quotes the head of the Defense
Ministry's main budget administration as saying that the funding
currently earmarked for the army would scarcely suffice to settle
debts for electricity, food, property services, and municipal
charges.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

PACIFIC FLEET COMMANDER DISMISSED. Only one year after his
appointment, the commander of Russia's Pacific Fleet, Admiral
Georgii Gurinov, has been relieved of his post, ITAR-TASS reported
on 17 May. The dismissal, which was attributed to a sharp
deterioration in the fleet's combat capabilities, also followed by
only days a huge blast at a Pacific Fleet arms depot that occurred
on 13 May. Gurinov was named to replace then Pacific Fleet
Commander Admiral Gennadii Khvatov on 1 April 1993, shortly after
an incident on the Far Eastern island of Russky that left four
navy conscripts dead of malnutrition. Initial reports of Gurinov's
character and performance were glowing, but the fleet's enduring
problems and, perhaps, Gurinov's own political inclinations, may
have done him in. As was the case when Khvatov was dismissed,
reports also suggested that Gurinov had health problems. Stephen
Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

SHAKHRAI DISMISSED AS NATIONALITIES MINISTER. The Presidential
Press Service confirmed on 16 May that Yeltsin had replaced Sergei
Shakhrai as Minister for Nationalities Affairs and Regional
Policy, ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported. Shakhrai remains a deputy
premier but it is reported that he may announce his resignation
from that position as well at a press conference on 17 May. It
would not be the first time that he had resigned from the
government. The parliamentary faction of Shakhrai's party is also
expected to discuss his situation. Shakhrai complained that he had
learnt of his coming dismissal from his ministerial post from the
press, and told Interfax that he did not think anyone understood
nationalities policy better than he did.  Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

SUGGESTED REASONS FOR DISMISSAL. Most commentators have suggested
that Shakhrai lost his miniterial post because he was an obstacle
to a Russian-Chechen agreement. He had set preconditions for such
an agreement, and Chechen President Dzhokhar had refused to
conduct talks with him. Dudaev's stance, however, seems to have
been based not only on antipathy to Shakhrai but also his
contention that as an independent state Chechnya should deal
either directly with the Russian president or at least through
Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Federation Council chairman
Vladimir Shumeiko, who is now expected to play a greater role as
regards talks with Chechnya, said on Russian TV on 16 May that an
agreement with Chechnya was vital to the solution of other
problems in the North Caucasus, and that Yeltsin should meet
Chechen president Dzhokhar Dudaev shortly. Dudaev is still
insisting that Russia recognized Chechnya's independence.  Ann
Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

NEW NATIONALITIES MINISTER. The new minister is Nikolai Egorov,
hitherto head of administration of Krasnodar krai, which borders
on the North Caucasus. Egorov, at 42 four years Shakhrai's senior
and like Shakhrai an ethnic Cossack, is credited with ruling
Krasnodar krai with a firm hand. He is probably the personal
choice of Yeltsin, who is said to have spent five hours talking to
him when he was recently in the area, whereas Shakhrai was lately
seen as one of Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin's men.  Ann
Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROSSEL REFUSES TO ABANDON IDEA OF URALS REPUBLIC. Eduard Rossel,
chairman of the Sverdlovsk oblast duma, said at a press conference
on 13 May that he had no intention of giving up the idea of
turning the oblast into the Urals republic, ITAR-TASS reported.
Rossel was earlier removed by Yeltsin as head of administration of
the oblast for pursuing this idea. Rossel said that he and the
oblast duma would act in favor of a territorial division of Russia
(i.e. for the abolition of ethnically-based republics). He also
said that they intended to use the "constitution of the Urals
Republic" as the basis for the oblast's charter. Under this
document the head of the oblast executive would be elected and not
appointed by the Russian president. Rossel added that the oblast
duma would shortly adopt a law on the local budget, something that
had not been done anywhere else up to now.  Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL,
Inc.

INDUSTRIAL SLUMP ACCELERATES. The State Statistical Committee
(Roskomstat) says industrial production in January-April 1994 was
25.4 percent lower than the same period in 1993, Interfax reported
on 16 May. [It was not immediately clear whether the drop referred
to the four-month period or to the month of April]. This followed
declines of 23.1, 24.1, and 24.9 percent respectively for the
first three months of 1994. Output in the machine-building branch
was down by 45 percent; the consumer goods industry produced 39
percent less; and the production of tractors, cars, and trucks was
down by 80, 28, and 66 percent respectively. The deepening slump
provoked renewed calls for an economic state of emergency. Arkady
Volsky, the president of the Union of Industrialists and
Entrepreneurs, announced that about 5,000 enterprises had been
closed or were on the verge of closure, and urged the "regulation
of the transition to a free market." Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

GRAIN IMPORTS IN 1994. The head of the Federal Agricultural
Monitoring Center reckons that a total of 7 million tons of grain
may be imported in 1994. Andrei Sizov was quoted by The Journal of
Commerce of 16 May as basing this on the latest projection of the
domestic grain harvest at around 88-89 million tons. Earlier
assertions by Yeltsin, Deputy Prime Minister Zaveryukha, and
others that Russia would be largely self-sufficient in grain this
year were predicated on an anticipated domestic harvest of some 94
million tons. Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

KARABAKH CEASEFIRE AGREEMENT SIGNED. At a meeting in Moscow on 16
May under the chairmanship of Russian Defense Minister Pavel
Grachev, apparently designed to exclude the CSCE Minsk group from
the Karabakh mediation process, the Defense Ministers of Armenia
and Azerbaijan and the head of the armed forces of the
self-proclaimed Nagorno-Karabakh Republic signed an agreement on a
ceasefire in the Karabakh conflict, beginning at midnight on 16
May, to be followed by the disengagement of the warring sides to a
distance of 5-10 km. This is to be followed by the deployment
beginning on 24 May of observers from Russia, the CIS, and the
conflicting sides, at 49 posts in the resulting buffer zone,
safeguarded by some 1,800 CIS troops, primarily Russians, under
the command of Russian First Deputy Defense Minister Georgii
Kondratev, according to Interfax. The costs of the peacekeeping
operation are to be shared equally between Armenia, Azerbaijan,
and Nagorno-Karabakh, according to ITAR-TASS. The Armenian Foreign
Ministry welcomed the agreement; the Los Angeles Times of 17 May
quoted a Russian expert as describing it as "an extraordinary
achievement."A similar ceasefire agreement, albeit without the
deployment of observers and peacekeeping forces, was brokered by
Grachev in February, but never went into effect.  Liz Fuller,
RFE/RL, Inc.

PRIVATIZATION IN TURKMENISTAN. Turkmenistan's President Saparmurad
Niyazov has signed a series of resolutions which will launch the
privatization of retail trade and industrial enterprises on 1
June, Russian agencies reported on 14 and 16 May. Enterprises with
less than 100 employees are to be sold to the employees or
auctioned off to citizens of Turkmenistan or foreigners. Money
obtained from the sales is to be transferred to the country's
budget. Larger enterprises are to become joint stock companies,
with the government retaining a controlling number of shares.
Turkmenistan has lagged significantly behind other Central Asian
states in beginning privatization on even a limited scale.  Bess
Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

ALL NUCLEAR WARHEADS OUT OF UKRAINE IN 3-4 YEARS. Ukrainian
Defense Minister Vitalii Radetsky told reporters that all nuclear
warheads will be withdrawn from Ukraine in three to four years,
Interfax reported on 16 May. There had been no official
confirmation of a withdrawal timetable previously, but unofficial
sources indicated that a two-year schedule had been agreed upon.
Radetsky confirmed that the current pace of withdrawal of
approximately 60 warheads per month would be maintained, a pace
which is consistent with his timetable.  John Lepingwell, RFE/RL,
Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

FIGHTING GOES ON AROUND BOSNIA. On 16 May RFE/RL's Balkan Service
reported that "increasingly intense fighting" is taking place
around Tuzla and elsewhere. UN observers listed Bihac, Gorazde,
Jablanica, and Mostar as scenes of the action, and a particular
struggle seems to be under way for a Serb communications relay
station on Mt. Majevica. Reuters noted that Muslim forces have
been massing in the vicinity of Turbe, near Travnik in central
Bosnia, and that the UN is concerned about a similar build-up on
Mt. Igman, near Sarajevo. In Brussels, EU foreign ministers met
and approved the new international Bosnian package agreed upon in
Geneva on 13 May, but the 16 May Neues Deutschland suggests that
the intensification of the fighting is the Serbs' and Muslims' own
answer to the Geneva agreement.  Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

MILOSEVIC MEETS CHURKIN, PATRIARCH ALEXEI. On 16 May Radio
Belgrade reported that Serbian President Milosevic met in Belgrade
with Russia's special envoy to the former Yugoslavia Churkin.
Discussions centered around the war in Bosnia, with Churkin
stressing that it was important for all sides in the Bosnian
conflict to begin implementing the latest Geneva agreement. On 17
May Borba reports that Churkin and Milosevic also discussed the
likelihood of international sanctions against rump Yugoslavia
being lifted. On 17 May Politika reported that Milosevic also met
with Russian Orthodox Patriarch Alexei II, who used the occasion
to draw attention to the historical and cultural bonds uniting
Russia and Serbia.  Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

GREECE, MACEDONIA VIOLATE UN EMBARGO ON SERBIA? According to UN
sources cited by the 16 May Washington Post, on 21 April some
8,350 tons of oil and 400 tons of ammonium nitrate were shipped
from Greece across Macedonia into Serbia, in violation of the UN
trade embargo against the former Yugoslavia. Evidently not an
isolated phenomenon, UN observers report that for the two week
period ending on 7 May, 167 oil tank cars crossed Macedonia and
entered Serbia. UN personnel, while not permitted to inspect the
contents of the rolling stock, said "we have good reason to think
(the rail cars) didn't contain milk or water." UN sources also
suspect what they termed "high-level collusion" among officials in
Greece, Macedonia, and the former Yugoslavia.  Duncan Perry,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SMUGGLING FROM ALBANIA TO MONTENEGRO CONTINUES. Albanian police
have detained 13 people who tried to smuggle oil to Montenegro via
Lake Shkodra, Gazeta Shqiptare reported on 13 May. After the
financial police discovered six road-tankers returning empty from
the Montenegrin border, they arrested the border guard at the
Miriqani crossing and the drivers of the road-tankers. The trucks
reportedly came from the Albanian-Italian oil company AIP. Two
other trucks crossed the Yugoslav-Albanian border in Pulaj and six
Albanian border guards were charged with letting the tankers
through. Gazeta Shqiptare alleges that AIP delivers 80-90 percent
of its oil to Shkodra near the Montenegrin border, and that
smuggling makes up "a good part of the activities of AIP."
Meanwhile in Durres police blocked a ship loaded with 3,300 tons
of sugar, which they suspected was bound for Montenegro.  Fabian
Schmidt, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK PREMIER VISITS FRANCE. Jozef Moravcik arrived in France on
15 May for a two-day visit, TASR reported. Talks with his French
counterpart Edouard Balladur on 16 May centered on possibilities
for economic cooperation and Slovakia's integration into European
structures. Moravcik also met with the general secretary of the
OECD, Jean Claude Paye, to discuss Slovakia's membership in that
group. Meeting with French business leaders, Moravcik attempted to
calm fears that Slovak policies are ambiguous, encouraging their
participation in Slovakia's next round of privatization. The visit
will conclude on 17 May.  Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

KOVAC IN AUSTRIA. On 16 May Slovak President Michal Kovac began an
official two-day visit to Austria After a welcoming ceremony in
Vienna, Kovac delivered a speech to more than 200 members of
Austria's business community, urging foreign investment in
Slovakia. Kovac noted that Slovakia has the lowest wages of the
four Visegrad countries and also offers tax breaks to foreign
investors. Austrian President Thomas Klestil expressed his
country's support for Slovak reforms, noting that 30% of foreign
investment in Slovakia comes from Austria. Austrian Chancellor
Franz Vranitzky reiterated his country's reservations about the
operation of nuclear power plants. Kovac said a nuclear-free
Central Europe is Slovakia's long-term goal. Sharon Fisher,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ZHIRINOVSKY TO VISIT SLOVAKIA? Vladimir Zhirinovsky, chairman of
the Russian Liberal Democratic Party, is planning a two-day
private visit to Slovakia, beginning on 21 May, TASR reports. He
was invited by businessman Ladislav Mojzis and by Jozef Lauko, who
had attended the LDP party congress in April. A spokesman for
Zhirinovsky's party told CTK that the trip might be canceled if
the position of Slovak authorities is strongly negative. Russian
citizens do not need a visa to enter Slovakia.  Sharon Fisher,
RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECH DEFENSE MINISTER ON VISEGRAD, RUSSIA. On 16 May, speaking at
a seminar in Prague on Security in Central Europe, Czech Defense
Minister Antonin Baudys said that Russia's efforts to gain special
status in relations with NATO must be respected. At the same time
Baudys argued that the Partnership for Peace project must be based
on equality of all participants, implying that Russia's special
status should not apply to the project. Baudys stressed that
Russia is still a superpower that "has always been an important
factor in [maintaining] the Eurasian balance of power." Baudys
said "it is in the interest of entire Europe that Russia continue
playing this role." The Czech defense minister further said that
the so-called Visegrad group (Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, and the
Czech Republic) should not be seen as "a political tool" for
putting pressure on NATO. Baudys said the Visegrad group also
cannot play the role of preparing its members for NATO membership.
Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACTIVISTS CRITICIZE PAWLAK. Michal Kulesza, the
Polish official responsible for local government reform, resigned
on 16 May, PAP reports. Appointed in 1992 by Prime Minister Hanna
Suchocka, Kulesza was one of the few officials from the Solidarity
governments who was not removed after the 1993 elections. Speaking
at the Second Local Government Congress in Poznan on 15 May,
Kulesza accused the current government of blocking the
decentralizing reforms embarked upon in 1989. Kulesza charged the
two-party coalition with attempting to rebuild the nomenklatura.
Kulesza's charges were echoed by local government activists
present at the congress, who shouted down a representative from
the public administration ministry. On the same day, Prime
Minister Waldemar Pawlak attended an "alternative" local
government congress staged in Warsaw by his own Polish Peasant
Party. Deputies at the Poznan gathering criticized Pawlak for
attempting to divide the local government movement on strictly
political lines.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

COUNCIL OF EUROPE DEBATES RUSSIA IN WARSAW. The Council of
Europe's Parliamentary Assembly opened its three-day "spring
meeting" in Warsaw on 16 May. The assembly's political commission
agreed Russian membership is unlikely in 1994; it stressed that
standards cannot be lowered simply to admit Russia to the Council
of Europe. Polish Sejm Speaker Jozef Oleksy said that Poland is
inclined to support Russian membership, Polish TV reports.
Assembly Chairman Miguel Martinez met with President Lech Walesa
and told reporters that Poland should be "an engine of European
integration." The two largest Polish opposition parties, the Union
of Freedom (UW) and the Confederation for an Independent Poland
(KPN), announced on 16 May that they will resume participation in
the Council of Europe. The two parties had withdrawn in protest,
after a former communist, Tadeusz Iwinski, was elected chairman of
the Polish delegation.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

CONTROVERSY AROUND HUNGARIAN PARTY LEADER'S CAR ACCIDENT. In
reference to an earlier statement by Socialist Party chairman
Gyula Horn implying that the car accident Horn suffered in early
May may not have been fortuitous, Interior Minister Imre Konya
said on 16 May that the police had no information supporting this
hypothesis; should Horn have any additional evidence, he should
give it to the police, Konya added. In a 16 April press statement,
the HSP termed Konya's statement "inadmissible" and asked him not
to engage in "public speculations" about the accident but let the
police provide detailed information about the circumstances of the
car crash, MTI reports.  Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL, Inc.

BULGARIAN UNION PREPARES FOR GENERAL STRIKE. On 16 May leaders of
the Confederation of Trade Unions in Bulgaria reaffirmed threats
of a general strike, of which the first wave has been scheduled
for 18 through 20 May. BTA reports that most public transport
employees in Plovdiv, Bulgaria's second city, participated on 17
May in a two-hour warning strike which caused major traffic
disruptions. Meanwhile in Sofia, CITUB negotiators are continuing
talks with government representatives and have promised to submit
a package of minimum demands before the general strike breaks out.
CITUB leader Krastyu Petkov nevertheless seemed skeptical that
progress could be made, saying that the cabinet has not yet made a
counter-proposal regarding key questions such as compensation for
the devaluation of wages and savings, adjustments in the
government concept for privatizing state companies, and protection
of Bulgarian businesses against cheap foreign imports. Kjell
Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

COUNCIL OF EUROPE POSTPONES DISCUSSING ROMANIA. The Political
Affairs Committee of the Council of Europe postponed debates on a
report on Romania's adjustment to European standards and values,
Radio Bucharest reported on 16 May. The report, prepared by
Friedrich Koenig and Gunnar Jansson, was scheduled to be presented
during a Council of Europe General Assembly's meeting in Warsaw
this week. Its discussion will now take place in Sofia on 7 June.
According to a Danish deputy quoted by Radio Bucharest, the report
includes several "very serious charges" at Romania's address.
Romanian Senator Florin Radulescu-Botica spoke instead of "a
series of erroneous information and judgments without coverage,"
and expressed "surprise" at the decision to delay the debates.
Romania was admitted as a full member to the Council of Europe in
October 1993 under the condition that Bucharest's compliance with
its European obligations would continue to be closely monitored in
the future.  Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIA MORE ACTIVE IN MOLDOVA, NORTH BUKOVINA. Adrian Nastase,
chairman of Romania's Chamber of Deputies and executive chairman
of the ruling Party of Social Democracy in Romania, conferred on
13 May in Bucharest with Iurie Rosca, head of Moldova's opposition
Popular Front which calls for unification with Romania. Nastase
told Radio Bucharest and Romanian TV that the talks dealt in part
with Romanian support for certain Moldovan newspapers. Following
Moldova's recent legislative elections, which the Popular Front
lost heavily, the Romanian government announced that it would
subsidize several pro-Romanian newspapers in Chisinau. The
governmental Romanian Cultural Foundation for its part launched on
14 May at a ceremony in Bucharest the first issue of Glasul
Bucovinei, a periodical edited by pro-Romanian activists in
Ukraine's Chernovtsy oblast, Basapress reported from Bucharest.
The Foundation reportedly also supports the newspaper Plai
romanesc, edited by the same group in Chernovtsy and currently
threatened with closure on charges of undermining Ukraine's
territorial integrity.  Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN REFORMS PRAISED BY IMF. In a press release on 13 May,
cited by Basapress, the International Monetary Fund's mission in
Chisinau pointed out that Moldova's monetary, financial, and
credit policies have sharply reduced the inflation rate and are
stabilizing the national currency. "The [Moldovan] government's
and National Bank's reform program is beginning to show results .
. . [Foreign] investor interest in Moldova's economy is growing,"
the release noted, pledging continued financial support for
Moldova's reforms by the IMF and the World Bank. Moldovan National
Bank officials told the domestic media on 13 May that Moldova has
"permanently renounced such practices as preferential credits or
supplementary currency emissions" and that it will continue
implementing the stipulations of the October 1993 Memorandum
signed by Andrei Sangheli's government with the IMF, as "the
reforms, including monetary policies, are our only chance."
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

INCIDENT BETWEEN ARMED FORCES IN CRIMEA. On 15 May there was a
minor incident involving militia from the ministry of defense of
the Republic of Crimea and servicemen from the Ukrainian National
Guard in Simferopol. As a result of the conflict the national
guardsmen were arrested by the Crimean militia. Both
representatives of the Ukrainian National Guard and the Crimean
defense ministry have said that the incident was the fault of the
national guards, Ukrainian radio reported on 16 May.  Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUSIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES. On 15 May the campaign to
collect signatures in support of candidates for the presidency
ended in Belarus. The official results should be released by the
end of the week. So far it has been reported that six candidates
have succeeded in collecting the required 100,000 signatures of
voters or 70 signatures of deputies. These are: Prime Minister
Vyacheslau Kebich; the head of the former parliamentary
anti-corruption commission, Aleksandr Lukashenka; the leader of
the Belarusian Popular Front, Zyanon Paznyak; the head of the
Party of Communists of Belarus, Vasil Novikau; the former chairman
of the Supreme Soviet, Stanislau Shushkevich; the leader of the
Popular Accord Party, Henadz Karpenka; and the head of the
Belarusian Agrarian Union, Aleksandr Dubko, Interfax reported on
16 May. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES. On 16 May Interfax reported
that the Ukrainian Central Electoral Commission is to register
presidential candidates on May 17. Seven candidates will
reportedly be submitting the signatures they collected for
approval. These are: President Leonid Kravchuk; the former speaker
of parliament Ivan Plyushch; former prime minister, Leonid Kuchma;
minister of education, Petro Talanchuk; the leader of the
Socialist Party, Oleksandr Moroz; the head of the market reform
center, Volodymyr Lanovy; and the head of the Ukrainian financial
group, Valerii Babych.  Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

SHMAROV ON CHORNOBYL CLOSURE. Ukrainian deputy prime minister
Valerii Shmarov told a press conference that it would take 10
years to close the Chornobyl nuclear power station and cost $6-8
billion, ITAR-TASS reported on 16 May. A final decision on the
plant's closure will be taken this summer. Ukraine has come under
international pressure to close the power station after parliament
decided not to shut it down after 1993, and to keep the plant
running because of the energy crisis in the country.  Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIAN NAVY TO LEAVE LATVIA BY 1 JUNE? On 12 May Russian
ambassador Aleksandr Rannikh presented to Latvian Premier Valdis
Birkavs a more detailed schedule of the withdrawal of Russian
military forces from Latvia. Under that schedule Russia intends to
withdraw all its military ships from the Latvian ports of Liepaja
and Ventspils by 1 June and the remaining forces by 31 August. The
schedule also indicates that there are 14 more Russian military
units in Latvia than were listed in the previous withdrawal
schedule which had been produced by Russia on 30 April; Latvian
officials had complained that the first schedule had listed only a
part of the Russian forces in Latvia. An even more detailed
schedule is to be provided by 1 June, LETA reported on 13 and 16
May.  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

LITHUANIAN PREMIER: SLOW DEVELOPMENT OF RELATIONS WITH RUSSIA.
Prime Minister Adolfas Slezevicius told the press in Vilnius on 12
May that there is too little improvement in relations with Russia,
Interfax reported. He criticized Russia for sending to joint
Lithuanian-Russian meetings too few representatives or
representatives that had insufficient decision-making authority.
He complained that the Lithuanian-Russian accord of 1993 on
granting each other the most-favored-nation trading status has
still not been implemented and of the very high tariffs that
Russia has set recently on Baltic goods. Slezevicius renewed his
call for a dialogue to be carried out at the level of heads of
government. Other Lithuanian officials have expressed
dissatisfaction over Russia's delays in settling issues related to
Russian military transports to and from Kaliningrad via Lithuania.
Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

  [As of 1200 CET]
  Compiled by Vladimir Socor and Michael Shafir
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU.  This report is also
available by postal mail, as are the other publications of the
Institute, and by fax.  RFE/RL NEWS BRIEFS, an edited compendium
of items first published in the Daily Report, is distributed
along with the RFE/RL RESEARCH REPORT, a weekly journal
providing topical analyses of political, economic and security
developments throughout the Institute's area of interest.
Longer analyses are available in a monograph series, RFE/RL
STUDIES, and brief analytic summaries appear monthly in the
RESEARCH BULLETIN.

Requests for permission to reprint or retransmit this material
should be addressed to PD@RFERL.ORG and will generally be
granted on the condition that the material is clearly attributed
to the RFE/RL DAILY REPORT. Inquiries about specific news items
or subscriptions to RFE/RL publications should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

In North America:

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907
Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783
Internet: RI-DC@RFERL.ORG

Elsewhere:

Ms. Helga Hofer
Publications Department
RFE/RL Research Institute
Oettingenstrasse 67
80538 Munich
Germany
Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2624
Fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648
Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole