Miracles are natural. When they do not occur, something has gone wrong. - A Course in Miracles
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 86, 5 May 1994

                              RUSSIA

DEFENSE INDUSTRY WORKERS STEP UP PRESSURE ON GOVERNMENT. A
spokesman for the trade unions representing workers in the defense
industries told Interfax on 4 May that "most of the industry's
workforce" had to go on forced leave starting on 1 May. Stoppages
were said to be widespread in the Vladimir, Nizhny Novgorod, and
Samara regions. The defense workers are now in a "pre-strike"
mode, and are demanding, inter alia, the payment of government
arrears to the industry, the resolution of the nonpayments crisis,
and tax cuts. Representatives of the "pre-strikers" have asked to
meet with First Deputy Prime Minister Oleg Soskovets, who is known
to favor more government support for the military-industrial
complex.  Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

INFLATION RATE UP IN APRIL. The inflation rate rose by one
percentage point, to 9.7 percent, in April, Interfax and Reuters
reported on 4 May. The monthly rates for the months of January
through April, according to the government's statistical committee
Roskomstat, have been 22.0, 9.0, 8.7, and 9.7 percent
respectively. The official data on inflation have been criticized
as understatements, in that they do not fully capture changes in
the prices of goods and services supplied by the private sector,
but the amount of distortion is fairly constant, and the important
feature is the trend. Many observers agree with economist Grigorii
Yavlinsky's oft-repeated prognosis that inflation will edge up
over the next few months then explode in late summer.  Keith Bush,
RFE/RL, Inc.

GAS SUPPLY TO REGIONS THREATENED. The state gas monopoly concern
Gazprom threatened to suspend the supply of gas to 13 republics,
regions, and territories between 4 and 9 May, Interfax reported on
4 May. The regions concerned were said to be 3 billion rubles in
arrears with payments for past supplies of gas (the figure is
probably 3 trillion rubles).  Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

SIGNING OF CIVIC ACCORD TO CONTINUE ON 5 MAY. ITAR-TASS of 4 May
quoted the president's chief of staff Sergei Filatov as saying
that the process of adding signatories to the Civic Accord is
expected to continue. According to Filatov, about 200 Russian
bankers and industrialists will add their names to the document on
5 May.  Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

TRIAL OF AUGUST 1991 COUP ORGANIZERS TO BE RESUMED? General
Valentin Varennikov, one of the defendants in the August 1991 coup
trial, has rejected the amnesty granted by the State Duma earlier
this year. This means that the August 1991 coup trial may be
resumed. Interfax and an RFE/RL correspondent in Moscow reported
Varennikov's move on 4 May and quoted the general as saying that
he expects the military collegium to pronounce its judgment on
those responsible for the collapse of the USSR--namely, former
USSR President Mikhail Gorbachev and his associates, Eduard
Shevardnadze and Aleksandr Yakovlev.  Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL,
Inc.

KOZYREV, CHRISTOPHER MEET. Following the signing ceremony for the
Gaza-Jericho agreement, Andrei Kozyrev and his US counterpart
Warren Christopher met to discuss the situation in Bosnia. They
called for an immediate cessation of hostilities in the region and
said that a ministerial meeting--an event for which Russia has
been campaigning--might be held in Geneva on 13 May, ITAR-TASS
reported. Meanwhile, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister and special
envoy Vitalii Churkin was quoted by Interfax on 4 May as saying
that the Bosnian situation remains complex but shows signs of
stabilizing. Churkin rejected attempts to oversimplify the
conflict and said a scheme, according to which the Bosnian Moslems
provoke the Bosnian Serbs to improper retaliatory actions, "exists
only in the Russian press. In fact, the situation is far more
complex. In this confrontation of nerves, someone somewhere acts,
another one retaliates, and it starts going." Suzanne Crow,
RFE/RL, Inc.

THIRD INTERNATIONAL PEACE CONFERENCE? On 4 May, the Russian
newspaper Rossiskiye vesti published a statement written by Andrei
Kozyrev calling for the convening of a third International Peace
Conference in The Hague. Kozyrev pointed out that the centenary of
the first such conference, held at Russia's initiative in 1899,
was approaching. He also noted that the second such conference,
held in 1907, was also a Russian initiative. On the achievements
of the two previous meetings, Kozyrev said that they had made a
"great beginning . . . determining the main direction of the
development of international life in the 20th century--the desire
for peace and the establishment of the foundations of philanthropy
and justice." Kozyrev said the purpose of holding another meeting
would be to strengthen international peace and assert the
principles of international law as the third millennium
approaches.  Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

KOLESNIKOV ON FAR EAST SPACEPORT. The Chief of the Russian General
Staff, Mikhail Kolesnikov, has confirmed that Russia will conduct
a space launch from the Svobodniy-18 former missile base in 1996.
According to an Interfax report of 4 May, Kolesnikov claimed that
the launch would not require extra funding for the site, but also
acknowledged that Baikonur was still necessary for the Russian
space program. He did not indicate what sort of launch would be
carried out, but presumably it would be a military payload
launched by the military space forces.  John Lepingwell, RFE/RL,
Inc.

RUSSIA TO UPGRADE INDIA'S MIG-21'S. Ending what was described by
AFP on 5 May as a fierce competition between Russia's MiG (Mikoyan
Design Bureau), France's Dassault Electronique, and two Israeli
concerns, New Delhi has awarded MiG a contract estimated to be
worth hundreds of millions of dollars to modernize India's large
but aging fleet of MiG-21 fighter planes. MiG will reportedly
upgrade the airframes of the 170 MiG-21's to make them capable of
carrying the latest weapons systems, and will incorporate modern
avionics and navigational systems. The contract is a major victory
for Russia's struggling defense sector which, prior to the Soviet
Union's collapse, had been India's major supplier of military
hardware. Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

US PROPOSES FISSILE MATERIAL INVENTORY. The New York Times and The
Washington Post reported on 5 May that the Clinton administration
has proposed a new program calling for the US and Russia to
declare their fissile material inventories. The program would go
well beyond current agreements on limited inspections of nuclear
storage sites. A US Defense Department delegation is currently in
Moscow for wide-ranging talks, and The New York Times reports that
delegations from the White House Office of Science and Technology
Policy and the State Department will soon visit Moscow to conduct
negotiations on the proposal.  John Lepingwell, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

AZERBAIJAN JOINS PARTNERSHIP FOR PEACE. On 4 May Azerbaijan became
the fifteenth former East bloc country to join NATO's Partnership
for Peace, Western agencies and ITAR-TASS reported. Speaking at
the signing ceremony in Brussels, Azerbaijan's President Heidar
Aliev affirmed his country's commitment to democracy and expressed
the hope that closer cooperation with NATO could expedite a
diplomatic solution to the ongoing Karabakh conflict.  Liz Fuller,
RFE/RL, Inc.

CIS INTER-PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY MEDIATES KARABAKH TALKS. The
chairman of the Armenian parliament, the deputy chairman of the
Azerbaijani parliament, and the speaker of the Supreme Soviet of
the self-proclaimed Nagorno-Karabakh Republic met in Bishkek on 4
May for three days' talks convened by the CIS Inter-Parliamentary
Assembly, Interfax reported. Although characterized as "tense and
difficult" the talks made some progress towards drafting a
non-binding protocol appealing to CIS heads of states to provide
peacekeeping forces to monitor a ceasefire should it prove
possible to reach agreement on a ceasefire beginning 9 May. Such
an agreement is, however, dubious given a renewed attack by
Armenian forces north-east of Nagorno-Karabakh which observers
believe is aimed at gaining control of the strategic Agdam-Barda
road, according to Interfax.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

KAZAKHSTAN'S MILITARY TIES WITH RUSSIA. Kazakhstan's Minister of
Defense Sagadat Nurmagambetov told a press conference on 4 May
that military cooperation with Russia is the cornerstone of
Kazakhstan's strategic policy and he foresees an increasingly
close association between the military establishments of the two
countries, Interfax reported. The press conference was held in
connection with the second anniversary of the creation of
Kazakhstan's own army. According to Nurmagambetov, Kazakhstan and
Russia are working on an agreement governing use of the
anti-ballistic missile and air defense testing range at
Sary-Shagan. In exchange Kazakhstani military specialists are to
receive training in Russia. The minister said that strategic
forces stationed in Kazakhstan are to be withdrawn by 2000.  Bess
Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

REPORT ON TURKMENISTAN'S MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT. Pakistan's
General Staff has offered the Turkmenistan military training in
its war colleges, but Turkmen authorities prefer to continue their
country's military association with Russia, Russian TV reported on
4 May. Russian officers on contract command the Turkmen armed
forces, in which the language of command is still Russian.
Turkmenistan has set up its own military institute, but Turkmen
officers continue to be trained in Russia. The TV report noted
that the traditional Soviet "Red Room" has been replaced in
Turkmen barracks by an "Independence Room" adorned with a portrait
of Turkmen President Saparmurad Niyazov, who has become the center
of a Stalinist-style personality cult.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

UKRAINE PROTESTS PLANNED BLACK SEA FLEET EXERCISES. The Ukrainian
defense ministry issued a statement protesting the alleged planned
takeover of over 20 TU-22M Backfire aircraft by Russia in upcoming
Black Sea Fleet military exercises, Ukrainian radio reported on 4
May. According to the defense ministry, Russia planned to have the
planes, which belong to the naval aviation arm of the Black Sea
Fleet, fly out of their air bases at Oktyabrskoye and Vesoloye in
Crimea to the Russian air base at Krymsk in Krasnodar krai. The
press service of the Ukrainian defense ministry said that any
attempt to transfer military technology or other Black Sea Fleet
assets outside Ukraine would be regarded as illegal acts by
Ukraine and would worsen the problem of dividing the fleet.
Interfax reported that Andrei Grachev, head of the Black Sea Fleet
press center, denied that there was any truth to the allegation.
According to Grachev the charge was a "figment of the imagination"
of the Ukrainian defense ministry.  Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

CIS COMMAND SUGGESTS CHANGES IN NATO PARTNERSHIP. The CIS military
command intends to propose to NATO leaders that the Partnership
for Peace plan be amended to include cooperation between NATO and
the CIS as two defense alliances, according to Lieutenant General
Leonid Ivashov, secretary of the CIS Council of Defense Ministers.
Ivashov and other CIS military leaders recently returned from
Brussels, where they met with NATO leaders on Bosnia and the
partnership program. ITAR-TASS quoted Ivashov as saying that
during the discussions the CIS delegation expressed concern over
the fact that, in its view, the current NATO partnership program
fails to provide guarantees of security to all the CIS states and
that it resolves only a small portion of the security problems
facing the CIS, especially peacemaking operations in the other
former Soviet republics. Ivashov's remarks suggest that Moscow
continues to try to win official international sanction for
maintaining its dominant security role on the territory of the
former Soviet Union.  Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

UN OBSERVERS ARRIVE NEAR BRCKO. Reuters reported on 4 May that
seven UN observers took up their posts on the Croatian side of the
Sava River across from Brcko. The UN plans to send three teams of
four each to the Serb lines soon, but there is no firm arrangement
for detailing men to the Muslim side. The agency notes that "Brcko
anchors a narrow corridor linking Serb-held lands in Bosnia and
Croatia with Serbia, the Bosnian Serbs' paymaster and supplier."
Politika on 5 May says that the previous day was fairly quiet
around Brcko, Gradacac, and Orasje. Elsewhere, British Foreign
Office Minister Douglas Hogg met Serbian President Slobodan
Milosevic and Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic in Belgrade and
told them that the Serbs could hold a maximum of 49% of Bosnian
territory, RFE/RL's Balkan Service reported. They now control over
70%, but Hogg did not specify how the Serbs would be dislodged if
they did not go peacefully. Meanwhile in Sarajevo, aid flights
were cancelled after two aircraft, one of which carried the German
ambassador, were the targets of small arms fire of unknown origin.
Finally, Hina reports on 5 May that Bosnian Croat and Muslim
representatives will meet in Vienna in the next few days to draft
documents to put the Washington agreements on a federation between
them into practice.  Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

SERBS CONTINUE ETHNIC CLEANSING OF THE BANJA LUKA AREA. RFE/RL's
Balkan Service said on 4 May that a group of 469 Muslims and
Croats arrived in Croatia from the northwest Bosnian Serb
stronghold of Banja Luka, making a total of 2,400 to flee from
there since January. UN refugee spokesman Peter Kessler talked
about the continuing attacks on and harassment of non-Serb
civilians, and a Croatian Red Cross representative added that "all
these people have shocking stories to tell." The Serbs seem
determined to eliminate any trace of other peoples from the area
and have destroyed all of Banja Luka's mosques, including two
centuries-old ones that were UNESCO-registered cultural
properties. Meanwhile in Zagreb, Vjesnik on 5 May reports that
Cardinal Franjo Kuharic has greeted an international initiative
from the Archbishop of Canterbury against racism and chauvinism.
The Croatian cardinal also condemned ethnic cleansing as "the
worst expression of racism." Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

CROATIAN UPDATE. Vecernji list reported on 4 May that the total
damage to medical facilities in the republic as the result of
Serbian aggression since 1991 amounts to DM 2.3 billion. Some
medical centers, such as those in Vukovar and Vinkovci, were
completely destroyed, while that in Osijek was not far behind. The
Osijek facility was the largest single item in terms of costs,
with damage estimated at over DM 275 million. Another badly
damaged town was the spa-center Lipik, but runners held a
competition there to promote the revival of tourism in the area.
Finally, Hina on 5 May says that Slovenian President Milan Kucan
will go to Zagreb for a meeting with Croatian President Franjo
Tudjman, possibly before summer. The relations between the two
neighbors have been strained since independence in 1991,
ostensibly by a series of border, transport, legal and sea-access
problems. The real issue, however, is mistrust as a result of each
side feeling that the other left it in the lurch during their
respective wars with the Serb army in 1991. Relations may now be
warming as both countries are concerned about possible irredentism
or at least financial claims against them by a new right-of-center
Italian government.  Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

DAFIMENT BANK SCANDAL. On 5 May Politika reports extensively on
the status of the now-defunct Dafiment Bank, once rump
Yugoslavia's largest private financial institution which closed
its doors in April 1993, owing its customers an estimated DM 212
million. Politika says much of the bank's hard currency reserves
may have been transferred overseas, where they now remain safely
ensconced. Such charges, however, are denied by bank owner Dafina
Milanovic who maintains she "took nothing out of the country." In
other news, on 4 May Financial Times reported remarks made by
Mirjana Markovic, wife of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.
Markovic, insisting that "representatives of those Serbs who are
mostly outside of Serbia and who think war is their only option .
. . have no right to foist that option on all Serbs." Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

AMERICAN HELICOPTERS ARRIVE IN MACEDONIA. Three US UH-60 Black
Hawk helicopters arrived in the Republic of Macedonia on 4 May
according to Nova Makedonija. They will be used to support the
American military contingent there as part of the UNPROFOR effort
to station observers on the Macedonian-Serbian border.  Duncan
Perry, RFE/RL, Inc.

NO AGREEMENT IN POLISH TRIPARTITE TALKS. Despite agreement on a
timetable to review union demands, marathon talks among trade
unions, employers, and the government on 4 May failed to satisfy
Solidarity, PAP reports. Government negotiators proposed lifting
all wage controls by the end of 1994, on the condition that all
state firms first undergo "commercialization" (transformation into
joint-stock companies). Solidarity's representative rejected this
proposal, insisting that the union can be trusted now to make
reasonable wage demands. Employers' representatives complained
that their views were ignored. The tripartite commission meets
again on 16-17 May. No wage controls are now in force, but the
Senate is expected to approve new regulations for firms with at
least 80% state ownership on 5 May. Scattered strikes continued on
4 May, but had a more limited impact than Solidarity expected.
Strikes hit twenty hard-coal mines. Participation ranged from a
mere 1% to 72% of the work force; some 10,000 miners (of a total
170,000) took part.  Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLAND TO REVISE COMMAND STRUCTURES. President Lech Walesa
attended a closed cabinet session on 4 May devoted to defense
policy, PAP reports. Defense Minister Piotr Kolodziejczyk
presented plans to create the post of "supreme commander" who
would bear constitutional responsibility for strictly military
issues such as training and operational planning (now the defense
minister's purview). Two options for supervision are under
consideration: the commander could report to the president or the
defense minister. Kolodziejczyk refused to reveal which option he
prefers, "even to my wife," he told reporters. Walesa is believed
to favor presidential supervision, but Kolodziejczyk said Walesa's
approach is "pragmatic." The defense minister also warned that
continuation of austerity policies will undermine Poland's defense
capabilities. The condition of military equipment is "extremely
unsatisfactory." He stressed the importance of military
cooperation with Ukraine and Belarus. Russia is also a potential
partner, he said, but is currently "not eager for dialogue."
Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

CLINTON: NATO OPEN TO POLAND. Responding to a question from a
Polish TV reporter during a CNN "global forum" on 4 May, US
President Bill Clinton denied that NATO had turned its back on
Poland or the other Visegrad countries. "If in fact imperialist
intentions in Russia reasserted themselves," Clinton said, NATO
could expand to include East European members.  Louisa Vinton,
RFE/RL, Inc.

NEW CZECH ATTORNEY GENERAL APPOINTED. On 4 May the Czech
government appointed Bohumira Kopecna as Attorney General.
Speaking to journalists after the government session, Prime
Minister Vaclav Klaus said that the government was glad that a
woman will hold a key post in the state administration. Kopecna's
appointment ended a four-month search for a person to fill the
post. In 1993, the parliament passed a law abolishing the
communist-era system of state prosecutors and providing for
establishing the system of state attorneys headed by attorney
general. CTK reports that some 800 out of 960 former state
prosecutors are to become state attorneys. Prior to her
appointment, Kopecna, herself a former prosecutor, was deputy
attorney general. She was appointed to that post on 1 January 1994
when the new system of state attorneys went into effect.  Jiri
Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK PARLIAMENT DISMISSES TV BOARD MEMBERS. On 4 May the
parliament voted by secret ballot to dismiss four members of the
Slovak Television (STV) Board, while two other members will remain
on the board, TASR reports. Jergus Ferko, one of the dismissed
members, claimed that the current cabinet acted based on
"unconfirmed agreements and unauthorized documents" and said that
the ruling coalition feels "a lack of control" over STV since the
board members were proposed by the government of former Premier
Vladimir Meciar. Arguing for changes in the STV board, National
Democratic Party Chairman Ludovit Cernak said "we want to believe
that it is only an accident that STV forgot in recent weeks to
inform the public about the work of the NDP." Also in the 4 May
session, a vote of no-confidence in Deputy Premier Roman Kovac on
grounds of corruption, which was proposed by deputies from the
Movement for a Democratic Slovakia and the Slovak National Party,
failed to be passed.  Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

DANISH FOREIGN MINISTER IN SLOVAKIA. Niels Helveg Petersen arrived
in Bratislava on 3 May for a two day official visit, TASR reports.
Meeting with his Slovak counterpart Eduard Kukan on 3 May,
Petersen said that following the entrance of Norway, Sweden,
Finland and Austria into the EU, there will be a long-term need to
expand eastwards. Noting that the goal of his trip was to
intensify economic cooperation between the two countries, Petersen
held talks with Economy Minister Peter Magvasi about possibilities
for Danish investment and an increase in bilateral trade. Denmark
is Slovakia's 19th biggest trading partner. Petersen also held
talks with Premier Jozef Moravcik and President Michal Kovac, to
whom he noted that the recent changes in the Slovak political
scene have contributed to improving Slovakia's image abroad. In
other developments Kukan left on 4 May for a two-day visit to
Germany, where talks will focus on Slovakia's integration into
West European structures.  Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN COMMUNIST PARTY REVIVED. A Bucharest court formally
approved on 4 May the registration of the Romanian Communist
Party, Rompres and Reuters reported. The new RCP has its
headquarters in the mining town of Targu Jiu. Opponents have up to
three days to appeal against the court approval of the party,
which regards itself as a continuation of the party led by Nicolae
Ceausescu; otherwise, the registration is final. The president of
the new party, Victor Hancu, told Rompres his organization has
between three and four thousand members, most of them young. Hancu
said the RCP wants to introduce a "mixed socialist economy of a
competitive type, which will be under [state] control." He also
said the party will "fight human exploitation." A member of the
new RCP was quoted by Reuters as saying that the party will decide
at its "15th Congress whether to rehabilitate Ceausescu." (The
14th RCP Congress was held in November 1989.) On the same day, an
obscure political group calling itself the Romanian National
Rebirth Party erected a tombstone on the supposed grave of
Ceausescu, at the Ghencea cemetery in Bucharest. The leader of the
RNRP, Lucian Vasilescu, said Ceausescu was a hero who had
"sacrificed himself for the welfare of the people he loved."
Michael Shafir, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIA AND GERMANY EXCHANGE REPROACHES. Horst Waffenschmidt, the
German official charged with dealing with issues regarding ethnic
Germans in Eastern Europe and the former USSR was received on 4
May by Romania's President, Ion Iliescu, the German media and
Radio Bucharest reported on the same day. Waffenschmidt called on
the Romanian authorities to show more support for the ethnic
Germans living in the country. He said they must be granted more
possibilities to acquire property under the current privatization
program and criticized Romania's raising of import duties and sale
taxes on some German products. In turn, Iliescu told Waffenschmidt
that Deutsche Welle was presenting Romanian "realities in an
ill-willed, biased manner," which distorts actual facts.
Waffenschmidt is in Romania to assess the relief-programs financed
by the German government for the ethnic German minority there.
Bonn has since 1990 spent DM 111 million on relief measures in
Romania.  Michael Shafir, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS BULGARIANS JOINED WARNING STRIKE. Bulgarian
dailies report on 5 May of several hundred thousand participants
in a warning strike on the previous day. The Confederation of
Trade Unions in Bulgaria, which organized the strike, is urging
the government to freeze charges on heating, transport, and other
basic services and commodities, and to adjust wages against
inflation. Unless the demands are met, the CITUB is threatening a
general strike on 17 May.  Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUS TO RESTRUCTURE KGB. The head of the Belarusian KGB, Henadz
Lavitsky, announced on 3 May that the republic's KGB is to be
restructured, Belarusian radio reported. It's main activities will
now focus on intelligence and counterintelligence, protecting
governing bodies and vital installations. There will also be a
special crime fighting department which will coordinate its
activities with other law enforcement agencies. These measures
were approved by the head of the permanent committee on national
security of the Belarusian Supreme Soviet, Anatol Novikau, and the
head of the administrative coordinating department of the cabinet
of ministers, Valer Paulau. Belarus is the last republic which
still calls its ministry for state security KGB.  Ustina Markus,
RFE/RL, Inc.

CRIME UP 14% IN BELARUS. On 3 May Belarusian radio reported that
there has been a sharp rise in crime in Belarus since the
beginning of this year. In the first quarter of 1994 27,500
criminal acts were reported, an increase of 14% over the first
quarter of 1993. Assault and economic crimes registered the
highest increases.  Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN OFFICIAL: WEST "DEFENDING US AGAINST ROMANIA."
Interviewed by RFE/RL's Romanian Service of 4 May, Dumitru Diacov,
chairman of the Moldovan Parliament's Foreign Relations
Commission, described recent Romanian statements questioning
Moldova's independence and again raising the issue of unification
as "worrisome." "We have reached the point at which Western
countries are defending us against Romania's attacks," he said. He
also revealed that Chisinau unofficially had asked Bucharest, most
recently during Council of Europe hearings in Strasbourg, to "stop
the confrontation." Now heading a delegation of Moldova's ruling
Agrarian Party to Bucharest, Diacov said that the message to
Romania's governing and opposition parties is that they "should
respect the independence of [Moldova,] a member state of the UN.
If they have decided otherwise we had better be notified."
Vladimir Socor , RFE/RL, Inc.

LATVIA TAKES OVER PART OF SKRUNDA RADAR SITE. A group of Latvian
officials, headed by Prime Minister Valdis Birkavs, took over on 4
May several unfinished buildings, including 42.2 hectares of land
where the buildings stand, at the Russian-controlled Skrunda radar
complex. At the same time, Latvia granted Russia temporary use of
164.5 hectares of land on which the functioning radar stands.
Latvian Minister of State for Environmental Protection and
Regional Development told BNS on 4 May that it would be difficult
to convert these buildings for civilian use and that they may have
to be torn down. Birkavs said that the regulations for bidding for
the work of dismantling of the Skrunda radar may be announced
around 15 May.  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

SIXTH ROUND OF PRIVATIZATION STARTS IN ESTONIA. The Estonian
Privatization Agency is going ahead with the privatization of an
additional 56 enterprises, BNS reported on 3 May. Contrary to
earlier practice, the list of enterprises was not published in
international publications, though foreign bidders have not been
excluded. The enterprises up for bids include a uranium plant in
Sillamae that used to belong to the Soviet military-industrial
complex, as well as a number of smaller companies. Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET]

  Compiled by John Lepingwell and Kjell Engelbrekt
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
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