If we are to live together in peace, we must first come to know each other better. - Lyndon B. Johnson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 76, 21 April 1994

                              RUSSIA

RUSSIAN OFFICIALS DISCUSS BOSNIA. How Russia should respond to
what some in the West are already terming a humiliation for
Russian diplomacy in Bosnia was being discussed in Moscow on 20
April. The State Duma decided to send a delegation to the former
Yugoslavia immediately to look into the situation first hand.
Indicating that the Duma does not wish to rely on information and
analysis provided by the Foreign Ministry (which is sending mixed
signals), Duma chairman Ivan Rybkin said that "conclusions reached
by State Duma representatives following the visit will be
discussed at a closed sitting of the chamber and will form the
basis for the Duma's stand on the situation in former Yugoslavia,"
ITAR-TASS reported. Meanwhile, suggesting that Russia's policy
might already be set, some Russian media reported that the
Security Council session of 20 April focused on problems in the
Caucasus and Russian support for the Cossacks rather than on
Bosnia. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

KOZYREV ON BOSNIA. Speaking to journalists prior to talks with
international mediators involved with the Bosnia crisis on 20
April, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev said that Russia
did not agree that increasing NATO air strikes against Bosnian
Serb targets was a good option as this would run the risk of
escalation. (NATO ambassadors said on 20 April that they
considered in a favorable light the request by UN Secretary
General Boutros Boutros-Ghali to widen the use of air strikes.)
Kozyrev said it would be a mistake for Western states not to
combine a coordinated military approach with a coordinated
political solution to the conflict. On the question of lifting
sanctions against the rump Yugoslavia, the report carried by
ITAR-TASS paraphrased Kozyrev as saying that "the Serbian side
must understand that each step along the path of a comprehensive
cessation of hostilities will be accompanied by a corresponding
lifting of sanctions." This would mean that Russia may be backing
away from its position that sanctions cannot be lifted until a
ceasefire has been achieved. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

CHURKIN INTERVIEW ON BOSNIA. The differences between Deputy
Foreign Minister Churkin's views on the Bosnian Serbs and the
stance of Yeltsin and Kozyrev remained in evidence on 20 April. In
an interview with Russian Television's "Details" program, Churkin
said that his experience led him to "the quite distinct feeling
that the Serbs are on the brink of a catastrophe--not only the
Bosnian Serbs, but all the Serbs." Churkin did not disavow his
statement of 18 April that "the time has come for Russia to stop
all discussion with the Bosnian Serbs," but he did say that Russia
should make it clear to the Bosnian Serbs that Russia's support is
limited by their cooperation. As his other statements continue to
make clear, though, Churkin does not expect the Bosnian Serbs to
cooperate. Other Russian officials still apparently hold out hope
for this. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

SHUMEIKO'S PRESS CONFERENCE. Vladimir Shumeiko, chairman of the
Council of the Federation, told journalists on 19 April that the
ministers of foreign affairs and defense of the CIS countries will
design a plan for a new integration of the CIS by 9 September of
this year, Russian TV "Vesti" reported. Shumeiko said that he
believes the result will be "a political and inter-state
integration." He remarked that the Council of the Federation
should meet on a permanent basis and suggested changes to the
Constitution so that deputies of the upper chamber would be
elected and not appointed by the President. Shumeiko also said
that the new "centrists" which are emerging on the political scene
and are united in the new movement "Concord In the Name of Russia"
are driven by anti-reformist considerations. Alexander Rahr,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ZHIRINOVSKY FAILED TO GET ELECTED. Extremist Vladimir Zhirinovsky
failed to get elected to the post of fifth deputy chairman of the
State Duma, ITAR-TASS reported on 20 April. Since none of the
candidates received a majority of votes, the position continues to
remain vacant. Zhirinovsky stated that he may sign the civic peace
agreement suggested by President Boris Yeltsin only if the latter
removes Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev, Interior Minister Viktor
Erin, and Deputy Prime Minister in charge of privatization
Anatolii Chubais from office. Zhirinovsky's faction also decided
to send its own delegation, separate from that of the State Duma,
to investigate the political situation in Bosnia. Alexander Rahr,
RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA AND TURKEY SIGN MILITARY COOPERATION ACCORD. On 20 April,
the Russian and Turkish defense ministers, Pavel Grachev and
Mehmet Gelhan, signed an agreement on military cooperation in
Moscow. The Turkish side characterized the accord as an
opportunity to consolidate the two countries' friendly relations.
During disucssions, the question of southern flank restrictions
imposed by the CFE treaty was discussed but with no apparent
movement on the Russian side to allay Turkey's concerns. Grachev
continued to voice concern about NATO's Partnership for Peace
program, but said that he would make a statement during his visit
to Brussels in May, Interfax reported. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN SENDS GET WELL TELEGRAM TO NIXON. On 20 April, Interfax
quoted Yeltin's letter to Richard Nixon, who has been taken to a
hospital with a stroke. In it, Yeltsin pays tribute to Nixon's
contribution to the gradual improvement of relations between
Russia and the United States. The letter could also be taken as an
apology of sorts for Yeltsin's outburst that followed Nixon's
meeting with the leaders of the Russian opposition in March. Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

CIS

GRACHEV IN SEVASTOPOL. The Russian defense minister, Pavel
Grachev, began an official visit to Sevastopol on 20 April,
Ukrainian radio reported. The purpose of the visit is to work out
details on dividing the Black Sea Fleet in accordance with the
agreement signed on 15 April. During the visit, Grachev is to meet
with the fleet's command as well as Crimean government officials.
One of the issues to be resolved is the fleet's headquarters.
Ukraine has claimed all shore facilities and many Ukrainians have
been opposed to allowing any Russian forces to be stationed in the
country. At the same time, Russia is against sharing the Black Sea
Fleet headquarters with the Ukrainian navy and feels that
Sevastopol should remain the fleet's main base. ITAR-TASS reported
that the Ukrainian defense minister, Vitalii Radetsky, sent a
telegram to the Black Sea Fleet command in which he proposed that
Sevastopol serve as the joint headquarters of both the Ukrainian
navy and the Black Sea Fleet. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

KAZAKHSTANI PARLIAMENT ELECTS CHAIRMAN. After two rounds of voting
in Kazakhstan's new professional parliament, writer Abish
Kekilbaev was elected chairman, ITAR-TASS reported on 20 April.
Kekilbaev is a close associate of President Nursultan Nazarbaev,
whose supporters dominate the legislature. Nazarbaev has proposed
that Kazakhstan's legislature consist of two chambers, a change
that would require a constitutional amendment. Bess Brown, RFE/RL,
Inc.

DRAFT CONSTITUTION APPEARS IN TAJIKISTAN. The draft of a
post-independence constitution for Tajikistan has been distributed
by the official Tajik news agency Khovar, the agency reported on
19 April. Tajikistan is the only Central Asian state that has been
unable to adopt a new constitution; plans to prepare one were
interrupted by the civil war in 1992. The draft distributed by
Khovar restores the executive presidency abolished in December
1992 and renames the national legislature Majlisi milli (National
Assembly). The draft is to be discussed by the public and sent to
international organizations for evaluation. Bess Brown, RFE/RL,
Inc.

YET ANOTHER GEORGIAN SECURITY OFFICIAL MURDERED. Georgian Deputy
Interior Minister Giorgi Gulua, his driver, and a further Interior
Ministry official were killed by machinegun fire in Tbilisi while
driving to work on the morning of 20 April, Russian news agencies
reported. The killers escaped by car. According to ITAR-TASS, this
was the eighth such terrorist act directed against a senior
Georgian security official in recent months. Liz Fuller, RFE/RL,
Inc.

GEORGIA, TURKMENISTAN REACH AGREEMENT ON GAS DEBT. Meeting with a
delegation of Turkmen businessmen in Tbilisi on 20 April, Georgian
parliament chairman Eduard Shevardnadze confirmed that an
agreement had been reached with the Turkmen government whereby
Georgia will supply consumer goods in lieu of paying its $200
million debt for supplies of natural gas in hard currency,
Interfax reported. Turkmenistan had previously threatened to cut
gas supplies to Georgia on 1 May if the debt remained unpaid. Ivan
Zazashvili, head of Gruztransgaz, was quoted by Interfax on 14
April as stating that virtually no one in Georgia can afford to
pay gas bills, and that Georgia was considering Iran as a
potential alternative supplier. Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

CLINTON WANTS SERBS TO "PAY A HIGHER PRICE FOR CONTINUED
VIOLENCE." International media report on 21 April that President
Bill Clinton the previous day called for stronger NATO air
protection to include all six UN-declared "safe areas" in
Bosnia-Herzegovina, not just Sarajevo. The New York Times quotes
him as saying: "NATO's air power alone cannot prevent further Serb
aggressions or advances . . . but it can deny the Serbs the
opportunity to shell safe areas with impunity." The five such
areas besides Sarajevo are Gorazde, Srebrenica, Zepa, Tuzla, and
Bihac. Clinton also wants tougher economic sanctions on Serbia to
encourage the government of President Slobodan Milosevic to stop
supporting the Bosnian Serbs. Meanwhile in Brussels, NATO agreed
in principle to provide greater use of air power in Bosnia, the
Los Angeles Times reports. The British ambassador said "it may
take a day or two" to work out the particulars, but another NATO
official noted that "we want to do something that really hurts. .
. . We're talking about going after ammunition dumps and
communications centers." Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

"THIS IS A DISGRACE FOR THE ENTIRE WORLD. IT IS A MASSACRE." This
is how Dr. Alija Begovic, the director of Gorazde's hospital,
described the situation there. The New York Times of 21 April also
said that the Serb shelling of the hospital the previous day
killed 44 and wounded 137. A UN military official noted that
"there is absolutely no reason for bombarding a city other than to
create terror and panic. . . . The imposition of a total-exclusion
zone is the best way to secure the safe areas. We can do it quite
fast, but we do need troops on the ground." UN High Commission for
Refugees spokesman Kris Janowski told the Washington Post that the
Serbs had engaged in "outrageous behavior" in "killing people and
at random." This is a tactic they first developed in their war
with Croatia in 1991, when they obliterated the baroque Danubian
town of Vukovar, among others. Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

TUDJMAN'S PARTY SPLITS. Western news agencies reported from Zagreb
on 20 April that eighteen legislators belonging to the governing
Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ) have set up a new party, the
Independent Democrats. They are led by upper house speaker Josip
Manolic and his lower house counterpart Stipe Mesic in a move that
will cost the HDZ its liberal wing, which was angry over President
Franjo Tudjman's autocratic style and his former policy of
partitioning Bosnia with the Serbs at the expense of the Muslims.
In the course of April, following the ham-fisted ouster of Manolic
from his party jobs by Tudjman's lieutenants, momentum built up
for a formal split in the party, but there had been rumors that
Tudjman had somehow managed to do a deal with Mesic to prevent the
liberal exodus. Depending on how many legislators actually do go
over to the new party, the HDZ stands to lose its parliamentary
majority, which could force early elections. With at least 18
deputies, the new organization is already the largest opposition
party in parliament. Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

BULGARIA AND UNPROFOR. Agencies report that, except for one
truckload, all supplies destined for UN troops stationed in
Macedonia left Bulgarian territory on the evening of 20 April.
Reuters quotes officials of the Bulgarian State Railways as
confirming that the Dutch cargo firm organizing the transport has
agreed to pay a higher transit fee, as demanded by the BSR, and
that all supplies will be in Macedonia on 21 April at the latest.
In another development, BTA says the UNPROFOR command in Zagreb on
15 April asked Bulgaria on 20 April to open an air corridor over
its territory to facilitate the passage of a Ukrainian air
transport of Finnish Peace keepers, but later withdrew the
request. Demokratsiya of 21 April quotes UDF lawmakers as arguing
that Bulgaria as a UN member needs to assume certain
responsibilities despite its policy of non-interference in the
Balkan conflict. The pro-BSP Kontinent says that recent requests
to use Bulgaria's territory for delicate transports seem designed
to tie the country closer to the anti-Serbian activities of
Western governments. Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALBANIAN-GREEK PROBLEMS ESCALATE? Leaders of Omonia, the Greek
minority organization in Albania, in Sarande and Gjiorkastra were
detained by authorities on 20 April according to Gazeta Shqiptare.
No explanation has yet been given for the action. Meantime,
Reuters reports that Greek Foreign Minister Karolos Papoulias, who
is visiting Washington with Greek Prime Minister Andreas
Papandreou, issued a stinging statement regarding the alleged
Albanian treatment of its Greek minority. Papoulias said in part
that Athens " condemns and denounces. . .the unprecedented and
continuing persecution of the Greek minority by Albanian
authorities." The comments were evidently at least in part a
reaction to the arrests of Omonia figures. Duncan Perry, RFE/RL,
Inc.

MACEDONIAN TALKS IN NEW YORK. Macedonian Foreign Minister Stevo
Crvenkovski is currently engaged in ongoing discussions with UN
mediator Cyrus Vance over a resolution of the Greek-Macedonian
dispute. While little concrete information about the deliberations
has emerged, observers speculate that Vance will suggest a three
stage solution according to MILS. Papandreou will not be pressed
by US President Bill Clinton to lift the embargo against Macedonia
officials noted. The US Department of State is at odds with
Clinton over the US's position concerning Macedonia according to
the New York Times News Service of 19 April. Duncan Perry, RFE/RL,
Inc.

CEASE-FIRE IN POLISH POLITICS. After a lively meeting with
deputies from the Democratic Left Alliance (SLD) on 20 April, a
contented President Lech Walesa told reporters that "we all
admitted errors; we are resuming cooperation." During the meeting,
the SLD agreed to withdraw a proposed constitutional amendment
that would have allowed the Sejm to overrule presidential
rejections of ministerial changes. SLD leader Aleksander
Kwasniewski also acknowledged that the coalition had erred in
voting to reject Walesa's proposal to permit groups of citizens to
submit their own constitutional drafts. Walesa treated this
admission as an apology. The two sides agreed that no
constitutional changes will be made without mutual agreement.
Despite a declaration that he will "not allow the political system
to be changed without elections," Walesa distanced himself from
his own threats to dissolve the parliament, stressing that he
accepts "all of democracy's verdicts." Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

PAWLAK FOR AND EVEN AGAINST. Despite continuing confusion as to
the prime minister's stance on wage controls, the Sejm voted on 20
April to give further consideration to revised draft legislation
designed to prevent excessive wage growth in state firms. The vote
was 258 to 88, PAP reports. The bill, submitted by deputies from
the ruling coalition, is identical to the draft that was accepted
by the government on 12 April and then shelved. Acting Finance
Minister Henryk Chmielak told the Sejm that the government opposes
complete wage liberalization and supports the "temporary
maintenance of wage controls." Earlier the same day, however,
Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak told trade union leaders that wage
controls are not necessary, provided the unions pledge to act in a
"calm, responsible" fashion. Pawlak said the new legislation
includes a clause allowing the government to suspend wage controls
if they prove not to be needed. Pawlak's ambiguous stance drew
protests from members of his own party, who charged him with
setting them up to take the blame for unpopular wage controls. An
economist interviewed by Polish TV said the official chaos
surrounding this and other policies may be a bigger threat to the
economy than the lack of wage controls. Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL,
Inc.

SLOVAK FOREIGN MINISTER IN CANADA. Eduard Kukan wrapped up a
week-long visit to the US and Canada on 20 April, meeting with
Canadian Premier Jean Chretien and Foreign Minister Andre Ouillet.
Kukan said he appreciated Canada's positive attitude towards NATO
membership for Central and East European nations. Concerning
minority issues, Kukan and Chretien agreed that emphasis should be
on individual rather than collective rights, TASR reports. Meeting
with Ouillet, Kukan suggested that a Canadian embassy be opened in
Bratislava or that the Canadian embassy in Vienna be charged to
cover Slovakia since the location is more convenient than Prague.
Kukan ended his visit by meeting with representatives of the
Canadian Slovak community. Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAKIA SOON TO HAVE PRIVATE TELEVISION? On 19 April the Slovak
Board for Radio and Television Broadcasting voted on a new
candidate to undertake the partial privatization of the second
national television station, STV 2. The new commercial station
would broadcast daily from 5:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. The
Bratislava-based ESPE Studio, which has promised to cooperate with
other firms, won the competition, although the parliament still
has to approve the motion. The first candidate, chosen by the
board on 29 December, was later rejected by the parliament. Sharon
Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

ETHNIC HUNGARIAN PARTIES AND SLOVAK ELECTIONS. Slovakia's ethnic
Hungarian parties are bracing for the forthcoming general
elections, the Budapest daily Magyar Nemzet reported on 19 April.
The liberal Hungarian Civic Party, which did not win parliamentary
representation in the 1992 elections, has been stressing the need
for a coalition of all four Hungarian parties. The recent
announcement that the HCP would drop the word "Hungarian" from its
name and set up a new Slovak liberal party thus came as a
surprise. According to Arpad Duka-Zolyomi, deputy chairman of the
Coexistence Political Movement, his party and the Hungarian
Christian Democratic Movement, which jointly have 14 deputies in
the Slovak parliament, can be expected to forge a new coalition
agreement for the forthcoming elections, with a program based on
the demands approved at a January 1994 gathering of southern
Slovakia's ethnic Magyar mayors and local government
representatives. Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL, Inc.

ISRAEL'S STATE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE VISITS HUNGARY. General David
Ivry began a three-day visit to Hungary, MTI reported on 20 April.
He will discuss cooperation in the fields of security policy and
military technology with representatives of the Hungary's
ministries of industry, defense, transportation, and foreign
affairs. Hungarian Defense Minister Lajos Fur signed in October
1993 in Israel a bilateral military cooperation accord and a joint
committee is to be set up soon to work out cooperation modalities
in the war industry sphere, including the possible modernization
by Israel of Hungary's obsolete MiG-21 and MiG-23 fighter
aircraft. Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARY SENDS OBSERVERS TO SOUTH AFRICA. A six-member Hungarian
observers' group made up of foreign and interior ministry
personnel left on 19 April for Johannesburg to join the
1,800-strong United Nations mission which will observe the 27
April South African general elections, MTI announced. Another
four-member Hungarian observers' group is already in the country.
Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL, Inc.

CRANS MONTANA FORUM CONFERENCE IN BUCHAREST. A four-days
conference of the Swiss-base Crans Montana Forum foundation opened
in Bucharest on 21 April, Radio Bucharest and Western media
report. The meeting, which is the first big international
conference to be hosted by post-communist Romania, will focus on
the emerging free markets in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet
Union and the Middle East. Some 1,100 top politicians and
businessmen from more than 70 countries, including several heads
of state and prime ministers, were listed as participants in the
conference. Some high-ranking officials, however, called off their
participation at the last moment. Among them, the most prominent
are the president of the rump Yugoslav federation, Zoran Lilic,
and Jordanian Prime Minister Abdul-Salam Al-Majali. Dan Ionescu,
RFE/RL, Inc.

CONTROVERSIAL SIGNALS IN ROMANIAN PARLIAMENT. In a joint session
held on 19 April, the two chambers of Romania's parliament
approved a controversial law on the organization of the state
radio and television societies, Radio Bucharest reports. The vote
ended months of wrangling over the draft law, which the opposition
criticized for allegedly trying to step up state control over the
media. On 20 April, Ion Ratiu, deputy for the National Peasant
Party Christian Democratic and a leader of the centrist
opposition, called the new law a step back toward the communist
era and said that it may help force off the air independent
television stations. Also on 19 April, the parliament
overwhelmingly voted in favor of setting up a panel to investigate
the illegal acquisition of formerly state-owned homes by members
of the government, presidency and parliament after December 1989.
The 239 to 5 vote with 58 abstentions was described by Reuters as
the first setback in parliament for the ruling Party of Social
Democracy in Romania. Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY TO HOLD SESSION ON CHORNOBYL.
On 21 April the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to
hold a meeting in Vienna to discuss the future of Ukraine's
Chornobyl nuclear power plant. The session follows an IAEA report
last month which found numerous safety deficiencies and called for
closing the plant. In the run-up to the meeting there were two
mishaps in a row at the facility. ITAR-TASS reported that on 18
April the number three reactor had to be shut down due to a
problem with its cooling system. Reuters reported that on 19 April
that mechanical unit used to move nuclear fuel failed and banged a
container of fuel against adjacent installations. IAEA experts
were inspecting the plant when the accidents happened. Nuclear
experts from thirteen countries are participating at the meeting
and will be looking at alternative energy options for Ukraine so
that the Chornobyl plant may be closed. Besides the safety
deficiencies, it has been reported that the sarcophagus around the
fourth reactor (which was destroyed in the 1986 fire) was in
danger collapsing, and that around 20% of the qualified staff had
left last year, making safety even more difficult to ensure,
Reuters reported on 20 April. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

REGISTRATION OF INITIATIVE GROUPS FOR BELARUSIAN PRESIDENTIAL
CAMPAIGN. On 15 April the registration of initiative groups
planning to collect signatures for presidential nominees began in
Belarus, Belarusian radio reported on 19 and 20 April. The groups
must collect 70 signatures from deputies to support their
candidates' nomination or 100,000 signatures from Belarusian
citizens within 55 days. To date six nominees have been
registered. Among the candidates are the former chairman of the
Supreme Soviet, Stanislau Shushkevich, who is supported by the
Social Democratic Party; Prime Minister Vyacheslau Kebich whose
campaign will be led by the director of the "Horizont" plant,
Aleksandr Senchukouski; Vasil Novikav from the Belarusian
Communist Party; the BPF opposition leader, Zyanon Paznyak;
Aleksandr Lukashenka, whose campaign will be run by Dzmitriy
Bulakhau; and Henadz Karpenka from the Party of People's Accord,
whose campaign will be led by Alyaksey Dydarau. Ustina Markus,
RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN-ULMANIS MEETING POSTPONED. The meeting that had been
tentatively planned for 21 April between Russian president Boris
Yeltsin and his Latvian counterpart Guntis Ulmanis has been
postponed, Diena and ITAR-TASS indicated on 20 April. In a
statement issued to the press on 20 April, Yeltsin said that "the
agreements on military matters, which were initialed this March,
create a contractual and legal basis for the completion of the
withdrawal of Russian troops from the territory of Latvia, and for
a civilized solution to the issues connected with it." He stressed
that Russia was not and is "not going to create military bases on
the territory of Latvia. It is a matter only of the temporary
functioning of one Russian military establishment under civilian
control--the radar station in the town of Skrunda." Yeltsin also
expressed a desire to meet in the very near future with Ulmanis
and said that during the meeting "a package of initialed
agreements will be signed." RFE/RL correspondent in Riga reported
on 21 April that a date for the meeting may be set by the two
presidents today. The extraordinary parliamentary meeting in Riga
on 20 April concerning the Latvian-Russian accords ended
inconclusively with members of Latvia's National Independence
Movement--they opposed the accords--walking out, thus ending the
session for lack of quorum. Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

US LEADERS MEET ESTONIAN PRIME MINISTER. On 20 April Vice
President Al Gore met with Prime Minister Mart Laar to discuss
economic and security issues. The two leaders signed agreements on
the protection and promotion of investments, trade relations and
the protection of intellectual property, BNS reported on 20 April.
Gore expressed support for Estonia's membership in GATT and the US
Baltic Entrepreneurship Foundation. Gore also promised US support
for completing the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonia by 31
August. On 19 April Laar met with Secretary of Defense William
Perry to discuss defense issues and Estonia's membership in NATO's
Partnership for Peace program. Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.


[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Roman Solchanyk & Edith Oltay
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