It is easier to love humanity than to love one's neighbor. - Eric Hoffer
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 68, 11 April 1994

RUSSIA

YELTSIN CRITICIZES GORAZDE STRIKES. Speaking to reporters at the
airport prior to his departure for Spain on 11 April, Russian
President Boris Yeltsin complained that US President Bill Clinton
had not consulted with Moscow prior to the strike by NATO
aircraft on Serb targets near the Bosnian city of Gorazde. We
want this matter to be discussed at the UN. Security Council,
Yeltsin said. Yeltsin, who talked to Clinton by telephone early
on 11 April, said he had insisted to Clinton time and again that
such decisions cannot be taken without prior consultation between
the United States and Russia. They cannot be. And we shall insist
on this, Western agencies reported. Yeltsin made no mention of
the UN resolution providing a legal basis for the strikes --to
defend UN peacekeepers under fire through close air support.
Meanwhile, Vitalii Churkin, Yeltsins special envoy to the former
Yugoslavia, arrived in Belgrade on 10 April for consultations
with Serb President Slobodan Milosevic. Churkins visit was
planned prior to the airstrikes and will continue with stops in
Zagreb and Sarajevo. Suzanne Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

HONEYMOON OVER; NATO PARTICIPATION LINKED TO G-7 MEMBERSHIP?
Yeltsins chief spokesman, Vyacheslav Kostikov, told reporters on
8 April that Russias romantic embrace with the West was over and
that Russia increasingly sees itself as a great power which has
its own strategic, military and political interests, different
from those of the US and Europe . . . It has started saying this
loudly. As reported by Reuters, Kostikov also linked Moscows
participation in the NATO Partnership for Peace program to
membership in the G-7 (Group of Seven) economic club. You know
that Russia want to join the G-7, he was quoted as saying; why
shouldnt these two problems be linked? According to AFP, Kostikov
argued that linkage of the two issues would appease opposition
leaders in parliament and help win their approval for Russias
participation in the NATO partnership program. Stephen Foye,
RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN TO SPAIN. Boris Yeltsin started a three-day visit to
Spain on 11 April where he is expected to sign a framework
agreement on Russian-Spanish relations and drum up business
interest in Russia. Yeltsin will meet with Spanish leaders,
including King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia, as well as with
business people in both Madrid and Barcelona before returning to
Moscow on 13 April. Western press reports stress that Yeltsin
will be under careful scrutiny of Western observers for
assurances that he is fit and able to lead his country. Suzanne
Crow, RFE/RL, Inc.

DRAFT 1994 BUDGET UNDER FIRE. Members of the State Dumas
Committee on Budget, Taxes, Banks, and Finances, told a news
conference on 8 April that the committee cannot accept the draft
federal budget for 1994 in its present form, ITAR-TASS and
Interfax reported. Their principal complaint is that planned
revenues do not take into account the sharp reduction in output
recorded during the first two months of this year. Too large a
share of planned revenues will accrue to the federal government
at the expense of regions. Other provisions of the draft do not
correspond with the governments projections of socio-economic
developments this year. Further, they criticized the lack of the
requisite supporting data. On 10 April, the
Yavlinsky-Boldyrev-Lukin group of deputies announced that it
would vote against the draft budget because it provides no basis
for further reforms nor for solving Russias acute problems.
Legislators had earlier promised to deal with the budget as
expeditiously as possible. It is unclear whether the IMF will
accept the governments good intentions as set out in a draft
budget or insist on a final document that has been approved by
parliament. Keith Bush

PAYMENTS ARREARS CRIPPLE ENERGY SUPPLIERS. Officials of the fuel
and energy complex, in interviews with Reuters and Interfax on 8
April, described the slowdown in output and supplies of oil, gas,
and nuclear power owing to payments arrears. In March, gas
supplies were down by 653 million cubic meters and nuclear power
was cut by 1.2 billion KWH. Debts to the complex now amounted to
6.6 trillion rubles, of which 450 billion rubles were owed to the
nuclear power industry. Last week, after nuclear power workers
picketed government buildings in Moscow, a 50-billion ruble
credit was offered to help ease the industrys payments arrears
problems. Fuel and Energy Minister Yurii Shafranik blamed the
sharp decline in oil output during the first quarter to 73.9
million tons (excluding joint venture output), compared with 88.3
million tons in the first quarter of 1993, on payments arrears.
Keith Bush, RFE/RL, Inc.

BURBULIS SEEKS RAPPROCHEMENT WITH YELTSIN. Former State Secretary
and cofounder of the Russian democratic movement, Gennadii
Burbulis, told journalists in the Kremlin on 9 April that he
expects Boris Yeltsin to run for a second term as president,
ITAR-TASS reported. However, according to Burbulis, success for
Yeltsin will depend upon whether he is able to unify the nation
over the next eighteen months, whether he succeeds in creating a
strong structure which would support him in the election
campaign, and whether Yeltsin will publicly promote those
political figures upon whom he wants to rely if elected. Burbulis
stated that if Yeltsin fulfills these requirements, he will
support the president. Alexander Rahr, RFE/RL, Inc.

KAZANNIK RESIGNS AGAIN, WARNS OF DICTATORSHIP. In an address to
the Council of the Federation on 8 April, Aleksei Kazannik
requested that his resignation be accepted. Appointed by Yeltsin
as the Russian Prosecutor-General during the presidents bloody
clashes with the parliament last fall, Kazannik submitted his
resignation for the first time in March because, he said, Yeltsin
and his aides had pressed him to bend the constitution and laws.
On 6-7 April the higher chamber of the Russian parliament voted
twice to reject Kazanniks resignation, a move which, in a strict
legal sense, meant that he remained in his post. Yeltsins aides,
in turn, claimed that Kazanniks successor, Aleksei Ilyushenko,
would continue as Acting Prosecutor-General. It has become
obvious . . . that the president has no intention of observing
the constitution and laws, nor does he intend to implement the
decision of the Council of Federation [as the constitution
requires], Kazannik said on 8 April; he added that an open
dictatorship is upcoming in Russia. Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL,
Inc.

GRACHEV ON CONSCRIPTS, SIZE OF ARMED FORCES. Addressing the
Russian Defense Ministry Collegium on 8 February, Defense
Minister Pavel Grachev complained that the army needed to draft
some 700,000 conscripts this year in order to maintain its combat
readiness, but that it would receive only about 200,000. The
Defense Ministry has long made clear that it hopes the new
parliament will amend the current laws regulating military
service. Grachev also repeated criticism of the Russian law on
defense, which mandates a Russian army of 1.5 million men. He
said that Russia needs an army of at least 2.1 million, arguing
that the lower staffing level would limit Russia to waging only
localized combat operations. Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

DEPUTIES OBJECT TO US-RUSSIAN MILITARY EXERCISE. Vladimir
Zhirinovsky and other hard-line deputies on 8 April criticized
plans for joint US-Russian military exercises, AFP and Interfax
reported. Their objections came during an appearance before the
parliament by Deputy Defense Minister Georgii Kondratev, who
announced that the exercises were to take place in July in the
southern Urals region of Orenburg. A total of 250 soldiers from
each side would take part, Kondratev said, and the US government
is to pay all expenses for the American troops. The exercises are
to focus on coordinating peacekeeping operations between the two
countries. Zhirinovsky was quoted as threatening that officers
who think that they can get an extra star by organizing this kind
of exercise should remember that the regime will change one day
and that they will lose everything. Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

                 TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TRANSCAUCASUS REACTION TO RUSSIAN BASES PROPOSAL. Neither the
Armenian nor the Georgian leadership has any objections to the
continued presence of Russian bases on their territory under the
terms of existing agreements, local spokesmen told Interfax on 10
April. An aide to Azerbaijani President Geidar Aliev told
Interfax that the issue did not concern Azerbaijan since there
were no longer any Russian troops stationed there, but that
negotiations were continuing on the leasing by Russia of the
Gebele radar station in northern Azerbaijan, which he qualified
as not an army base but a military facility. Liz Fuller, RFE/RL,
Inc.

AZERBAIJAN IS NOT PLANNING TO LEAVE CIS. A spokesman for
Azerbaijans President Geidar Aliev told Interfax on 10 April that
there was no truth to a report published in Kommersant on 8 April
that Azerbaijan planned to announce its withdrawal from the CIS
at the upcoming summit of CIS leaders in Moscow to protest
Russian plans for the deployment of peacekeeping forces in
Nagorno-Karabakh and for the closure of the Azerbaijani-Iranian
frontier. No comment was made on the Kommersant allegation that
because of his advanced age and deteriorating health Aliev will
send parliament speaker Rasul Guliev to attend the CIS summit in
his place. Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

TURKMENISTAN CUTS OFF GAS TO AZERBAIJAN. Turkmenistan cut off the
supply of its natural gas to Azerbaijan on 8 April, Western and
Russian agencies reported on 9 April, because the Caucasian state
has not paid its bills. According to Azertadzh-TASS, Turkmenistan
provides half the gas used in Azerbaijan. Baku TV reported on the
day of the cutoff that Azerbaijan was supposed to supply oil
industry equipment and other products to Turkmenistan in return
for the gas, but has not met its obligations. Earlier in the year
Turkmenistan successfully used threatened or actual gas cutoffs
to discipline other CIS states into paying up their arrears or
making arrangements to do so. Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

BLACK SEA FLEET INCIDENT. On 9 April Russian Foreign Minister
Andrei Kozyrev spoke with his Ukrainian counterpart, Anatolii
Zlenko, about a provocation involving the Black Sea Fleet and the
Ukrainian navy. The incident, reported by various agencies,
involved a Black Sea Fleet vessel, the Cheleken, which left the
port of Odessa and sailed to Sevastopol carrying marine research
and navigational equipment valued at some $10 million. According
to the Ukrainian navy command, the equipment belonged to the port
facilities of Odessa and was not the property of the Black Sea
Fleet. When Ukrainian coast guard boats tried to stop the
Cheleken they were reportedly fired on with tracer bullets and
water cannon, and a Ukrainian naval commander, Mykola Zhibarev,
was detained overnight after he boarded the ship in an attempt to
prevent it from sailing with the equipment. According to Russian
and Black Sea Fleet naval officials the equipment belonged to
Russia; they blamed Ukraines failure to finance navigational
systems of the Black Sea Fleet for the seizure. This has been the
most serious in a series of incidents between the Ukrainian navy
and Black Sea Fleet personnel. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

                   CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

NATO BOMBS SERB TARGETS. International media reported that two
American F-16 jets, after repeated warnings, bombed Serb
positions near Gorazde on 10 April. The Bosnian Muslim enclave
has been under renewed attack for nearly two weeks. UN commander
General Sir Michael Rose called for the air strikes to protect UN
personnel in the safe area, but US President Bill Clinton also
described the attack as a clear call to the Serbs to pull back
from Gorazde and resume the negotiations. A Serb-Muslim
cease-fire on 8 April had fizzled out, and negotiations on a
broader agreement broke down the following day. The BBC on 11
April quoted Bosnian Serb spokesmen as saying that all talks with
the UN were off, since the world body had in Serb eyes allied
itself with the Muslims. The Gorazde Muslims welcomed the
bombing, which followed important Serb strategic gains in the
area over the weekend. NATO had launched air strikes against Serb
planes on 28 February, but the Gorazde episode marked the
alliances first-ever bombing run against Serb land positions.
Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic told the New York Times
that the strikes restored the international communitys
credibility in the area. Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

TUDJMAN MOVES TO HOLD PARTY TOGETHER. Croatian dailies on 8 and 9
April reported on President Franjo Tudjmans efforts to prevent
the ruling Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ) from splitting. By
the middle of that week it had appeared that upper house speaker
Josip Manolic, whom Tudjman had stripped of his party offices,
would form a new center-left party with the help of lower house
speaker Stipe Mesic, together with up to 20 other legislators.
Tudjman told HDZ parliamentarians at a special meeting that
Manolic had attacked the Croatian state itself and politically
could do as he pleased, but that Mesic would remain in the party
and at his post, although other accounts in the Croatian, German,
and Austrian press suggest that Mesic is lost to Tudjman. At
issue is not only the unity of the HDZ--perhaps East Europes last
post-communist broad front movement--but also that partys
majority in parliament. Should the majority crumble, new
elections would be all but certain. Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

JOVANOVIC INTERVIEWED ON RADIO BUCHAREST. In a 9 April interview
on Radio Bucharest, the Foreign Minister of the rump Yugoslav
Federation Vladislav Jovanovic described his impressions from a
recent visit to Bucharest with President Slobodan Milosevic as
extremely positive. Romania and rump Yugoslavia are expected to
sign a friendship and cooperation treaty later this month.
According to Jovanovic, the treaty will create a framework not
only for cooperation but also for possible integration between
the two countries, which, he maintained, shared a keen interest
in integration initiatives in the Balkan peninsula. Jovanovic
seized the opportunity to attack against the West for alleged
interference in the Balkans. Germany, he added, was the country
most responsible for the tragedy that fell upon us. Dan Ionescu,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SEJM PROBES SUCHOCKAS GOVERNMENT. The Sejm voted 212 to 61, with
31 abstentions, on 8 April to accept the report of a special
commission set up to investigate the performance of Prime
Minister Hanna Suchockas government during the period in which
there was no sitting parliament (June-October 1993). While
conceding that Suchockas government did not in essence violate
the law, the commission cited six instances on which it had
reservations, most associated with the privatization of state
firms. Suchockas party, the Democratic Union (UD), denounced the
commissions findings as an attempt to take political revenge and
discredit the ousted governments achievements. The vote has no
practical consequences. Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECH PREMIER, SLOVAK FOREIGN MINISTER IN POLAND. The Polish and
Czech prime ministers held unofficial talks on 10 April at a
castle near Lesna, on the Polish side of the Polish-Czech border.
Vaclav Klaus denied that there are strains in Czech-Polish
relations and said that the Czech Republic does not intend to vie
with Poland for entry into the European Union. Klaus acknowledged
discussing EU membership with Polish officials but said
coordination is too strong a term to describe these talks. Polish
TV reports that Klaus accepted Polands offer to repay its debt to
the Czech Republic in coal, ecological investments, and the
construction of new border crossings. On 9 April, Slovak Foreign
Minister Eduard Kukan held talks with Polish officials in Warsaw.
Kukan told reporters that it is not accidental that Poland was
the destination of his first foreign visit. Polish Defense
Minister Piotr Kolodziejczyk met briefly with his Slovak
counterpart, Pavol Kanis, in Poprad on 8 April, after concluding
a three-day visit to Ukraine. The two ministers stressed the
importance of defense coordination among the Visegrad countries.
Louisa Vinton, RFE/RL, Inc.

LARGEST CZECH TRADE UNION HOLDS CONGRESS. The Bohemian and
Moravian Trade Union Chamber, the largest trade union
organization in the Czech Republic, held a congress in Prague on
8 and 9 April. CTK reports that Richard Falbr was elected the
organizations new chairman. Premier Vaclav Klaus told the
congress that trade unions should focus on activities in
enterprises rather than lobbying the government. The delegates
were upset by Klauss remarks, and demanded an apology for other
disparaging statements he had made about a trade union
demonstration in Prague on 22 March. The congress decided that
all newly elected union officials be screened for ties with the
communist secret police. Falbr cautioned that he himself might be
eliminated, because he was a foreign language teacher at the
internal affairs ministry in the early 1960s. Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL,
Inc.

FORMER CZECH SECRET POLICE AGENT SENTENCED. On 8 April, a Czech
military court sentenced a former agent of the Federal Bureau of
Security and Intelligence (FBIS), Vaclav Wallis, to 37 months in
prison on charges of selling classified information to Viktor
Kozeny, head of the Harvard Investment Funds. Kozeny himself was
cleared of any wrongdoing by the court at the end of March. In
the summer of 1993, revelations about Walliss activities sparked
the biggest post-1989 political scandal in the Czech Republic, as
the file provided by Wallis to Kozeny allegedly contained
sensitive information about the private lives of leading Czech
politicians and data on other investment funds and companies due
to become privatized. The contents of the file were not made
public during the trial. CTK reported the story. Jiri Pehe,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SHARES IN 861 CZECH COMPANIES ON OFFER. Shares valued at a total
of over $5 billion, in 861 Czech companies that are being
privatized under the second wave of the voucher privatization
program, are on offer from 11 April to 25 April. More than six
million Czechs purchased vouchers and registered to bid for
shares in the companies slated for privatization when the second
wave was launched in the fall of 1993. The highest valued
enterprise being offered is the Ostrava-Karvina coal mine; it is
worth an estimated $400 million. Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIANS WRITE OPEN LETTER TO US CONGRESS. About one hundred
Hungarian intellectuals, politicians, and journalists, including
former members of RFEs Hungarian Service, addressed an open
letter to the US congress demanding that RFEs Hungarian archives
be placed in Hungary and made available for public use there.
Judith Pataki, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN COMMUNISTS HOLD CONGRESS. On 9 and 10 April, the
Socialist Labor Party (former communists) held its second
national congress in Bucharest, Radio Bucharest reports. In his
report, SLP president Ilie Verdet, a former prime minister under
Nicolae Ceausescu, claimed free market reforms had disrupted
public and social life and introduced rapacious capitalism in
Romania. Verdet presented his partys own alternative ruling
program aimed at creating what he termed a social and humanist
market economy. The congress unanimously re-elected Verdet as the
partys chairman. The SLP, which won seats in both chambers of
parliament in the September 1992 elections, backs Nicolae
Vacaroius minority cabinet, which is dominated by the Party of
Social Democracy in Romania. Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

WEU DELEGATION IN SOFIA. Between 6 and 8 April a group of leading
politicians and officials of the West European Union visited
Bulgaria to participate in meetings and seminars devoted to
European security problems, BTA reports. On the first day of the
visit, the Chairman of the WEU Parliamentary Assembly, Dudley
Smith, confirmed that Bulgaria will most likely be invited to
become an associate WEU member when the organization convenes in
Luxembourg on 9-10 May. Smith said Bulgaria would be eligible for
a reinforced status within the alliance, which means that it will
be represented in the so-called Group on Operative Planning. On 7
April WEU Secretary General Willem van Eekelen was received by
President Zhelyu Zhelev. At present, Bulgaria has observer status
in the WEU. Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

JOINT STATEMENT OF BALTIC PRESIDENTS. On 7 April presidents
Algirdas Brazauskas (Lithuania), Guntis Ulmanis (Latvia), and
Lennart Meri (Estonia) released a statement reported by BNS on 8
April. It welcomed the Russian governments press report that
Latvia was mistakenly included in the Russian presidents decree
of 5 April listing countries where Moscow seeks to establish
military bases, but noted with concern the continuing
consequences of such incidents for our countries, our
relationship with the Russian Federation, and indeed the ability
of all countries to work with the Moscow government. The
presidents called on the Russian President to declare personally
and publicly that Decree No. 174 was in error concerning Latvia
and to reaffirm his own past commitments to a rapid and complete
withdrawal of Russian forces from Estonia and Latvia. The
statement said that the Baltic countries have always negotiated
with the Russian Federation in good faith and will continue to do
so, but there are obvious limits to our ability to continue in
this direction. Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

LATVIAN PRESIDENT POSTPONES VISIT TO MOSCOW. On 8 April Ulmanis
told a meeting of local government officials in Kuldiga that he
had indefinitely postponed his planned visit to Moscow on 20
April, BNS reports. The purpose of the visit was to sign the
agreements on Russian troop withdrawal that were initialed on 15
March, but Ulmanis said they were incomplete and unfavorable for
the Latvian side. Nobody had taken the trouble to explain the
draft agreements to the people, he said, and there had been no
nationwide discussion. On 10 April Ulmanis departed for France,
Denmark, and Great Britain, where he will be sounding out Western
leaders opinion on the latest problems in Baltic-Russian
relations. Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

HIGH INFLATION IN ESTONIA IN MARCH. The Estonian Statistics
Department announced that the consumer price index in March rose
by 8.9%, BNS reported on 8 April. The monthly increases in
January and February had been 5.2% and 5.5%, respectively. The
greatest increases were for housing--18.5%, milk and eggs--13.3%,
transport and communications--9,7%, meat and fish--8.2%, and
flour, fruits, and vegetables--8%. The cost of health care
dropped a negligible 1.1%. Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

PRELIMINARY UKRAINIAN ELECTION RESULTS. According to the
preliminary results issued by the Central Electoral Commission
and broadcast by Radio Ukraine, voter turnout was generally quite
high again in this weekends runoff parliamentary elections. By
the morning of 11 March a total of 312 deputies were known to
have been elected to the 450-seat-legislature in the two rounds,
and more results were pending. This means that, despite fears
previously expressed by President Leonid Kravchuk, enough
deputies have already been elected to make the new parliament
quorate. Among the deputies so far known to have been elected in
the second round are Acting Prime Minister Yefim Zvyahilsky,
Deputy Prime Ministers Valentyn Landyk and Mykola Zhulynsky,
Deputy Parliamentary Speaker Vasyl Durdynets, Economics Minister
Roman Shpek, presidential foreign affairs advisor Anton Buteiko,
Rukh leaders Ivan Zayets and Oleksandr Lavrynovych, and
liberal-centrist Volodymyr Hrynov. The RFE/RL Research Institute
has also learned that in Lviv, two members of the ultra-right
paramilitary organization UNA-UNSO, including the commander of
the UNSO, Oleh Vitovych, have been elected. In Crimea, despite
calls for a boycott by Crimean President Yurii Meshkov, more than
50% of the voters cast their ballots. Bohdan Nahaylo, RFE/RL,
Inc.

KRAVCHUKS COMMENTS AT THE POLLING BOOTH. After casting his
ballot, President Kravchuk told journalists that although the new
election law was a relic of the Soviet era, he was confident that
a new parliament would be capable of working for reforms,
democracy and independence. Asked whether he would seek
reelection in June, he replied that the new parliament must
resolve the issue of the division of powers between the
president, government and parliament, and define the role of the
president more clearly, before he would run for re-election. If
the role of the president was to be reduced to that of a
ceremonial figurehead, he saw no point in being a candidate.
Responding to the strong showing by the Communists and their
allies in eastern Ukraine, Kravchuk denounced their calls to halt
privatization. That would mean moving backward, he said, and the
attempted socialist revolution could lead to confrontation.
Bohdan Nahaylo, RFE/RL, Inc.

CHERNOBYL TO SHUT DOWN? On 9 and 10 April various agencies
reported that the Ukrainian government has agreed, in principle,
to shut down the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. This follows a
visit to the plant by US deputy energy secretary Bill White, who
said the power plant was full of safety violations. The plant
should have been shut down last year, but the Ukrainian
parliament voted to keep it running because of the energy crisis
in the country. Ukraine relies on nuclear energy for 30% of its
energy needs and the Chernobyl plant supplies 7% of Ukraines
electricity. No timetable for the closure has been specified and
officials stressed that this could only be done when alternative
energy supplies become available. According to White, the major
industrialized countries, the World Bank and the European Bank
will all need to participate in financing Ukraines energy needs.
Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUSIAN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION UPDATE. On 8 April Interfax
reported an initiative of left-wing parties and movements to form
a unified election bloc. The move was advanced by the new
Socialist Party and is expected to be called Belarus. It will
encompass five political parties, including the countrys largest
party, the 70,000 strong Communist Party. According to left-wing
representatives, the bloc would support the candidacy of prime
minister Vyacheslau Kebich if he formally announced his
candidacy. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVANS RATIFY CIS MEMBERSHIP, ECONOMIC UNION. On 8 April the
Moldovan parliament ratified Moldovas membership of the CIS with
certain reservations, and also the agreement on the CIS economic
union, ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported. The parliament stated
that Moldova would not participate in any military pacts or a
ruble zone. The vote was 80 in favor and 18 against. Pre-term
elections had been called after the previous parliament had
failed by four votes to ratify CIS membership. Valerii Litskai,
State Secretary of the self-proclaimed Transdniester Republic,
told Interfax that ratification of CIS membership would enable
talks between Kishinev and Tiraspol to be resumed at a completely
new level. Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL, Inc.

SNEGUR MEETS TRANSDNIESTRIAN LEADER. On 9 April Moldovan
President Mircea Snegur had confidential talks with the leader of
Transdniestria, Igor Smirnov, Interfax and ITAR-TASS reported.
The meeting, which was held on Snegurs initiative, discussed the
renewal of talks on determining the legal status of
Transdniestria. It was agreed that the talks would be held with
the mediation of the CSCE mission and Russia, and that they would
be based on the CSCE missions report providing for broad autonomy
for Transdniestria and a delimitation of powers between the
central and Transdniestrian authorities. The two parties also
discussed the resumption of contacts between the left and right
banks of the Dniester, and decided that working groups should be
set up to draw up the necessary documents. Ann Sheehy, RFE/RL,
Inc.


[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Stephen Foye and Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka
The RFE/RL Daily Report is produced by the RFE/RL Research
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