It is a mistake to look too far ahead. Only one link in the chain of destiny can be handled at a time. - Sir Winston Churchill
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 239, 15 December 1993







RUSSIA



ZHIRINOVSKY'S PRESS CONFERENCE. At a press conference on 14 December,
Vladimir Zhirinovsky tried to soften some of his pre-election
statements, in what journalists characterized as his attempt
"to look less frightening" to the world. Whereas Zhirinovsky's
party electoral platform said the party "stands for the restoration
of the Russian state in the borders of the former USSR," at the
press conference Zhirinovsky stated that he was "decisively against
any territorial expansion of Russia." He added, however, that
he believed that in the next few years the former Soviet republics
would beg Russia to take them into the Russian state. The media
quoted the nationalist leader as denying that he was promoting
anti-Semitism. Zhirinovsky added, however, that he agreed with
Russian voters who would like to see "good Russian faces speaking
good Russian" on national television screens. -Vera Tolz

ZHIRINOVSKY HOPES TO BECOME NEXT RUSSIAN PRESIDENT. At the press
conference Zhirinovsky said he expected to win the next presidential
elections regardless of whether they were held in June 1994 or
in 1996. He also said he expected to meet President Boris Yeltsin
in the next few days to discuss new government appointments.
Zhirinovsky introduced members of his party's "shadow cabinet
of ministers." Yeltsin's spokesman told RFE/RL that the president
was not planning any meeting with Zhirinovsky and any such meeting
would have to be on Zhirinovsky's initiative. -Vera Tolz

GAINS FOR RUSSIA'S CHOICE IN EARLY RESULTS FOR CONSTITUENCY SEATS.
The first returns for the State Duma's single-mandate constituency
seats, numbering half the chamber's 450 seats, show a slight
gain for Russia's Choice. The Central Electoral Commission said
on 14 December that preliminary results from 83-constituencies
give Russia's Choice 11 seats and the Liberal Democrats four.
The Agrarian Party has won eight seats and the Communists three.
The majority of seats counted so far, however, have been won
by candidates terming themselves "independents." The results
were reported by Reuters. An RFE/RL correspondent reported that
the President's office claimed a decline in support for Zhirinovsky
in the votes for party lists in the Western regions of Russia,
where his party was said to be gaining some 16% of the vote.
-Wendy Slater

PRESIDENTIAL ADVISOR ASSESSES ELECTIONS. In an interview with
ITAR-TASS on 14-December, Sergei Stankevich, the political advisor
to President Yeltsin, predicted serious conflict within and outside
the new parliament. The new constitution, however, would go some
way to containing this conflict. Stankevich criticized the reformist
forces for complacency, saying that they had relied excessively
on the results of the April referendum and failed to understand
that popular support for them could be undermined; they had also
underestimated "the scope of discontent in society." The democratic
forces should now consolidate their actions and adopt a two-year
joint program. (The next parliamentary elections are due in two
years' time.) Stankevich, unlike another Yeltsin ally Gennadii
Burbulis, praised the President for not having supported any
political party in the campaign. He also rejected any political
alliance with Zhirinovsky, whilst noting that some contact with
him was inevitable. -Wendy Slater

YAVLINSKY ON ALLIANCE WITH RUSSIA'S CHOICE. Grigorii Yavlinsky,
the reform economist whose bloc has taken sixth place in the
parliamentary elections according to preliminary results, rejected
the claim by Egor Gaidar of Russia's Choice that the reformist
forces' defeat by Zhirinovsky and the Communists was caused by
fragmentation in the reformist camp. In remarks to Interfax on
14 December, he blamed the rise of nationalism and communism
on the economic crisis, two years of the government's "mishandling
of the economy," and the crushing of the parliamentary opposition
in October. Had his party merged with Russia's Choice before
the elections, he said, the electorate would not even have voted,
because it rejected the government's economic policy, which is
associated with Russia's Choice. Yavlinsky described Gaidar's
call to form a broad "anti-fascist coalition" in the new parliament
as "sensible," however. -Wendy Slater

LIBERAL RUSSIAN PRESS ON ZHIRINOVSKY, NEW CONSTITUTION. The liberal
Russian press expressed shock and dismay over the apparent victory
of extreme nationalists in the parliamentary elections. Most
liberal newspapers did not hesitate to brand Vladimir Zhirinovsky
a fascist. "Country, what have you chosen?" asked Izvestiya on
14 December, drawing a parallel between Zhirinovsky's rise and
that of Hitler in Weimar Germany. Views in the liberal press
on the new constitution, which had been heavily criticized on
the eve of the constitutional referendum for giving too extensive
powers to the president, have divided. Otto Latsis, a political
analyst for Izvestiya, said on 14-December that the new constitution,
by giving most of the decision-making power to Yeltsin, was offering
remarkable safeguards against what might be undertaken by extreme
nationalists in the new parliament. The independent newspaper,
Segodnya, on the contrary, posed the question "The Constitution
is Passed, Will Zhirinovsky Use It? "referring to Zhirinovsky's
statements that he would be Russia's next president. -Vera Tolz


COMMUNIST PARTY ON ELECTION RESULTS. The leaders of the Communist
Party of the Russian Federation, still holding third place in
the election results, said at a news conference on 14 December
reported by Russian agencies, that they expect to receive 70-80
seats in the 450-seat State Duma. Party leader Gennadii Zyuganov
said that the Communists will create a center-left coalition
in parliament and will propose its candidate for the chairmanship
of the State Duma. He evaded answering directly the question
of cooperation with Zhirinovsky's Liberal Democratic Party, saying
that the communists would cooperate with all forces which shared
their ideas. He rejected extreme nationalism and expansionism,
however. Responding to Gaidar's invitation to form an anti-fascist
front, Zyuganov said that the government should introduce changes
to its economic policy instead of forming blocs. In an interview
with Sovetskaya Rossiya of 14 December, Zyuganov emphasized this
point, and called for the formation of a government of national
confidence. -Wendy Slater

GORE ARRIVES IN MOSCOW. US Vice President Albert Gore arrived
in Moscow on 14-December and chose to avoid making extensive
comments on the results of the Russian election. Western reports
said the Clinton administration has decided to take a cautious
approach to the surprisingly strong showing by Zhirinovsky's
Liberal Democratic Party. A State Department spokesman on 14
December did, however, note that Zhirinovsky's views are "anathema
to the principles of democracy." While in Moscow, Gore is to
meet with Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin to discuss joint
Russian-US space programs. Gore's first visit was to the Russian
space flight control center. -John Lepingwell

RUSSIA'S CHOICE TO BECOME POLITICAL PARTY. Gennadii Burbulis,
who headed the Russia's Choice bloc electoral campaign, announced
that the movement's executive committee had voted to preserve
Russia's Choice as a political movement and to establish a political
party based on it. In remarks to the Interfax news agency reported
on 14 December, Burbulis also said that the movement's leadership
had also discussed its future relations with the President and
the Russian government (many members of which belong to Russia's
Choice) "under conditions which demand the maximum consolidation
of all democratic and reformist forces." -Wendy Slater

RUSSIA'S CHOICE PERFORMS WELL IN MOSCOW DUMA ELECTIONS. According
to the preliminary results, 19 of the 35 seats in the Moscow
city duma have been won by candidates from the pro-reform Russia's
Choice bloc, ITAR-TASS reported on 14 December. (The elections
to the city duma were held on 12-December, simultaneously with
the nation-wide parliamentary elections.) Two seats in the duma
have been won by other reformist and centrist blocs. The remaining
seats were won by independent candidates. -Vera Tolz

SEVERAL REPUBLICS FAIL TO ENDORSE CONSTITUTION. At least nine
republics either did not hold the referendum on the constitution
(Chechnya), had a turnout that was too low to validate the referendum
(Tatarstan, Komi, Khakassia, and Udmurtia) or voted against it
(Bashkortostan, Chuvashia, Dagestan, and Tuva), Russian media
reported on 13-14 December. In Dagestan only 20 percent of a
turnout of over 60 percent (or little over 12 percent of registered
voters) voted in favor of the draft, ITAR-TASS reported on 14
December. -Ann Sheehy

REPUBLIC LEADERS ELECTED TO FEDERATION COUNCIL. The results published
so far show that in at least ten of the 19 republics where elections
to the Federation Council were held, the president of the republic
(Ingushetia, Kalmykia, and Sakha) or the speaker of the parliament
where there is no president (Altai, Bashkortostan, Buryatia,
Dagestan, Karelia, Komi, and North Ossetia) were elected to the
Federation Council. The Kalmyk President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov received
76 percent of the votes in a turnout of 60-percent, which is
many more votes than when he was elected president in April 1993,
Interfax reported on 14-December. In Bashkortostan, Karelia,
and North Ossetia the prime minister was also elected to the
Council. In Chuvashia, however, the speaker Eduard Kubarev failed
to gain election, and got a mere 3.7 percent in the vote for
republican president. The limited data available on the support
for political parties in the republics would indicate that Zhirinovsky
gained a lower share of the vote than elsewhere. This could have
been expected in view of his strong Russian nationalist views.
-Ann Sheehy

NORTH OSSETIAN REACTION TO YELTSIN'S DECREE ON INGUSH REFUGEES.
North Ossetian speaker Akhsarbek Galazov told a joint session
of the presidium of the parliament, the council of ministers,
and the security council of North Ossetia on 14 December that
he had telephoned Yeltsin to warn him that to force the process
of the return of Ingush refugees to the Prigorodnyi raion of
North Ossetia, as envisaged in Yeltsin's decree of 13 December,
could lead to a new tragedy, ITAR-TASS reported. Galazov later
appeared on local television where he read out the text of a
joint appeal to Yeltsin from the presidiums of the parliament
and council of ministers, which said that Yeltsin's decree had
been received with anxiety and had led to protest meetings in
Prigorodnyi raion, and warned that using force to resettle the
refugees could lead to bloodshed -Ann Sheehy



CIS DOUBTS RAISED ABOUT RUSSIAN SPACE CAPABILITY. According to
an article in the Los Angeles Times of 15 December, the Chairman
of the House Space Science and Technology Committee, Representative
George Brown and a group of experts visited the Baikonur launch
site in Kazakhstan last week to assess its capability to support
joint US-Russian space projects. The group reportedly found that
the support infrastructure at the base was inadequate, with many
buildings not even heated. The article states that Brown expressed
misgivings over the proposed joint US-Russian space station,
both because of its overall cost and the difficulties of ensuring
Russian participation. He noted that up to $100 million might
have to be invested in the Baikonur site to bring its facilities
up to Western standards. -John Lepingwell

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



SERIOUS FIGHTING IN SARAJEVO. International media report on 14
December that fighting, the heaviest in several weeks, has flared
again in and around the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo. The reports
say at least ten people have died so far and up to twenty have
been wounded. It is believed that most of the dead and wounded
are the victims of Serbian artillery. Reports of fighting in
other areas of Bosnia also continue to circulate. In other developments,
Bosnian Croat forces have freed several hundred Bosnian Muslim
prisoners from a camp by Mostar, and pledged to release the remaining
several thousand prisoners soon. On 14-December the Sarajevo
daily Oslobodjenje (Liberation) was awarded the Sakharov Prize,
an international human rights award. According to AFP, Zlatcko
Dizdarevic, the paper's editor, claimed the prize and used the
opportunity to criticize Western nations for allegedly supporting
the reprehensible policy of partitioning Bosnia. -Stan Markotich


KRAJINA ELECTION RETURNS. On 14 December Borba summed up the
state of the ballot counting in the recent elections held in
the self-proclaimed Republic of Serbian Krajina with the headline
"Babic Ahead of Martic." Elections in the RSK, which was formed
out of Croatian territory in 1991 as rebel Serbs objected to
Croatian independence, were held on 12 December for an 84-seat
parliament and a president. Milan Babic and Milan Martic, along
with at least five other contenders, are vying for the presidency
and both are regarded by the Croatian state media and the Croatian
government as extremists and harmful Serbian nationalists. Croatian
media say both men are bent on gaining independence for the RSK,
which lacks international recognition, and are unwilling to compromise
or negotiate with Zagreb. On 14-December Reuters notes that Martic
is the candidate who has received the backing and blessing of
Serbia's president, Slobodan Milosevic. The ballot counting,
in an election which has been denounced as illegal by Zagreb
authories, may continue for several more days. -Stan Markotich


WILL MILOSEVIC'S PARTY FORM A COALITION? AFP ON 15 DECEMBER SAYS
THE SOCIALIST PARTY OF SERBIA (SPS), HEADED BY PRESIDENT SLOBODAN
MILOSEVIC MAY HAVE TO FORM A PARLIAMENTARY COALITION WITH SEVERAL
OTHER PARTIES AFTER THE 19 DECEMBER ELECTIONS. AFP cites recent
polling data which suggest that only 25.5% of committed voters
will support the Socialists. The news agency speculates that
the Socialists may form a minority government with Zoran Djindjic's
Democratic Party, supported by about 6% of voters, and notes
that the SPS will receive backing from Zeljko Raznjatovic, the
extremist nationalist leader of the Serbian Unity Party. -Stan
Markotich

CZECH PRIME MINISTER ON RUSSIAN ELECTIONS. Speaking on Czech
Radio on 14-December, Premier Vaclav Klaus said that the Russian
election results are by no means encouraging but, at the same
time, "it would not be good to sound alarm." Klaus argued that
the period of transformation in Russia will be much longer than
in the Czech Republic. He said that-in the interest of Russian
citizens and all of Russia's neighbors-the period of transformation
must be as peaceful as possible. President Vaclav Havel said
on 13 December that he would comment on the Russian elections
when the results are more complete. -Jiri Pehe

MECIAR ON RUSSIAN ELECTIONS. In a 14 December address on Slovak
Television, Premier Vladimir Meciar said Russia will be threatened
with fascism if democratic forces fail to win the next presidential
elections and that the current Russian president and government
will require much support to counterbalance Zhirinovsky. -Sharon
Fisher

POLAND AGHAST AT RUSSIAN ELECTIONS. The mood in Poland in the
wake of the Russian elections was one of restrained horror. Gazeta
Wyborcza on 14-December quoted Zhirinovsky's statement that "Germany
and Russia should again share a common border," while Polish
TV reported on a recent interview with a German neo-Nazi paper
in which Zhirinovsky called for a renewal of the Molotov-Ribbentrop
Pact. While some Polish observers argued hopefully that the Russian
election results will encourage the more rapid incorporation
of the Eastern European democracies into Western security structures,
many privately expressed deepened pessimism about Poland's chances
for NATO membership. Warsaw seems to sense that the West will
now become even more hesitant to extend security guarantees,
in keeping with the perceived need to buttress Yeltsin against
right-wing foes. In an interview with CBS television on 14 December,
President Lech Walesa nonetheless urged the West not to allow
Russia to assume the role of the "the world's policeman" and
to resist "blackmail" on the question of expanding NATO. The
Polish government is withholding comment until the final election
results are made public, PAP reports. -Louisa Vinton

OLECHOWSKI PRESSES FOR SECURITY COMMITMENT. Opening a three-day
official visit to Washington on 14 December, Polish Foreign Minister
Andrzej Olechowski said that the news from Russia is "undeniably
bad." Olechowski nonetheless urged circumspection until the final
results are in. During a meeting with US Secretary of State Warren
Christopher on 14-December, Olechowski pressed for assurance
that the "partnership for peace" proposal is something more than
a hollow substitute for security guarantees. Excluding Poland
from NATO, Olechowski said, "would be an invitation to rivalry
or collusion between our two mighty neighbors," Western agencies
report. Despite an assurance from Christopher that NATO does
not rule out admitting new members in the future, Olechowski
told reporters that an explicit timetable and clear criteria
for membership are essential immediately for the Visegrad countries.
Before leaving for the US, Olechowski warned in a 12 December
New York Times interview that the West is "too optimistic about
Russia" and is "playing into Russia's hands by not seeing the
signals of imperial thinking." -Louisa Vinton

MORE ON UKRAINIAN REACTION TO RUSSIAN ELECTION RESULTS. Ukrainian
leaders have continued to express alarm over the stunning election
success of the Russian chauvinist politician Vladimir Zhirinovsky,
Ukrainian media report. President Leonid Kravchuk emphasized
at a press conference on 14 December that what was so shocking
was that "so many people" had voted for Zhirinovsky's platform
"who favors restoring the tsarist empire." He said that he hoped
that President Yeltsin would not allow an imperial policy of
"revanchism" with respect to the non-Russian states that were
formerly part of the Soviet empire to become state policy for
this would have "cataclysmic" consequences for Europe and the
world. The head of the parliamentary foreign affairs commission,
Dmytro Pavlychko, said the election results had confirmed that
Ukraine had been right to hold on to part of the nuclear arsenal
on its territory and that he hoped that the West would now show
more understanding for Ukraine's security concerns and approach
to nuclear disarmament. Meanwhile, more radical deputies, such
as Ihor Derkach and Stepan Khmara, have begun urging that Ukraine
now secure "operational control" over the nuclear weapons on
its territory. -Bohdan Nahaylo

HAVEL UNDER ATTACK FROM FORMER DISSIDENTS. Czech and international
media report that Czech President Havel and a former fellow Charter
77 signatory, Petr Cibulka, clashed in court on 14 December over
the issue of using communist secret police files to identify
alleged police collaborators. Havel was summoned to appear in
court because Cibulka and another former dissident, Lubos Vydra,
both of whom Havel had publicly condemned for publishing lists
of alleged secret police collaborators and thus causing human
tragedies, filed a libel suit against him. In his court speech,
Havel condemned witch hunts for communist collaborators, saying
that he had evidence that people attempted suicide after their
names appeared on the unofficial lists of some 140,000 alleged
collaborators. Havel said that the lists were of "thoroughly
dubious origin," riddled with mistakes and were probably designed
by the former secret police to undermine any future democracy.
"I am ashamed that your names once appeared under Charter 77,"
Havel told Cibulka and Vydra. Cibulka, in turn, called Havel
"a pig" and "a brute." It is not know whether Havel plans to
press defamation charges. -Jiri Pehe

SLOVAKIA'S ETHNIC HUNGARIANS DEMAND AUTONOMY. On 14 December
the Slovak daily Republika published a translation of a document
which was approved by ethnic Hungarians on 6 December in Komarno,
calling for self-administration in southern Slovakia. The document,
entitled "The Declaration of the Association of Towns and Villages
of Zitny Ostrov," calls for another session on 8 January 1994
to further discuss the establishment of "a province with special
status and an independent self-government and public administration."
In a 14 December press conference of the ethnic Hungarian Coexistence
Movement, the group said it was taking such actions because the
Slovak cabinet "has no interest in listening to the opinions
of the representatives of the Hungarian minority." The party
further said that if Slovakia will be divided into regional administrative
zones, "then one must belong to the Hungarian minority." In a
press conference of the Hungarian Christian Democratic Movement,
Chairman Pal Csaky complained that the parliament has yet to
deal with the minority legislation presented by his party earlier
this year. The declaration caused an uproar among Slovak politicians.
Slovak National Party Chairman Ludovit Cernak held a special
meeting with President Michal Kovac to discuss the declaration,
which he called unconstitutional. Cernak also said "some Hungarian
parties provoke friction because they want to test the resistance
of the Slovak independent state." -Sharon Fisher

OLSZEWSKI OUSTED AS PARTY CHAIRMAN. Former Polish Prime Minister
Jan Olszewski failed to win reelection as chairman of his own
party, the Movement for the Republic (RdR), at its second congress
on 12-December, PAP reports. Olszewski was defeated 106-100,
by Romuald Szeremietiew, a former deputy defense minister. Olszewski
and his supporters stormed out after the vote, which reflected
support for cooperation with the coalition recently formed by
three other leading "center-right" parties, rather than the confrontational
stance advocated by Olszewski. Szeremietiew also argued that
"radical anticommunism will not win us support." The RdR, founded
by Olszewski after his government fell in June 1992, failed to
win any seats in the recent elections. -Louisa Vinton

SEKULA NAMED POLISH CUSTOMS CHIEF. Ireneusz Sekula, a former
deputy prime minister for economic matters in the communist government
headed by Prime Minister Mieczyslaw Rakowski, was named to head
the Main Customs Office on 11 December. Sekula, a veteran communist
functionary, has since 1990 served as chairman of the board of
Polnippon, a Polish-Japanese joint venture. He belongs to the
Democratic Left Alliance's "liberal," pro-business wing. Sekula
told PAP on 13-December that he favors more liberal customs duties
rather than "political methods" as the best means to fight smuggling.
-Louisa Vinton

ROMANIAN SENATE VOTES ON INFORMERS. On 13-December the Senate
approved by a vote of 104 to 2 with two abstentions a proposal
that could pave the way for exposing communist-era securitate
informers. Radio Bucharest says the motion, which calls for barring
those who served the political police as informers between 1945-1989
from public service, was presented to parliament by Constantin-Ticu
Dumitrescu, a Senator for the National Peasant Party Christian
Democratic and chairman of the Association of Former Political
Prisoners in Romania. Before becoming law, the proposal has to
be adopted by the Chamber of Deputies, parliament's lower house.
Previous efforts to expose securitate members and collaborators
have been blocked by the ruling left-nationalist coalition. -Dan
Ionescu

CORRUPTION CHARGED IN BELARUSIAN GOVERNMENT. At a parliamentary
session on 14 December Aleksandr Lukashenka, head of a provisional
parliamentary commission checking the operations of businesses
run by central and local governmental bodies, blasted the finance
minister, the head of the State Committee on Industry, the head
of the National Bank and other senior officials, charging them
with corruption, Radiofakt and Interfax reported. Among other
allegations, Lukashenka charged that money was funneled from
the national stabilization fund into private companies. He alleged
that the Chairman of the Supreme Soviet, Stanislau Shushkevich,
and Prime Minister, Vyacheslau Kebich, were aware of many of
these offenses. Lukashenka said his commission had concluded
that businesses run by governmental bodies were generally engaged
in criminal activities. Since the beginning of the year the Belorusian
KGB sent the government over 200 reports of offenses in foreign
trade and privatization, but parliament's leaders have not investigated
a single case. -Ustina Markus

BELARUS TO FREE ENERGY PRICES. A representative of the Committee
for Foreign Relations, Uladzimir Radkevich, announced that it
has been decided to completely free the price of gas and oil
used internally in Belarus and allow it to reach the market level,
Radiofakt reported on 14 December. He said this was the only
way in which the republic would be able to pay Russia for its
energy. Radkevich added that while Russia has a monopoly on Belarus's
energy supplies the republic is looking for alternative suppliers.
-Ustina Markus

UKRAINIAN GOVERNMENT PRESENTS ECONOMIC PROGRAM. On 14 December,
the Ukrainian government presented parliament with a program
for overcoming the economic crisis and its provisions are being
debated, Ukrainian media reported. The program does not provide
for the introduction of a state of emergency as had been speculated
in the press earlier. According to the Minister of Economy, Roman
Shpek, the government wants to stabilize the economy by privatizing
state owned firms and forcing those remaining in state hands
to be profitable. Most state firms will have to buy oil and gas
themselves next year. Other measures to limit inflation include
forbidding emissionary credits which have bloated the money supply
and driven inflation to 70% per month. -Ustina Markus and Bohdan
Nahaylo

MEETING OF BALTIC PRESIDENTS. On 15 December at the invitation
of Estonian President Lennart Meri his Latvian and Lithuanian
counterparts Guntis Ulmania and Algirdas Brazauskas will take
part at the opening of the Baltic Institute for Strategic and
International Studies, BNS reported on 14 December. They will
meet separately to discuss the recent Russian elections, greater
Baltic economic, political, and security cooperation, and relations
with NATO. The presidents will attend the opening session of
the institute's conference on 16 December. -Saulius Girnius

LATVIAN CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT HEAD DISMISSED.
On 14-December the Latvian government dismissed Maris Plavnieks
for gross breaches of law, Baltfax reports. A report in November
by "Helsinki Watch" had pointed to gross violations of human
rights of Latvian permanent residents who were not citizens.
A parliamentary human rights committee, appointed to investigate
the charges that Plavnieks had refused to register several thousand
individuals who were entitled to registration and repeatedly
ignored court decisions declaring his actions unlawful, determined
that all the accusations were grounded. The committee also said
that the department had illegally used state funds to pay for
insurance policies for its leaders. -Saulius Girnius

ESTONIAN SOCIAL DEMOCRATS PROPOSE TAX HIKES. On 12 December the
annual meeting of the Estonian Social Democratic Party suggested
that taxes should be raised to provide for larger pensions, BNS
reported on 13 December. The options proposed were raising the
valued-added tax from 18% to 20%, introducing an additional 3-4%
social welfare tax on employees, or hiking the employer-paid
social welfare tax from 20% to 21.5% and introducing an employee
social welfare tax of 2-3%. The party proposed a gradual increase
in the monthly child benefits especially after the birth of a
third child. -Saulius Girnius

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Liz Fuller and Edith Oltay









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