A disagreement may be the shortest cut between two minds. - Kahlil Gibran
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 235, 09 December 1993







RUSSIA



CENTRAL ELECTORAL COMMISSION APPEALS TO VOTERS. The Central Electoral
Commission appealed to voters to make their own decision on whether
to take part in the 12 December referendum and election, ITAR-TASS
reported on 8 December. The appeal said that some Russian federal
government and regional leaders had made public statements telling
people to go or not to go to the polls. The commission said only
voting results could express the will of the population and recommendations
from the country's officials should be regarded as personal positions
of ordinary voters. On 9 December, President Boris Yeltsin is
expected to appear on national television to discuss the referendum
and elections. -Vera Tolz

OFFICIAL ELECTIONS RESULTS TO TAKE 12 TO 14-DAYS. Russia's Central
Electoral Commission said the final results of the 12 December
referendum and elections would be announced 12 to 14 days after
the event, Interfax reported on 8 December. The agency quoted
Aleksei Korobov, director of the commission's statistical department,
as saying that period of time was needed for the examination
of protocols to be submitted to Moscow by more than 95,000 constituency
commissions. -Vera Tolz

GAIDAR ON FUTURE PARLIAMENT. The leader of Russia's Choice, Egor
Gaidar, warned in an interview with Izvestiya on 8 December that
the composition of the future parliament is likely to be similar
to that of the old legislature. He said that he believes communists,
the conservative Agrarian Party, the bloc of Vladimir Zhirinovsky,
and the party of Nikolai Travkin will be well represented in
the new parliament. Meanwhile observers are speculating as to
who will be the candidates elected in single-member constituencies.
According to official data, of the 1,567 registered candidates
running for seats in the State Duma in single-member constituencies,
almost 60% do not belong to any political bloc. They are expected
to decide upon their political affiliation after parliament begins
its work. -Alexander Rahr

YAVLINSKY ON NEW CONSTITUTION. In an interview with Nezavisimaya
gazeta on 8 December, Grigorii Yavlinsky, a leader of the Yavlinsky-Boldyrev-Lukin
electoral bloc, said he believed that, even if approved at the
12 December referendum, the new constitution would prove to be
a temporary one. He said that yet another constitution would
probably have to be worked out by 1996. Yavlinsky said the main
task of the new parliament would be to work on the next constitution
and to prepare for new parliamentary, local and presidential
elections by 1996. Asked whether Russia was moving towards authoritarian
rule, Yavlinsky said that authoritarianism was impossible in
today's Russia, since society had become too free and too open
to obey an authoritarian ruler. -Vera Tolz

RUTSKOI AND KHASBULATOV TO BE DETAINED THREE MORE MONTHS. Aleksandr
Zvyagintsev, a spokesman for the Russian Prosecutor, said on
8-December that the investigation into the events of 3-4 October
was to be extended by three months, AFP and Interfax reported.
The decision was taken on 3-December and aims to ensure that
the investigation is "absolutely comprehensive, absolutely accurate
and absolutely unbiased," according to Zvyagintsev. During the
investigation, the accused, who include former Vice President
Aleksandr Rutskoi and former parliamentary chairman Ruslan Khasbulatov,
will not be released from Moscow's Lefortovo prison. Although
accused of organizing mass disturbances, they have not yet been
officially charged. Another of the accused, former Security Minister
Viktor Barannikov, was recently hospitalized. -Wendy Slater

YELTSIN IN BRUSSELS. Boris Yeltsin traveled to Brussels to start
official visits to Belgium as well as to NATO and the European
Union (EU) on 8 December. He held talks on 8 December with the
Belgian side, meeting with the king of Belgium, Albert-II, and
with Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene and Foreign Minister Willy
Claes. At the end of talks, the Russian and Belgian sides signed
an agreement of accord and cooperation. Yeltsin was scheduled
to sign a joint declaration on partnership and cooperation with
the EU on 9 December, but the text could not be finalized in
time and a general statement will be issued instead, Russian
and Western agencies reported. -Suzanne Crow

STRIKE WATCH. From news agencies reports received through late
8 December, it appears that 12 coal mines in the Vorkuta regions
remained closed; 3 mine construction agencies in the Sverdlovsk
region continued their strike over back wages; communications
workers have threatened to stop work on 10 December if their
overdue wages are not forthcoming; and employees of the Russian
Academy of Sciences protested on 8 December about their low wages,
but did not threaten to lay down their pens. -Keith Bush

PROSPECTS FOR CONVERSION. According to a deputy chairman of Roskomoboronprom,
although Russia inherited some 80% of the defense industry of
the former Soviet Union, it can produce only 17% of the military
hardware needed without inputs from other states, Interfax reported
on 8 December. It will therefore need to collaborate on defense
output with other former Soviet republics for another 5-7 years.
The official, Boris Lapshev, also disclosed that about 4.5 million
people were employed in some 2,000 defense factories in Russia.
Nearly 75% of these are scheduled to be privatized during the
next two years, but about 450 of the plants-including the "most
important"-will remain in state hands. -Keith Bush

DENIAL OF MONETARY REFORM. As is customary at this time of year,
rumors of monetary reform have been circulating. This time, it
is speculated, banknotes will be exchanged at the rate of 10:1
or 100:1, while coins will remain in circulation and will be
revalued. According to Interfax on 8 December, the Russian Central
Bank has officially denied that monetary reform is contemplated
and has complained that small change is being hoarded. -Keith
Bush

LAND SALES TO BE TAXED. On 8 December, President Yeltsin signed
a decree "On the Taxation on the Sale of Plots of Land and Other
Land Transactions," ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported. Sales of
land by individuals will be taxed at the current rates on personal
income, e.g., 12% on earnings of up to 1 million rubles a year,
20% on earnings between 1 and 2 million rubles, and so on. (Income
tax rates are expected to be altered soon). Corporate bodies
will pay a tax rate of 32% and brokers even more. -Keith Bush


FILATOV, MEDVEDEV CRITICIZE TATARSTAN, BASHKORTOSTAN, AND TUVA
OVER CONSTITUTION. Sergei Filatov, head of the President's Administration,
expressed concern on 8 December at the opposition of the leaders
of Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, and Tuva to the draft constitution
and suggested that an official statement should be issued on
the matter, ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported. Filatov said the
leaders of these republics were "seeking not the sovereignty
of the republics, but the sovereignty of power," and added that
what they were doing disturbs our services, armed forces, and
interior ministry bodies stationed on their territories. A similar
statement was made at a press conference by Nikolai Medvedev,
the head of the department responsible for work with territories
of the President's administration, who included Kalmykia with
the other three republics. -Ann Sheehy

TUVIN PRESIDENT DENIES REPUBLIC WILL SECEDE. Tuvin President
Sherig-Ool Oorzhak said in the republican parliament on 8 December
that the republic would remain part of Russia whatever the outcome
of the referendums on 12 December on the Russian and Tuvin constitutions,
ITAR-TASS reported. (The Tuvin constitution includes a provision
for secession, and it has been proposed that, if it is approved,
a referendum on the matter be held in mid-1994.) Oorzhak said,
however, that he hoped the federal authorities would remain true
to the spirit and letter of the federal treaty, and referred
to Tuva's experience of independence prior to 1994. The President
of Marii-El Vladislav Zotin said on 8 December that he is convinced
the draft constitution is a transitional document and that the
new Federal Assembly will start work by discussing it, Interfax
reported. He does not approve of the equality of the republics
and regions. -Ann Sheehy

REACTIONS IN NORTH OSSETIA, CHECHNYA TO YELTSIN'S VISIT TO NORTH
CAUCASUS. On 8 December the North Ossetian parliament and the
North Ossetian Prime Minister Sergei Khetagurov both condemned
the decision taken during Yeltsin's visit to the North Caucasus
to return Ingush refugees to the Prigorodnyi raion on North Ossetia
by forcible methods, ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported. A protest
meeting of about 10,000 also gathered outside the parliament.
Chechen President Dzhokhar Dudaev and the commanders of the Chechen
armed forces issued a statement saying that the decision to tighten
controls on the Chechen border and take control of the railway
was a veiled declaration of war. According to AFP, an anonymous
aide who travelled to the Caucasus with Yeltsin, said steps were
also being taken to prevent Dudaev making any more of the foreign
trips which he has so far been able to make at will. -Ann Sheehy


TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



ELECTION DATE SET IN KAZAKHSTAN. Kazakhstani, Russian and Western
news agencies reported on 8-December that Kazakhstan's Supreme
Soviet had dissolved itself after designating 7 March as the
date for elections to a full-time legislature to replace the
Soviet-style parliament. Nearly 200 of the Supreme Soviet's 350-deputies
had already given up their mandates before the session opened.
Having voted to dissolve the Supreme Soviet, remaining deputies
debated giving some parliamentary functions to President Nursultan
Nazarbaev until the upcoming elections. Some intellectuals promptly
protested that Kazakhstan was rapidly becoming an authoritarian
state. -Bess Brown

NEW HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP CREATED IN BISHKEK. An RFE/RL correspondent
in Bishkek reported on 8 December that human rights activists
from all Central Asian countries had gathered in Bishkek and
set up a Congress of Non-Governmental Human Rights Organizations.
The chairman of Kyrgyzstan's Human Rights Defense Committee,
Tursunbai Akhunov, was chosen to head the new organization. Shukhrat
Ismatullaev and Vasila Inoyatova, both leading figures in the
Uzbek opposition movement Birlik, were warned by Tashkent police
not to attend the Bishkek meeting; a Birlik member told RFE/RL
that Inoyatova, tried and amnestied earlier in the year on charges
of having insulted President Islam Karimov, was detained for
eight hours. On 7 December a leader of the Birlik women's group
Tomaris, Mamura Usmanova, said she had been beaten up in her
home because she planned to attend the Bishkek meeting. -Bess
Brown

GEORGIAN ECONOMICS MINISTER RESIGNS IN PROTEST. On 8 December,
the day that bread rationing was finally introduced in Tbilisi,
Georgian Economics Minister Mikhail Dzhibuti submitted his resignation
on the grounds that he is fundamentally opposed to the government's
existing economic policies and its style of management, Radio
Tbilisi reported. -Liz Fuller

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



BOSNIANS SAY FORCE NECESSARY TO MAKE PEACE. An RFE/RL correspondent
reported from London on 8 December that Bosnian Foreign Minister
Irfan Ljubijankic has called again for the lifting of the arms
embargo against his government. He warned against taking commitments
by the warring parties at face value, calling them "only words
on paper." Ljubijankic added that force is necessary to uphold
any peace agreements, and, if the international community cannot
or will not provide the necessary muscle, then it should allow
the Bosnian government to have the means to do so itself. -Patrick
Moore

ALBANIAN PARTY LEADERSHIP FRAGMENTED IN MACEDONIA. Muhamed Halili,
leader of the Albanian parliamentary faction, commented in the
8 December issue of Nova Makedonija that the forced resignation
of the Party for Democratic Prosperity's leadership early December
was a result of a power struggle. Whatever differences exist
in the party, he claimed, would be resolved in a party congress
to be held later in December or perhaps in January. The party,
which has been divided over approach to the matter of Albanian
rights in Macedonia, has been secretive about internal affairs.
Hard-liners seem to be angered by the way in which the arrests
of Albanians connected with an allegedly subversive group, the
All Albanian Army, were treated. Some observers see the hand
of Albania in PDP developments. -Duncan Perry

TURKISH FOREIGN MINISTER IN MACEDONIA, BULGARIA. Hikmet Cetin,
Turkish foreign minister, visited Skopje on 7 December, accompanied
by representatives of Turkey's business community. Cetin, according
to MILS and MIC, was warmly received by officials, including
President Kiro Gligorov. Matters of mutual interest were discussed,
especially the construction of the proposed Tirana-Skopje-Sofia-Istanbul
highway. Business representatives identified problems and talked
about the possibility of establishing a joint economic council
to further cooperation and enhance economic ties. On 8 December
Cetin went on to Bulgaria, where he is scheduled to attend the
third meeting of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation group and
meet with Bulgarian leaders. On the same day he was received
by Prime Minister Lyuben Berov, Foreign Minister Stanislav Daskalov
and leaders of the parliamentary factions. Both bilateral and
regional issues were discussed, and BTA quoted Cetin as saying
that current Bulgarian-Turkish relations could serve as an example
not only for the Balkans but also for the West. While praising
the role of the predominantly Turkish Movement for Rights and
Freedoms in strengthening Bulgarian democracy, he told journalists
that Ankara considers the problems of ethnic Turks an internal
Bulgarian matter that should be resolved within the framework
of the constitution. -Duncan Perry and Kjell Engelbrekt

HAVEL MEETS LORD OWEN. David Owen, an international mediator
in the Bosnian crisis, arrived in Prague on 8 December for a
private visit. In a meeting with President Vaclav Havel, which
took place at Owen's request, Owen informed Havel about the perspectives
and meaning of the Geneva peace conference on former Yugoslavia.
Havel's spokesman told journalists after the meeting that Owen
and Havel discussed mainly their differing views of the peace
negotiations. Havel told Owen that goals and meaning of these
negotiations need to be redefined and that "the principles on
which they are based are not optimal." Owen told journalists
that the division of Bosnia-Herzegovina into three republics,
which will coexist in some sort of union, "appears to be definite."
Owen argued that such a solution is not "ideal," but that the
main goal is to stop killing and end the war. -Jiri Pehe

ROMANIAN PRESIDENT INTERVIEWED BY POLITIKA. On 5 December the
Belgrade daily Politika ran an exclusive interview that had been
granted by Romania's president, Ion Iliescu. Iliescu seized the
opportunity to comment on economic and political conditions plaguing
both the world and the Balkan region. Iliescu stressed his belief
that the West was passing through "no ordinary" but "a deep [political
and economic] crisis." Insofar as the Balkans are concerned,
Iliescu deplored the instability and destruction caused by conflicts
throughout former Yugoslavia; he further reaffirmed Romania's
policy of a "good relationship to all the countries that have
been formed out of former Yugoslavia." Iliescu added that Bucharest
"has had and should have excellent relations with Serbia." -Stan
Markotich

DEMONSTRATIONS IN ROMANIA. An estimated 30,000 to 40,000 people
marched through Bucharest on 8 December calling for the resignation
of Premier Nicolae Vacaroiu's minority left-wing government,
Radio Bucharest and Western agencies report. The rally, which
was staged by the Alfa Trade Union Cartel and the National Trade
Union Bloc, two of Romania's largest labor organizations, was
joined by hundreds of Bucharest University students. The protesters
demanded a doubling of the minimum wage, faster privatization
and rapid distribution of land ownership certificates. Groups
of students went to President Ion Iliescu's residence, and some
scuffled with presidential guards and police when they tried
to paint anti-Iliescu slogans on the walls. In a separate rally
in Cluj-Napoca, local university students demanded better living
and study conditions, while they colleagues in Iasi continued
a general strike to protest official education policies. The
Bucharest rally was the third in less than one month, after those
on 18 and 29 November. They were described by journalists as
having been the largest since the fall Nicolae Ceausescu's communist
regime in December 1989. -Dan Ionescu

WALESA LASHES OUT AT BROADCASTING COUNCIL. Presidential spokesman
Andrzej Drzycimski announced unexpectedly on 8 December that
President Lech Walesa has "withdrawn his support" for the three
members of the National Broadcasting Council he appointed this
spring. The council is the body with constitutional authority
to regulate the Polish airwaves and supervise public radio and
television. Drzycimski explained that Walesa was displeased that
the council had failed to consult its decisions with him. By
law, the president appoints three of the council's nine members,
including its chairman. He has no power to dismiss them, however;
the council is meant to be independent of all political influence.
Walesa's "withdrawal of support" thus has political rather than
practical significance. In an interview with PAP on 9-December,
Walesa nonetheless said he expects his three appointees-Marek
Markiewicz, Maciej Ilowiecki, and Ryszard Bender-to resign. Ilowiecki
told reporters on 8 December that the president's move came as
a shock and that he had learned of it first from radio reports;
he defended the council's performance. The reasons for Walesa's
outburst remain unclear, but he was apparently displeased by
the council's decision on 15 November to appoint a political
independent, Wieslaw Walendziak, to head public television, rather
than a presidential loyalist. -Louisa Vinton

INFLATION REIGNITES IN POLAND? POLAND'S MAIN STATISTICAL OFFICE
REPORTED ON 8 DECEMBER THAT CONSUMER PRICES ROSE 3.9% in November,
the sharpest monthly increase since January 1993. Food prices
led the way, rising 6.8% in November alone. This new upsurge
drew worried commentary from two leading dailies. Rzeczpospolita's
financial correspondent on 8-December attributed the jump in
inflation to the new government's protectionist policies; import
barriers have been retained on agricultural goods, and this has
failed to counteract steep domestic prices for meat, eggs, and
other farm products. Nowa Europa on 9 December expressed concern
that the annual inflation rate could rise as high as 36% by year's
end, well in excess of the anticipated 32%. The paper called
this development a "bad omen" for 1994. -Louisa Vinton

POLISH LABOR MINISTER OFF THE HOOK. The Warsaw prosecutor's office
officially halted criminal proceedings against Labor Minister
Leszek Miller on 8-December, PAP reports. Miller had faced charges
in connection with a $1.2 million loan from the CPSU to the Polish
communist party, then in its death throes, in early 1990. In
his capacity as General Secretary of the Social Democracy of
the Polish Republic (SdRP), the successor to the communist party,
Miller had been accused of violating hard currency regulations
by secretly repaying $600,000 of the loan to an alleged KGB agent
in November 1990. Miller, now SdRP deputy chairman, has denied
these charges. The investigation against Miller was halted because
of "lack of evidence," but former communist First Secretary Mieczyslaw
Rakowski, who solicited the loan in the first place, may still
face charges. -Louisa Vinton

POLAND HOSTS INTERNATIONAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT CONFERENCE. Local
government representatives from Albania, Belarus, Bulgaria, the
Czech lands, Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia,
and Ukraine met on 6 December in Poznan at an International Conference
on Urban and Communal Cooperation. PAP reported that the participants
shared a feeling of insecurity about the stability and future
of democratic reforms in their countries. They complained that
the burdens of systemic transformation were being off loaded
onto local government bodies but without giving them sufficient
financial means to implement the tasks. They agreed on the need
to renew and intensify links between local and regional authorities
in Central and Eastern Europe and to establish relations with
partners in Western Europe as a foundation for future European
integration. They called for equal treatment with urban and communal
authorities of the European Union that were involved in trans-border
cooperation. -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka

CZECH PARLIAMENT AMENDS LAW ON REFUGEES. Czech parliament voted
on 8 December to tighten conditions for obtaining refugee status
in the Czech Republic. CTK quotes Interior Minister Jan Ruml
as saying that the decision was a reaction to Germany's stricter
asylum laws. Under the amendment, refugee status will be given
only to those who fear persecution from the state from which
they came. Economic hardship can no longer be used as justification.
Clearly unjustified cases must be refused within seven days.
The parliament also voted to give the refugees who meet the new
criteria protection under the Czech health insurance and social
security systems. -Jiri Pehe

KOVAC SURPASSES MECIAR IN SLOVAK POLL. On 8 December the Slovak
Statistical Office released statistics on the most trusted politician,
based on a November survey. President Michal Kovac, with the
trust of 22% of respondents, came out ahead of Premier Vladimir
Meciar, with 19%. Party of the Democratic Left Chairman Peter
Weiss was third with 16%, while parliament chairman Ivan Gasparovic
and Christian Democratic Movement Chairman Jan Carnogursky tied
for fourth with 7%. Deputy Premier Roman Kovac and Slovak National
Party Chairman Ludovit Cernak tied for sixth place, each with
5%. The percentage of respondents who do not trust any politician
fell from 48% to 42%. -Sharon Fisher

SLOVAK PRESIDENT SIGNS LAW ON NAMES. After a long delay, on 7
December Michal Kovac signed the law on names and surnames that
was passed by the parliament on 24 September and which has been
criticized by ethnic Hungarian parties. Kovac decided to sign
it after assurance from Meciar that the law will allow female
members of minority groups to write their surnames on official
documents without the feminine "ova" suffix. TASR reports that
this will be resolved through a revision of the law on the register
of births, marriages and deaths, which the cabinet will soon
send to parliament. Presidential spokesman Anton Bodis said the
president's decision was made after talks with party representatives
on 6 December. -Sharon Fisher

CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY EXCHANGE PROGRAM. On 8 December the
cultural ministers of Austria, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia,
and Slovenia signed in Budapest an agreement on a Central European
university exchange program, Radio Budapest reports. The program
was created in the framework of the Central European Initiative.
The program's goal is to promote an exchange of students, the
mutual recognition of university degrees, and the strengthening
of understanding among peoples. Hungarian Minister of Culture
Ferenc Madl praised the regional agreement for making possible
intensive cooperation in the field of science and education.
A representative of the Czech Republic attended the signing ceremony
as an observer; Croatia, Greece, Italy, Switzerland, and Ukraine
expressed interest in the program. -Edith Oltay

HUNGARY AND THE EUROPEAN UNION. The Hungarian parliament's foreign
relations committee expressed on 8 December unanimous support
for the promulgation of Hungary's associate agreement with the
European Union. Foreign Ministry State Secretary Endre Juhasz
was quoted by Radio Budapest as calling the agreement a milestone
in Hungarian legal practice since under the agreement Hungary
commits itself to bringing its legislation in harmony with the
legal norms of the European Union. The Hungarian parliament is
expected to pass the agreement next week. -Edith Oltay

STATE OF ECONOMIC EMERGENCY IN UKRAINE. The Ukrainian Cabinet
of Ministers has decided to introduce a state of emergency because
of the economic crisis, UNIAR reported on 8 December. Among the
features of the move are: the introduction of regulated prices,
the nationalization of commercial banks, and measures to renew
state control over production. The banning of strikes and rallies,
as well as a curtailment on the activities of parties is also
under consideration. -Ustina Markus

LATVIAN-RUSSIAN TALKS CONCLUDED. On 8 December three days of
talks in Jurmala ended with no agreement on the future of the
Russian radar installation at Skrunda, BNS reports. Russian delegation
head Sergei Zotov repeated his country's proposal to withdraw
its troops from Latvia by 31 August 1994 if allowed to maintain
the radar for six more years. He noted that the "limited" Russian
budget made financing its maintenance difficult, and added that
Russia was willing to allow Latvian specialists to work in it.
The next round of talks will be held in Moscow on 20-21 December.
-Saulius Girnius

UN RESOLUTION NOTES "UNRESOLVED ISSUES" IN LATVIA, ESTONIA. On
8 December the UN General Assembly Social, Humanitarian, and
Cultural Committee approved by consensus a resolution stating
that there are "unresolved issues" in Estonia and Latvia with
the non-native population, an RFE/RL correspondent in New York
reports. The initial resolution, proposed by Russia, had noted
"the persistence of serious problems" for Russian-speakers in
those countries, but due to Estonian efforts the text was toned
down. It did not go into the merits of the charges, but simply
asked the UN Secretary General to report to the next General
Assembly on progress in human rights in the two countries. -Saulius
Girnius

LATVIAN PRESIDENT VISITS FINLAND. On 8 December Guntis Ulmanis,
accompanied by Baltic and Nordic Affairs' Minister Gunars Meierovics
and Forestry Minister Kazimirs Slakota, made a one-day visit
to Helsinki, BNS reports. He held talks with his counterpart
Mauno Koivisto and Prime Minister Esko Aho. At a news conference
Ulmanis stressed the need for the swift withdrawal of Russian
armed forces from Latvia and said that international pressure
was needed to convince Russia to abandon its radar station at
Skrunda. -Saulius Girnius

TWO ALBANIAN DEPUTIES TURN INDEPENDENT. According to Rilindja
Demokratike on 8 December, parliamentary deputies Petrit Kalakula
and Abdi Baleta, both former members of the ruling Albanian Democratic
Party, have become independents. Their departure for the DP is
neither a surprise nor a blow to the Democrats. Baleta was operating
as an independent already, having been removed from his post
as cabinet minister and chairman of the Tirana District of the
Democratic Party for an allegedly "pro-fascist" statement in
the Albanian parliament. Kalakula challenged on several occasions
key tenets of government policy, thus alienating himself from
the DP. -Robert Austin

DISNEY CARTOONS ELUDE SANCTIONS. Politika reported on 1 December
that Disney characters will reappear soon in the daily. In January
1993, Disney announced it would freeze comic strips publication
in keeping with UN sanctions. According to the daily, Disney
representatives for southern Europe and Politika Publishing House
officials agreed in Athens to resume publication. -Milan Andrejevich


[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Roman Solchanyk and Dan Ionescu









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