This communicating of a man's self to his friend works two contrary effects; for it redoubleth joy, and cutteth griefs in half. - Francis Bacon
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 226, 26 November 1993



	Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.





RUSSIA



FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE OPPOSES NATO EXPANSION. The Director of
the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service, Evgenii Primakov, told
a press- conference in Moscow on 25 November that the incorporation
into NATO of Poland, Hungary, and the Czech and Slovak Republics
would not accord with Russian national interests. Primakov was
presenting the findings of an analytical report, "Prospects for
Expanding NATO and Russia's Interests," prepared by his service;
his remarks were carried by Ostankino Television and reported
by ITAR-TASS. Among the negative consequences for Russia, the
report listed the expansion of "the world's largest military
organization" as far as Russia's borders and the weakening of
Russia's military capability. If this happened, Primakov said,
Moscow would undertake a total review of its defense concepts,
operational plans, and deployment of forces. Primakov added that
Russia's own membership in NATO was a matter for the distant
not the near future. Previewing the report, Izvestiya on 24 November
said the opinion of the foreign intelligence service was supported
by leadership of the Russian military establishment but opposed
by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which was in favor of closer
cooperation with NATO. -Suzanne Crow and Victor Yasmann

OSTANKINO TV AGAIN ACCUSED OF BIAS. On 24-November, the afternoon
edition of the "Vesti" newscast reported that the "Russia's Future-New
Names" electoral bloc had filed a formal complaint with Russia's
Court of Arbitration. The bloc accuses Ostankino TV of showing
bias toward one of the competitors in the upcoming parliamentary
elections-the pro-government "Russia's Choice" bloc which is
led by First Deputy Prime Minister Egor Gaidar. (The Court was
set up by President Boris Yeltsin in early November to ensure
that all contenders obtained equal access to the state-owned
radio and TV during the election campaign.) Citing monitoring
carried out by the Institute of the USA and Canada, "Russia's
Future" is alleging that "Russia's Choice" has so far received
"ten times" more air-time on Ostankino TV than any other contender.
-Julia Wishnevsky

CANDIDATES MAY NOT CRITICIZE PRESIDENT OR DRAFT CONSTITUTION.
Ostankino news of 25 November quoted Anatolii Vengerov, chairman
of the Court of Arbitration, as saying that parties and individual
candidates for seats in the new parliament may not use the time
allocated to them on television to criticize the Russian president
or the draft Russian constitution that is to be put to a countrywide
referendum on 12 December. Nor may the contenders seek to incite
tensions between nationalities and reveal state secrets "or other
confidential information." This ruling was reiterated by Yeltsin
who told the newscast that he was going to warn the leaders of
the 13 blocs taking part in the elections that they have been
given broadcasting time "in order to present their programs,"
not to criticize the president or the constitution. In addition,
the Court ruled that the managers of TV channels are entitled
to decide whether or not to sell further air-time to this or
that candidate or bloc. -Julia Wishnevsky

OFFICIALS URGE CITIZENS TO APPROVE CONSTITUTION. Government ministers
are urging Russian citizens to vote in favor of the new draft
constitution in the referendum on 12 December. Speaking to regional
leaders in Kaliningrad on 25 November, First Deputy Prime Minister
Vladimir Shumeiko said Russia might disintegrate if voters did
not approve the new draft, Russian TV reported. Addressing a
Moscow press conference the same day, Deputy Prime Ministers
Sergei Shakhrai and Aleksandr Shokhin said the new parliament
would not be a lawful body unless the new constitution was approved,
Reuters reported. Meanwhile, the chairman of the Russian Central
Electoral Commission, Nikolai Ryabov, was quoted the same day
by AFP as calling preparations for the referendum inadequate.
He said he doubted the draft constitution would be approved.
The draft has been criticized in the Russian media for giving
too much power to the executive and by leaders of Russia's ethnic
republics, who say it limits the rights they currently enjoy.
-Vera Tolz

TATARSTAN PARLIAMENT CRITICIZES DRAFT CONSTITUTION. All the deputies
of the Tatarstan parliament who spoke in a debate on the draft
Russian constitution on 25 November said that they would urge
their constituents to vote against the draft in the referendum
on 12 December, Interfax reported. Tatarstan Vice-President Vasilii
Likhachev said the draft was contradictory and left the status
of the republics unclear. He also maintained that the center
had decided to do away with the federal treaty. It was proposed
that Yeltsin be asked to recall the draft for further work on
it. -Ann Sheehy

DUDAEV CALLS FOR ISLAMIC ALLIANCE AGAINST WEST. Chechen president
Dzhokhar Dudaev has urged the Islamic world to form an alliance
against the West, AFP reported from Grozny on 25 November. Dudaev,
who had just returned from four days in Iraq, Jordan and Sudan,
said Iraq needed the support of the Islamic world. Dudaev blamed
Moscow for "terrorist actions" in Chechnya, saying that individuals
were being given large sums of money to destabilize the situation
in the republic. There have recently been a number of serious
explosions in Chechnya. -Ann Sheehy

GAIDAR ADVOCATES PROTECTION FOR INDUSTRY. At a Moscow news conference
on 23 November, First Deputy Prime Minister Egor Gaidar said
that he favored limited protection for domestic industry through
the use of import tariffs, Reuters reported. Noting that import
restrictions had been lifted for six months in 1992, Gaidar stated
that the government has since then started to reinstate import
tariffs to protect domestic markets and to raise additional revenues.
He was specific neither on which branches of industry were being
protected nor on the scale of tariffs. His statement should be
seen in the context of the election campaign; it will not be
welcomed by the IMF and other external monitors. -Keith Bush


DEFENSE EXPENDITURE AND PROCUREMENT. After a cabinet meeting
on 25 November that discussed, inter alia, defense orders in
1994, conflicting reports circulated on the decisions reached.
According to Interfax, First Deputy Prime Minister Oleg Soskovets
said defense expenditure in 1994 will remain at the 1993 level.
The defense budget this year is said to represent 5% of GDP;
since output is expected to continue to decline next year, this
suggests that the defense burden will grow. Soskovets told RIA
that military procurement in 1994 will remain at this year's
level, but ITAR-TASS quoted Viktor Glukhikh as saying defense
orders will fall. Glukhikh, who is the chairman of the State
Committee for the Defense Branches of Industry, also went public
about his disagreements with the Ministry of Economics, notably
over R & D and the preservation of technological capacity. -Keith
Bush

KOZYREV ON PEACEKEEPING. In a 24 November interview with Nezavisimaya
gazeta, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev discussed Russia's
motivations for pursuing peacekeeping missions in the former
USSR. Kozyrev highlighted the two paths Russia faced when the
USSR collapsed: either to try to hold the former USSR together
as a centralized state or to pull out completely. Kozyrev termed
the first option "hopeless" and the second "an unwarranted loss"
because Russia had won influence in these areas over the centuries.
The compromise between the two extremes was to maintain military
bases in conflict zones capable of peacekeeping operations. -Suzanne
Crow

GRACHEV IN GERMANY. Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev stopped
in Germany on his way from Switzerland to Russia on 24 November.
He visited the headquarters of the Western Group of Forces and
commented at a news conference on the orderly and punctual pace
of withdrawal from Germany. Grachev mentioned that construction
of housing for the returning troops continued to be a problem:
the contractors constructing the housing are on schedule, but
the Russian building industry bureaucracy fails to meet its deadlines,
ITAR-TASS reported. -Suzanne Crow

MEASURES TO EASE ENERGY SHORTAGE. The Russian government is taking
measures to resolve the energy shortage created by the winter's
unusually cold temperatures, Russian and Western news agencies
reported on 24 and 25 November. Yurii Shafranik, Minister of
Fuel and Energy, said on 24 November that Russia would reduce
its oil exports to meet the increased domestic demand; he did
not specify which markets would be sacrificed. First Deputy Prime
Minister Soskovets said the same day that a government delegation
was preparing to fly to Kazakhstan to investigate the possibility
of additional coal imports. Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin
called for "non-traditional methods" for resolving the financial
problems of the sector at a meeting of the Council of Ministers
on 25 November. -Erik Whitlock

WORKERS THREATEN TO CUT GAS SUPPLY. About 8,000 transport and
gas industry workers had joined a strike in the northern Siberian
city of Nadym, a center of the natural gas producing industry
in the Yamal Nenets Autonomous Okrug, RFE/RL's Moscow correspondent
reported on 24 November. The strikers blocked access roads to
the city and were threatening that, if the government did not
meet their demand for payment of owed wages by 26 November, they
would cut gas supplies to consumers by 10%. Also on 26 November,
First Deputy Prime Minister Egor Gaidar is due to meet with representatives
of coalminers in the far northern city of Vorkuta, who are threatening
to strike in demand of unpaid wages on 1 December. Coalminers
in the Kuznetsk Basin in western Siberia say they will join them,
AFP reported on 24 November. -Elizabeth Teague

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



SHEVARDNADZE PROPOSES NEW CONSTITUTION, ELECTIONS. The Georgian
parliament convened on 25-November after its voluntary two-month
suspension and agreed to prolong the nation-wide state of emergency
for a further two months but rejected parliament chairman Eduard
Shevardnadze's proposal that the voluntary recess also be extended,
Western agencies reported. Shevardnadze proposed drafting a new
constitution, to be followed by new parliamentary elections.
-Liz Fuller

KARIMOV IN BRITAIN. The high point of Uzbek President Islam Karimov's
four-day stay in Great Britain was the signing on 25 November
of a gold-mining deal and an agreement under which the European
Bank for Reconstruction and Development will provide Uzbekistan
with $60 million in credits to develop the private sector. On
24 and 25 November Western and Russian news agencies reported
on Karimov's meetings with British political and business leaders
and on the economic successes achieved during the Uzbek leader's
visit, including the deal with the Lonhro conglomerate to develop
a gold mine in partnership with two Uzbek government-owned firms.
Mining is expected to begin in 1996. -Bess Brown

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



MAJOR DESTRUCTION OF BOSNIA'S CULTURAL HERITAGE. The Guardian
on 25 November reported at length on the toll the current war
has taken on priceless landmarks and artifacts, particularly
Muslim ones deliberately destroyed by Serbs and Croats. In addition
to the Serbs' burning the National Library and the Croats' shelling
the Mostar bridge, the article refers to the ruining of the oldest
mosque in Bosnia dating from 1448, the Ustikolina, as well as
to Foca's 14-mosques and Banja Luka's Ferhadija and other mosques.
The destruction of Sarajevo's Oriental Institute meant the loss
of 22,000 manuscripts, although the Jewish Hagadah and a few
other treasures were saved in time. The article notes the activities
of local volunteers who are trying to rescue as much of Sarajevo's
heritage as possible in the face of international indifference
and of art smuggling by local criminals. On a related topic,
Vecernji list on 23-November quoted Croatian Liberal opposition
leader Drazen Budisa as saying he could provide hard evidence
on the destruction of mosques in Herzegovina by Croatian forces.
Budisa is a critic of President Franjo Tudjman's policies there
and supports Croat-Muslim cooperation. -Patrick Moore

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS IN THE YUGOSLAV AREA. While the resumption
of aid relief efforts to central Bosnia dominates the international
media's coverage of the Yugoslav area and while the Serbian press
is concentrating on the December elections, the Croatian papers
focus on the economic situation, on the current legislative debate
about private television, and on the fighting in Bosnia. Belgrade's
Politika on 25 November said that Croatian regular forces as
well as Bosnian Croat troops are attacking Muslims in Gornji
Vakuf, while Muslim government troops continue to battle supporters
of Fikret Abdic around Cazin. Borba noted the election activities
of Serbian-American businessman Milan Panic, and also reported
on the remarks of a ruling Socialist Party spokesman that Macedonia
has become an "American occupation zone" in a bitter reference
to improvements in relations between Washington and Skopje. Serbian
and Croatian dailies have recently managed to find common ground
on at least one topic, however: neither the Zagreb nor the Belgrade
papers have much hope or use for the current European peace initiative
aimed at persuading the Serbs to trade land in Bosnia for a lifting
of sanctions. -Patrick Moore

SERBIAN DEMOCRATS WANT KOSOVO FORUM. The Democratic Party has
launched work on a non-partisan forum to solve the Kosovo crisis,
Borba reported on 25 November. The project, which will include
several institutions like the Serbian Orthodox church and the
universities, is expected to "return Serbian political life to
Kosovo and Metohija," party chairman Zoran Djindjic said. He
added that the Democrats would not sign any document that Serbian
President Slobodan Milosevic or the chairman of the ultra-nationalist
Party of Serbian Unity, Zeljko Raznatovic "Arkan," helped draft.
"It is obvious to anybody that those who pushed us into the war
cannot free us from sanctions," Djindjic said. Nonetheless, he
seems concerned mainly with the Serbs in Kosovo rather than with
the entire population, which is over 90% Albanian. The forum
seems unlikely to include either the Democratic League of Kosovo,
which got about 76% of the vote in the underground elections
in May 1992, or any other of the ethnic Albanian parties in the
Kosovar shadow government. They call for direct negotiations
with the Serbian government under international mediation and
do not recognize any other Albanian group or individual to represent
the interests of the Kosovar population. -Fabian Schmidt

POLISH SECURITY SERVICE REVEALS ARMS CACHE. The State Security
Office (UOP) tipped off the British authorities about a major
arms cache on board the Polish container ship Inowroclaw that
docked at Teesport on 23 November. The arms were reportedly destined
for Northern Ireland. The daily Zycie Warszawy revealed on 26
November that the UOP had been keeping an eye on the illegal
deal ever since the dealers appeared on the Polish scene, and
had been closely cooperating with its British counterparts. The
Poles have been at pains to improve control of illegal arms deals
after a number of embarrassing oversights that spoiled the country's
international image. -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka

POLISH MILITARY NOT READY TO YIELD FREQUENCIES. PAP reported
on 25 November that the defense ministry has gone back on earlier
promises to make 8 of the frequencies reserved for its sole use
available for a private television channel. The ministry claims
that it needs 6 of the 8 frequencies for at least another three
years, until it has sufficient modern technology to restrict
itself to just one frequency as envisaged. It estimated the costs
as 2 trillion zloty (ca. $96 million). The chairman of the National
Broadcasting Council which is responsible for reorganizing Polish
radio and television broadcasting, Marek Markiewicz, expressed
the hope that the problems were purely of a technical nature
and could be solved in a "peaceful" atmosphere. He said that
the hitch might force the council to extend the deadline for
submission of applications for the television license past 30
November. -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka

POLISH STATEMENT ON WEU. In a formal statement issued on 23 November
Poland's foreign ministry expressed satisfaction that the French
and German foreign ministers had taken steps, as agreed in the
joint declaration of Polish, French and German foreign ministers
made in Warsaw on 12 November, to propose that the countries
of the "Visegrad Group" enjoy the status of associate members
of the West European Union (WEU). At the same time, it said the
decision made at the meeting of WEU ministers in Luxembourg on
22 November to consider other ways of strengthening ties at a
later date did not "fully satisfy" Polish aspirations, and pledged
to pursue the matter further. -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka

HAVEL ON NATO MEMBERSHIP. Czech President Vaclav Havel has again
called for admission of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland,
and Hungary to NATO. In an interview with the Belgian daily Le
Soir on 25 November, Havel said that these countries' membership
would promote regional stability and prosperity. At the same
time, Havel warned that the West would be making "the worst possible
error" if it heeded the objections of "reactionary forces in
Russia" to expanding NATO membership. -Jan Obrman

LEADERS OF MDS PARLIAMENTARY CAUCUS RESIGN. The leadership of
the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia parliamentary caucus resigned
on 24-November, TASR reports. The members included Chairman Ivan
Laluha as well as four deputy chairmen. Following the announcement
Premier Vladimir Meciar said he encouraged Laluha to reconsider
his decision, while Laluha said he decided to resign since new
leadership should be elected every year. New elections will be
held at a working session of the MDS and the Slovak cabinet on
26 November. Parliament chairman Ivan Gasparovic said the resignations
do not mean a split in the party; however, on 17 November seven
members of the party were reportedly criticized for voting in
contrary to the MDS coalition agreement with the Slovak National
Party because they voted for the dismissal of Health Minister
Viliam Sobona and supported the election of SNP Chairman Ludovit
Cernak as deputy chairman of the parliament. Although there have
been discussions of replacing Meciar as prime minister, opposition
leader Jan Carnogursky, chairman of the Christian Democratic
Movement, said on 25-November that his party would not initiate
such a move since "it is unrealistic to believe 76 deputies of
the Slovak parliament would be willing to recall Meciar." Also
on 25 November Meciar criticized the opposition, saying "their
only policy is based on hate." He said his party "will not crumble
as the opposition secretly hopes."--Sharon Fisher

NEW HEALTH MINISTER IN SLOVAKIA. On 24 November President Michal
Kovac dismissed Viliam Sobona as health minister and appointed
Irena Belohorska as a replacement. Belohorska studied medicine
at Comenius University in Bratislava and received post graduate
diplomas in gynecology and clinical oncology. She is a member
of the MDS and since April 1993 has worked at the Defense Ministry.
Sobona was ousted last week following a no confidence vote in
the parliament. -Sharon Fisher

SLOVAK DEFENSE MINISTER IN RUSSIA. Imrich Andrejcak began a two-day
visit to Moscow on 25-November, TASR reports. Meeting with his
Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev his deputy Boris Gromov,
military cooperation and Slovakia's membership in NATO were discussed.
Grachev told Andrejcak that the Russian cabinet has agreed to
pay back part of Russia's debt to Slovakia with deliveries to
the Slovak army, including five MiG-29s, one training airplane,
spare parts for planes and ammunition for the infantry. Gromov
said, "if some states, including Slovakia, insist on their incorporation
into NATO, it is their business," but that Russia "would appreciate
it if the former Warsaw Pact countries postponed their admittance
into NATO," TASR reports. Slovakia and Russia signed a military
cooperation agreement in August 1993. -Sharon Fisher

HUNGARIAN PRIME MINISTER HOSPITALIZED. The prime minister's press
office announced on 25 November that Prime Minister Jozsef Antall
has developed new symptoms relating to his illness non-Hodgkin's
lymphoma, MTI reports. Antall has only recently returned from
a month long medical treatment of the disease in Germany. The
deterioration of Antall's health raises anew the question whether
he will be able to lead the Hungarian Democratic Forum in the
1994 national elections. -Edith Oltay

ROMANIAN CONTROVERSY OVER KING MICHAEL'S VISIT. In a press release
broadcast by Radio Bucharest on 24 November, the Democratic Convention
of Romania, the largest opposition alliance, said it had decided
to refrain from participating officially in the celebrations
of the national day in Alba Iulia on 1 December and to organize
a separate meeting in Bucharest on the same day. The decision
comes after President Ion Iliescu refused to receive separately
a delegation of the DCR to discuss the possible participation
of King Michael in the celebrations. Presidential spokesman Traian
Chebeleu said the DCR's decision was "surprising" and that the
president had invited all parties to discuss the matter at a
joint meeting on the same day. He also said that the visit depended
on a joint decision by all political formations. It is clear,
however, that such an agreement was not possible, since the nationalist
and leftist parties opposed it. At a press conference after his
meeting with representatives of the parties, Iliescu claimed
that Corneliu Coposu, the leader of the National Peasant Party
Christian Democratic (the largest component of the DCR) had told
him at an earlier meeting that he personally opposed the visit
and that the former monarch should be invited to visit Romania
for Christmas. The leader of the Party of Civic Alliance, Nicolae
Manolescu, and the National Liberal Party leader Mircea Ionescu
Quintus said their parties will also boycott the celebrations
in protest against the officials' attitude towards the visit
of the former monarch. In turn, Adrian Nastase, executive chairman
of the ruling Party of Social Democracy of Romania, threatened
after the meeting with Iliescu to introduce a bill banning the
former monarch from visiting the country for the next ten to
fifteen years, if the opposition boycotts the ceremonies. A declaration
in this sense was also released after a meeting of the PSDR's
executive bureau on 25 November. -Michael Shafir

MAJOR BREAKTHROUGH IN BULGARIAN DEBT NEGOTIATIONS. Following
two years of negotiations between Bulgaria and its foreign commercial
creditors, Finance Minister Stoyan Aleksandrov on 25-November
announced that the latest round of talks, held in Frankfurt,
had resulted in a preliminary agreement on a comprehensive deal.
Upon his return to Sofia, Aleksandrov told Reuters that the creditors
had agreed in principle to reduce the $9.3 billion debt by half.
Deutsche Bank, chairman of the some 300 creditor banks, confirmed
that the general terms of a debt-reduction package are now in
place. Pari of 26-November reports that the deal would involve
a $865 million instalment as soon as it is finalized, followed
by annual payments amounting to around $300 million. For 1993
Bulgaria would only pay 5% of the interests, starting from 1
April. Aleksandrov said the final agreement can be expected by
mid-1994, but that Bulgaria in the meantime needs to achieve
a standby agreement with the International Monetary Fund to help
finance the deal. Bulgaria suspended all payments on its foreign
debt in spring 1990. -Kjell Engelbrekt

UN MAY PERMIT LIMITED TRANSIT OF BULGARIAN GOODS. Bulgaria's
ambassador to the United Nations says the UN has endorsed a proposal
by Sofia to allow limited goods transport through Serbia and
Montenegro, despite the heavy sanctions currently imposed against
rump Yugoslavia. Ambassador Slave Pashovski on 25 November told
RFE/RL that Bulgaria now in principle may be able to transit
goods through the embargoed area, although each individual transport
has to be approved by the UN Committee on Sanctions. According
to the proposal, the goods would be transported in sealed vehicles
under a precise time table. Referring both to the numerous restrictions
involved in the scheme and to the slow pace of UN procedures,
Deputy Foreign Minister Todor Churov told Standart of 26 November
that he sees "no need to be euphoric." The UN Committee on Sanctions
reportedly endorsed the Bulgarian proposal already on 19-November,
but did not inform Sofia until 25-November. -Kjell Engelbrekt


LITHUANIA AND NATO. On 23-24 November National Defense Minister
Linas Linkevicius and armed forces commander Jonas Andriskevicius
held meetings in Brussels with NATO officials, the RFE/RL Lithuanian
Service reports. NATO General Secretary Manfred Woerner said
that the Baltic States were not considered to be former Soviet
republics, the "near abroad" in which Russia demands special
interests. Lithuania desires closer cooperation and eventual
membership in NATO. It supports the US initiative "Partnership
for Peace" that will be discussed at the 10 January NATO summit
meeting. -Saulius Girnius

RUSSIA SWITCHES UKRAINE OFF POWER GRID. Moscow has switched Ukrainian
consumers off the single power grid of the former USSR because
of a sharp increase in electricity consumption in Ukraine, Interfax
reported on 25 November. As a result of the action, Ukraine has
cut electricity supplies to Bulgaria, Western press agencies
report. -Ustina Markus

CONFLICT IN BELARUSIAN SECURITY SERVICES. In a letter to the
Chairman of the Supreme Soviet Stanislau Shushkevich and Prime
Minister Vyacheslau Kebich, KGB Minister Eduard Shyrkousky and
Interior Minister Uladzimir Yahorav have accused the Belarusian
border guards and the state secretariat of exceeding their mandates,
Reuters reported on 24 November. They said that the border guards
had created their own service for "active operations," and that
the state secretariat interferes in the way counterespionage
and internal security forces operate. The two ministers proposed
abolishing the state secretariat and placing the border guards
under the KGB control. Shushkevich is said to support the two
ministers because their demands are directed against Kebich,
with whom he has been at odds over the course of reforms in Belarus.
Mechislav Hryb, head of parliament's security commission, urged
Shushkevich and Kebich to stop arguing over the issue as it was
dividing parliament into two camps and destabilizing the situation,
Radiofakt on 25 November. -Ustina Markus

BELARUS DECIDES ON OWN CURRENCY. On 24-November ITAR-TASS reported
that parliament decided that the Belarusian rubel would be the
only legal currency in the country. It is hoped that making the
Russian ruble a foreign currency will help facilitate the implementation
of Minsk's financial policy. The government and national bank
have been ordered to prepare a mechanism to implement the decision.
-Ustina Markus

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Elizabeth Teague and Jan B. de Weydenthal







THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
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The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
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Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
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