Words that open our eyes to the world are always the easiest to remember. - Ryszard Kapuscinski
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 220, 16 November 1993



	Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.





RUSSIA



YELTSIN DENIES HAVING CANCELED EARLY PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS.
In an interview appearing in the 15 November issue of Izvestiya,
Russsian President Boris Yeltsin says that his decree calling
presidential elections two years ahead of schedule is still valid.
He claims that his remarks to media representatives on 6-November
expressing unwillingness to honor the decree were a "personal
view," not an official decision, and that he "wanted to hear
the views" of the future Federal Assembly on the issue of early
presidential elections. Yeltsin admitted, however, that he was
not favorably inclined towards early elections, and claimed that
the forthcoming constitutional referendum would be "the second
in the course of this year in which directly or indirectly confidence
in the President would be expressed." Publication of the new
draft constitution has effectively made speculation about early
presidential elections irrelevant, however, since the draft states
that, on promulgation of the constitution, the President serves
out the full term of office for which he was elected, but assumes
the new powers granted him by the new constitution. -Wendy Slater


PARTIES JOIN FORCES TO FORMULATE NEW LEGISLATURE'S RULES. Representatives
of 9 parties and election blocs of the 13 that will compete for
seats in the State Duma have decided to combine forces to formulate
the mechanics of the working of the future Federal Assembly,
Interfax reported on 15 November. The pro-Yeltsin "Russia's Choice"
bloc initiated the proposal; a presidential committee will shortly
hold open meetings, to be attended by political parties, on procedural
issues of the future parliament. The meeting was attended by
the Communist Party of Russia, the Women of Russia movement,
Russia's Future-New Names association, Cedar ecological movement,
the Agrarian Party, the Liberal Democratic Party, the Dignity
and Charity association, and the Russian Movement for Democratic
Reforms. The Democratic Party of Russia, Civic Union, the Party
of Russian Unity and Concord, and the "Yavlinsky-Boldyrev-Lukin"
bloc failed to take part in the meeting, although the Democratic
Party of Russia nominated its representatives to the initiative.
-Wendy Slater

CHECHNYA PROTESTS REFERENCE TO IT IN RUSSIAN CONSTITUTION. The
government of Chechnya has described as "a provocation" the fact
that the republic is listed as a constituent member of the Russian
Federation in the draft Russian constitution to be put to referendum
on 12 December, Interfax reported on 15-November. Chechnya announced
independence from Russia in 1991 but the Moscow leadership has
not recognized this move. The Chechen government said last week
that the republic would not hold elections to the new Russian
parliament nor would it conduct a referendum on the new Russian
constitution. -Vera Tolz

REGISTRATION OF CANDIDATES FOR NON-PARTY SEATS HAS BEGUN. The
Chairman of the Central Electoral Commission, Nikolai Ryabov,
has reported on the progress of registering the remaining candidates
for the seats in the future parliament, Interfax reported on
15-November. 1,505 candidates have been nominated for the half
of the 450 seats in the State Duma (the lower house) to be contested
in single-candidate constituencies. (The remainder are to be
contested by political parties on a system of proportional representation.)
493-candidates have been nominated for the 178 seats in the Council
of the Federation (the upper house, to which two candidates from
each constituent part of the Russian Federation are to be elected).
Registration of the candidates depends on their having collected
a certain number of signatures in support. Some opposition parties
which failed to qualify for the elections are fielding candidates
as individuals in the single-mandate constituencies. -Wendy Slater


PARTICIPANTS IN OCTOBER DISTURBANCES SEEK ELECTION . . . Supporters
of Ilya Konstantinov, a leader of the banned National Salvation
Front who is in prison awaiting trial for his role in October's
parliamentary rebellion, are reported to have collected enough
signatures to qualify Konstantinov as a candidate for the 12-December
elections, Reuters reported on 15 November. The same day, Ekho
Moskvy reported that supporters of former parliamentary speaker
Ruslan Khasbulatov were also collecting signatures to register
Khasbulatov as an election candidates in the Makhachkala (Northern
Caucasus) electoral district. On 19 October, however, Yeltsin
signed a decree stripping those people who had been formally
charged with organizing the 3-4 October disturbances of the right
to run for seats in the new parliament. Ekho Moskvy reported
that Russia's Procurator General had recently sent the list of
names of 21-such people, who include Konstantinov and Khasbulatov,
to the Central Electoral Commission. -Vera Tolz

. . . AS DO DEFENDANTS IN COUP TRIAL. At least two of the men
currently on trial for treason in the stalled case on the August
1991 attempted coup are planning to stand for election on 12
December. Vasilii Starodubtsev, formerly the chairman of the
USSR Peasants' Union, occupies a low position on the list of
candidates of the Agrarian Party; Anatolii Lukyanov, former Chairman
of the USSR Supreme Soviet, is registered as a candidate for
the State Duma in the Smolensk district, AFP and an RFE/RL Moscow
correspondent reported on 15 November. They may stand for election
since they have not yet been convicted of any crime. -Wendy Slater


RUSSIA TO DEMAND ADVANCE PAYMENT FOR OIL TO FSU? A SPOKESMAN
FOR THE RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF FUEL AND ENERGY HAS SAID THAT THE
NATIONS OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION MAY BE REQUIRED TO ELIMINATE
OLD DEBTS FOR OIL AND PAY IN ADVANCE FOR NEW SHIPMENTS IN ORDER
TO RECEIVE SUPPLIES FOR THE REST OF THE YEAR, INTERFAX REPORTED
ON 15-NOVEMBER. The date by which such conditions might be enforced
were not specified. As of last month, nations of the former Soviet
Union owed Russia 386-billion rubles for oil supplies, according
the Committee for Economic Cooperation with CIS countries. Interfax
also reported that the Russian government intends to investigate
the reexport of Russian oil and other raw materials from these
nations and, if it is confirmed, will "take [this reexporting]
into account" at future negotiations over debt repayment and
fuel supply. -Erik Whitlock

MINISTRY OF SECURITY MUST BE REFORMED TO MEET NEW CHALLENGES.
First Deputy Minister of Security Sergei Stepashin made this
statement to Rossiiskaya gazeta of 13-November. Stepashin revealed
that at the meeting between Security Minister Nikolai Golushko
and Boris Yeltsin on 5 November, the Russian President approved
Golushko's proposals for the re-organization of his agency. The
proposals include creating the post of national security assistant
to the Russian President and forming a new subdivision of the
agency for "the prevention of anti-constitutional activity."
Stepashin announced that his service will reassert control over
a "powerful combat detachment" (presumably the former KGB anti-terrorist
group "Alfa" which was separated from the KGB in 1991). He noted
that his agency will focus on economic and ecological security
aspects, as well as on the protection of commercial secrets and
computer networks. Finally, Stepashin stressed the importance
of intelligence contacts between the Russian security agencies
and the secret services of the United States, major European
powers, Israel, and South Africa, claiming that such contacts
facilitated joint operations against international drug traffickers.
-Victor Yasmann

AIRBORNE FORCES IN THE NEWS. Interfax reported on 15 November
that President Yeltsin is scheduled to visit the Tula Airborne
Forces division on 17-November, where he will observe a military
exercise and meet with officers and soldiers. Units from the
Tula Division were among those that took part in the 4 October
assault on the White House. On 1 September it was announced that
Yeltsin had promised to spend one day each month meeting with
military personnel, and he has paid special attention to the
elite forces that are stationed in the Moscow region. Meanwhile,
on 12-13 November the staff of the Ryazan Airborne Forces Command
Academy celebrated its 75th anniversary, ITAR-TASS reported.
Among those present was Defense Minister Pavel Grachev, himself
a 1969 graduate and a former commander of the Soviet Airborne
Forces. In a 13-November address Grachev emphasized that the
Airborne Forces remain at the center of Russia's military reform
efforts and that their role in Russia's military planning will
continue to grow. -Stephen Foye

RUSSIA-ASIA UPDATE. Interfax and Radio Rossii, quoting the 15
November issue of Rossiiskaya gazeta, report that a North Korean
diplomat has been expelled from Russia for trying to recruit
Russian missile specialists. According to Russian First Deputy
Minister of Security Sergei Stepashin, the diplomat had succeeded
in smuggling a large group of Russian military specialists to
the North Korean capital of Pyongyang. Meanwhile, Interfax reported
on 15 November that a Russian-Japanese group of experts meeting
in Moscow a week earlier had agreed in principle to conduct joint
research on the effects of dumping radioactive waste in the Sea
of Japan. According to a communique released by the group, research
is to be conducted by specialists from Japan, Russia, and South
Korea, as well as from the International Atomic Energy Agency.
The first research operations are scheduled to begin in mid-January
of 1994. Japan and Russia clashed over the dumping of radioactive
waste by Russia in mid-October. -Stephen Foye

CIS

IS START-1 ON OR OFF IN UKRAINE? DESPITE EARLIER WESTERN REPORTS
THAT THE START-1 TREATY HAD BEEN REMOVED FROM THE UKRAINIAN PARLIAMENT'S
AGENDA, UKRAINIAN PRESS AGENCIES ARE INDICATING THAT THE TREATY
WILL BE CONSIDERED. UNIAR on 16 November reported that the joint
parliamentary commission examining the issue of ratification
had informally approved a government program for the dismantling
of nuclear weapons after START-1 ratification. The commission
heard reports on the treaty from the defense minister, foreign
minister, and Deputy Prime Minister Valerii Shmarov. The program
reportedly relaxes the requirement that $2.8-billion be paid
to finance the dismantling, and provides for dismantling to proceed
even before all financing is secured. According to the UNIAN
agency on 16 November, the treaty could be discussed in closed
session as early as 18 November, although there are a number
of other items on the agenda before it. There has been no indication
whether the non-proliferation treaty, which is also on the parliament's
agenda, will be discussed as well. -John Lepingwell and Bohdan
Nahaylo

UKRAINIAN SERVICEMEN WITHDRAWN FROM POTI. Interfax reported on
13 and 15-November that two ships of the Black Sea Fleet stationed
off Poti are returning to Crimea with some 41 Ukrainian servicemen
on board. The reports follow a visit by the Ukrainian Deputy
Defense Minister Anatolii Lopata to Sevastopol to discuss Ukrainian
participation with the fleet's command. On 15 November, UNIAN
reported that the servicemen would arrive in Sevastopol on 17
November, and that the decision was prompted by questions raised
in the Ukrainian parliament concerning Ukrainian participation.
Krasnaya zvezda of 10 November had noted that the landing of
troops in Poti was based on a Russian-Georgian agreement, apparently
without any Ukrainian approval. At present the fleet is under
the joint control of the Ukrainian and Russian presidents, with
both their permission required before it can participate in military
operations. The decision by Ukraine to withdraw from the operation
underlines the differing interests of Ukraine and Russia, and
the difficulty of maintaining a joint fleet. -John Lepingwell


CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



BOSNIA UPDATE. On 15 November Reuters reported that Bosnian Croatian
troops had launched a new attack against Muslim forces near the
central Bosnian town of Gornji Vakuf. Croatian media, however,
reject such reports, and insist that Muslim forces initiated
the fighting. Meanwhile, Western agencies report on 15-November
that Muslim government forces once again took the central Bosnian
town of Fojnica after Croat troops failed to occupy it. UN representatives
report that fighting between Serb and Croat troops is continuing
near the town of Vares and that UN forces have been shelled,
perhaps by Serb artillery, near the town of Olovo, to the east
of Sarajevo. In other news, the political and military leaders
of the Muslim, Serb, and Croat groups have been invited to attend
a UN-backed meeting on 18-November to discuss questions related
to aid operations during the winter. Thus far, only Bosnian Serb
leader Radovan Karadzic and his supporters have expressed interest
in the meeting. Meanwhile, Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic,
on 15 November reportedly said that peace was not in the cards
for Bosnia-Hercegovina. According to Radio Sarajevo reports,
Izetbegovic stated that he is committed to fighting the war in
Bosnia, and that Bosnia no longer has any future as a multi-ethnic
state. -Stan Markotich

DIPLOMATIC TENSION BETWEEN ITALY AND CROATIA? ACCORDING TO REPORTS
CARRIED IN THE CROATIAN MEDIA, RANKING GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS IN
ITALY, AND NOTABLY ITALY'S FOREIGN MINISTER BENIAMINO ANDREATTA,
HAVE MADE REMARKS WHICH MAKE IT APPEAR THAT ITALY MAY WISH TO
ADVOCATE SANCTIONS AGAINST CROATIA AND TO RE-DRAW CROATIA'S BORDERS.
According to a Vecernji list report of 16 November, sources in
the Italian foreign ministry have suggested that a possible peace
strategy for ex-Yugoslavia might involve redrawing borders. In
short, the Vecernji list report suggests that a Muslim state
in Bosnia could be made viable by incorporating territories presently
held by Bosnian Serbs, but that the Serbs could "have their compensation
in Croatia". Such remarks have been interpreted by Croatian media
to mean that Italy may be willing to hand over all or part of
Serb-held Krajina, a region seen by the Croatian government as
an integral part of Croatia, to Serbia. Italian officials deny
that any such remarks reflect official Italian government policy.
-Stan Markotich

DETAILS CONCERNING THE PLOT IN MACEDONIA. In its 12 November
issue, the weekly Puls, said that ethnic Albanians recently arrested
in connection with the plot against the state were part of the
leadership of a secret "All-Albanian Army" which had been founded
in 1991, just before the promulgation of the republic's constitution.
According to Puls, the authorities discovered a computer data
base with more than 21,000 names of potential recruits. Puls
claimed that the AAA planned to collect some 600,000 DM to fund
its operations and possessed secret military information that
would enable it to defeat the republican army. Puls also alleged
that the AAA had contact with officials in the Albanian government
and political figures in the Party for Democratic Prosperity,
the largest ethnic Albanian party in Macedonia. -Duncan Perry


GREEK RELATIONS WITH ALBANIA, MACEDONIA. After two days of talks
between Greek Foreign Minister Karolos Papoulias and Albanian
leaders on 14 and 15-November, both sides agreed that Papoulias'
visit could mean the end to several months of bilateral tension.
In particular, progress was reported on questions related to
the situation of the Greek minority in Albania, as well as that
of thousands of Albanian citizens working illegally in Greece.
Papoulias said Tirana had displayed "the will and the spirit"
to understand the problems of the Greek minority, while Athens
would try to find a solution to Albanian immigration "acceptable
to both sides." Meanwhile in the Greek capital, Prime Minister
Andreas Papandreou stated that Greece's refusal to recognize
the Republic of Macedonia under its current name must not necessarily
determine the character of bilateral contacts. Papandreou told
Reuters that ties between Athens and Skopje could range "from
friendly to hostile," but that Macedonian President Kiro Gligorov
"has to prove that he wants good relations." On the same day
a Greek government spokesman strongly criticized Italy's plans
to establish normal diplomatic ties with Skopje, saying EC states
should help keep the Balkans stable and "not encourage provocative
and historically unfounded claims." -Kjell Engelbrekt

POLISH PUBLIC TV GETS NEW DIRECTOR. The Polish National Broadcasting
Council on 15 November appointed Wieslaw Walendziak to head Poland's
public television system, which is to be reorganized as a corporation
as of 1 January 1994. Walendziak, 31, is a journalist, former
author of the "Without Anesthesia" political discussion program,
and director of the private PolSat television station. President
Lech Walesa called Walendziak's appointment "a big mistake,"
Polish TV reports. Prior to the appointment, there were press
reports that Walendziak intends to take off the air "Straight
from Belweder," a program devoted to the president's activities
that has often been criticized as fawning. A presidential spokesman
nonetheless announced that Walesa recognizes the broadcasting
council's legal independence. -Louisa Vinton

SLOVAK PRESIDENT MEETS GERMAN OFFICIALS. Speaking at a press
conference in Bonn on 15 November, Slovak President Michal Kovac
said he was satisfied with the results of his talks with German
officials. Kovac met President Richard von Weizsaecker, Foreign
Minister Klaus Kinkel, and members of Bundestag. He told reporters
that he received assurances that Slovakia will receive the same
kind of support and security guarantees as the Czech Republic,
Poland, and Hungary. The RFE/RL correspondent in Bonn reports
that Weizsaecker told Kovac that Bonn wants to help Slovakia
in its bid to join the European Community but warned that the
road to full integration will not be easy. Kinkel assured Kovac
that Germany will help Slovakia gain entry to "the European and
Atlantic institutions. -Jiri Pehe

ECONOMIC NEWS FROM THE CZECH REPUBLIC. Czech Economy Minister
Karel Dyba told journalists in Prague on 15 November that, following
three years of decline, the Czech Republic's gross domestic product
will grow by 0.5 to 1% in 1993. Dyba said that the share of exports
in the creation of the gross domestic product is almost 50%;
the country's exports are expected to grow by 13% in comparison
with 1992. In the first 9-months of 1993, the receipts from tourism
were more than $1 billion, which represents a 36% increase in
comparison with the same period of 1992. Czech Finance Minister
Ivan Kocarnik, speaking at a meeting with bankers in Znojmo,
said that the share of the private sector in the economy has
reached 44%. Finally, CTK reports that more than 2.5 million
people have bought vouchers enabling them to participate in the
second wave of voucher privatization, during which some 700 enterprises
are slated for privatization. The sale of vouchers will continue
until the end of November. More than 5 million Czechs bought
vouchers during the first wave of voucher privatization, which
ended earlier this year. -Jiri Pehe

ROMANIAN VESSELS AGAIN DETAINED IN SERBIA. A Romanian shipping
company spokesman said on 15-November two of its convoys had
been detained by Serbian nationalist organizations in Belgrade,
an RFE/RL correspondent and Radio Bucharest reported on the same
day. Last month two other ships were detained by the same organizations,
but eventually managed to escape, taking advantage of the fog.
The spokesman said the two organizations, White Rose and New
Byzantium, demanded the release of a Serbian convoy detained
in the Romanian port of Braila on suspicion of infringing on
the UN embargo against Serbia and Montenegro. -Michael Shafir


FORMER ROMANIAN POLITICAL PRISONERS URGE BOYCOTT OF NATIONAL
DAY. Romania's Association of Former Political Prisoners called
on 15 November on the opposition to boycott the national day
ceremonies in Alba Iulia, on 1 December, an RFE/RL correspondent
reported on the same day. The statement called the festivities
planned by the authorities a "diversion show" in which the opposition
should not participate, especially because former King Michael
will probably be prevented from visiting Romania for the occasion.
The National Peasant Party Christian Democratic threatened to
boycott the celebrations if the former monarch is not allowed
to attend; and several trade unions have also condemned the government
for creating barriers to his request to participate in the celebrations,
Radio Bucharest and Western agencies reported on 15 November.
-Michael Shafir

ROMANIAN MEDIA WARNS OF ILIESCU'S PLANS. President Ion Iliescu
was accused of trying to concentrate more power in his hands,
following an announcement that he intended to set up an economic
oversight body to oversee the reform, Reuters reported on 15-November.
The daily Evenimentul zilei said the move would transform Romania
into a "presidential republic" governed by a duplicate government
from the presidential palace. The daily Tineretul liber said
the intended move was just another "strategy" of the "parliamentary
Left." -Michael Shafir

ZHIVKOV TO BE TRIED FOR ETHNIC ASSIMILATION POLICY. The former
head of state and communist party leader, Todor Zhivkov, is facing
a trial for his part in organizing a massive assimilation campaign
against ethnic Turks in the second half of the 1980s, Western
agencies reported on 15 November. Together with ex-premier Georgi
Atanasov and former interior minister Dimitar Stoyanov, who also
stand charged, the 82-year-old Zhivkov will go on trial early
next year, on 8 February, accused of having exceeded his authority
in planning and executing the scheme. Because of their resistance
to the assimilation policy, Bulgaria's ethnic Turks were the
subject of harsh repressions during the last years of Zhivkov's
rule, which in the summer of 1989 prompted the exodus of over
300,000 Turks. Zhivkov, who in September 1992 was sentenced to
7-years imprisonment for embezzlement-a ruling still pending
appeal-could receive 8 years under the new charges. Criminal
investigations into Zhivkov's personal role in running inhuman
labor camps and diverting funds to communist organizations in
the third world are also underway. -Kjell Engelbrekt

NO-CONFIDENCE AGAINST ESTONIAN GOVERNMENT FAILS. On 15 November
the Estonian parliament rejected a no-confidence motion against
Prime Minister Mart Laar by a vote of 21 to 45 with 10-abstentions,
BNS reports. It needed 51 votes to pass. Eleven deputies who
were present did not take part in the vote. 24 deputies from
the Rural Union Association, the Assembly Party, the Centrist
faction, the Royalist Party, and the former Estonian Citizen
faction presented the motion to the parliament on 11 November,
but six of them did not vote for it. While the government is
not popular, no viable replacement for it was proposed. -Saulius
Girnius

LITHUANIAN-RUSSIAN RELATIONS. In an interview on Radio Lithuania
on 15 November Lithuanian Prime Minister Adolfas Slezevicius
said that nine agreements should be signed during the visit to
Vilnius on 18-November of his Russian counterpart Viktor Chernomyrdyn.
They include a most favored nation trade agreement, agreements
on air and motor transport, on sea and river navigation, on military
and general pensions, on cooperation between interior ministries,
and on military transit from Germany through Lithuania. An agreement
on military transit from Kaliningrad is still being discussed.
Slezevicius noted that Lithuania owed Russia about 196 million
litai ($50 million) while Russia owed 219 million litai, but
was repaying it faster. -Saulius Girnius

TALKS ON RUSSIAN TROOP WITHDRAWAL FROM BALTICS RESUME. On 15
November Latvian and Russian delegations resumed negotiations
in Jurmala on the pullout of some 17,000 Russian soldiers from
Latvia. Russian delegation head Sergei Zotov was said to have
proposed that the troops could depart by 31-August 1994 if Latvia
allowed Russia to maintain the anti-missile radar system in Skrunda
for six years, Diena reported on 15 November. Heretofore, Latvia
has wanted all troops out by the end of this year, while Russia
has maintained that the earliest possible troop departure date
could be the end of 1994 and that it needed to maintain control
over the Skrunda radar system, naval harbor in Liepaja, and a
satellite monitoring station near Ventspils. It is not clear
what Russia's latest position is on the last two sites. Meanwhile,
Estonian-Russian negotiations on the pullout of about 3,000 Russian
soldiers from Estonia and on other topics also resumed on 15
November in Lohusalu, Estonia. Like the Latvians, the Estonians
were more cautious than their Russian counterparts about predicting
a positive outcome of the talks, BNS reported on 15 November.
-Dzintra Bungs

UN RESOLUTION ON RUSSIAN TROOPS IN BALTIC STATES. On 15 November
the UN General Assembly passed a consensus resolution calling
for the "early, orderly, and complete withdrawal" of Russian
troops from Latvia and Estonia, an RFE/RL correspondent in New
York reports. The resolution, co-sponsored by Estonia and Lithuania,
was introduced by Latvian Prime Minister Valdis Birkavs who noted
that Latvia could not accept Russian demands to maintain three
"strategic facilities" into the next century and was willing
to extend the deadline for their relocation only under international
guarantees with a reasonably tight internationally controlled
schedule. Russian Ambassador Yuri Vorontsov said that Russia
had no intention to protract the withdrawal or to tie it with
the protection of the rights of the Russian-speaking population
in these countries. -Saulius Girnius

LATVIAN SAEIMA PASSES TIGHTER RULES FOR ORGANIZATIONS. On 11
November the Latvian parliament amended a law on public organizations,
Diena reports. According to Deputy Janis Lagzdins, Latvia will
recognize only those public organizations that comply with its
constitution, observe its laws and the international conventions
that it has signed. Furthermore, the Latvian authorities may
refuse to register an organization that uses communist, Nazi,
or former Soviet symbols, or whose name coincides with or resembles
names of outlawed organizations. The amendments could affect
the future of existing pro-communist and pro-soviet organizations.
-Dzintra Bungs

KUCHMA CRITICIZES KRAVCHUK DECREES. On 12-November the Ukrainian
parliament vetoed President Kravchuk's decree on state commodity
bonds which envisaged issuing $10-billion worth of bonds against
the pledge of state property and land. On 15-November Interfax
reported that former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma criticized
the decree saying the country could not repay the interest on
such bonds. He was also critical of the decision to suspend the
Ukrainian currency exchange and introduce an official exchange
rate for the karbovanets which would make it four times as valuable
in relation to the dollar and ruble than it is today on the market.
In contrast, First Vice-Prime Minister Yukhim Zvyahilski believes
public control should be established over prices, hard-currency
spending and foreign trade. He also believes the value of the
karbovanets established at the currency exchange is unrealistic
and has spurred inflation. -Ustina Markus

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Wendy Slater and Jan B. de Weydenthal



THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal
mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions,
or additional copies, please contact: in North America: Mr. Brian
Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907; Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783;
Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse 67, 80538
Munich, Germany;.Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2624; Fax:
(+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG 1993, RFE/RL, Inc.
All rights reserved.

RFE/RL Daily Report

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole