What you can become, you are already. - Friedrich Hebbel
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 218, 12 November 1993



Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.







RUSSIA



GRACHEV CONCLUDES CHINA VISIT. Speaking at the end of his official
visit to China, Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev said on
11 November that the two countries hoped to restore the close
ties that had once united the Soviet Union and China, but that
they did not envisage forging a military alliance. On 9-November
the two defense ministers had signed a five-year military cooperation
agreement. According to ITAR-TASS, Grachev said that the two
sides believed that regional security in Asia would be strengthened
by an improvement in Sino-Russian relations; Reuter reported
that Grachev had expressed the hope that a visit to Moscow next
year by Chinese Defense Minister Chi Haotian would lead to another
bilateral accord aimed at preventing incidents along the long
border between the two countries. Both sides went out of their
way to emphasize that arms sales had not been on their agenda,
but Grachev said that that issue would be discussed during a
visit to China by Deputy Premier Aleksandr Shokhin, scheduled
to take place in the near future. -Stephen Foye

RUSSIA SOFTENS POSITION ON CFE. According to a Reuters report
from Brussels of 11-November, the Russian government has dropped
its threat to unilaterally exceed the provisions of the Conventional
Forces in Europe (CFE) treaty if it is not modified. Russia has
been pressing for an increase in the limits on flank deployment
which constrain its arms buildup in the Caucasus, but NATO and
East European states oppose any renegotiation of the treaty.
That the Russian government will decide to drop the issue and
abide by the CFE flank limits appears unlikely, however, given
that the new military doctrine would seem to endorse just such
a buildup. Pressure for changes to the agreement is therefore
likely to continue. -John Lepingwell

PARTIES AGAINST FORMING ALLIANCES. The leaders of two of the
major pro-reform parties have spoken out against forming pre-election
alliances, Reuters and Interfax reported on 11 November. Sergei
Shakhrai and Aleksandr Shokhin, both deputy prime ministers,
said at a news conference of the Russian Party of Unity and Concord
which they lead that they rejected the idea of joining forces
with like-minded parties before the elections. Their remarks
were construed as a response to the call for a political alliance
from leaders of the pro-Yeltsin Russia's Choice bloc on 10 November.
Separately, Nikolai Travkin, leader of the Democratic Party of
Russia also said on 11 November that his party did not intend
to join any pre-election coalitions, ITAR-TASS reported. Both
Shakhrai's and Travkin's parties support reform, but at a more
gradual pace than is proposed by the radical Russia's Choice.
-Wendy Slater

BABURIN FIGHTS FOR HIS BLOC'S READMISSION TO ELECTIONS. The Chairman
of the Electoral Commission, Nikolai Ryabov, was quoted by Reuters
on 11-November as saying that authorities could allow the nationalist
Russian National Union bloc to take part in the elections to
the State Duma after all if prosecutors back the claim of the
Union's head Sergei Baburin that 22,000 signatures needed to
make up the total for eligibility were stolen from the Union's
headquarters. Baburin told Pravda on 11 November that he would
fight the matter in court. If Baburin's bloc is not reinstated,
his supporters will probably vote for the Communist Party which
did collect enough signatures to participate in the elections.
-Alexander Rahr

SOBCHAK VERSUS YAVLINSKY. St. Petersburg Mayor Anatolii Sobchak
told Nezavisimaya gazeta on 10-November that the pre-election
split in the ranks of the democrats occurred because of the position
taken by economist Grigorii Yavlinsky. Sobchak said he initially
favored the creation of only two blocs-one led by reformist government
officials and another designed as a democratic opposition, but
that Yavlinsky insisted on setting up his own rival bloc. Sobchak
asserted that, because of the disarray among democrats, many
votes may go to hard-liners. Sobchak said that, unlike the three
Russian Dumas that existed in the beginning of this century,
the new Duma will have the benefit of the professional parliamentary
experience of many of the former USSR and Russian deputies. -Alexander
Rahr

CHERNOMYRDIN LIMITS POWERS OF CABINET MEMBERS. Prime Minister
Viktor Chernomyrdin has deprived his cabinet members of their
previous rights to issue licenses for export quotas and government
credits, Nezavisimaya gazeta reported on 11 November. Chernomyrdin
decreed that only he has these rights. Chernomyrdin apparently
took this step in order to rule out the possibility of some leading
government members, such as Egor Gaidar, Boris Fedorov, Vladimir
Shumeiko, Aleksandr Shokhin and others, who are campaigning for
seats in the new parliament, using their positions in the government
to win the support of financial circles in the elections. -Alexander
Rahr

COMMENTS ON THE NEW DRAFT CONSTITUTION. Representatives of the
conservative and centrist Russian parties criticized the new
draft constitution for giving the president vast powers, an RFE/RL
correspondent in Moscow reported on 11 November. A spokesman
for the nationalist Russian People's Union told RFE/RL that the
draft was "a constitution of an almost unrestricted monarchy."
Sergei Rogov of the centrist Civic Union criticized the draft
for making the procedure of impeaching a president too complicated.
At the same time, the President of the Republic of Sakha, Mikhail
Nikolaev, said he "unreservedly supports" the new draft constitution.
He told RFE/RL that, in his view, the draft did not infringe
upon the sovereignty of Russia's republics. Nikolaev's position
differs from that of the majority of leaders of other republics,
who have protested the fact that the draft fails to define republics
as "sovereign states." -Vera Tolz

THE CONSTITUTION AND THE MILITARY. The proposed new Russian constitution
contains a number of provisions pertaining to the military, many
of which give the president substantial powers over security
policy and personnel. The president is considered the "supreme
commander in chief" of the armed forces and may appoint and remove
the "high command" of the military, apparently without even consulting
the Federal Assembly. He is also entitled to form and head the
Security Council, in accordance with existing laws, and is given
the authority to approve Russia's military doctrine. The Federation
Council has to confirm the use of Russian military forces outside
Russia, while both houses of the parliament must consider treaties
and issues of "war and peace." The document does not, however,
appear to specify whether a simple or qualified majority is required
to ratify international treaties. -John Lepingwell

URAL LEADER CALLS NEW JOB "A PROTEST." Eduard Rossel, formerly
governor of Sverdlovsk Oblast, has been elected president of
the Association for Economic Cooperation in the Urals Region,
Interfax reported on 11 November. In October, Sverdlovsk Oblast
declared itself a republic within the Russian Federation. On
9-November, President Boris Yeltsin retaliated by dissolving
the republic; the following day, he dismissed Rossel from his
post. Rossel called his new appointment a form of protest against
Yeltsin's actions; he told Interfax on 11 November that the idea
of a Urals Republic dated back to 1918 and that Russia's regions
had won the right to a level of independence that was not recognized
in the draft Russian constitution. -Elizabeth Teague

HIGHER BUDGET DEFICIT FORESEEN. At the cabinet meeting on 11
November, Finance Minister Boris Fedorov announced that the budget
deficit for 1993 could rise to 22.2 trillion rubles, or 14% of
GDP, ITAR-TASS reported. This is appreciably above the latest
target, published last week, of 17 trillion rubles or 10% of
GDP. Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin ordered all ministries
to reassess their planned revenues and expenditures by 15 November.
-Keith Bush

NEW TAX BRACKETS PROPOSED. The Russian Finance Ministry is proposing
changes in the income tax system for 1993 and 1994, Interfax
reported on 10 and 11 November. At the moment the lowest tax
rate is 12% on the first million rubles of income, and the highest
is 30% for sums over two million rubles. Among the Finance Ministry's
proposals is to push up the brackets, but increase the top rate.
For example, the lowest rate of 12% would apply to incomes of
two million rubles or less, and the highest income category,
10 million rubles and above, would be subject to a flat 2.34
million rubles plus 40% of income in excess of 10-million rubles.
It is not clear whether Chernomyrdin's call for revisions in
the 1993 budget will affect the Finance Ministry's proposals.
-Erik Whitlock

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



RUSSIA ON KARABAKH CONFLICT. Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman
Mikhail Demurin said on 11 November that President Yeltsin had
sent a personal envoy to Baku, Erevan, and Stepanakert to discuss
settlement of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. He said that Russian
Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev had recently been pushing for
efforts toward settlement to be increased, aiming at a "complete
end" to hostilities "as soon as possible." The Russian Foreign
Ministry also called for the cessation of all military operations
in the region and the withdrawal of Karabakh forces to positions
they held on 21 October when the truce was broken, ITAR-TASS
and Radio Rossii reported. -Suzanne Crow

CIS

TAJIKISTAN TO STAY IN RUBLE ZONE. The chairman of Tajikistan's
national bank, Kayum Kavmetdinov, was quoted on Radio Rossii
on 11 November as saying that Tajikistan intends to remain in
the ruble zone, though the country may introduce its own currency.
He said that discussions are underway between Tajik and Russian
officials on Tajik participation in a new type of ruble zone.
Tajikistan's economy remains very weak as a result of Soviet-era
poverty and the 1992 civil war. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan
intended to participate in a new ruble zone, but have decided
to introduce their own currencies in the face of what the two
countries regard as unreasonable conditions placed on their participation
by the Russian Federation. Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan have already
withdrawn from the ruble zone. -Bess Brown

KOZYREV ON IMMIGRATION, PEACEKEEPING. In an interview broadcast
by Radio Mayak on 11 November, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev said that Russia needs to examine the question of immigration
from the other former Soviet republics. He cited the conflicts
in the former Soviet Union as a primary factor driving ethnic
Russians and Russophones to Russia, and he stressed that Russia's
use of peacekeeping forces to stifle these conflicts would reduce
the numbers of immigrants into Russia. Kozyrev expressed dissatisfaction
with the reaction among the other former republics to Russia's
proposals on dual citizenship and said that he favors linkage
of the acceptance of Russian proposals with economic aid and
financial links to these states. -Suzanne Crow

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



BOSNIA UPDATE. According to a HINA report, fighting in Sarajevo
eased up on 11 November after nearly two days of heavy shelling
by Serb forces which claimed the lives of at least 17-people
and injured about 100 more. HINA also reported that on 12 November
Croatia's foreign minister, Mate Granic, will arrive in Sarajevo
in order to try to bring local Croat and Muslim leaders together
for peace talks. Granic will be joined by Turkey's foreign minister,
Hikmet Cetin, who is scheduled to mediate the talks. Meanwhile,
on 12 November Tanjug reports that Russia's special envoy to
the former Yugoslavia, Deputy Foreign Minister Vitalii Churkin,
arrived in Serbia for talks with President Slobodan Milosevic.
The talks are aimed at finding ways of resuming the stalled peace
process in Bosnia, and Churkin reportedly observed that a peace
agreement for Bosnia should make it possible for the international
community to lift the sanctions imposed against rump Yugoslavia
for its involvement in fomenting the war in Bosnia. -Stan Markotich


MORE RADICALS ARRESTED, SERB ATROCITIES DETAILED. Belgrade media
on 11 and 12 November report that police have rounded up more
members of the extremist Serbian Chetnik Movement militia. For
the first time since war broke out in the former Yugoslavia in
June 1991, the daily Borba and other Belgrade papers published
detailed eyewitness accounts of atrocities committed by Serb
paramilitary groups in Croatia and Bosnia. The largest and most
notorious group is the Chetnik Movement, the armed wing of Vojislav
Seselj's Radical Party (SRS). Borba reports that the number of
arrests of Chetniks and other extreme nationalists has risen
to about 40. The charges include murder, rape, kidnapping and
illegal arms possession. These developments appear linked to
a campaign by President Milosevic to discredit Seselj, his toughest
rival, prior to the upcoming elections.--Milan Andrejevich

"MILOSEVIC IS THE HEAD MAFIOSI IN SERBIA." This is how Seselj
responded to the latest attacks against him and the SRS. At a
press conference in Belgrade on 11 November, Seselj asserted
that Serb prisons "are not big enough to house all SRS members"
and alleged that an attempt on his life was made by Serbian police
on 17-September. He charged that the Milosevic government "consists
of criminals, profiteers and the financial Mafia [private bankers]"
and said that "crime on such a high level could not have taken
place without Milosevic's knowledge and agreement." Politika
indicated Milosevic must have known about the atrocities Serb
paramilitary groups have committed since those troops were officially
placed under the Yugoslav Army command in December 1991. Seselj
also said his party will back down from its earlier decision
to call for a vote of no confidence in the federal government.
He explained that such a move now would allow Milosevic to dissolve
it and call for new federal elections or impose a military dictatorship."
-Milan Andrejevich

WALESA WINS CONTROL OF DEFENSE MINISTRY? IN A MOVE SUGGESTING
THAT THE NEW GOVERNMENT HAS OPTED TO CEDE CONTROL OVER DEFENSE
POLICY TO PRESIDENT LECH WALESA, A HIGH-RANKING PRESIDENTIAL
STAFF MEMBER HAS BEEN APPOINTED DEPUTY DEFENSE MINISTER. Premier
Waldemar Pawlak appointed the chief of the president's National
Security Office, Jerzy Milewski, to the post on 11 November.
While serving in the defense ministry, Milewski will also retain
his position in the president's office, PAP reports. Defense
is one of the three "presidential" ministries, over which Walesa
has the constitutional right of supervision; the others are foreign
and internal affairs. The new government agreed to accept candidates
for these three posts chosen by the president. -Louisa Vinton


POLISH RIGHT BUILDS COALITIONS. The leaders of the three largest
right-wing parties in Poland-the Christian National Union, the
Center Alliance, and the Peasant Alliance-signed a coalition
agreement in Warsaw on 10 November, Polish TV reports. None of
the three is represented in the Sejm, although the parties together
received over 13% of the vote. The coalition partners agreed
to run a joint campaign in the 1994 local government elections.
Arguing that the parliament is not representative enough to adopt
a new constitution, they called for a national referendum on
the subject. The coalition said it hopes to win the cooperation
of the Solidarity trade union. Leadership of the coalition will
rotate every month. A second right-wing coalition was formed
on 11 November by four smaller parties, which also have no seats
in the Sejm: the Conservative Party, the Party of Christian Democrats,
the Peasant Christian Alliance, and the Real Politics Union.
The second coalition says it will focus on the economy rather
than the "ideological" questions such as lustration and decommunization
that preoccupy the first. Gazeta Wyborcza commented on 12 November
that "there may not be enough voters for two right wings." -Louisa
Vinton

CERNAK ON CONFLICT BETWEEN SLOVAK PRESIDENT AND PREMIER. Speaking
at a press conference in Bratislava on 11 November, Ludovit Cernak,
chairman of the Slovak National Party, a new coalition partner
of Premier Vladimir Meciar's Movement for a Democratic Slovakia,
said his party will not be drawn into a war against the president.
On 10-November Meciar attacked President Michal Kovac for refusing
to accept one of his new government nominees, Ivan Lexa. Lexa
himself issued a statement on 11 November harshly critical of
the president and accusing him of a variety of past failures.
Cernak said that he felt sorry "about statements made by MDS
representatives, including Lexa." In commenting on Meciar's attack
on Kovac, Cernak said that "an adult politician, a person older
than 18 years, is responsible for his own deeds." Cernak indicated
that he will accept the position of the Slovak parliament's vice-chairman
if the position is offered to him. Two of these positions are
now vacant after Jozef Prokes and Marian Andel, both members
of Cernak's party, were named deputy prime ministers in Meciar's
government. -Jiri Pehe

COUNTERFEIT PLOT IN SLOVAKIA. On 11 November TASR quoted Interior
Minister Jozef Tuchyna as saying that there was a conspiracy
to put counterfeit 1000-koruny notes (old Czechoslovak notes
marked with special identification stickers) into circulation
in Slovakia and that state officials were involved. Tuchyna said
the investigation continues, and the names of the plotters cannot
yet be revealed. The minister further said that Slovak police
learned about the conspiracy in August and started watching the
suspects. The police learned the counterfeit notes would be circulated
last week. National Bank Governor Vladimir Masar told TASR that
the information he received from Tuchyna led him to order the
circulation of new Slovak 1000koruny notes at the beginning
of November. Originally, Czechoslovak banknotes were not to be
replaced until December. -Jiri Pehe

HAVEL, KUCAN CALL FOR END OF BOSNIAN WAR. On 12 November, at
the end of Czech President Vaclav Havel's visit to Slovenia,
Havel and his Slovene counterpart, Milan Kucan, issued a joint
declaration calling for an end to the fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
The declaration said that previous peace plans for Bosnia have
accepted the principle of ethnic states and that such ethnic
states contradict the idea of the European Union. The two presidents
argue that the concept of civil society is being destroyed right
outside the borders of some EU member states. They also say that
the war in Bosnia is a war in Europe and about Europe. Havel
and Kucan call on all warring parties and their political and
military leaders to consider the seriousness of the Bosnian situation
in light of the coming winter, CTK reports. -Jiri Pehe

HUNGARIAN AND SLOVENE DEFENSE MINISTERS MEET. On 10 November
Slovene Defense Minister Janez Jansa paid an official visit to
Hungary at the invitation of his Hungarian counterpart Lajos
Fur, Pesti Hirlap of 11 November reports. The two ministers agreed
that their countries were threatened by the war on the territory
of former Yugoslavia and endorsed the extension of the mandate
of UN peace keeping forces in Croatia and Bosnia. Jansa recalled
at a press conference that Hungary was the first country to conclude
a military cooperation agreement with Slovenia. He said that
the Slovene government has officially applied for NATO membership
and would like to cooperate with the Visegrad countries in gaining
admittance to the organization. -Edith Oltay

EXTREME NATIONALIST PARTY GAINS STRENGTH THROUGH ALLIANCE. At
an extraordinary congress of his party, the leader of the Democratic
Agrarian Party, Victor Surdu, announced that his group intends
to set up an alliance with Gheorghe Funar's extreme nationalist
Party of Romanian National Unity, Radio Bucharest reports on
11 November. On 12 November the congress is to approve the alliance,
to be called the National Unity Block. The DAP is represented
in the Senate by five Senators, but gained no representation
in the Chamber of Deputies in the elections held in 1992. In
a related development, a spokesman for the PRNU said discussions
are continuing with the Party of Social Democracy in Romania
for the purpose of joining the ruling coalition. The PRNU is
not represented in the government but supports Vacaroiu's PSDR
in the parliament. -Michael Shafir

ROMANIAN CHIEF RABBI DEMANDS STEPS AGAINST ANTI-SEMITISM. Chief
Rabbi Moses Rosen says he cannot understand why legal action
is not taken against anti-Semitism in his country. In an interview
with RFE/RL on 11 November, Rosen criticized the refusal of the
Prosecutor General to ban publication of Hitler's book Mein Kampf,
as well as anti-Semitic publications and political formations.
Rosen said the Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania would
ask again the Prosecutor General and President Ion Iliescu to
investigate ultranationalist magazines. One day earlier, Radio
Bucharest said that in a letter addressed to the Council of National
Minorities, the federation said the government should initiate
legislation prohibiting incitement to racial hatred. -Michael
Shafir

PAPOULIAS IN SOFIA. After visiting Serbia, Montenegro, Croatia
and Slovenia within the framework of a six-day Balkan tour, Greek
Foreign Minister Karolos Papoulias arrived in Bulgaria. On 11
November Papoulias held meetings with President Zhelyu Zhelev,
Prime Minister Lyuben Berov, as well as with members of the four
parliamentary factions. He told BTA that the prospects for development
of bilateral relations remain "excellent" after the recent change
of government in Athens. Answering questions about the war in
ex-Yugoslavia and its possible implications, Berov told reporters
that Sofia supports the unity of the Republic of Macedonia and
would react negatively to the establishment of a Greater Albania.
Papoulias agreed that a division of Macedonia cannot bring peace
to the Balkans. Papoulias also raised the idea that Greece, Bulgaria,
Romania and Ukraine should jointly seek compensation from the
EC for the economic losses incurred by United Nations sanctions
against Serbia and Montenegro.--Kjell Engelbrekt

ALBANIAN FINANCE MINISTER RESIGNS AMID CORRUPTION CHARGES. Albanian
Finance and Economy Minister Genc Ruli has resigned from office
amid allegations of corruption, which he denies, Reuters reports
on 10 November. President Sali Berisha named two new ministers
that same day, splitting Ruli's old portfolio, and confirmed
another appointee at the head of the restructured energy ministry.
Berisha promoted economist Pirro Dishnica from the Institute
of Statistics to the finance ministry and appointed Selih Belortaja,
who headed the National Center for Foreign Investments, as minister
for industry and trade. Abdyl Xhaja was called in to head the
energy and mineral sources ministry. Reuters quotes government
sources as saying that Ruli now is supposed to head parliament's
finance and economy commission. Fabian Schmidt

CHANGES IN UKRAINIAN DEFENSE MINISTRY. The controversial "Social-Psychological
Service" within Ukraine's Ministry of Defense, which was concerned
with patriotic education, has been reorganized, Ukrainian media
reported on 10 November. It is now to be known as the "Main Administration
for Educational and Social-Psychological Work," and Gen. Colonel
Anatolii Kobzar has been appointed to head it. The former head
of the "Social-Psychological Service", Gen. Colonel Volodymyr
Mulyava, has been made an assistant to the minister of defense
with responsibility for liasing with organizations, parties and
movements. -Ustina Markus and Bohdan Nahaylo

UKRAINIAN PARLIAMENT DELAYS START DEBATE . . . The Ukrainian
parliament has stricken the debate for the ratification of the
START-1 agreement from this month's agenda, AFP reports on 11
November. The debate has been listed on every agenda since February,
but no decision has been made since Ukraine claims the agreement
cannot be ratified without sufficient security guarantees from
other nuclear powers or adequate compensation for dismantling
its nuclear weapons and a share of the proceeds from the sale
of their nuclear materials. The move contrasts with assertions
made last month by US Secretary of State Warren Christopher during
his visit to Ukraine. Christopher said he was confident Ukraine
would ratify START before the end of the year. -Ustina Markus


. . . AND BANS PARAMILITARY ORGANIZATIONS. The Ukrainian parliament
adopted a law banning paramilitary organizations, especially
those which send fighters into conflict areas of the former Soviet
Union, UNIAN reports on 11 November. Under the law's terms, the
penalty for belonging to such groups is up to eight years in
prison for members, and up to ten for leaders. Taking part in
or organizing armed actions with such groups is punishable by
up to fifteen years imprisonment. The law is aimed at the radical
nationalist Ukrainian National Self-Defense Organization (UNSO),
which has sent fighters to Abkhazia and Moldova and has staged
a number of demonstrations in Ukraine in recent months. -Ustina
Markus

LITHUANIAN-RUSSIAN TRANSPORT TALKS. On 11-November, after two
days of talks, Lithuanian Deputy Communications Minister Arvydas
Lescinskas and Russian Deputy Transportation Minister Andrei
Shevshuk initialed a protocol on motorcar transport of passengers
and goods between the two states, Radio Lithuania reports. Transport
of goods to and from Kaliningrad and Russia proper through Lithuania
will be regulated by permits whose number will be decided by
the respective transportation ministries. Russian Prime Minister
Viktor Chernomyrdin is scheduled to visit Vilnius on 16 November
to sign a package of economic, trade, and transportation agreements.
-Saulius Girnius

NEW MAYORS IN ESTONIA. On 11 November the council of Tartu, Estonia's
second largest city, elected Vaino Kull as mayor, BNS reports.
Kull, who ran on the "Tartu" list of candidates in the October
municipal elections, defeated Estonian National Independence
Party candidate Viktor Korrovits by a vote to 26 to 12. Mayoral
elections in the Russian populated city of Narva were less successful.
None of the 5 candidates received the necessary majority of the
city council's votes in two rounds of voting on 10 November;
another round of voting will be held on 17 November. -Saulius
Girnius

VETERAN LATVIAN DIPLOMAT IN US DIES. On 9-November the Latvian
Embassy in Washington announced the death of Dr. Anatols Dinbergs.
From 1941 until 1992 Dinbergs served in the US, first as his
country's vice consul in New York, and subsequently in various
senior diplomatic positions in Latvia's embassy in Washington.
Shortly after Latvia regained its independence in August 1991,
Dinbergs was appointed Latvian Ambassador to the US, a position
he held until his retirement on 31 December 1992. -Dzintra Bungs


KELLOGG OPENS CEREAL PLANT IN LATVIA. A correspondent of the
RFE/RL Latvian Service reported on 10 November that the US-based
Kellogg company has opened a plant to produce breakfast cereals
in Adazi, a community near Riga. Kellogg's East European director
Phillip Stewart said that the plant would start out by producing
corn flakes and broaden the production when the demand increases.
-Dzintra Bungs

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Ann Sheehy and Sharon Fisher











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