This communicating of a man's self to his friend works two contrary effects; for it redoubleth joy, and cutteth griefs in half. - Francis Bacon
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 181, 21 September 1993



Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.





RUSSIA



CONGRESS OF PEOPLES OF THE USSR. About 1,300-people attended
a Congress of Peoples of the USSR in Moscow on 20 September,
AFP reported. Participants included conservative parliamentary
deputies from Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan, as well
as Russian pro-communist and pro-nationalist groups. Among the
speakers was Oleg Shenin, who announced that he, together with
Russian deputy parliamentary chairman Yurii Voronin and chairman
of the Union of Officers Stanislav Terekhov, was forming a coordination
committee of communist parties in the former Soviet republics.
Shenin is currently on trial for his part in the failed coup
of August 1991. Recently, top Russian officials have called for
a closer union of former Soviet republics or the resurrection
of the union [see RFE/RL Daily Report no. 180]. -Wendy Slater


CHERNOMYRDIN: NO DEAL ON KURILS. Responding to recent statements
by former presidential advisor Gennadii Burbulis to Japanese
news agencies to the effect that Russia would be flexible on
the Kurils issue, Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin reiterated
his position that the Kurils will not be ceded to Japan. He claimed
that this position was shared by the entire Russian cabinet,
according to Kuranty of 17 September. -John Lepingwell

PROCURACY EXONERATES RUTSKOI. Moscow Procurator Gennadii Ponomarev
has announced that the available evidence does not bear out the
charges made in August by a special commission set up by President
Boris Yeltsin that Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi had engaged
in corrupt dealings with the Swiss firm, Tradelink, Radio Rossii
reported on 19-September. The allegations were investigated by
the Moscow procurator's office rather than by the Russian procuracy
because the special commission accused the Russian procurator
general of bias and of taking sides in the power struggle between
top Russian state and government officials. -Vera Tolz

CLAIM THAT YELTSIN PLANNED TO STORM PARLIAMENT DENIED. Parliamentary
speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov told a meeting of the parliamentary
presidium that deputies had spent the night of 19-20 September
in the parliament building because they feared rumored troop
movements in Moscow meant that Yeltsin intended to dissolve the
Supreme Soviet by force, ITAR-TASS reported on 20 September.
Khasbulatov called on internal affairs minister Viktor Erin to
resign. The Ministry of Internal Affairs subsequently issued
a statement saying that its special troops had taken part in
raids against criminal gangs in Moscow but that otherwise there
were no unusual troop movements that night. -Alexander Rahr

AMBASSADORS TO US, UN, BRITAIN, TO BE CHANGED? WESTERN AND RUSSIAN
PRESS AGENCIES REPORTED ON 17-19 SEPTEMBER THAT THE RUSSIAN FOREIGN
MINISTRY WAS PREPARING TO REMOVE VLADIMIR LUKIN FROM HIS POSITION
AS AMBASSADOR TO THE US. Lukin has long been at odds with Foreign
Minister Kozyrev. Yulii Vorontsov, the Russian ambassador to
the UN, is reportedly the leading candidate to replace Lukin.
However, the official decree on Lukin's removal has apparently
not yet been signed. Boris Pankin, the ambassador to the United
Kingdom, was removed from his post on 18 September, according
to Radio Rossii, and a decree to that effect appears in Rossiiskaya
gazeta of 21 September. -John Lepingwell

INGUSH LEADER SATISFIED WITH SECURITY COUNCIL SESSION. Ingush
president Ruslan Aushev said in an interview in Nezavisimaya
gazeta of 17-September that at the 15-September session of Russia's
security council devoted to North Ossetia and Ingushetia he had
been encouraged to find that Chernomyrdin, Yeltsin, and Grachev
were inclined to take his side against the North Ossetians. Aushev
said he had been entrusted by the Congress of Peoples of Ingushetia
to determine not only the question for, but the date of, the
referendum on secession from Russia, and he said he would exercise
all caution in doing so. Aushev added that if things did not
work out with Russia, Ingushetia had the choice of forming a
Vainakh state with Chechnya or of reaching an unspecified arrangement
with Georgia. -Ann Sheehy

IS THE DEFENSE MINISTRY BANKRUPT? IZVESTIYA ON 16 SEPTEMBER REPORTED
THAT THE MINISTRY OF DEFENSE CLAIMS THAT OVER 1.7 trillion rubles
are owed to the defense industry for arms procurement. The reason
for this immense shortfall is apparently the failure to index
Defense Ministry funds so as to keep pace with inflation. The
ministry claims that the cost of weapons has increased by a factor
of 12 to 22 in the last year, while its funds have been allocated
according to old prices. It also argues that average wages in
the defense industry are half those of other sectors. The Ministry
of Finance has refuted the Defense Ministry's complaints, claiming,
among other things, that the shortfall is calculated based on
the increased budget passed by parliament and vetoed by Yeltsin,
thus inflating the estimated shortfall. -John Lepingwell

RUSSIA'S FIRST BANKRUPTCIES. Russia's bankruptcy law, which came
into force in April 1993, is gradually beginning to be applied,
The Financial Times reported on 17 September. Bankruptcy proceedings
have been initiated against more than a dozen loss-making Russian
enterprises and some have already been put out of business by
the courts. The paper said the main obstacle to the widespread
application of the law is the shortage of qualified judges and
auditors to handle the paperwork. -Elizabeth Teague

COMMUNIST PARTY PLENUM. The Central Executive Committee (CEC)
of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation (CP-RF), which
claims to be the largest of Russia's political parties with 600,000
members, held a plenary session on 18 September. The only item
on the agenda, according to ITAR-TASS of 19 September, was "the
tasks of the CP-RF in strengthening the foundations of Russian
statehood." The CPRF backed the Russian parliamentary leadership
in resisting calls for early elections, called for the creation
of "a renewed union state," and criticized current Russian foreign
policy. CEC Chairman Gennadii Zyuganov told ITAR-TASS that possible
election partners for the CP-RF were pro-communist and socialist
organizations and the nationalist Russian All-People's Union
and Union of Officers. -Wendy Slater

MURASHOV OPTIMISTIC ON DEMOCRATS' PROSPECTS. Arkadii Murashov,
who is the chief coordinator of the democratic pre-electoral
bloc "Russia's Choice" and head of the Center for Liberal-Conservative
Policy, told Ostankino TV on 18 September that Russia had changed
more in the past four years than at any other time. He claimed
the economic crisis was over and that Russia is already experiencing
an economic boom. In support of his argument, Murashov said that
anyone who wants to engage in entrepreneurial activity is now
free to do so unimpeded. But he said the hour of true liberal
democracy has yet to come because Yeltsin has not formed a government
in which reformers are properly represented. -Alexander Rahr


KARELIANS APPEAL FOR HELP PRESERVING NATIONAL IDENTITY. Representatives
of Karelians from Russia's Karelian republic appealed on 9 September
for help in preserving their national identity, Reuters reported.
They told a press conference in Helsinki that Karelians were
worse off than the Russians in the Baltic states and that the
hoped-for improvement in their situation after the collapse of
the Soviet Union had not taken place. Their share of the population
of Karelia had dropped from 60 percent in the 1920s to less than
10 percent today and few native children could speak Karelian,
they said. They charged that the Russian parliament had so far
ignored their plight, favoring the majority Russian population
instead. -Ann Sheehy

RUSSIA'S FIRST WOMEN'S PARTY REGISTERED. A political party billing
itself as the first designed to cater for women's special needs
has been registered by Russia's Justice Ministry, ITAR-TASS reported
on 17 September. It does not sound as if the new party, called
the "Party of Political Equality," will favor a radical feminist
agenda. Its spokesperson, Elena Lukashenko, told ITAR-TASS the
party would not turn away male members; she herself has until
now been associated with the party headed by Vice-President Aleksandr
Rutskoi, the "Free Russia" People's Party. -Elizabeth Teague


CIS

AZERBAIJAN TO REJOIN CIS. After several postponements, the Azerbaijan
National Assembly (the rump parliament) voted on 20 September
by 31 votes in favor to 13 against for the renewal of Azerbaijan's
membership of the CIS, Western agencies reported. ITAR-TASS quoted
Parliament chairman Geidar Aliev as assuring deputies that the
vote would not compromise Azerbaijan's independence. (In October
1992 the Azerbaijan National Assembly had unanimously voted not
to ratify former President Ayaz Mutalibov's decision of December
1991 to commit Azerbaijan to membership of the CIS.) -Liz Fuller


TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



ABKHAZ FORCES SURROUND SUKHUMI. Abkhaz spokesmen claimed on 20
September to have completely surrounded Sukhumi; their offer
to open a corridor to allow defending Georgian troops to withdraw
was refused and Georgian defenders later repulsed an attack on
the outskirts, Western agencies reported. Artillery bombardment
continued during the night of 20-21 September. On 20 September
Georgia's Ambassador to the European Community, Zurab Abashidze,
termed "unacceptable" Russian Defense Minister Grachev's call
for a Georgian withdrawal from Abkhazia, according to Reuters.
Abashidze suggested NATO and the EC should pressure Russia to
take steps to end the conflict. US President Bill Clinton sent
a message to Shevardnadze urging him to agree to peace talks
with the Abkhaz leadership. -Liz Fuller

UZBEKISTAN AND RUSSIA SIGN RUBLE ACCORD. Uzbek deputy prime minister
Bakhtiar Khamidov and Russian deputy prime minister Aleksandr
Shokhin signed a bilateral agreement outlining measures to unify
their monetary systems, according to various Russian news agencies
on 17 September. The agreement follows from a multilateral pact
approved in early September by Russia, Belarus, Armenia, Tajikistan,
Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan that establishes a new ruble zone.
Reportedly only Kazakhstan has yet to sign a bilateral agreement
specifying terms for joining this monetary union with Moscow.
-Erik Whitlock

CASPIAN SHELF OIL DEAL DEFERRED. Final agreement to begin exploration
of the northern shelf of the Caspian Sea, due to be signed between
a consortium of Western oil firms and a Kazakhstani state oil
firm, will probably occur in late October or early November,
Kazakhstani energy officials told Reuters. In a report issued
on 20 September, Deputy Minister of Energy Baltabek Kuandykov,
who also heads the state concern that is one of the signatories
of the deal, was quoted as saying that legal issues remain to
be ironed out with representatives of the Western firms which
signed the initial agreement in June. A major hindrance to the
deal is the fact that Kazakhstan's legislature has not yet adopted
a law on petroleum development. -Bess Brown

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



BOSNIAN TALKS HIT STALEMATE. International media on 20 September
report that a discussion held on a British aircraft carrier in
the Adriatic between UN negotiators and the Bosnian, Serbian,
and Croatian presidents failed to reach an agreement on a peace
settlement, forcing the calling off of a planned meeting in Sarajevo
slated for the 21st. The Muslims want more land and access to
the sea, but Serbian spokesmen have made it clear that they would
consider swapping land with the Muslims but not any additional
concessions. President Franjo Tudjman and the Croatian media,
for their part, have stressed that Croatia might make port facilities
available to the Muslims but will not give up Neum to them. Bosnian
President Alija Izetbegovic has promised to submit a peace proposal
to parliament on 27-September, but it is not clear what, if anything,
this gesture might mean. Elsewhere, fierce fighting was reported
between Croats and Muslims in Mostar and in central Bosnia near
Vitez, while the BBC's Serbian Service added that Croats have
been shelling Serb positions around Trebinje in eastern Herzegovina
for some days. -Patrick Moore

POSTCOMMUNISTS SET TO DOMINATE POLISH SENATE. According to Rzeczpospolita
on 21 September, the SLD seems likely to win 35 seats in the
100-seat Senate. The PSL will be the other major winner, garnering
as many as an additional 35 seats. The UD, which had the largest
share in the old Senate, looks likely to preserve only a handful
of seats. PAP reports that the Senator representing the German
minority in Opole, Gerhard Bartodziej, was reelected. The Senate
can veto or amend legislation passed by the Sejm and can propose
draft legislation. -Louisa Vinton

POLISH COALITION MANEUVERING BEGINS. President Lech Walesa continues
to withhold any comment on the election outcome, save his assurance
that he "will manage." When the final results are known, the
president will ask the winning party to name prime minister candidates,
a spokesman said. The Democratic Left Alliance (SLD), which looks
set to control 38% of the Sejm, is taking pains to suggest that
the reform course will go on, with minor revisions. Coalition
leader Aleksander Kwasniewski told Western reporters on 19-September,
"Don't worry. We're not communists; we will continue the reforms."
At a press conference on 20 September, SLD leaders said that
they support privatization but without "ideologically inspired
acceleration" and are "open to the West and the world but without
illusions." The SLD also said it favors adopting a constitution
centered on a parliamentary system of government, with a role
of "active mediation" for the president. It ruled out early presidential
elections but stressed the government's right to work without
presidential interference. Kwasniewski earlier said the SLD's
favored coalition partner is the Democratic Union (UD), "which
has experience and good contacts with the West." But UD leader
Tadeusz Mazowiecki ruled out any coalition with the SLD on 20
September, PAP reports. A party statement said the UD refuses
to take responsibility for the unreal expectations aroused by
the PSL and the SLD in their election campaigns. A coalition
of the PSL, UD, and Union of Labor is being discussed as a possible
alternative to an SLD-dominated government. -Louisa Vinton

WHAT NEXT IN POLAND? FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE TERMS OF THE "LITTLE
CONSTITUTION" ADOPTED IN 1992 WILL REGULATE THE FORMATION OF
A NEW GOVERNMENT. President Lech Walesa has a month to convene
the first session of the new parliament. The constitution grants
the president the first move in forming a government. Within
fourteen days of the first Sejm session, Walesa can name a new
prime minister and, on his recommendation, call the government
into being. In the past, the Sejm voted to approve a prime minister
nominated by the president. Now, the new government takes power
when named by Walesa, but is required to secure a vote of confidence
from the Sejm within fourteen days. The confidence vote requires
a majority (more than half of those present vote "yes"). If the
president's first attempt fails, the initiative then passes to
the Sejm, which has twenty-one days to approve its own cabinet
by an absolute majority. Should it fail in turn, the initiative
returns to the president, who can try again, this time with a
simple majority (the "yes" votes must exceed the "no" votes).
-Louisa Vinton

KLAUS ON POLISH ELECTION RESULTS. Czech Prime Minister Vaclav
Klaus said it was not the ex-communist parties' strength, but
rather the weakness of right-wing parties, which was responsible
for the political shift in Poland, Czech TV reports on 20-September.
Klaus said the political right had been "missing chances" and
eventually proved to be too weak to carry the day. The prime
minister made it clear, however, that he expects no "major changes"
in Poland's economic or foreign policies. He predicted that the
pro-reform course will not be changed as the new government's
room for maneuver will be very limited both domestically and
internationally. -Jan Obrman

CZECH PROSECUTOR RESIGNS. The Prosecutor General of the Czech
Republic, Jiri Setina, has announced his resignation without
giving any reasons, CTK reported on 16 September. Setina has
been criticized both by the opposition and, more recently, by
coalition parties for alleged tax evasion and dubious real estate
transactions. According to CTK, Setina's tax records are the
subject of a Prague police investigation, although no charges
have been filed to date. -Jan Obrman

SLOVAKIA, ROMANIA SIGN READMISSION TREATY. Romanian Interior
Minister George Ioan Danescu visited Bratislava on 20 September,
where he and his Slovak counterpart Jozef Tuchyna signed an agreement
which allows either country to return illegal aliens and asylum
seekers entering from the other. In addition to the readmission
treaty, the two ministers signed a cooperation agreement, which
is mainly concerned with international organized crime prevention,
TASR reports. Danescu also discussed cooperation in fighting
crime with Premier Vladimir Meciar. Slovakia expects to sign
a readmission treaty with Hungary shortly. -Sharon Fisher

HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTER IN MOSCOW. After a five-day visit
to Romania, Hungarian Foreign Minister Geza Jeszenszky left for
a one-day visit to Moscow. Hungarian media report that Jeszenszky
on 20 September held talks with his Russian counterpart Andrei
Kozyrev and with Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Shakhrai, who is
also State Secretary for Nationality Affairs. Discussions centered
on Russian views toward NATO, the creation of a stable European
security system including Russia, cultural and economic cooperation
including Russia's foreign debt to Hungary, as well as nationality
conflicts. Kozyrev said that although the Russian parliament
has not yet ratified the Russian-Hungarian friendship treaty,
relations have already improved significantly. After the talks
concluded, Jeszenszky addressed the Moscow Institute of International
Relations. -Judith Pataki

HUNGARIAN FOREIGN DEBT INCREASES. In the first four months of
1993, Hungarian foreign debt has increased by $2.2 billion, reported
the economic daily Napi Gazdasag on 15-September. Hungary's gross
foreign debt was $21.4 billion at the end of December 1992 and
shot up to $23.6 billion by the end of April. This is the first
significant increase in foreign debt since the political changes
in 1990. Hungarian economists regard this as troublesome because
it is coupled with a reduction both in GDP and export performance.
-Judith Pataki

ROMANIAN FOREIGN MINISTER IN BRUSSELS. A Romanian delegation
headed by Foreign Minister Teodor Melescanu began a visit to
Brussels on 20 September. Radio Bucharest reported that Melescanu
was received by NATO Secretary General Manfred Woerner on that
day. The two discussed prospects for the admission of new members
to the organization. Melescanu stressed that in the long term
Romania is striving for full integration into NATO's structures.
He handed over a message on behalf of Romania's President Ion
Iliescu expressing the desire of closer cooperation between Romania
and NATO. Melescanu also met European Parliament Chairman Egon
Klepsch, with whom he discussed ways to step up the political
dialogue between the European Economic Community and the associate
member states. -Dan Ionescu

ROMANIAN CABINET WANTS BILINGUAL SIGNS LEGALIZED. Reuters reported
on 20-September that Romania's cabinet is making preparations
to legalize the use of bilingual signs in areas with significant
ethnic minorities. The agency quoted a government spokesman as
saying that the justice and finance ministers at a cabinet meeting
on 17 September had been ordered to determine a government policy
regarding signs. The government's Council for Minorities has
recommended the use of multi-lingual road and commercial signs
in communities with ethnic minorities. In August, the extreme
nationalist Greater Romania Party accused the government's general
secretary Viorel Hrebenciuc of high treason after the minority
council, which he heads, had advocated the use of bilingual signs.
-Dan Ionescu

BULGARIA, GERMANY TO EXPAND MILITARY TIES. During a visit to
Bonn by Bulgarian Defense Minister Valentin Aleksandrov, German
dailies on 21 September report that the two countries have agreed
to forge a closer relationship on military matters, primarily
in the field of education. Aleksandrov's counterpart Volker Ruehe
told journalists that an accord to that effect will be signed
in Sofia next year. Answering questions about Bulgaria's relationship
to NATO, Aleksandrov said his country will ask to join when it
has developed into a stable democracy. Meanwhile in Bulgaria,
BTA says a delegation of the North Atlantic Assembly is having
talks with government and military officials. -Kjell Engelbrekt


ATHENS PROTESTS CLOSURE OF GREEK SCHOOLS IN ALBANIA. On 20 September
Mihalis Papacon-stantinou, Greek Minister of Foreign Affairs,
stated that Athens is strongly protesting against the closure
of schools mainly serving the Greek minority in three Albanian
cities. Papaconstantinou, who said he had already notified the
high commissioner on ethnic minorities of the Conference on Security
and Cooperation in Europe, was quoted by AFP that Tirana "cannot
ignore the general rules on minorities agreed under international
law." The protest comes as Greece is wrapped up in an intensive
pre-election campaign in which relations with Albania will presumably
play a major role. Tension between the two countries began to
grow in several months ago, as Tirana expelled a Greek cleric
and Athens responded by returning an estimated 20,000 illegal
Albanian immigrants. -Kjell Engelbrekt

SOCIALISTS CHARGE FRAUD IN LOCAL ALBANIAN ELECTIONS. The ex-communist
Socialist Party charged fraud was involved in the 12 September
local elections in two communities of the eastern district of
Dibra, an RFE/RL correspondent reports on 20-September. The Socialists
lost many votes, compared with the nationwide local elections
of July 1992, when they took just 2% less than the ruling Democrats.
They now say that the governing Democratic Party bribed voters
with money, food and medicine, and they demand new elections.
Meanwhile, a conference of Democratic Party leaders praised the
victories as a sign of declining support for the Socialists at
the local level. -Fabian Schmidt

FALL SESSION OF PARLIAMENT OPENS IN KIEV. The eighth session
of parliament opens in Kiev on 21-September with the economic
crisis in the country the top item on the agenda. Deputy Minister
of Economics Volodymyr Naumenko was quoted as saying that the
government has introduced changes into its economic reform plan
moving away from the original idea of a "liberal conception of
state regulation" to "tough state regulation of state property."
The move toward more state control was announced by Prime Minister
Leonid Kuchma last week. The parliament is also set to consider
the referendum on confidence in the president and parliament,
originally scheduled for 26 September, the Massandra agreements
between Kiev and Moscow, and the draft of a new constitution.
-Roman Solchanyk

CRIMEAN PRESIDENCY LAW. The Crimean parliament has passed legislation
providing for the election of a president of the Crimean Republic,
Ukrinform-TASS reported on 17-September. According to the law,
the Crimean president will be chosen by direct popular vote for
a four-year term of office and must know one of the three state
languages of Crimea (Russian, Ukrainian, or Crimean Tatar). -Roman
Solchanyk

MOLDOVA ANNOUNCES INCENTIVES FOR FOREIGN INVESTORS. The Moldovan
government on 18-September made public a decree on "Tax Concessions
for Joint Ventures with Foreign Capital." According to the decree,
joint ventures manufacturing the following products are exempted
from all taxes on profit for 6 years: medicine and medical supplies,
nonconventional energy equipment, and seed selection. Manufacturers
of agricultural machinery and equipment for food storage, as
well as processing and packaging, are exempted for 4 years. Producers
of instruments and electronics are exempted for 2-years. The
concessions apply to joint ventures whose foreign capital amounts
to at least $ 250,000 or at least 30% of the capital. The incentives
are intended to capitalize on Moldova's vast agricultural resources
and relatively modern industrial base in certain sectors. -Vladimir
Socor

BALTIC PRESIDENTS TO MEET CLINTON. On 20-September Latvian President
Guntis Ulmanis told a press conference in Riga that, along with
his Estonian and Lithuanian counterparts Lennart Meri and Algirdas
Brazauskas, he would meet with US President Bill Clinton for
a half hour on 27 September, Diena reports. The meeting was arranged
to take advantage of the Baltic presidents' concurrent visits
to New York where they will speak at the United Nations General
Assembly on 28-30 September. -Saulius Girnius

AMENDMENTS TO ESTONIAN EDUCATION LAW? ESTONIAN MINISTER OF CULTURE
AND EDUCATION PAUL-EERIK RUMMO PROMISED HIS MINISTRY WILL LATER
THIS YEAR SUBMIT TO PARLIAMENT AMENDMENTS TO THE EDUCATION LAW,
BNS REPORTED ON 20 SEPTEMBER. Rummo said that the law's requirement
to end instruction in all languages other than Estonian in state
high schools by the year 2000 should be extended to 2005. He
also said he thought that local authorities should be given the
right to determine the language of instruction in municipal and
private schools and that the latter could even be financed by
ethnic groups, international organizations or other countries.
-Saulius Girnius

IMPASSE ON LITHUANIAN INSURRECTION CONTINUES. The members of
the Volunteer Home Guard Service (VHGS) in Kaunas, who on 16
September withdrew to the forests with their weapons, did not
comply with the deadline of noon 20 September set by National
Defense Minister Audrius Butkevicius to return to their posts,
Radio Lithuania reports. The defense ministry thus no longer
considers the defectors members of the VHGS but merely an armed
band of civilians. In his weekly radio interview that day President
Algirdas Brazauskas said that the matter was a "misunderstanding"
which he hoped would be resolved peacefully this week. While
condemning the method of the VHGS protest, Brazauskas expressed
support for some of the demands, such as offering the soldiers
social guarantees. -Saulius Girnius

SOME PROGRESS IN LITHUANIAN-RUSSIAN TALKS. On 16 and 17 September
Russian and Lithuanian delegations, headed by Viktor Isakov and
Virgilijus Bulovas, held talks in Vilnius in which two draft
agreements and a protocol on the transit of Russian troops withdrawing
from Germany were initialed, BNS reported on 18 September. While
calculated in Swiss francs, payments for the transit will be
made in Russian rubles. The delegations discussed social security
guarantees for retired military officers, pensions for Russian
citizens, and a trade and economic treaty, but not compensations
for military damage. It is expected that 6 to 8 agreements may
be initialed at the next meeting to be held in Moscow on 10 October.
-Saulius Girnius

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Elizabeth Teague and Kjell Engelbrekt









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