If you wish to live wisely, ignore sayings--including this one. - Heywood Broun
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 180, 20 September 1993

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.





RUSSIA



YELTSIN CONCEDES EARLY PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS. Russian President
Boris Yeltsin has publicly conceded that there could be early
elections to the presidency, Russian and Western agencies reported
on 18 September. Yeltsin made this statement at a closed meeting
of about 150 heads of legislative and executive power of the
republics and regions convened to discuss the foundation of a
Federation Council. Holding early presidential elections could
be a way for Yeltsin to force the Congress of People's Deputies
to allow early legislative elections. Yeltsin insisted, however,
that a simultaneous vote would "have grave consequences," and
suggested a delay of at least six months between elections to
the parliament and the presidency. -Wendy Slater

SIGNING OF AGREEMENT ON FEDERATION COUNCIL POSTPONED. Opinions
differ as to whether or not the Federation Council was set up
at Yeltsin's meeting with regional leaders on 18 September, Russian
media reported. A presidential spokesman called the meeting the
constituent session of the council and the statement issued by
the participants afterwards claimed that the council had been
created. But the heads of administrations, who are often appointees
of Yeltsin, were better represented than the heads of the soviets
and the signing of the agreement on the council's creation was
postponed until the next meeting in October. Moreover, the head
of administration of Nizhnyi Novgorod oblast, Boris Nemtsov,
said flatly that the Federation Council had not been created
and that the participants wasted their time. -Ann Sheehy

GAIDAR'S REAPPOINTMENT CONFIRMED. On 18-September, Yeltsin signed
a decree appointing Egor Gaidar to the post of First Deputy Prime
Minister, ITAR-TASS reported. Despite Prime Minister Chernomyrdin's
assertion that the appointment had been his idea all along, press
and agency coverage suggests that the move may have been made
by Yeltsin on the spur of the moment. Making what was apparently
his last speech before his formal appointment, Gaidar on 17 September
listed four preconditions for economic recovery: financial stability;
lower interest rates for producers; lower taxes; and observance
of property rights. Parliament reacted quickly to Gaidar's return
by demanding a new economic program containing more social protection.
Observers warned, too, of potential conflict between Gaidar and
Finance Minister Boris Fedorov. -Keith Bush

NEW ECONOMIC REFORM PACKAGE READIED. Deputy Prime Minister and
Finance Minister Fedorov have drawn up a program of measures
aimed at macroeconomic discipline that is expected to be implemented
soon, The Financial Times reported on 18 September. The measures
include: banning the use of foreign currency; raising the value-added
tax by 7-percentage points; increasing the marginal rate of income
tax on top salaries to 50%; higher import duties on cars and
other goods; further restriction of credit to most sectors of
industry; review of capital investment; postponing interest payments
on government debt to the Russian Central Bank until 1997; and
cutting imports of raw materials by 30%. -Keith Bush

MORE PRESSURE FROM INTERNATIONAL CREDITORS. A senior International
Monetary Fund official confirmed suspicions that the Fund may
delay a $1.5-billion loan to Russia because of slow progress
on reforms, The New York Times reported on 20 September. The
official suggested, however, that the loan might be forthcoming
by the end of the year if the Russian government gets reforms
back on track soon. The official, who was unnamed, complained
that "important measures in the budget field have not been taken
and credit discipline has been relaxed." Russia may expect further
pressure to restore the reform drive later this week, according
to AFP, when representatives from the G-7 meet in Washington
to discuss Russia's disappointing performance in paying the $2
billion it owes this year as part of an April agreement to reschedule
the servicing of the debt of the former USSR. -Erik Whitlock


LOBOV NEW SECRETARY OF SECURITY COUNCIL. Yeltsin has appointed
Oleg Lobov, whose job as First Deputy Prime Minister has just
gone to Gaidar, as the new Secretary of the Security Council,
ITAR-TASS reported on 18 September. Lobov has been one of Yeltsin's
most trusted allies ever since the two men worked in the Party
apparatus in Sverdlovsk Oblast in the 1960s and 1970s. Lobov's
recent attempts to alter the government's economic program had
caused alarm in reformist circles. In the Security Council, Lobov
will replace Marshal Evgenii Shaposhnikov who offered his resignation
two months ago. The Security Council, once a powerful body, has
lately lost influence. -Alexander Rahr

GOLUSHKO APPOINTED MINISTRY OF SECURITY. President Yeltsin has
named Nikolai Golushko to be Russia's new Minister of Security,
Radio Rossiya reported on 20 September. A KGB veteran, Golushko
is the first career "chekist" to head the ministry since its
creation in 1992. His predecessor, MVD general Viktor Barannikov,
who was dismissed by Yeltsin in July, was seen as an "outsider"
by security ministry officials. Golushko began his career in
the KGB Fifth Main Administration, headed the Secretariat of
the USSR KGB, headed the Ukrainian KGB from 1986, and in 1991
worked as deputy to Vadim Bakatin, who presided over the disbanding
of the KGB. He has been acting head of the security ministry
since Barannikov's dismissal. His appointment suggests Yeltsin
needs the ministry as an ally in the present power struggle.
-Victor Yasmann

CIS

RUTSKOI WANTS TO RE-CREATE SOVIET EMPIRE . . . Aleksandr Rutskoi,
temporarily suspended from his duties as Russian Vice-President,
has repeated his earlier calls for the restoration of the Soviet
empire, ITAR-TASS reported on 18 September. Rutskoi was speaking
at a regional conference convened by the chairman of the Russian
parliament, Ruslan Khasbulatov, as a counterweight to the first
meeting of the Council of the Federation, convened by Yeltsin.
Rutskoi denounced Yeltsin and his allies as "political adventurers,"
called for all-round resistance to Yeltsin's policies, and said
that Russia's foreign policy was being "dictated by the United
States." The same day, Yeltsin cut Rutskoi's powers still further
by issuing a decree stipulating that Rutskoi may deputize for
Yeltsin only if the president explicitly orders him to do so.
-Alexander Rahr

. . . WHILE KHASBULATOV PROPOSES CLOSER UNION. Meanwhile, Ruslan
Khasbulatov has written to the parliaments of the CIS states
proposing that they should delegate certain unspecified powers
to a new parliament that would coordinate their political, economic
and military activities, Reuters reported on 17-September. Khasbulatov
intends to raise his proposal with the CIS interparliamentary
assembly which he chairs and which is scheduled to meet on 25
September in St.-Petersburg. -Elizabeth Teague

UKRAINE'S UNION OF NAVAL OFFICERS ON RUSSIA. On 15 September
the Ukrainian Union of Officers asked the Ukrainian Defense Council
not to accept Russia's proposal to buy out Ukraine's portion
of the Black Sea Fleet, and called for placing the fleet's coastal
infrastructure under Ukrainian jurisdiction, Radio Ukraine reported.
The statement also criticized Ukrainian officials involved in
the agreement. According to Rear-Admiral Mykola Kostrov, Russia's
territorial claims on Ukraine make it impossible for a Russian
fleet on the Black Sea to protect Ukraine's security and interests
in the disputed regions. The Defense Ministry condemned the statement
on 17 September, saying it violated a ban on political activities
by military personnel, and threatened action against its initiators,
the UNIAN news agency reported. -Ustina Markus and John Lepingwell


TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



GRACHEV CALLS FOR GEORGIAN TROOP WITHDRAWAL. Ostankino TV and
ITAR-TASS reported on 20 September that Russian Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev stated that the only way out of the crisis in Georgia
was the immediate withdrawal of Georgian troops from Abkhazian
territory. Moreover, he was highly critical of the Georgian leadership's
refusal to negotiate with Abkhaz leaders. -John Lepingwell

ABKHAZIA: GRACHEV ACCUSES . . . The Abkhaz offensive against
Sukhumi continued on 17 September as Russian Defense Minister
Grachev met in Gudauta with Abkhaz leader Vladislav Ardzinba,
who refused to withdraw his forces, and in Sochi with Georgian
parliament chairman Eduard Shevardnadze, Western agencies reported.
Both Shevardnadze and the mayor of Tbilisi appealed on 17 September
for armed volunteers to defend Sukhumi. On 18 September, several
hours after the expiry of an ultimatum to Abkhaz forces to withdraw,
Russia cut electricity supplies to Abkhazia. Speaking at a news
conference in Moscow on 18-September, Grachev called for tough
political and economic sanctions against both Georgia and Abkhazia,
adding that in his opinion neither side wanted peace. Grachev
also stated that Shevardnadze had rejected as "intervention and
occupation" an offer of Russian military assistance; meanwhile
Abkhaz troops were reported to have reached the outskirts of
Sukhumi.-Liz Fuller

. . . SHEVARDNADZE RESPONDS. Shevardnadze for his part, speaking
on Georgian television on 17 September, claimed that it was the
Russian parliament that had rejected Grachev's initiative to
send Russian troops to Sukhumi. On 18 September, Shevardnadze
issued an appeal for help to the international community to oppose
what he termed "a well-coordinated and highly synchronized" attempt
by Abkhaz forces and unnamed circles in Moscow to dismember Georgia.
On 19 September Abkhaz and Georgian representatives met in Sochi
with Russian officials including Deputy Prime Minister Boris
Pastukhov but failed to reach an agreement. -Liz Fuller

ADZHAR LEADER BROKERS CEASEFIRE BETWEEN GAMSAKHURDIA, GOVERNMENT.
On 19 September, following two rounds of talks brokered by Adzhar
parliament chairman Aslan Abashidze, representatives of the Georgian
government and of ousted Georgian president Zviad Gamsakhurdia
signed an agreement in the Adzhar town of Kobuleti on a cessation
of hostilities within 24 hours, the withdrawal of all armed units
and equipment from the conflict zone, and the lifting of blockades,
Radio Tbilisi reported. Gamsakhurdia's supporters had occupied
several towns in western Georgia over recent weeks and taken
advantage of the confusion resulting from Shevardnadze's 14 September
threat to resign to attack the rail junction of Samtredia and
the Black Sea port of Poti. In a telephone interview with Reuters
on 19 September, Gamsakhurdia claimed that 90 per cent of the
Georgian troops currently opposing the Abkhaz advance were loyal
to him rather than to the Georgian government; two days earlier
he had affirmed his readiness to return to Georgia, since "the
people are demanding this." -Liz Fuller

NORTH CAUCASIAN VOLUNTEERS TO RETURN TO ABKHAZIA. On 17 September
the Confederation of the Peoples of the Caucasus, which had earlier
withdrawn its forces from Abkhazia, told all units to be in a
state of complete combat readiness to return to Abkhazia, ITAR-TASS
reported. Radio Mayak reported on 19-September that in the Kabardino-Balkar
capital, Nalchik, more than 1,000 volunteers had signed up to
fight in Abkhazia and the first busload had already left. Reuters
said there had been clashes in the Nadterechnyi raion of Chechnya
when president Dzhokhar Dudaev's forces took action to stop volunteers
from the region going to Abkhazia. -Ann Sheehy

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



POLAND GOES LEFT. The parliamentary elections in Poland on 19
September have produced a political earthquake, with power shifting
from the broad Solidarity elite to parties with their roots in
the communist system. According to partial and unofficial results,
the Democratic Left Alliance (SLD)-a coalition dominated by the
direct successor to the communist party-finished first, with
over 20% of the popular vote. The former official Polish Peasant
Party (PSL) came second with 15.3%. Because the election law
rewards the biggest winners with bonus seats, the two postcommunist
parties appear likely to control a full 65% of the seats in the
Sejm. The only party in the current government coalition to reach
the threshold was the Democratic Union (UD), but its 11% of the
vote was less than in 1991. The Union of Labor, a social-democratic
party with roots in Solidarity, won 7.3%, confirming the voters'
general shift to the Left. The Confederation for an Independent
Poland and President Lech Walesa's Nonparty Reform Bloc appear
also to have squeaked in, with 5.7% and 5.3% of the vote, respectively.
The list of losers is long: the Solidarity trade union, the Liberal
Democratic Congress, and the Catholic and the anticommunist right-wing
parties all failed to clear their thresholds and will not be
represented in the Sejm. Before the elections, President Lech
Walesa pledged to ask the largest party to make the first attempt
to form a government. Since the initial results were announced,
Walesa's office has had no comment. The SLD has delegated two
representatives to begin coalition talks. -Louisa Vinton

LAST RUSSIAN TROOPS LEAVE POLAND . . . The departure of the last
Russian troops from Poland on 17-September, the 54th anniversary
of the Soviet invasion, was not attended by the Russian Minister
of Defense, Pavel Grachev. While reports had indicated that Grachev
remained in Russia for treatment of a kidney ailment, Rossiiskaya
gazeta on 17 September speculated, based on military sources,
that Grachev opposed hastened withdrawal of the forces because
of the housing shortage and that his absence might be deliberate.
(Indeed, Grachev flew to the Caucasus on 16 September to meet
Georgian leaders.) PAP reported that the absence of Russian government
representatives from the ceremonies, as well as continuing differences
between the two sides, were preventing the signing of Polish-Russian
agreements formalizing the withdrawal and regulating the status
of Russia's military mission in Poland. President Lech Walesa
said the withdrawal's conclusion reflects "historical justice"
and gives final confirmation to Poland's sovereignty. -John Lepingwell
and Louisa Vinton

. . . BUT DEBATE OVER POLISH INTEREST IN NATO CONTINUES. Russian
commentaries on the possibility of Poland's entering NATO have
become more critical with Sergei Karaganov of the Institute of
Europe arguing (Moscow News, No. 38) that such a move would meet
with opposition in both conservative and centrist circles, particularly
among the Russian military elite. Segodnya on 14 September published
an analysis by a representative of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
who pointed out that, while Poland is free to join NATO, Russia
opposes a bloc-oriented approach to security and would prefer
to see a stronger CSCE than either a larger NATO or the creation
of a "buffer zone." While not an official statement, the article
spells out Moscow's "reinterpretation" of Yeltsin's comments
in Poland. -John Lepingwell

HOPES DIM FOR BOSNIAN SETTLEMENT. Despite initial optimism by
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic that a peace settlement
will be reached in time for the scheduled 21-September Sarajevo
airport meeting of the Bosnian, Serbian, and Croatian presidents,
Bosnia's Alija Izetbegovic said: "I personally don't see it,
and I told [international mediator Lord] Owen that." International
media also noted that the stumbling block continues to be Muslim
demands for more territory from the Serbs and for access to the
Adriatic from the Croats. A Muslim concession late last week
that would enable the Serb and Croat republics to leave the Bosnian
union after two years has apparently not brought the desired
reciprocity from the other two sides. Meanwhile, a Croat-Muslim
cease-fire slated to take effect on 18 September has proven still-born,
as have so many other such agreements in the Yugoslav conflicts.
Particularly intense fighting was reported from the Mostar, Vitez,
and Gornji Vakuf areas. -Patrick Moore

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS IN AND AROUND THE BOSNIAN CONFLICT. Vjesnik
on 18-September reported on a press conference by the Croatian
Social Liberal Party, which slightly leads President Franjo Tudjman's
ruling party in the polls. The Liberals continued their opposition
to Tudjman's support for Herzegovinian Croat leaders, arguing
that this works against Croatia's strategic interests and sells
out the Bosnian Croats, a view widely shared not only throughout
the opposition but in Tudjman's party itself. Croatian TV on
19-September, however, showed Tudjman speaking in Varazdin and
defending his policy in the embattled neighboring republic. Meanwhile
in Banja Luka, rebel soldiers in the "September 93" movement
ended their mutiny on 17 September after getting assurances from
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic that action would be taken
against profiteers and that soldiers' living standards would
be improved. The Financial Times on 18 September reported that
some of the rebel leaders had been arrested, that the soldiers
had dropped their political demands, and that confusion continues
to surround the organization and motives of what seems to have
been an attempted coup against Karadzic. The paper added that
more such rebellions might be expected as Serbs' living conditions
continue to deteriorate and as Milosevic and other Serb political
leaders jockey for power. Finally, the BBC on 19 September quoted
UNPROFOR spokesmen as saying that Croat troops had systematically
killed at least 10 Serb civilians before withdrawing from three
villages in the Gospic area. -Patrick Moore

KOSOVO UPDATE. On 18 September the Serbian police raided several
houses of members of the Democratic League of Kosovo (LDK) and
arrested the whole local shadow government in Kacanik, Rilindja
reports on 19 September. ATA reported already on 17 September
raids and arrests of activists of the LDK, the largest Kosovo
Albanian political organization, in Pristina. Allegedly police
demolished furniture and beat people. Tensions have risen since
the beginning of the new school year in Kosovo this month because
the police hindered children from entering privately organized
Albanian schools. Meanwhile, Borba reports on 17-September on
reactions to the visit of Montenegrin President Momir Bulatovic
to Tirana, quoting Mahmut Bakali, a former Kosovar politician
as saying: "that is the beginning of a coming together of Serbians
and Albanians, and of talks for the good of the people in the
Balkans." The Kosovo Albanian independent trade union, meanwhile,
announced that its representatives would go to Montenegro to
hold talks, even though there are still doubts among the unionists
and others as to whether Montenegro is a proper mediator for
talks with the political authorities in Belgrade. -Fabian Schmidt


ALBANIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY CONCLUDES CONFERENCE. Albania's ruling
Democratic Party (DP) concluded closed door meetings on 17 September.
The mood of the conference was good and there was considerable
self-congratulation on the party's achievements after one and
a half years in office. The party has set an ambitious economic
growth agenda for the coming years and called for a strengthening
of the government coalition, although any cooperation with the
opposition Socialists was ruled out. DP policy remains to isolate
and eventually eliminate the Socialists as a viable force in
Albanian politics. At a press conference on 18 September, Democratic
Party leader Eduard Selami spoke out on a number of issues. He
denied suggestions that corruption was evident in the government
administration and took the opportunity to slam Socialist policy
as "anti-national" and blamed that party for Albania's failure
to gain admission into the Council of Europe. His attack on the
Socialists was greeted with considerable applause from the press.
An open national congress of the DP is scheduled for December.
-Robert Austin

PAPANDREOU: "THE NAME MACEDONIA IS OUR SOUL." Reuters reports
that Andreas Papandreou, leader of the Panhellenic Socialist
Movement [PASOK] and possibly Greece's next Prime Minister, on
18 September told a rally that, if elected, he would relentlessly
oppose recognition of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia
under any name including the word 'Macedonia.' Criticizing the
current conservative government for its failure to muster international
support for the Greek view that the name Macedonia implies territorial
designs on parts of northern Greece, and specifically premier
Constantine Mitsotakis for his apparent willingness to negotiate
a compromise with Skopje, Papandreou said he would reject any
settlement which may "undermine our national rights." According
to Vecer of 20 September, he also threatened to close the border
to Macedonia as a means of pressuring a name change. The conservative
New Democracy party lost its parliamentary majority two weeks
ago when deputies of the newly formed Political Spring faction,
which also has accused Mitsotakis of being too lenient with Skopje,
withdrew their support for the cabinet. The elections are due
on 10 October and polls suggest that PASOK is clearly ahead.
-Kjell Engelbrekt

TENSIONS BETWEEN VW AND CZECH GOVERNMENT. Volkswagen's decision
to cancel a major credit line with an international consortium
of banks as part of the pledged investment to its Czech subsidiary
Skoda led to tensions with the government of Czech Prime Minister
Vaclav Klaus, domestic and international media reported over
the weekend. Individual government members said they were "disappointed"
by the decision, others criticized the fact that they were informed
only one day ahead of the planned signing ceremony. Finance Minister
Ivan Kocarnik told Czech TV that it was "an unfavorable signal
for the future," while Tomas Jezek, Chairman of the Czech National
Property Fund that is currently holding 69% of Skoda's shares,
said VW managers "had to admit that the financial plans for Skoda's
development were ill conceived." Klaus agreed that VW should
have informed Prague earlier but was quoted as saying that VW's
move should not be "overdramatized" and that any company's decision
to postpone a planned investment is "legitimate." In the meantime,
Skoda managers pointed out that the plans to double Skoda's production
by 1997 and introduce new models have not been changed. -Jan
Obrman

SLOVAK PRESIDENT ON NATO, DISMISSED AMBASSADOR. On 18 September
Willy De Clercq, chairman of the European Federation of Liberal,
Democratic and Reform Parties, visited Bratislava, where he met
with President Michal Kovac. Kovac informed De Clercq about the
political situation in Slovakia and expressed his concern that
Slovakia's entrance into NATO is "increasingly in doubt from
the standpoint of Western European nations," TASR reports. Kovac
also said that in Slovakia, the political situation is "no worse"
than in other postcommunist countries. On 17 September Kovac
held a press conference aboard a ship carrying foreign diplomats
to the Gabcikovo waterworks. When asked about the recent dismissal
of Slovak Ambassador to Austria Rudolf Filkus, Kovac said his
resignation was "the best solution." According to Kovac, if Filkus
had stayed in office despite the Slovak Cabinet's resolution
to dismiss him, Slovakia's relations with Austria "could have
been impaired for a relatively long period," TASR reports. -Sharon
Fisher

SLOVAK PREMIER ON POLITICAL SITUATION. In a 17 September interview
with Slovak Radio in Zilina, Vladimir Meciar complained about
growing pressure from the opposition against himself and his
party and claimed that the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia
has "an acknowledged partner" in the US Democratic Party. On
18 September the MDS leadership held a special session, during
which Meciar presented his evaluation of the current political
and economic situation. Regarding the present political situation,
which has left the MDS with a minority government, Deputy Premier
Roman Kovac said the party "will initiate discussions with all
parliamentary and selected extraparliamentary political parties,"
TASR reports. Meanwhile, the Slovak opposition parties met on
17-September to discuss "alternative solutions" to the present
political situation in Slovakia. A definitive solution will be
made at their next meeting, scheduled for early October, TASR
reports. -Sharon Fisher

JESZENSZKY ENDS ROMANIAN VISIT. On 19 September Hungary's Foreign
Minister Geza Jeszenszky ended a five-day official visit to Romania.
At a press conference broadcast by Radio Bucharest, Jeszenszky
said that the visit had been auspicious for the future of bilateral
relations and that steps had been taken to improve economic ties
and human contacts between Romania and Hungary. On the visit's
last leg, in the Western Romanian town of Timisoara, Jeszenszky
laid a wreath at the monument of the victims of the December
1989 events and attended a service celebrated by the Reformed
Church bishop Laszlo Tokes. In a commentary, Radio Budapest said
there were also indications that Romania is unwilling to include
the minority issue in of the bilateral treaty with Hungary currently
under negotiation. -Dan Ionescu and Alfred Reisch

ROMANIA RESUMES TALKS WITH THE IMF. A 14man Romanian delegation
arrived on 18 September in Washington for a new round of negotiations
with the International Monetary Fund. The delegation includes
Minister of State Mircea Cosea, chairman of the government's
Council for Economic Coordination, Strategy and Reform, Finance
Minister Florin Georgescu and National Bank Governor Mugur Isarescu.
Cosea told Radio Bucharest that the visit aimed at finding ways
"to adapt the IMF claims to Romania's [economic] conditions."
Romania, he added, was open to suggestions from the IMF on how
to reform its fiscal and monetary system. The Romanian government
and the IMF failed to agree on a new loan arrangement in July,
mainly because of the IMF's dissatisfaction over Romania's exchange
and interest rates. -Dan Ionescu

MOLDOVA APPEALS FOR INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT IN CONFLICT WITH RUSSIA.
Moldovan Foreign Minister Nicolae Tiu on 17 September cabled
Catherine Lalumiere, General Secretary of the Council of Europe,
complaining that "the Russian government has failed to even reply
to our numerous requests that it halt the Russian military's
permanent interference in Moldova's internal affairs." As cited
by Moldovan media, Tiu wrote that the interference "is taking
place with the Moscow authorities' tacit agreement and reflects
the Russian pro-imperial forces' real intentions to tear away
the eastern part of Moldova," and that "only concerted efforts
by the Council of Europe and other European and world organizations
may halt this brutal interference." Tiu's call for international
support came in the wake of the election of Lt.-Gen. Aleksandr
Lebed, commander of Russia's 14th Army in Moldova, as deputy
to the Supreme Soviet of the secessionist "Dniester republic"
on a platform envisaging the latter's accession to Russia. -Vladimir
Socor

COMMISSION TO LOOK INTO ARMENIAN WEAPONS CHARGES. A spokeswoman
for the Ukrainian Ministry of Foreign Affairs told reporters
that a commission has been created to investigate Armenia's allegations
that Ukraine is supplying tanks and aircraft to Azerbaijan, an
RFE/RL correspondent reported on 14-September. The matter is
being investigated jointly by the Ministry of Defense and Ukraine's
security services. Ukraine does have an agreement with Azerbaijan
to repair tanks, but officials deny providing other military
equipment to Baku. -Ustina Markus

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Elizabeth Teague and Kjell Engelbrekt









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