Experience is in the fingers and head. The heart is inexperienced. - Henry David Thoreau
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 178, 16 September 1993



Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.





RUSSIA



ELECTIONS UNLIKELY BEFORE THE SPRING. Russian press reports from
15 September of the previous day's presidential council meeting
gave more details of what was discussed in the closed session.
Yeltsin's advisors apparently told him that it was "technically
impossible" to hold elections in the autumn. Nezavisimaya gazeta
wrote that parliamentary, and probably presidential, elections
would be called next spring, depending on whether the current
parliament could be made to adopt an election law. Kommersant-Daily
claimed that Boris Yeltsin had said "he would consider his mission
accomplished" once "democratic reelections" were held. Yeltsin's
advisors encouraged him to continue with his plan to convene
the Federation Council for 18 September, but warned that the
necessary two-thirds of the delegates might not attend. -Wendy
Slater

RUMYANTSEV SUSPENDS MEMBERSHIP IN CONSTITUTIONAL WORKING GROUP.
The executive secretary of the parliament's constitutional commission,
Oleg Rumyantsev, told ITAR-TASS on 15 September that he had suspended
his activities in the working group set up last week by President
Yeltsin to finalize the new draft constitution. Rumyantsev complained
that the majority of the working group's members supported the
draft constitution worked out by the Constitutional Assembly,
and failed to give enough consideration to the draft of the parliament's
constitutional commission. Rumyantsev is one of the principal
authors of the latter. -Vera Tolz

MORE ON LOBOV'S PRIVATIZATION PLANS. First Deputy Prime Minister
Oleg Lobov's proposals for modifying the current Russian privatization
program include raising the nominal value privatization vouchers
by a factor of 25, revaluating Russia's state capital stock by
a factor of 100-200, therewith lowering the share of state property
targeted for voucher sales from 80% to 30%, according to Ekho
Moskvy on 14 September. Kommersant-Daily reported that Lobov
prepared a draft decree containing these provisions pursuant
to a presidential directive dated 30 August entitled "On the
Simultaneous Indexation of Privatization Checks and Capital Stock."
Yeltsin rescinded this directive on 11-September and asked Lobov,
Deputy Prime Minister Anatolii Chubais and Prime Minister Viktor
Chernomyrdin to formulate a compromise plan. -Erik Whitlock

NEW BATTLE LOOMS IN TAX WAR. The Ministry of Finance is planning
to introduce a uniform tax system from January 1994, The Financial
Times reported on 15-September. The aim is to do away with the
present system, under which over 30 of Russia's 89 republics
and regions are withholding taxes from the center and bargaining
over how much tax revenue they can keep for themselves. The ministry's
plan seems certain to be resisted by Tatarstan and Bashkortostan,
which have already declared "fiscal sovereignty," and by Sakha
(Yakutia), which has negotiated a special tax deal with the center.
-Elizabeth Teague

GOVERNMENT INSPECTORATE FOR PROTECTION OF MASS MEDIA. The government
has issued a resolution setting up the Inspectorate for the Protection
of the Freedom of the Mass Media. ITAR-TASS reported on 15 September
that the inspectorate will be subordinate to the Ministry of
Information and that its main goal will be to make sure that
the legislation on mass media is observed by both journalists
and government and state officials. Parliament recently voted
to create supervisory bodies to control the activities of the
broadcasting media-a move that provoked an outcry on the part
of many journalists. At the same time, Mikhail Fedotov, who recently
resigned from the post of minister of information, has complained
that another body-the Federal Information Center (FIC) under
the chairmanship of Yeltsin's closest ally Poltoranin-exercises
excessive control over television. (The parliament, in turn,
demands the abolition of the FIC.) It is very probable that the
new inspectorate will take over the FIC's functions. -Vera Tolz


YELTSIN MEETS PRO-REFORM WRITERS. On 15-September, Russian TV
broadcast the footage of Yeltsin's meeting with a large group
of writers who, on 5 August, had signed an appeal calling for
parliamentary elections not later than the fall of 1993. Those
present included prominent poets and novelists, but there also
appeared to be many political journalists. Among the suggestions
aired was the convocation of a congress that would examine the
plight of Russian cultural institutions at risk under market
conditions. This meeting may have been intended to counter earlier
gatherings of nationalist cultural figures with Khasbulatov and
Rutskoi. -Julia Wishnevsky

INDIAN OFFICIAL ASSERTS ROCKET DEAL STILL ON. AFP reported on
15 September that the chief of the Indian Space Research Organization
asserted that he has "no reason to believe" that the 1991 contract
under which Russia agreed to provide rocket engine technology
to India will be broken. He noted that India had received plans
from Russia and that 15 Indian scientists were still being trained
in Russia. The Russian government had agreed to terminate the
deal, in part in order to win contracts from the US space agency,
but Glavkosmos, the organization responsible for the contract,
appears determined to continue with it. -John Lepingwell

RUSSIAN SPACE PROGRAM HOPES FOR US CONTRACTS. Yurii Koptev, the
head of the Russian space agency, told Russian TV on 15 September
that the Russian space program had only received half the funds
it had been budgeted. He noted, however, that in 1994 Russian
aerospace firms would receive $100 million in contracts from
the US. As The Washington Post reported on 9 September, however,
extensive US-Russian cooperation on the space station Freedom
is being slowed by congressional opposition to extensive use
of Russian equipment and technology. Koptev also announced, according
to Radio Moscow, an agreement with an Australian organization
to build a spaceport "in the equatorial part of the Pacific"
at a cost of some $900-million. The launch site would allow Russian
boosters to place payloads in orbits that are not readily accessible
from the higher-latitude launch sites of Baikonur and Plesetsk.
-John Lepingwell

GRACHEV ILL, CANCELS TRIP. Defense Minister Pavel Grachev requires
treatment for a kidney ailment and has cancelled a trip to Poland
and Kaliningrad, which had been scheduled to begin on 16 September,
ITAR-Tass reported on 15 September. -John Lepingwell

HIJACK ENDED. An Aeroflot TU-134, with about 50-passengers and
crew on board, was hijacked on 15 September during a scheduled
flight from Baku to Perm, Russian and Western agencies reported.
The hijackers-reportedly 4 in number-were said to be members
or supporters of the pro-Iranian Hezbollah, and were armed with
grenades and other devices. After a refueling stop in Kiev, the
plane landed at an airport near Oslo. All passengers were released
unharmed, and the hijackers gave themselves up. -Keith Bush

YELTSIN'S DECREE ON COSSACKS RULED CONSTITUTIONAL. The Constitutional
Court ruled on 15-September that Yeltsin's decree of 15 March
1993 on reforming military structures in the North Caucasus and
state support of the Cossacks was in accord with the constitution,
ITAR-TASS reported. The Russian parliament had protested the
decree, saying that it established a special form of military
service for the Cossacks, thus violating the division of powers
between the legislative and executive. The court ruled that it
does not establish a special form of military service for the
Cossacks and does not set up any new kinds of military units.
At the same time the court stated that any broad interpretation
of the president's decree in the sense of granting the Cossacks
any kind of privileges was impermissible. -Ann Sheehy

SECURITY COUNCIL DISCUSSES NORTH OSSETIA, INGUSHETIA. Yeltsin
chaired a meeting of the security council on 15 September to
review the North Ossetian-Ingush conflict, ITAR-TASS reported.
The meeting was addressed by Deputy Premier Sergei Shakhrai,
the head of the North Ossetian parliament Akhsarbek Galazov,
and Ingush President Ruslan Aushev. A political analysis of the
armed clashes in October-November 1992, which ascribed them to
the attempts of nationalist and extremist forces to solve long-standing
territorial and interethnic problems by force, was approved and
will be sent to the Russian parliament and issued to the mass
media for publication. The session paid particular attention
to the problem of the refugees, the disarming of illegal armed
units, and the restoration of law and order. Ministries and departments
were instructed to take urgent measures in the area , and a list
of bills to regulate interethnic conflicts was approved. -Ann
Sheehy

CIS

NUCLEAR WEAPONS COOLING OFF. Izvestiya on 15-September reported
that conditions in the nuclear warheads storage facility at Pervomaysk
were being corrected. According to the paper, the temperature
within the storage facility had risen by 1.2 degrees Celsius.
Krasnaya zvezda on the same day, however, published a more alarmist
report. According to the military newspaper, Russian specialists
had been urgently called to the depot on 12 September because
the temperature rise had been accompanied by radiation levels
that were several times higher than normal background levels.
The article went on to assert that the fault was clearly that
of the Ukrainian government which, it claimed , has failed to
fulfill its responsibility to return the warheads to Russia.-John
Lepingwell

RUSSIA ACCUSES UKRAINE OF STOPPING FUNDING BLACK SEA FLEET. The
Russian navy has accused Ukraine of suddenly cutting its share
of the funding for the Black Sea Fleet without consultation ,
ITAR-TASS reported on 15 September. A spokesman for the Ukrainian
Ministry of Defense, Anatolii Murakovsky, denied the charges,
Reuters reported. Murakovsky said that Russia was hindering the
fleet's financing by channelling the funds through Russian banks
in Crimea instead of going through the Ukrainian navy as had
been agreed. Both Russia and Ukraine have frequently claimed
that they alone are financing the fleet. -Ustina Markus

GAZPROM'S BELARUSIAN ACQUISITION. A recent equity-for-debt swap
between Belarus and Russia was hailed as a model for resolving
financial problems between Russia and her other CIS trading partners
by Segodnya on 11 September. Belarusian Prime Minister Vyacheslav
Kebich signed over the assets of Beltransgaz, his nation's gas
distributor, to Gazprom on 8 September, reportedly in exchange
for wiping out the debt owed by Belarusian enterprises to the
Russian gas giant. The debt had risen to 100 billion rubles by
mid-August. The deal raised none of the public outcry like that
aroused by the recent ships-for-debt proposal between Ukraine
and Russia . -Erik Whitlock

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



STROBE TALBOTT IN UZBEKISTAN, TURKMENISTAN. Uzbek president Islam
Karimov told Strobe Talbott, the US envoy for the CIS who was
visiting Tashkent, that Uzbekistan would not accept US interference
in its internal affairs, Reuters reported on 15-September citing
the Uzbek media. Karimov said that Washington should mind its
own business and let Uzbekistan do the same. Two Uzbek newspapers
quoted top Uzbek officials saying that Karimov refused to discuss
alleged human rights abuses by his government and Talbott's requests
for the release of political detainees and the liberalization
of laws regarding opposition political parties. Talbott also
cut short a visit to Turkmenistan and refused to sign an aid
agreement in protest at the detention of four opposition leaders
he had been scheduled to meet, The Washington Post reported on
16 September. -Ann Sheehy

HEAVY FIGHTING IN WESTERN GEORGIA. Russian media said on 15 September
that forces loyal to ousted president Zviad Gamsakhurdia were
fighting in western Georgia for the control of the main rail
line. If it was cut, Georgia's rail network would be paralyzed.
Moscow radio said road connections between western and eastern
Georgia had already been cut. Shevardnadze arrived in nearby
Kutaisi on the evening of 15 September, and Georgian defense
minister Georgi Karakashvili, recalled from Moscow talks with
Russian defense minister Pavel Grachev was expected to join him
there. Shevardnadze resumed his duties as parliament chairman
on 15 September. Parliament met his demand for the declaration
of a state of emergency for two months, and then suspended itself
temporarily. -Ann Sheehy

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



RUSSIA BACK-PEDALS ON POLISH NATO MEMBERSHIP. Russia's ambassador
to Poland, Yuri Kashlev, told reporters on 15 September in Warsaw
that Russia's stance on possible Polish membership in NATO has
been "oversimplified and misunderstood," PAP reports. During
his recent visit to Poland, Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed
a joint declaration saying that joining NATO was a decision for
a "sovereign Poland" and did not conflict with Russian interests.
The Polish government seized this opportunity to press Western
leaders for a commitment to expand NATO. Kashlev disputed reports
that Yeltsin had "agreed" to Polish membership in NATO, however.
Echoing the more circumspect tone of Russian commentary on the
Yeltsin visit, he stressed that the joint Russian-Polish declaration
refers to "eventual" NATO membership "in the larger process of
European integration" and suggested that the alliance would first
evolve into the CSCE's military arm. Other Russian officials
have made similar statements. A foreign ministry analyst said
on 14 September that Russia does not like the concept of expanding
existing "security blocs" and sees no reason for haste in East
European efforts to join NATO. Similarly, the chairman of the
Russian parliament's committee on foreign affairs, Evgenii Ambartsumov,
said on an Austrian TV talk show ("Europa," 12 September) that
Yeltsin's comments on Polish membership in NATO were an improvisation
and would probably be "reinterpreted" by Yeltsin himself at a
later date.-Louisa Vinton and Suzanne Crow

US CAUTIOUS ON EXPANDING NATO. Meanwhile, a high-ranking US State
Department official told a congressional subcommittee on 15 September
that the US is seriously considering supporting the admission
of new members, but that "any expansion of NATO must contribute
to and be seen to contribute to the overall security and stability
of the new democracies to NATO's east, while preserving the security
and stability of NATO's current members." Assistant Secretary
of State for European and Canadian Affairs Stephen Oxman said
that no "final decision" had been made on the question, but that
it would be a focus for discussion at NATO's January summit in
Brussels. He acknowledged that Russian President Boris Yeltsin's
recent statements in Warsaw and Prague to the effect that Polish
and Czech membership would not threaten Russia had "aroused new
interest in expanding NATO." -Louisa Vinton

MASSACRE OF CROAT CIVILIANS. The BBC's Croatian and Serbian Services
reported on 15 September that over 35 Croats, most of them civilians
and including women, children, and elderly people, were killed
in or near their village of Uzdol near Prozor in central Bosnia,
presumably by Muslim forces operating in the area. Croatian troops
then staged a counterattack, but the outcome of the action remains
unclear. Fighting also continued in Mostar less than 24 hours
after the Croatian and Bosnian presidents signed a cease-fire
agreement. Meanwhile in Banja Luka, Bosnian Serb leader Radovan
Karadzic finally met with the rebel soldiers who now demand the
resignation of the Bosnian government as well as the arrest of
war profiteers. The outcome of the talks remains unclear, but
the men seem unlikely to be moved by his call to "defeat the
main enemy" and only then worry about "thieves, our secondary
enemy," AFP reported. Finally, Hina quotes health officials in
Bosnia as saying that hepatitis is spreading among children in
particular in Sarajevo and Tuzla. -Patrick Moore

UNEASY TRUCE BEGINS IN KRAJINA. Hina reports on 16 September
that Croat and rebel Serb commanders the previous day agreed
to a UN-brokered agreement to defuse hostilities in the Gospic
area. The Croats will withdraw from the three villages they occupied
the previous Sunday, and UNPROFOR troops will form a buffer between
the two lines, occupying the villages in the process. It is not
clear whether the Croats will achieve their main aim, namely
a total cease-fire throughout the republic. As President Franjo
Tudjman told Nedjeljna Dalmacija on 15 September, the purpose
of the 12-September offensive was to end months of Serb shelling
of nearby Croat towns. Hina notes that Serb forces fired some
shells on 15 September in the Gospic area, but that Karlovac
was now quiet. Meanwhile, Vjesnik of 16 September quotes the
visiting Chinese foreign minister as calling for respect for
all the prewar internal Yugoslav boundaries, including the territorial
integrity of Croatia and of Bosnia-Herzegovina. -Patrick Moore


BULATOVIC VISITS ALBANIA. Montenegrin President Momir Bulatovic
and his Albanian counterpart Sali Berisha met in Tirana on 15
September for the highest level talks in 50 years between the
neighboring countries. They agreed on some issues but not on
two of the most contentious: the fate of Bosnian Muslims and
of the Albanian majority in the Serbian province of Kosovo, Reuters
reports. Rilindja Demokratike on 16 September quoted Bulatovic
as saying that "there are problems and questions for which we
have not found a common language yet, these are a reason to continue
the talks. Bulatovic noted that the talks were an important step
toward regional stabilty. Berisha said the two sides were considering
ways of increasing cooperation and exchanges so long as these
would not violate the UN embargo against rump Yugoslavia. According
to Rilindja Demokratike he stated: "we said publicly that we
will respect the embargo. Nevertheless," he continued, "Albania
regrets that its actions harm the Republic of Montenegro," which
he said was not responsible for events in Bosnia. Elsewhere Reuters
reports that mediators Lord Owen and Thorvald Stoltenberg left
Geneva for Macedonia and Turkey on 15 September. -Fabian Schmidt


TEACHERS STRIKE IN ALBANIA. Zeri i Popullit on 16-September runs
a report about a one-day strike by teachers. At the start of
the new school year on 15-September in Tirana, about two third
of the schools remained closed. The teachers demand a wage rise,
the preparation of a working contract, and better working conditions.
According to Zeri i Popullit the government has not yet responded
to the demands. -Fabian Schmidt

KOOIJMANS IN SLOVAKIA. Dutch Foreign Minister Peter Kooijmans
met with various Slovak leaders on 15-September to discuss European
unification, national minorities and bilateral cooperation, TASR
reports. President Michal Kovac stressed Slovakia's interest
in joining the EC, NATO and the WEU, while Kooijmans said "NATO
is interested in widening its activities to Central and Eastern
Europe" and that membership of the four Visegrad nations will
be discussed at NATO's January 1994 summit. Concerning national
minorities, Kovac said Slovakia "is ready to fulfill all demands
of national minorities...if these demands will not be controversial
to the security of the Slovak Republic;" all moves which signal
a border change are "dangerous" for the country's sovereignty.
In a joint press conference with his Slovak counterpart Jozef
Moravcik, Kooijmans said his country "had doubted [Slovakia's]
abilities to guarantee rights of national minorities," but talks
with Slovak representatives showed the doubts might have been
unfounded. -Sharon Fisher

FILKUS QUITS SLOVAK RULING PARTY. In a 15 September interview
with Slovak Radio, former ambassador to Austria Rudolf Filkus
announced that he would quit the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia.
Filkus resigned the diplomatic post two days earlier to prevent
a dispute between President Michal Kovac and Premier Vladimir
Meciar. He said "Meciar is not the MDS, and the MDS is not Meciar.
But as long as Meciar is a member of the MDS, I do not want to
be a member of the movement." Filkus also said "Slovak politics
need peace, not political intrigues." Recent speculation suggests
that Filkus will join the Social Democratic Party, but Filkus
did not confirm his intentions. -Sharon Fisher

SLOVAK UNEMPLOYMENT RISES. The Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs
announced on 15 September that unemployment reached 13.53% by
the end of August. The highest unemployment rate was in the district
of Rimavska Sobota (23.4%) and the lowest was in Bratislava (4.62%).
-Sharon Fisher

CHINESE DEPUTY PREMIER VISITS HUNGARY. A Chinese economic delegation
led by Deputy Premier Zou Jiahua ended on 15 September a three-day
visit to Hungary, during which it held talks with Interior Minister
Peter Boros, President Arpad Goncz, and Industry and Trade Minister
Janos Latorcai. According to MTI, the visit was designed to expand
trade and economic cooperation: bilateral trade exchanges, which
had declined in recent years, have increased and are expected
to reach $100 million this year, compared to between $55 and
$60 million in 1992. In the past three years, Chinese firms have
invested some $30 million in the Hungarian economy.--Alfred Reisch


HUNGARIAN ECONOMIC BRIEFS. According to the Chairman of the National
Statistical Office, Gyorgy Vukovits, Hungary's consumer's price
index rose by 1.8% in August, bringing the annual inflation rate
for 1993 to 22.3%. The rise was primarily due to an increase
of the value-added tax, which resulted in foodstuff prices climbing
3.3% during the month of August and 30.6% in the past 12 months.
A four-member household now needs 45,000 forint (about $500)
a month to meet the minimum standard of living, compared to 17,000
forint in 1989. Hungary's National Labor Center announced on
15 September that the number of unemployed in August stood at
675,000,which is 30,000 less than in February and 2,000 less
than in July; young people starting a career make up over 11%
of the jobless and numbered 74,600, 6,100 more than in July.
-Alfred Reisch

HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTER IN BUCHAREST. On 15 September Geza
Jeszenszky, who began a five-day official visit to Romania, held
two rounds of talks with his Romanian counterpart Teodor Melescanu.
Radio Bucharest said that the two placed "special emphasis" on
ways to boost bilateral economic relations-one of the few non-controversial
topics on the visit's agenda. On the other hand, no progress
was reported on such issues as collective rights for the Hungarian
minority in Romania and the principle of inviolability of frontiers
between the twor countries. According to Budapest, Melescanu
handed over to the Hungarian side a collection of documents dealing
with the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and the fate of Hungarian
Premier Imre Nagy, who was kidnapped by Soviet forces and held
captive in Romania until 1957. -Dan Ionescu and Alfred Reisch


RALLY AGAINST CORRUPTION IN BUCHAREST. Radio Bucharest reported
on 14 September that a rally was held in downtown Bucharest against
alleged government tolerance of corrupt politicians. The rally,
which was attended by 3,000 to 5,000 people, was staged by the
Civic Alliance, a group belonging to the Democratic Convention
of Romania. Civic Alliance Chairman Gabriel Andreescu accused
the government of tolerating corrupt persons within its ranks.
Romania's Parliament convened on 30 and 31 August in a special
session to debate corruption at the top. But Premier Nicolae
Vacaroiu rejected calls for the dismissal of ministers accused
of abusing their powers. -Dan Ionescu



LATEST ROUND OF RUSSIAN-ESTONIAN TALKS. On 14 and 15 September
the 14th round of talks between Russian and Estonian delegations,
headed by Vasillii Svirin and Estonian Defense Minister Juri
Luik, were held in Moscow, BNS reports. No agreements were signed
or initialed at the talks. Svirin said that Russia would not
agree to pay compensations for damages since 1940, but only from
1992 when the Soviet army passed to Russian jurisdiction. He
also said that Estonia had agreed not to apply to military pensioners
and their families the articles of the aliens law depriving non-citizens
of retirement pensions. Western agencies report that Luik said
that the talks reached an impasse on Russian demands for aid
in building housing for withdrawing officers. -Saulius Girnius


ESTONIA PASSES AMENDED EDUCATION LAW. On 15 September the Estonian
parliament adopted by a vote of 51 to 3 with 7 abstentions an
amended law on education, BNS reports. It had been passed on
16 June, but President Lennar Meri sent it back for revisions,
noting that there were inconsistencies in the text. The law stipulates
that Estonian is the language of instruction in schools although
some other language can be used in elementary schools. The article
of the law that had created the greatest controversy was the
phasing out from all state and municipal high schcols by the
year 2000 of education in languages other than Estonian. -Saulius
Girnius

COUNCIL OF EUROPE DELEGATION IN LATVIA. On 15 September a delegation
of experts from the Council of Europe, headed by its Secretariat's
Director Hans Peter Furrer, held a press conference in Riga at
which they discussed their 3-day visit that focused on the future
Latvian citizenship law, the RFE/RL Latvian Service reports.
On 13 September they met with some of the coalitions in the parliament
and leaders of ethnic minority groups. On 14 and 15 they held
consultations with three parliament commissions in which they
stressed that the principles of human rights should be taken
into account in drafting the citizenship law. Several of the
smaller parliament parties have presented their drafts of the
law, but the ruling coalition is expected to present its proposals
only in October. -Saulius Girnius

MOLDOVA CHALLENGES RUSSIA TO DISCIPLINE LEBED. In a note handed
over and made public on 15-September, Moldova's Foreign Ministry
protested to Russia over the election of Lt.-Gen. Aleksandr Lebed,
commander of Russia's 14th Army in Moldova, to the "Dniester
republic"'s Supreme Soviet. The note terms this action "an attempt
by certain forces in Russia to recognize that pseudo-republic
de facto... and a signal from the Russian side that it does not
wish to withdraw its forces from Moldova." Recalling that Russia
has thus far "offered no reply, taken no position" regarding
Moldova's repeated protests over Lebed's "reckless actions,"
the Moldovan note asked the Russian side "to take all necessary
measures to stop such destabilizing activities." -Vladimir Socor


MOLDOVA HOSTS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFLICT RESOLUTION.
The Council of Europe, CSCE, Helsinki Citizens' Assembly, Soros
Foundation, International Human Rights Law Group, and Gorbachev
Foundation cosponsored and participated in a four-day conference
on "Conflict resolution and civic consensus in multiethnic societies,"
dealing specifically with Moldova's problems. Held in the right-bank
city of Bendery, controlled by the left-bank "Dniester republic,"
the conference gathered Western scholars, lawyers, human rights
monitors, parliamentarians, and diplomats, as well as a large
number of representatives of most of Moldova's political, civic,
and ethnic organizations. Most participants subscribed to a joint
document endorsing Moldova's territorial integrity, unconditional
observance of human and ethnic rights according to international
norms, nonuse of force to settle civic disputes, and other general
principles. Left-bank Russians did not join the basic consensus
on most issues while right-bank Russians did. The participants
met with President Mircea Snegur on 13 September, Basapress reported.
-Vladimir Socor

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Keith Bush and Jan B. de Weydenthal











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