He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom. - J.R. Tolkien
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 155, 16 August 1993







RUSSIA



YELTSIN AGREES TO JOINT CONSTITUTIONAL SESSION. At the insistence
of the members of the Council of the Heads of the Republics at
their session in Petrozavodsk on 13-August, President Boris Yeltsin
reluctantly agreed that there should be a joint session of his
constitutional assembly and the parliament's Constitutional Commission
in mid-September, the Russian and Western media reported. According
to Leonid Smirnyagin, a member of the Presidential Council, Yeltsin
insisted that the republics must submit their comments on the
draft constitution by 15 September, otherwise it would be assumed
they had none, and "we will adopt the constitution without you."
Although a joint session might increase the chances of the draft
constitution being adopted by the Congress, the chances of its
adoption still do not look high. -Ann Sheehy

YELTSIN SAYS RUSSIA WILL REMAIN ONE. In his speech to the Council,
Yeltsin spelt out clearly that there could be no question of
Russia disintegrating, the Russian and Western media reported.
While stating that there could be no question at present of depriving
the republics of their sovereign status, he said that this sovereignty
was limited. If any republics, krais, or oblasts nurtured hopes
of secession, they would not succeed, he added. Russia would
be preserved as a single state either on the basis of a civilized
constitutional process or on the basis of naked force and dictatorship.
There was no third way, Yeltsin maintained. -Ann Sheehy

REPUBLICS AGREE TO CREATION OF CONSULTATIVE FEDERATION COUNCIL.
The Council of the Heads of the Republics agreed to the creation
of the Federation Council proposed by Yeltsin. Earlier, the republics
had been reluctant to see themselves put on the same level as
the other subjects of the federation, and the Congress of People's
Deputies had rejected the idea. It is thought that the idea may
be more palatable to the Congress this time round as the new
council will include one representative each of both the legislative
and executive power from each subject of the federation. At the
same time commentators see the new body as a counterweight to
the Congress. -Ann Sheehy

PARLIAMENTARY FACTIONS CALL FOR DIALOGUE WITH YELTSIN. Twelve
of the fourteen factions of the Russian parliament issued a joint
statement calling on President Yeltsin to renew dialogue with
deputies, Moscow TV reported on 13 August. The statement said
that Yeltsin was not honoring his promise to hold regular consultations
with the parliament, and proposed that he meet faction representatives
on 19-August. It also said that to call for early parliamentary
elections, as Yeltsin had on 12 August, flouted the results of
the April referendum whereby citizens had told the parliament
and president to cooperate. The pro-Yeltsin Radical Democrats
and Democratic Russia factions did not sign the statement, which
was said to constitute parliament's response to Yeltsin's remarks,
replacing the planned debate on the issue. -Wendy Slater

KHASBULATOV CONTINUES ATTACKS. Parliamentary chairman Ruslan
Khasbulatov continued attacking President Yeltsin's call for
early parliamentary elections. Speaking to foreign correspondents
on 14-August, Khasbulatov said that there would be no elections
in the fall, Russian TV and ITAR-TASS reported. He implied that
political issues, particularly the constitutional debate, were
being unsuccessfully employed to distract the population from
its economic and social concerns. He said that the presidency
should be distanced from executive power, leaving the president
only as head of state, but denied that the confrontation between
president and parliament was the major problem, citing instead
the "duality of executive power" resulting from Yeltsin's administration's
having "replaced the constitutional government." -Wendy Slater


FOREIGN MINISTRY DISMISSES US PEACEKEEPING IN REGION. The Russian
Foreign Ministry issued a statement on 13 August denying that
the United States will be playing a significant role in peacekeeping
to quell conflicts in the former Soviet Union. According to MFA
spokesman Mikhail Demurin, information circulating in the media
to this effect misrepresented the actual state of affairs. In
its statement on 13 August, Russia asserted a special interest
in performing this role in the region, ITAR-TASS reported. In
keeping with a Russian campaign in the spring of 1993 to gain
international recognition as the region's official peacekeeper,
the MFA statement also expressed Russia's desire for support
for this function within the UN Security Council. The MFA statement
of 13 August appears designed to quiet concerns in Russia that
the United States may be stepping unwanted into what Russia considers
its sphere of influence. In addition, the statement can be interpreted
as a signal to Washington highlighting Russian sensitivities.
-Suzanne Crow

KOZYREV IN SWEDEN. Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev ended a two-day
visit to Sweden on 15 August. ITAR-TASS reported on 14 August
that the aim of the visit was to discuss regional and bilateral
issues with Swedish leaders. However, the question of Baltic
troop withdrawals and Russia's stance toward the Baltic states
dominated the agenda. This reflects Sweden's growing concern
for the plight of these states amid signs that Russia is moving
increasingly toward heavy-handed approaches in relations with
these countries. -Suzanne Crow

KOZYREV CLAIMS NUCLEAR AGREEMENT NEAR. Reuters reported on 15
August that Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev claimed there
had been a breakthrough in Russian-Ukrainian negotiations over
the dismantling of nuclear weapons located in Ukraine. According
to Kozyrev, an agreement could be signed within a few days. This
unexpected statement comes after a week in which Russia and Ukraine
exchanged harsh words over the ownership and fate of the weapons.
Indeed, ITAR-TASS reported on 13 August that at the UN the Russian
delegation was circulating a statement critical of Ukraine's
position. Some progress was made when Ukrainian Prime Minister
Leonid Kuchma discussed the issue in Moscow with President Yeltsin
on 11 August, at which time Yeltsin agreed to pay for the nuclear
materials in the warheads. Past Russian claims that an agreement
was near have proven to be overly optimistic, however, and so
far the Ukrainian government has not confirmed Kozyrev's statement.
-John Lepingwell

DISSATISFACTION AMONG DEFENSE ENTERPRISE MANAGERS. Defense enterprise
directors, convening in Tula on 13 August, told Deputy Prime
Minister Oleg Lobov that the defense industrial sector in the
region was in dire straits, and demanded that the government
play a more active role in resolving its financial difficulties,
ITAR-TASS reported. Among the measures called for were: government
controls on energy prices; clarification of the state procurement
budget for 1994 and subsequent years; the promulgation of normative
acts on the status of defense enterprises and their activities
with respect to conversion; an easing of the government's tax
policies; and the granting of credits for conversion. On the
following day, defense enterprise directors meeting with Lobov
in Rostov on the Don reportedly expressed their bewilderment
over the government's policies and were especially critical of
what they said was the Defense Ministry's failure to adopt a
military doctrine and a procurement policy. They further complained
that the Defense Ministry had allocated virtually nothing this
year for conversion. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Oleg Soskovets,
meeting with enterprise directors in Khabarovsk on 16-August,
heard many of the same complaints, ITAR-TASS reported. -Stephen
Foye

IRAN TO RECEIVE THIRD RUSSIAN SUB. An Iranian Admiral has said
that Iran will soon receive a third Russian-built Kilo-class
submarine, AFP reported on 14-August. The Admiral was quoted
as saying that the sub would soon "be posted to a surveillance
position in Iranian territorial waters" in the Persian Gulf.
Iran received its first submarine from Russia in November of
1992; it received the second sub in early August of this year.
-Stephen Foye

WIDESPREAD INCIDENCE OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES. Russian and Western
agencies on 13 and 14-August, and Komsomolskaya pravda on 14
August reported widespread outbreaks of serious diseases in Russian
cities. Russian TV on 14 August announced that 4,000 cases of
diptheria had been reported in Russia this year, including 900
in Moscow. The authorities have appealed to citizens to get themselves
inoculated against this disease. At least 125 cases of cholera
have been diagnosed during the past month in Russia and in other
former Soviet republics. Typhoid fever struck 106-people in Volgodonsk.
Mosquitoes were said to be breeding in more than 10,000 reservoirs
in the Moscow region and doctors were advising that precautions
be taken against malaria. In addition, more than 60 people were
admitted to hospital in the southern Altai region after eating
meat infected with anthrax. Keith Bush

TRAVEL AGENCY SUSPENDS TOURS TO RUSSIA. One of Britain's largest
travel agencies, Thomson Holidays, announced on 14 August that
it is suspending its package tours to Moscow and St. Petersburg
from the end of August, Reuters reported. The reason given was
the increased risk of diptheria in these cities. Tourists who
have booked for the month of August would be offered a refund.
If they insisted on going, they were advised to get inoculated.
-Keith Bush



TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



TAJIK-AFGHAN AGREEMENT. Western and Russian news agencies reported
on 15 August that the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of Tajikistan
and Afghanistan ended several days of negotiations in Dushanbe
with a communique in which the Afghan side promised to try to
stop attacks on Tajikistan from its territory, and the Tajik
side undertook not to allow attacks against Afghanistan except
in self-defense. Delegations of government representatives from
both sides are to deal with future problems on the Tajik-Afghan
border, and a trilateral commission of Tajik, Afghan and UN representatives
is to be formed to assist in the return of Tajik refugees from
Afghanistan. The Afghan Foreign Minister promised to press for
the return of four Russian border guards and an officer from
Kazakhstan who were kidnapped on the Afghan border on 10 August.
-Bess Brown





CIS

RUSSIA AND UKRAINE OPPOSE AIR STRIKES IN BOSNIA. Russian and
Ukrainian officials on 13 August criticized US plans for air
strikes against Bosnian Serb forces . Russian Deputy Foreign
Minister Boris Kolokolov told the parliament that Russia "has
been firmly adhering to the policy of settling [politically]
the Bosnian crisis" and termed military action inadmissible under
the current UN resolutions. Evgenii Ambartsumov, the chairman
of the Russian parliament's Committee for International Affairs,
warned that "Russia cannot remain indifferent to the destiny
of this region." Meanwhile, a Ukrainian Foreign Ministry official,
Volodymyr Furkalo, objected to air strikes on the grounds that
limited military action would leave UN peacekeeping forces hostage
to the warring sides. He said air strikes would have to be accompanied
by large-scale ground operations. -Suzanne Crow

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



GENEVA PEACE TALKS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE. Bosnian President Alija
Izetbegovic said over the weekend that he will return to the
negotiations scheduled to resume on 16-August. Although international
media also reported that Serbian troops withdrew from Mts.-Bjelasnica
and Igman, Bosnian government officials said the siege had actually
been tightened by the deployment of fresh Serb troops and the
redeployment of those withdrawn from the highlands. Izetbegovic
said the first topic he will raise in Geneva is ending the siege
to allow humanitarian aid to arrive. Newsday on 15 August quotes
UNPROFOR's Gen. Vere Hayes as praising the "great good will"
of the Serb commander Gen. Ratko Mladic for leaving the peaks.
The general added: "there is still a military siege, but there
has never been a humanitarian strangulation of Sarajevo." Some
300 French peacekeepers are to control the mountains. Meanwhile,
Izetbegovic said ethnic partition of Bosnia should be accepted
temporarily but expressed his hope that ethnic partition will
not last. Elsewhere, UN and NATO commanders agreed on 14 August
on a list of possible Serb targets for air strikes. Finally,
the UN carried out its first major medical evacuation from Sarajevo
on 15 August, affecting 39 seriously wounded people. The British
government was criticized by the UN medical evacuation committee
with turning the evacuation into a public relations show and
treating sick and wounded children "like animals in a zoo." An
official said the British government only wanted to bring children
to Britain because of the "sad and quaint pictures they make
on the TV back home," the Washington Post reports on 16 August.
-Fabian Schmidt

TUDJMAN: NO BOSNIAN MUSLIM STATE ON THE ADRIATIC. Hina on 15
August quotes Croatian President Franjo Tudjman as telling an
audience in the port town of Ploce that the Bosnian Muslims might
be granted a free trade zone there but that Croatia "cannot allow
the extension of an Islamic state" to the coast. Tudjman had
earlier raised several options for a Muslim outlet to the sea,
one of which was widely interpreted as meaning to grant them
Ploce outright. Meanwhile, news agencies report continued Croat-Muslim
fighting over the weekend in central Bosnia, and the BBC's Serbian
Service on 16 August quotes local observers as saying that the
situation around Mostar in Herzegovina is "particularly dangerous."
The broadcast adds that Muslims are accusing the Croat authorities
of using forced civilian labor in war zones, while AFP on 13
August cited Red Cross officials as putting the number of Muslim
prisoners in Croat hands at Mostar at 22,000. Such charges of
abuse of civilians have been common on all sides throughout this
brutal war, with Croats and Serbs accusing the Muslim authorities
of using brutal press-gang tactics to recruit trench-diggers
in Sarajevo and giving Serbs the riskiest jobs. Finally, the
BBC's Serbian Service on 16 August quotes Bosnian Croat spokesmen
as saying they will boycott the Geneva talks unless Muslim forces
stop blocking a Croat aid convoy in central Bosnia. -Patrick
Moore

MILOSEVIC CRITICIZES ACADEMY "MEMORANDUM." New revelations surrounding
a controversial memorandum of the Serbian Academy of Arts and
Sciences (SANU) were made public in the latest issue of Vreme.
The independent Belgrade weekly published a document in which
Serbia's President Slobodan Milosevic criticizes the 1986 memorandum,
which, many domestic and international observers believe, may
have precipitated Yugoslavia's disintegration in 1991. Never
before had Milosevic been associated with criticism of the document
and never had he made an official public statement about it.
The interior ministry document published by Vreme indicates,
however, that he felt the memorandum posed a threat to Tito's
communist system. At a closed meeting of the Federal Interior
Ministry and the Institute for Security held in Belgrade on 4
June 1987, Milosevic, then head of Serbia's League of Communists,
said: "the appearance of the memorandum . . . represents nothing
else but the darkest nationalism. It means the liquidation of
the current socialist system of our country, . . . in which no
nation or nationality can survive." In late July of this year
SANU's presidency decided to publish a critical edition of the
memorandum, which Vreme suggests is being prepared to offer a
ex post facto justification of the roles played by certain individuals
currently in power, such as Mihailo Markovic, vice president
of the ruling Socialist Party of Serbia. -Milan Andrejevich

ALBANIAN MISCELLANY. Rilindja Demokratike reports on 15 August
that Agriculture Minister Petrit Kalakula was removed from his
post after barely five months in the cabinet. His removal was
initiated by an allegedly profascist comment he made in the People's
Assembly. Kalakula is considered an extremist among the members
of the ruling Democratic Party, and his removal could mean the
resurgence of the moderate faction. In other developments, an
RFE/RL correspondent reported on 12 August that the US Ambassador
to the UN Madeleine Albright has asked Secretary-General Boutros
Boutros-Ghali to "urge all states to provide immediate technical,
financial, and material assistance to Albania to mitigate the
adverse impact of the Yugoslav sanctions." Albania's chrome and
electricity exports have been particularly hard hit by the UN-imposed
sanctions against the rump Yugoslavia. Rilindja also reports
on 13 August that Antonio Napolitano, head of a committee set
up by the CSCE and the EC to monitor the effects of the sanctions
on neighboring countries, remarked in Tirana that Albania is
faithfully carrying out the sanctions. In a related story, ATA
on 12-August notes that a Serbian helicopter violated Albanian
airspace near the northern city of Shkoder on 11 August. This
incident follows the 6 August shooting of 2 Albanian soldiers
and one civilian by Serbian forces just inside Albanian territory.
-Robert Austin

POLAND MARKS "MIRACLE ON VISTULA." Meetings with the armed forces
were the order of the day on 14-15 August, as Poland celebrated
the anniversary of its victory over the Red Army just outside
Warsaw in 1920. Attending tank exercises organized to mark Polish
Army Day on 14 August, President Lech Walesa appeared to court
the military vote by pledging to be an "ally of and spokesman
for" the armed forces. He expressed satisfaction that the army
had not been drawn into "political scandals" and said it must
be "above [political] divisions." Speaking to a sappers' unit
in Gorzow Wielkopolski on 14 August, Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka
stressed that "the armed forces should be apolitical" in the
elections and added that instructions to this effect had been
issued to the defense minister. Gazeta Wyborcza reports on 16
August that 18 military officers are running for office as part
of Walesa's Nonparty Reform Bloc. Other military figures are
candidates for the former communist Democratic Left Alliance,
the leftist Union of Labor, the radical-populist Confederation
for an Independent Poland, the libertarian Union of Real Politics,
Party "X," and Self Defense. -Louisa Vinton

HARSH RHETORIC IN POLISH ELECTION CAMPAIGN. Drawing parallels
between the "Miracle on the Vistula" and its own struggle against
"communist sources of evil," the Center Alliance (PC) presented
its election program at a candidates' gathering in Warsaw on
15-August. Despite arduous negotiations and virtually identical
goals, the PC failed to build a coalition with former Prime Minister
Jan Olszewski's Coalition for the Republic. The two forces will
thus compete for the anticommunist, antigovernment vote. Asserting
that "recommunization" is the biggest threat to Poland, PC activists
lashed out at the government, the president, and the two major
governing parties, the Democratic Union (UD) and the Liberal
Democratic Congress (KLD). Former Defense Minister Jan Parys
charged that "the Suchocka government was formed, out of fear
of the truth, to defend a network of communist agents," Polish
TV reports. Parys called for the abolition of the privatization
ministry and measures to protect the budget from "thieves." PC
activist Adam Glapinski called the UD and KLD "wolves in sheep's
clothing" and said they "must be removed from power once and
for all" because "the economic policy conducted for the past
four years, with a short break of a few months [when Olszewski
was prime minister], is leading to the ruin of Poland." -Louisa
Vinton

KLAUS, STOIBER DISCUSS SUDETEN GERMANS. During a meeting between
Bavarian Prime Minister Edmund Stoiber and Czech Premier Vaclav
Klaus in the Southern Bavarian town of Frasdorf on 15 August,
Stoiber told Klaus that he wants Sudeten Germans to be represented
in talks on Sudeten German issues with the Czech Republic. Stoiber
argued that persisting differences of views can only be solved
through talks and mutual understanding. According to Czech and
German media, Klaus repeated his stand that dialogue with Sudeten
Germans should not be conducted by the Czech government but rather
by various groups, organizations, and political parties. Klaus
and Stoiber also discussed a number of other issues, such as
the construction of an oil pipeline from Bavaria to the Czech
Republic and problems of asylum seekers. -Jiri Pehe

POSSIBLE CHANGES IN SLOVAK GOVERNMENT. The Bratislava daily Sme
reported on 13-August that Premier Vladimir Meciar proposed changes
in his cabinet that may result in the appointment of Finance
Minister Julius Toth to the now vacabt post of deputy premier
for economy and former deputy governor of the Slovak National
Bank, Marian Jusko, to the post of finance minister. Jusko, who
is not a member of Meciar's party, is a respected economist who
also worked as acting deputy under former privatization minister
Ivan Miklos. Concerning the failed coalition talks between the
Movement for a Democratic Slovakia and the Slovak National Party,
the paper says that Meciar's new strategy is "to look for potential
allies" in parliament and reports that Meciar has been holding
talks with certain SNP members to help them "get in line with
his ideas." In a 12 August SNP press conference Deputy Chairman
Peter Sokol said that although his party is ready to begin a
new round of coalition talks with the MDS, "it will not be the
SNP that will initiate the talks." -Sharon Fisher

SLANDER CHARGES AGAINST HUNGARIAN ACADEMIC. The Prosecutor's
Office in Gyr announced that it will press charges against political
scientist Laszlo Lengyel for insulting the authorities, MTI reports.
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall initiated the investigation in early
August because he felt that statements made by Lengyel concerning
the government amounted to slander. Lengyel allegedly said at
a conference that every minister and department head is corrupt,
and that even ministers could be bought. Government spokeswoman
Judit Juhasz argued in the daily Nepszabadsag of 5-August that
the prime minister's intention is "to protect government officials
from baseless accusations." Opposition politicians and media
condemned Antall's move, charging that he is seeking to silence
independent critical voices. If convicted, Lengyel would face
a maximum sentence of three years in prison. -Edith Oltay

ROMANIAN RAIL STRIKE CONTINUES DESPITE COURT DECISION. On 13
August the Supreme Court suspended for 80 days a strike by locomotive
drivers that started on 11 August. The ruling was requested by
the state railroad company in view of the huge damages caused
by the strike, which crippled domestic and international rail
service. But train drivers in key railroad yards announced that
they would not obey the order to return to work and would go
instead on a "total strike" affecting all transport activity.
Railways director Aurel Dumitrescu told Radio Bucharest that
the strike "endangers the country's infrastructure," while the
Bulgarian railway chairman Atanas Tonev described the Romanian
strike as "a financial tragedy" for Bulgaria, whose rail traffic
has been entirely diverted through Romania following the embargo
imposed by the UN on Serbia. In a communique issued after an
emergency meeting, on 13 August the government's executive bureau
expressed "surprise and concern" over the strikers' decision
to step up their action. The statement, which called the union
leaders' stance "irresponsible," warned that their decision violates
provisions of the penal code and is punishable by severe jail
sentences. On 14 and 15 August Transport Minister Paul Teodoru
and Chamber of Deputies Chairman Adrian Nastase attended unofficial
talks with the strike organizers in Brasov on 14 and 15 August.
The negotiations failed to produce an agreement. -Dan Ionescu


NEW CURRENCY REGULATIONS IN UKRAINE. As of 16 August the value
of the karbovanets will no longer be set by the Central Bank,
but will be determined in trading against other currencies on
the Kiev currency exchange, an RFE/RL correspondent reports.
In addition, a new rule requiring Ukrainian exporters to sell
half of their hard currency earnings to the bank takes effect
on 16 August, and private citizens can now buy and sell hard
currency without restrictions. -Ustina Markus

RUSSIA CUTS GAS TO BELARUS. Gazprom, Russia's state gas supplier,
has cut deliveries to Belarus because of unpaid bills, Reuters
reported on 15 August. Gas is only being supplied to homes, bakeries,
dairies, and some other important enterprises from reserves in
the republic. Belarus owes Russia 100 billion rubles ($100 million)
for gas supplies. Ustina Markus

LATVIAN PRESIDENT VISITS LITHUANIA. On 13-August Guntis Ulmanis
made a one-day trip to Lithuania, Radio Lithuania reports. He
held talks with President Algirdas Brazauskas on cooperation
among the Baltic States and their relations with Russia. Ulmanis
told a press briefing that the Baltic States should create a
single energy system and gain independence from Russian supplies.
He also met Prime Minister Alfonsas Slezevicius, parliament chairman
Ceslovas Jursenas, and other officials. Slezevicius will travel
to Riga on 16-August to continue talks with his Latvian counterpart
Valdis Birkavs. Estonian Prime Minister Mart Laar declined the
invitation to attend, suggesting that September would be a better
date for a meeting to deal with a free trade agreement between
the three states. -Saulius Girnius

LATVIANS UNHAPPY OVER PLANS FOR LITHUANIAN OIL TERMINAL. Environmentalists
and leaders from nearby coastal communities are unhappy over
plans to build a petroleum terminal at Butinge, Lithuania, a
few kilometers from the Latvian border. The terminal would handle
about 12 million tons of petroleum and 5.2 million tons of petroleum
products annually. Latvians are worried because the construction
would threaten wildlife in the area and, given the northward
flow of coastal waters in that area, the effluent from the terminals
would be carried to Latvian territory where it could damage the
environment and seep into the ground water. Latvia has offered
Lithuania use the facilities at Ventspils, which could handle
the additional transfer of petroleum and petroleum products,
Diena reported on 12 August. -Dzintra Bungs

NEW ENIP CHAIRMAN. On 14 August the board of Estonia's National
Independence Party elected parliament deputy chairman Tunne Kelam
as its chairman, Baltic media report. Peeter Tepp and Kaido Kalder
were elected deputy board chairmen. The party chairman is Ants
Erm. The board decided to propose Avo Kiir, a Lutheran pastor
from Iisaku in northeastern Estonia, as defense minister to replace
Hain Rebas who resigned on 4 August. -Saulius Girnius

KOZYREV CHARGES NATIONALISM IN TROOP PULLOUT DEBATE. Russian
Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev told the press in Stockholm on
14 August that interethnic tensions in the Baltic States have
"a strong potential for violence and disruptions" and that Russia
must wait before withdrawing its troops remaining there. Kozyrev
also claimed that the policy of Estonia and "probably also" Latvia
is to "squeeze out the Russian-speaking populations" and accused
the two countries of aggressive nationalism. Kozyrev elaborated
on these views in an article the International Herald Tribune
of 14 August. On 13 August the Swedish and British prime ministers
called on Russia to withdraw its troops from the Baltic States
without linking the action to other issues. Swedish Foreign Minister
Margaretha af Ugglas also demanded from Moscow a timetable for
the withdrawal of its forces from Latvia. -Dzintra Bungs

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by VladimirSocor and Charles Trumbull







THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
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Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036
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Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
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