CHelovek zhivet nastoyaschej zhizn'yu, esli schastliv chuzhim schast'em. - Gete
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 120, 28 June 1993







RUSSIA



YELTSIN ISSUES STATEMENT ON CORRUPTION CHARGES. On 25 June President
Boris Yeltsin issued a statement dismissing as an anti-presidential
provocation corruption charges against two top government officials,
First Deputy Prime Minister Vladimir Shumeiko and head of the
Federal Information Center Mikhail Poltoranin. (See RFE/RL Daily
Report no. 119 on the charges). In his statement distributed
by ITAR-TASS Yeltsin said that the accusations against the officials
were an attempt to discredit him (Yeltsin) and thereby to bloc
the adoption of a new Russian Constitution. The statement also
accused the parliament of engaging in the "dangerous practice
of confrontation" by voting for the dismissals of Poltoranin
and Shumeiko. -Vera Tolz

GROUP OF DEPUTIES CALLS FOR DISMISSAL OF KHASBULATOV. More than
fifty members of the Congress of People's Deputies have signed
a statement saying that its leadership had to be replaced if
"true parliamentarism and political and economic stability" were
to be established in Russia. The statement, distributed by ITAR-TASS
on 26 June, accused the parliament's leadership , especially
its speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov, of trying to suppress any dissenting
views. It said that several parliamentary commissions and committees
which disagreed with Khasbulatov's line were "practically liquidated."
The statement accused the leadership of trying to consolidate
in its own hands all branches of power in Russia. It said that
"the activities of the speaker of the parliament discredits the
entire corps of deputies and the very idea of representative
democracy." According to ITAR-TASS of 26 June, the group continues
to collect signatures for the statement. -Vera Tolz

WORK ON THE DRAFT CONSTITUTION TO CONTINUE. The plenary session
of the Constitutional Assembly on 26 June was originally planned
to be the last one. Yet, addressing the session, President Yeltsin
said that the prepared draft constitution could not be regarded
as the final one, but would need further discussion and revision.
The Russian media quoted Yeltsin as saying that there were still
unresolved issues and this was sure to cause changes in the draft.
The president said the draft should go back to the assembly's
working groups for further work and that another plenary session
would have to be held. The media said that this session would
be held in early July. -Vera Tolz

REGIONS OBJECT TO HIGHER STATUS OF REPUBLICS. The chairman of
the Krasnoyarsk krai soviet Vyacheslav Novikov, speaking in the
name of the krais and oblasts, objected strongly at the plenary
session of the constitutional assembly on 26 June to the republics'
having higher status than the regions, ITAR-TASS and Western
media reported. He said the republics' demand for more autonomy
than the regions reminded him of George Orwell's Animal Farm
where all animals were equal but some were more equal than others.
Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Shakhrai maintained, however, that
no other solution was politically viable at the present juncture,
and said the draft made clear that, although the draft declared
the republics sovereign, they did not have the right of secession,
and the draft secured the equality of citizens of the Russian
Federation throughout the federation. A concession has evidently
been made to the regions as regards the composition of the future
upper house, the Council of the Federation. In the original presidential
draft the republics were to have at least 50 percent of the seats,
but now each subject of the federation, whether republic or region,
will have two. Shakhrai said this mean that decisions would have
to be adopted by a majority of three quarters to make sure the
voice of the republics was heard. -Ann Sheehy

TATARSTAN STILL INSISTS ON SPECIAL STATUS. Tatarstan's Vice-President
Vasilii Likhachev reiterated at the plenary session of the constitutional
assembly on 26-June that the text of the constitution should
make provision for the special status of individual subjects
of the federation, ITAR-TASS reported. Tatarstan had threatened
to boycott the assembly on this issue, but Yeltsin had promised
that Likhachev could speak if he continued to participate, an
RFE/RL correspondent in Moscow reported on 25 June. Likhachev
maintained that there was still time to include in the draft
of the constitution norms on the treaty-constitutional status
of some subjects. -Ann Sheehy

RUSSIA SUPPORTS US RAIDS ON IRAQ. The Russian Foreign Ministry
issued a statement on 27-June expressing Moscow's approval of
pre-dawn air attacks on the headquarters of the Iraqi intelligence
service by US forces. The Foreign Ministry statement said: "In
the opinion of the Russian government, the actions of the United
States are justified in as much as they stem from the right of
a state to individual or collective self-defense in accordance
with Article 51 of the United Nations charter. We hope for the
achievement of mutually acceptable solutions in this bilateral
problem without the escalation of military activity." At an emergency
session of the UN Security Council called by the United States
on 27 June, Russia's permanent representative to the UN, Yulii
Vorontsov, expressed his appreciation of US efforts to clarify
the situation and provide information to the other UNSC members,
ITAR-TASS reported. -Suzanne Crow

US TO BUY MORE TOPAZ REACTORS FROM RUSSIA. Citing an article
in the US weekly Space News, ITAR-TASS on 26 June reported that
the US is planning to purchase an additional four Topaz-2 nuclear
reactors designed to produce electricity for spaceprobes and
satellites. The deal may be worth up to $20 million. The reactors
are to provide the basis for the development by US firms of a
larger reactor based on the Topaz design. -John Lepingwell

MILITARY TO HOLD EXERCISES. The Russian military is to hold exercises
at the Kubinka military base near Moscow starting 29 June, ITAR-TASS
reported on 25 June. The exercises, which will apparently test
the interaction of mobile forces with regular army units, was
delayed a week so that government officials could observe them.
John Lepingwell

RUSSIA-JAPAN UPDATE. Less than ten days before the start of the
7-9 July G-7 summit, Tokyo and Moscow continue to joust over
a proposed Western aid plan for Russia and the status of discussions
on ownership of the disputed Kuril Islands. On 25 June, according
to AFP and Kyodo, Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Sergei Yastrzembsky
and Deputy Prime Minister Anatolii Chubais criticized remarks
made earlier that week by Japanese Foreign Minister Kabun Muto
to the effect that a proposed G-7 privatization fund for Russia
would be scaled back from some $4 billion to under $500 million.
Yastrzembsky accused Tokyo of lacking a "positive approach" and
of attempting unilaterally to set a ceiling on aid to Russia.
Meanwhile, Kyodo on 25-June quoted Muto as suggesting that Japanese
public opinion would compel the government to take up the Kuril
Islands dispute with Boris Yeltsin during the summit, although
he repeated that the issue would "probably not be included" in
this year's political declaration as it had been last year at
the G-7 summit in Munich. -Stephen Foye

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



AZERBAIJAN UPDATE. On 25 June President Abulfaz Elchibey denounced
as unconstitutional the decision of the National Assembly the
previous day to transfer his powers to Supreme Soviet chairman
Geidar Aliev, Western agencies reported. Police fired warning
shots to disperse a student demonstration in Baku on 25 June
in support of Elchibey, according to ITAR-TASS. In Vienna, the
CSCE Council of Senior Officials issued a statement on 25 June
condemning "any unconstitutional attempt to remove the democratically
elected president of Azerbaijan". On 26 June Secretary of State
Ali Karimov, Foreign Minister Tofik Gasymov and Presidential
Press service chief Arif Aliev announced that they were "temporarily
stopping their authorities" to protest the "unconstitutional
decree of 24 June", Turan reported. On June 27 rebel leader Surat
Huseinov held talks with Gaidar Aliev in Baku on resolving the
crisis, after which Huseinov announced that his revolt was over,
and pledged loyalty to Aliev. Huseinov then ordered his troops
to withdraw from Baku and redeploy in Nagorno-Karabakh. Meanwhile,
Armenian forces on 27 June took the town of Mardakert in northern
Karabakh, according to The Los Angeles Times of 28 June. -Liz
Fuller

TAJIK PARLIAMENT CONTINUES RESTORATION. Through 26 June, Tajikistan's
Supreme Soviet, in its first full session since the end of the
civil war, adopted several resolutions aimed at strengthening
the pro-Communist forces. Khovar-TASS reported the parliament
decided that the resignation of then-President Rakhmon Nabiev
in September 1992 was made under pressure, and hence, all decrees
made under his successor, Akbarsho Iskandarov, were illegal.
The resolution has no effect on the presidency itself; the position
was abolished in December 1992, and Nabiev died in April. The
deputies also voted to strip two opposition deputies of their
immunity, and to indict them on criminal charges for "guiding
the terrorism and civil war in Tajikistan." The two, Qazi Ali
Akhbar Turadzhonzoda (formerly Tajikistan's religious leader)
and Takhir Abdujobar (leader of the opposition Rastokhez movement),
are both in exile. Parliament also ratified a friendship treaty
with Russia and a Commonwealth of Independent States collective
security agreement; both of which give the Russian military considerable
latitude within Tajikistan. -Keith Martin

COMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES



BLACK SEA FLEET OFFICERS OPPOSE AGREEMENT. According to an ITAR-TASS
report of 25 June, senior staff officers in the Black Sea Fleet
have urged sailors to hoist the Russian naval ensign on their
ships on 1 July. The officers also reportedly oppose the Yeltsin-Kravchuk
agreement on 17 June that provides for the fleet to be evenly
divided between Russia and Ukraine and called upon the parliaments
of the two countries to reject it. A larger meeting of officers
is planned for 29 June to further discuss the statement. The
number or rank of officers issuing the statement is uncertain,
but it echoes a similar call by officers of the fleet's air arm,
and appears to reflect a widespread sentiment that the personnel's
interests are being neglected in negotiations over the fleet.
-John Lepingwell

COMMERCIAL DEBT SERVICE DEFERRED AGAIN. A spokesman for the Deutsche
Bank, which is acting as point man for the roughly 600 Western
banks that are owed money by the former Soviet Union (FSU), told
an RFE/RL correspondent on 25 June that interest payments on
the estimated $25 billion of commercial debts have been deferred
for 90 days for the seventh time. Russia has assumed responsibility
for the FSU's government and commercial debts which are currently
estimated to total around $88 billion in principal and interest
but has let it be known that it cannot repay more than $2-3 billion
in 1993. -Charles Lambeth and Keith Bush

DEADLINE FOR DECISION ON RUBLE ZONE. An official of the State
Committee for Coordination with the Commonwealth of Independent
States told an RFE/RL correspondent on 25 June that CIS members
must decide by 1 July whether they wish to remain in the ruble
zone or issue their own currencies. Those former Soviet republics
that have issued their own currencies have been asked to return
ruble notes to Russia. -Keith Bush

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



SERBS AND CROATS COORDINATE ATTACKS ON MUSLIMS. International
media over the weekend quote Sarajevo radio to the effect that
Serb and Croat forces are cooperating in making war on the Muslims.
The area most affected is that around Maglaj, Zepce, and Zavidovici,
which lie along the north-south route linking Sarajevo with the
Serb-held town of Doboj and on to Croatia. Meanwhile, the BBC
on 28 June quotes Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic as warning
the Muslims that they had better accept the Serb-Croat three-way
partition plan "or face a two-way division." Finally, Austrian
media reported on 25 June that authorities in that country are
investigating charges that the colorful Bosnian presidency member
Fikret Abdic has embezzled $8 million in refugee relief funds.
Abdic, who made headlines in Yugoslavia in the late 1980s following
the collapse of his Agrokomerc business empire, denies the charges.
Other accounts suggest that he may currently be engaged in lively
trading across Muslim, Serb, and Croat battle lines. -Patrick
Moore

RUMP YUGOSLAV PRESIDENT ELECTED, MORE PROTESTS. The Federal Assembly
of rump Yugoslavia on 25 June elected Zoran Lilic as federal
President replacing Dobrica Cosic who was ousted on 1 June. Deputies
from the main Socialist Party (SPS), the Radicals, and the main
Montenegrin Democratic Socialist Party backed him. The 39 year
old Lilic is widely regarded as a close ally of Serbia's President
Slobodan Milosevic and currently serves as President of Serbia's
National Assembly and on the ruling Socialist Party's Executive
Steering Committee. In his acceptance speech Lilic pledged to
revive the economy and end isolation but "not at any price .
. . and not at the expense of national interests." According
to Politika of 26 June, the latest government figures show that
the monthly inflation in Serbia-Montenegro reached a record 366.7%
in June. Economists also estimate that rump Yugoslavia lost $20
billion in revenues due to UN sanctions imposed in late May 1992.
Meanwhile, on 26-June some 10,000 members and supporters of the
opposition Serbian Renewal Movement rallied in front of the St.-Sava
Cathedral in Belgrade to demand the release of their jailed leader
Vuk Draskovic and his wife. Police blocked off side streets during
the rally and no clashes were reported. Radios Serbia and B92
carried the reports. -Milan Andrejevich

SLOVENIAN PRESIDENT UNDER FIRE. Five popular members of the Slovenian
government and a former foreign minister have accused Slovenian
President Milan Kucan of being "pro-Yugoslav." In a letter to
Kucan, the six accused Kucan of awarding the country's highest
award, the Golden Medal for Slovenian Freedom, to two former
communists who are secretly pro-Yugoslav and of pulling strings
on behalf of former Yugoslav army officers seeking retirement
benefits and housing. Kucan told reporters on 25 June that he
is mystified by the charges. Among those who signed the letter
is Defense Minister Janez Jansa, who is seen as the master-mind
of recent criticism against Kucan. Primer Minister Janez Drnovsek
has not commented on the letter, but some members of his Liberal
Democratic Party are accusing the six of trying to trigger a
parliamentary crisis that would force new elections in the fall.
The letter appeared as Slovenia marked its second anniversary
of independence. According to the daily Delo, "the rift is polarizing
the country." Milan Andrejevich

INCIDENT ON MACEDONIAN-ALBANIAN BORDER. Western news agencies
reported on 27-June that one Albanian border guard was killed
and another wounded from shots fired by troops of the Former
Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. It appears that the two Albanian
guards had crossed the border and ignored calls to halt. A commission
from both countries was investigating the incident. Relations
between the two countries are outwardly good, but Tirana is concerned
about the rights enjoyed by Macedonia's large Albanian minority,
while Skopje is concerned about possible Albanian irredentism.
-Robert Austin

GRECO-ALBANIAN TENSIONS ON THE RISE. Western media reported on
26 June that Albania had expelled a Greek priest on grounds that
he was fostering irredentist sentiments in Southern Albania.
The region has a sizeable Greek minority of some 50,000, although
Athens puts the figure much higher. Reuters reported on 27 June
that Greek Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis called the action
an "unwarranted provocation." Greek authorities, moreover, have
rounded up 4,500 Albanians judged as illegal immigrants and is
preparing to deport them. -Robert Austin

SOLIDARITY: GOING IT ALONE. The Solidarity labor union held its
fifth congress in Zielona Gora from 25 to 27 June. PAP reports
that the congress voted overwhelmingly that the union should
field its own candidates in the forthcoming parliamentary elections,
thereby disappointing any lingering hopes that President Lech
Walesa may have had of winning Solidarity's support for his Nonparty
Bloc to Support Reforms (BBWR). As a result, Walesa declined
the union's invitation to address the congress on the final day
of proceedings, and told Polish Television that for the first
time their ways had parted. The congress passed one resolution
strongly critical of the Network, the association of Solidarity
locals from the major industrial plants, which have been pursuing
their own interests and, in particular, supporting Walesa, and
another resolution condemning its own deputies in the previous
Sejm for going against the recommendations of the union's National
Commission. Both resolutions were subsequently toned down in
order to avoid the appearance of a major split at election time.
Solidarity's Chairman, Marian Krzaklewski accused the outgoing
government of having failed to implement negotiated agreements
and pledged that the union would continue fighting for long-term
solutions that would help to build a stable and efficient social
and economic system. -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka

WALESA'S REFORM BLOC COLD-SHOULDERED. Most political parties
also distanced themselves from the BBWR, PAP reported on 27 June.
The Chairman of the Polish Peasant Party, Waldemar Pawlak, said
that the BBWR lacked a program. Aleksander Hall's Conservative
Party ruled out any participation in the bloc. The Democratic
Union's leader Tadeusz Mazowiecki criticized the BBWR as "an
element of disorientation and misinformation" and the party's
campaign leader Bronislaw Geremek said it would only lead to
"a repeat of the previous incompetent and fractious Sejm." Another
influential member of the party, head of the office of the Council
of Ministers, Jan Maria Rokita, did not, however, exclude the
possibility of working with the BBWR after the elections if that
bloc proved to be "a self-disciplined force." A new lay-Catholic
group called the Movement for Responsibility for the Nation,
the State and the Church is considering joining the BBWR. -Anna
Sabbat-Swidlicka

CZECH COMMUNISTS SPLIT. The Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia,
the second strongest party in the Czech Republic, held a congress
in Prostejov on 26-and 27 June. Jiri Svoboda, the party chairman
since 1990, resigned on 25 June, claiming that the party cannot
be reformed. Svoboda and his followers, who had campaigned for
a change of the party's name and a non-communist orientation,
had increasingly found themselves under pressure from neo-Stalinist
elements. CTK reports that the congress voted against a change
of the party's name and elected conservative Miroslav Grebenicek
the new party leader. At the same time, it expelled from the
party's ranks several ultra-conservatives, such as Miroslav Stepan
and Jaromir Obzina, two top officials under the regime of Milos
Jakes in the 1980s. Earlier this year, Stepan and Obzina had
founded a platform in the party, whose main goal was the revival
of orthodox Marxism-Leninism. Some 70 delegates, unhappy with
developments at the congress, walked out and announced that they
would form a new, non-communist opposition group, called the
Party of the Democratic Left, with Jiri Svoboda as its chairman.
Svoboda has not said whether he intends to lead the new party.--Jiri
Pehe

RUSSIA, UKRAINE AGREE ON OIL PRICES. After the official program
of Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin's visit to Ukraine
had ended, a last minute agreement was reached on the price of
Russian gas, the cost of its transport through Ukraine, and on
Ukraine's gas debt to Russia. ITAR-TASS reported on 25-June that
Ukraine is to pay 42,000 rubles per 1,000 cubic meters of gas.
As of 1 January 1994 Ukraine will go over to hard currency payments
at a rate of $80 per 1,000 cubic meters. Russia has been renegotiating
its gas prices with all of the CIS states to bring them up to
world levels and its agreement with Ukraine has been the first
to be concluded in this vein. -Ustina Markus

SHEVARDNADZE, KRAVCHUK DISCUSS UKRAINIAN PARTICIPATION IN ABKHAZIA
SETTLEMENT. The chairman of Georgia's parliament, Eduard Shevardnadze,
met with Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk on 26 June, an RFE/RL
correspondent reported. One of the issues discussed in their
45-minute meeting was possible Ukrainian mediation in settling
the Abkhazian conflict. Georgian Foreign Minister Aleksandr Chikvaidze
said the mediation could take place under UN auspices or through
bilateral relations. The UN has reportedly reacted positively
to the possibility of Ukrainian involvement in resolving the
problem. -Ustina Markus

HUNGARIAN-UKRANIAN JOINT COMMITTEE MEETS. On 24 June, the Hungarian-Ukrainian
Joint Committee began its two-day meeting in Nyiregyhaza, Hungary,
MTI reports. The committee was set up two years ago as part of
an agreement on national minorities. Several major agreements
were reported to have been reached, such as opening two new border
crossings, placing Hungarian schools under their own administration,
opening a Hungarian library in Beregovo, and improving the operation
of the Hungarian theater there. Hungary also pledged 60 million
forint to build a hospital in that town. Hungary was reported
ready to introduce Ukranian language classes and training in
two high schools as well as in one college. The two countries
also plan to set up special trading zones along their borders.
-Judith Pataki

HUNGARIAN FREEDOM DAY. On 27 June, several meetings and celebrations
were held across Hungary to celebrate Freedom Day to mark the
Soviet troop withdrawal two years ago. In Mohacs, for example,
Foreign Minister Geza Jeszenszky received diplomatic representatives
of all those countries that had ever occupied the country throughout
its history. In Fertod, Social Welfare Minister Laszlo Surjan
reacted to the fact that the Russian parliament did not support
a clause in the bilateral treaty by which Russia would apologize
for the 1956 invasion of its neighbor. Surjan said that the present
Russian parliament is not yet free, but the next one might be.
-Judith Pataki

MOLDOVAN-HUNGARIAN TALKS. Hungarian parliament chairman Gyorgy
Szabad headed a delegation representing all six parliamentary
parties for talks with the Moldovan leaders in Chisinau on 25
June, Basapress reported. President Mircea Snegur, parliament
Chairman Petru Lucinschi, and Foreign Minister Nicolae Tiu thanked
their visitors for Hungary's support to Moldova in international
institutions and on the Dniester problem. On the latter point,
Szabad reaffirmed at a press conference that Hungary "found Moldova's
position convincing" and "very much wanted to see Moldova independent
and integral." Hungary "wished that its relations with Romania
were as good as they are with Moldova," he added. The sides noted
that the preparation of a bilateral state treaty is nearly complete
(Moldova has thus far declined to sign the one proposed to it
by Romania). -Vladimir Socor

"DNIESTER CITIZENSHIP" TO BE IMPOSED ON MOLDOVANS. Several "Dniester
republic" leaders, including its Vice-President Aleksandr Karaman,
said on Tiraspol TV on 25-June that residents are soon to be
registered for "Dniester citizenship." Those who decline will
be excluded from the privatization of housing and other property
and from public employment, and will forfeit the right to vote.
Basapress carried the story. -Vladimir Socor

ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN DISPUTE CONTINUES. The dispute between Estonia
and Russia intensified on 25-June when Lentransgaz halted the
daily shipment of 500,000 cubic meters of natural gas. While
Lentransgaz commercial director said that the cutoff was due
to Estonia's discrimination against Russian speakers, other Russian
officials stated that it was prompted by Estonia's failure to
pay existing gas debts of about $11 million. Eesti Gaas officials
replied that the debt was only $6-million and would be settled
soon, in part with credits from the Japanese Import-Export Bank.
In a radio address Prime Minister Mart Laar called for calm,
noting that only about 10% of Estonia's energy needs are supplied
by gas and existing reserves would result in no disruptions for
3-4 days, Baltic media report. On 25 June Estonian President
Lennart Meri decided to delay signing the proposed law on aliens,
which Russia claims is discriminatory, until receiving expert
opinions on it from the Council of Europe, the CSCE, and other
international organizations. -Saulius Girnius

LALUMIERE SUPPORTS ZHELEV. On 25 June Catherine Lalumiere, the
Secretary General of the Council of Europe who was in Bulgaria
for a two day visit, defended President Zhelyu Zhelev in the
wake of opposition rallies designed to bring down his government.
BTA carried the report. According to Reuters, she was greeted
upon arrival by anti-Zhelev demonstrators but referred to him
as "a true Democrat." Meanwhile, speaking on Bulgarian radio
on 27-June, Zhelev called for an end to all hunger strikes, including
those sponsored by his supporters as a counter-measure to an
anti-government one. Zhelev appealed to his supporters, saying
it was partly up to them to show the country that political differences
can be solved through reasonable means. -Stan Markotich

ROMANIAN SHIPPING DEAL TURNS INTO POLITICAL SCANDAL. Romanian
independent media criticized official plans to sell a 51% controlling
stake in the Romanian state shipping firm Petromin to the Greek
Forum Maritime company for $335 million, suggesting that the
Greek offer was below the scrap value of the 106 ships involved
in the deal. The mass circulation daily Evenimentul zilei accused
the government of selling off Romania's fleet "for a pittance,"
while the usually pro-government daily Adevarul spoke of a "deliberate
wrecking of the Romanian fleet." Both newspapers questioned the
role of President Ion Iliescu in the affair. Recently, Iliescu
defended the deal, saying that it was necessary to avoid bankruptcy.
-Dan Ionescu

ROMANIAN RULING PARTY ANNOUNCES POLITICAL PACT, MERGERS. According
to Western agencies, the president of the ruling Democratic National
Salvation Front Oliviu Gherman announced on 25-June that his
party won a pledge of support from the Socialist Labor Party
(the reborn communist party), the Greater Romania Party, and
the Party of Romanian National Unity (two parties known for their
extreme nationalist views). The DNSF, which won 28% of votes
in last year's elections, has traditionally depended on those
parties in parliament but has refrained so far from entering
an open alliance with them. A communique released by the new
alliance says that the parties agreed that Premier Nicolae Vacaroiu
should have the authority to issue regulations when the Parliament
is not in session. In a separate development, Radio Bucharest
announced on 26 June the DNSF's decision to merge with the Republican
Party and the Romanian Socialist-Democratic Party, two leftist
parties which are not represented in parliament. These developments,
which come shortly before the DNSF's national congress, appear
as a response to recent moves by the opposition towards more
unity. -Dan Ionescu

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Saulius Girnius and Patrick Moore







THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
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Natasha Bulashova,Greg Koul
Updated: 1998-11-

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