Our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children's future. And we are all mortal. - John F. Kennedy
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 115, 21 June 1993







COMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES



KRAVCHUK ON SUMMIT DISCUSSIONS OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS. According
to reports from Radio Ukraine and the New York Times of 18 June,
Russian President Boris Yeltsin reiterated during his meeting
with Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk Russia's willingness
to provide security guarantees to Ukraine if it ratifies the
START-1 and NPT treaties. Previous Russian security guarantees
have been found wanting, however, by both the Ukrainian parliament
and foreign ministry. Kravchuk noted that Russia's willingness
to discuss compensating Ukraine for the materials in the nuclear
warheads on Ukraine's territory recognized Ukraine's ownership
of them and suggested that consideration of the treaties should
not be delayed until after the 26 September referendum. He did,
however, suggest that the START-1 treaty might have to be amended
so that vacated missile silos could be filled with concrete rather
than destroyed, as is called for by the treaty. -John Lepingwell


WHO CONTROLS THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS? KRAVCHUK DID NOT ADDRESS THE
QUESTION OF WHO NOW CONTROLS THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS BASED IN UKRAINE.
Until the dissolution of the CIS Joint Command on 15 June, Marshal
Evgenii Shaposhnikov and Yeltsin both held the launch codes for
weapons based in Ukraine and Kazakhstan, as provided for by CIS
agreements on nuclear weapons control. However, according to
an account in Izvestiya of 18 June, Shaposhnikov stated during
a press conference that he retained the codes, even though he
is no longer in the CIS military command structure. The result
appears to be that Russia has assumed de facto direct operational
control over all former Soviet nuclear weapons. If so, the lack
of a response or comment from Ukraine and Kazakhstan is surprising.
The issue of nuclear command and control is thus likely to be
a central issue of discussion once again at the upcoming CIS
summit meeting in Erevan in July. -John Lepingwell

RUSSIA



RUSSIAN TROOPS PLACED ON ALERT IN NORTH OSSETIA AND INGUSHETIA.
Russian troops have been placed on alert in North Ossetia and
Ingushetia due to concern over growing tensions in the region,
ITAR-TASS and AFP reported on 20 June. The Russian State Committee
for Nationalities warned on 19 June that there was a real threat
of large-scale conflict, and said troops were having difficulty
coping with the refugee problem, disarming illegal groups, and
controlling crime. It also asked Georgia and Chechnya to prevent
weapons getting into the region. The chief problem is the return
of Ingush refugees to the Prigorodnyi raion of North Ossetia.
On 18 June Yeltsin issued a decree ordering the Russian government
to review measures to implement the agreements on the return
of the refugees reached in Kislovodsk on 20-March. The same day,
a protest meeting attended by several thousand was held in the
North Ossetian capital Vladikavkaz to demand a referendum on
whether or not Ingush and Ossetians could live together in North
Ossetia, ITAR-TASS reported. So far, about 16,000 Ingush refugees
have declared their wish to return. -Ann Sheehy

CHECHEN PREMIER SAYS POWER CRISIS IN CHECHNYA HAS REACHED APOGEE.
Yaragi Mamodaev, the head of the Chechen government of national
trust appointed by the Chechen parliament but not recognized
by Chechen president Dzhokhar Dudaev, claimed in an interview
with ITAR-TASS on 19 June that the crisis of power in Chechnya
had reached its apogee and would soon be resolved. Mamodaev,
who is currently in Moscow, said Dudaev had only one option,
namely to create the image of the external enemy, which he might
do by provoking the non-indigenous population or causing problems
on the disputed frontier with Ingushetia. To forestall this,
Mamodaev had spoken with Ingush president Ruslan Aushev and with
representatives of the Russian-speaking population. In a further
interview with ITAR-TASS on 20 June, Mamodaev denied accusations
that he had fled Chechnya and said he would return shortly. -Ann
Sheehy

DUDAEV VISITS PARIS, VIENNA. Not for the first time during a
period of acute tension in Chechnya, Dudaev has been abroad.
ITAR-TASS reported on 18 June that he had been in Paris from
13-16 June in conditions of near total secrecy, and an RFE/RL
correspondent reported that he had arrived unexpectedly at the
World Human Rights Conference in Vienna on 18-June. On 20-June
Dudaev told journalists in Vienna that he had discussions with
business circles and parliamentarians from Germany, France, and
Austria, and also with representatives of the United Nations
Industrial Development Organization. He maintained that the West
had distorted information on the situation in Chechnya. In the
meantime, the commandant of Mozdok in North Ossetia turned down
a request for military assistance from the Chechen opposition
in the Nadterechnyi raion of Chechnya where a 500-strong unit
of Dudaev's guards is said to have killed four people, ITAR-TASS
reported on 19 June. -Ann Sheehy

YELTSIN IN SAKHA (YAKUTIA). Yeltsin returned to Moscow on 20
June after a two-day trip to Sakha (Yakutia). During his stay
Yeltsin visited a jewelry factory, had talks with the leadership
and attended a folk festival, Russian and Western media reported.
Trying to ensure the republic's support for his draft constitution,
Yeltsin said before departure that the republic should have more
rights and autonomy, ITAR-TASS reported on 20 June. Yeltsin said
on 19-June that Moscow would no longer dictate the way the mineral-rich
republic uses its resources. Sakha's leaders told Yeltsin that
they supported his economic reforms but wanted more political
autonomy. According to Le Monde of 18 June, Sakha parliamentary
chairman Klement Ivanov had declared, apropos of the statement
adopted last week by the constitutional assembly, that by dropping
the reference to the sovereignty of the republics Yeltsin "had
created a dangerous situation which menaced reducing to naught
all the results of the conference. -Ann Sheehy

NEW ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM APPROVED. The Presidium of the
Council of Ministers approved a package of energy conservation
measures on 18 June, ITAR-TASS reported. The program is intended
to cut energy consumption to 35-40 million tons below 1990 levels
by 1995 and 200 million tons below 1990 levels by the year 2000.
Minister of Fuel and Energy Yurii Shafranik, who presented the
program to the presidium, noted that waste of energy resources
had increased in the last two years; despite significant declines
in production, energy use has remained relatively stable. Initial
consumption-cutting measures include fines against enterprises
using excessive amounts of energy. Erik Whitlock

INFLATION RATE UP IN MAY. The retail price index in Russia rose
to 22-24% in May according to the government's Center on Economic
Reform, Radio Moscow and Reuters reported on 18 June. The June
figure, based on inflation to date this month, is expected to
be around 20%. These figures compare unfavorably with those of
March and April, which were in the mid-teens. The Chairman of
the Center was not optimistic about near-term prospects for improvement
in Russian price stability and suggested that the Central Bank
would not honor its commitment to keep credit creation for the
second quarter of this year within a 30% growth limit. -Keith
Bush and Erik Whitlock

IFC APPROVES LOANS TO RUSSIA'S OIL AND GAS INDUSTRIES. The International
Finance Corporation (IFC) approved two loans amounting to $71.5
million on 18 June, according to ITAR-TASS on 19 June. These
are the first two programs to be supported by the IFC since Russia
became a member on 12 April. One loan worth $60 million goes
to "Polar Lights", a joint venture between the American company,
Conoco Inc., and the Russian company, Arkhangelskgeologia. This
joint venture has already been promised a $90 million loan from
the EBRD and is expected to receive a $50-million loan from the
United States. The IFC will also invest $1.5 million in, and
lend $10 million to, "Vasyugan Services", a joint enterprise
between a Canadian company and two Russian companies. This company
plans to use modern drilling methods to boost oil and gas production
in western Siberia. In the meantime the American House of Representatives
has passed a bill on foreign aid which envisages $2.5-billion
in aid for Russia for the year beginning 1 October. -Sheila Marnie


JAPAN'S DOMESTIC PROBLEMS COULD AFFECT RUSSIAN AID. Experts and
government officials in the West are concerned that domestic
political problems in Japan could complicate efforts to provide
more G-7 financial aid to Russia. Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi
Miyazawa lost a vote of confidence on 18 June, leaving the government
in disarray less than a month before the next G-7 Summit meeting,
to be hosted by Tokyo from 7-9 July. Aid to Russia figures prominently
on the agenda at the summit and, as Western agencies report,
there is some concern in Western capitals that a weakened Japanese
government will be unable or unwilling to commit itself to a
more ambitious aid program. Meanwhile, Kyodo reported on 19 June
that the IMF would provide the first disbursement ($1.5-billion)
of a new aid plan for Russia that was worked at a G-7 meeting
held in Tokyo in April of this year. -Stephen Foye

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



POLITICAL STANDOFF IN AZERBAIJAN. Azerbaijani President Abulfaz
Elchibey left Baku by private plane in the early morning of 18
June for his home town of Ordubad in Nakhichevan. In a TV address
on 18 June, Parliament chairman Geidar Aliev claimed to have
assumed the powers of president in accordance with the Azerbaijani
Constitution. When the National Assembly declined to transfer
presidential power to Aliev, he later claimed he had assumed
temporary power. Speaking to journalists in Ordubad on 19 June,
Elchibey affirmed that he remained president and would continue
to direct state affairs, ITAR-TASS reported. In response to a
request from the Azerbaijani military, rebel leader Surat Huseinov
sent a detachment of his troops to reinforce government troops
defending the town of Agdam; on 19-20 June the combined Azerbaijani
forces succeeded in driving back an Armenian offensive, Western
agencies reported. Meanwhile the main body of Huseinov's men
continued their advance to within a few miles of Baku. On 20
June National Independence Party chairman Etibar Mamedov succeeded
in negotiating an agreement whereby Huseinov would halt all military
activity for one week to enable the Azerbaijani parliament to
debate the circumstances of the 4 June clash in Gyandzha between
Huseinov's men and government forces., for which Huseinov holds
Elchibey responsible. A spokesman for Huseinov told Western journalists
that reports that Huseinov was demanding a top government post
for himself were false. -Liz Fuller

TAJIK REGION ACQUIESCES. Reuters on 20 June quoted officials
of Tajikistan's Gorno-Badakhshon region as saying that they are
no longer pursuing their quest for independence. In an apparent
effort to improve relations with the Dushanbe government, the
Badakhshoni authorities have taken several conciliatory steps,
including a promise to guard the region's border with Afghanistan
to stop infiltration by rebels fighting the central government.
The leader of Gorno-Badakhshon's "self-defense squadron" said
his forces would be controlled by the Tajik army, but would continue
to be made up of Pamiris, the region's predominant ethnic group;
he also claimed his forces had beaten back four recent attempts
by government troops to enter Badakhshon. While the central government
hopes this agreement will stabilize the general situation, the
Badakhshoni authorities believe that the truce will allow desperately
needed aid to reach the region and that it will permit some of
the 70,000 refugees from other parts of Tajikistan to return
home. -Keith Martin

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



KRAJINA SERBS CONCLUDE VOTE. According to preliminary figures,
more than 92% of the 400,000 Serbs in the self-declared Krajina
Republic in Croatia have turned out to vote in a referendum calling
for union with the similarly self-declared Serb Republic in Bosnia.
The referendum also asks if the regions should merge "with other
Serb territories." Organizers say final results will be announced
on 23 June and predict that more than 95% will approve unification.
Ceremonies marking unification are already scheduled for 28 June,
the Serbian Vidovdan holiday. Croatia's government has widely
condemned the vote, and the moderate Serbian People's Party based
in Zagreb has accused organizers of misleading Croatia's Serb
minority. Radios Serbia and Croatia carried the report. -Milan
Andrejevich

IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN THE KRAJINA AND BOSNIA ISSUES? THE 19
JUNE STUTTGARTER ZEITUNG SUGGESTS THAT THE REFERENDUM HAS PROMPTED
BOTH CROATIAN PRESIDENT FRANJO TUDJMAN AND HIS SERBIAN COUNTERPART
SLOBODAN MILOSEVIC TO CLOSE THEIR DEAL ON EFFECTIVELY PARTITIONING
BOSNIA AND TURN THEIR JOINT ATTENTION TO KRAJINA. Tudjman's party
contains one faction pressing for a military solution to Serb
control of about a quarter of Croatia's territory, while another
favors a political approach. Tudjman may well have now ruled
in favor of the latter and entered into talks with Milosevic
about a solution to the Krajina problem. The Serbian leader,
for his part, may want to come to terms with Tudjman before the
Krajina and Bosnian Serbs create a new state that he may not
be able to control. Milosevic has, however, been ruthless in
the past in dealing with nominal subordinates who have crossed
him, and he has also gotten the better of Tudjman in bilateral
negotiations. -Patrick Moore

SERBIAN GOVERNMENT SURVIVES NO-CONFIDENCE VOTE. On 18 June by
a vote of 159 to 41 the predominantly Socialist Serbian government
survived a vote of no-confidence demanded by the opposition DEPOS
coalition. The outcome depended largely on Vojislav Seselj's
Radical Party, Serbia's second largest, which sided with the
socialists in voting for the government. Seselj, however, warned
that his party is giving the federal and Serbian Governments
until September to improve the country's economic and social
situation or face "a more radical option." On 19 June police
clashed near Belgrade's central jail with several hundred protesters
who demanded the release of opposition leader Vuk Draskovic and
his wife. Those demonstrators were part of some 10,000 people
who marched in Belgrade in support of Draskovic. Serbian authorities
have accused Draskovic of inciting violent demonstration on 1
and 2 June and are seeking to ban Draskovic's Serbian Renewal
Movement. Seselj and paramilitary leader Zeljko Raznjatovic ("Arkan")
are opposed to such a ban and have said that Draskovic was not
responsible for the violence. Meanwhile, former Prime Minister
Milan Panic, in Belgrade on a three-day visit, met with top opposition
leaders to coordinate activities. Radio Serbia and Studio B TV
carried the reports. -Milan Andrejevich

LONG-TERM PROSPECTS FOR THE YUGOSLAV AREA. Panic took advantage
of his trip to Belgrade to promote a favorite idea of his, namely
a Balkan economic union, Reuters reports on 20 June. He said
that the countries of the region are otherwise not viable and
included in his statement not only the former Yugoslav republics,
but also Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey. He also argued
against the idea of creating states in the ethnically mixed Balkans
on a purely national basis. The Croatian media, for their part,
have periodically raised the issue of possible outside attempts
to set up a "third Yugoslavia." While the Croatian leadership
argues strongly that its goal is a "European Croatia," it is
clear that people are thinking about future links of some sort
to the regions with which they were formerly closely integrated
economically. Croatian opinion would seem to agree with Slovenian
Foreign Minister Lojze Peterle, who told Vjesnik on 14 June that
Slovenia ultimately seeks good relations with all the former
Yugoslav republics but rules out the creation of any new supranational
state. The key principle, Peterle argued, is one of concrete
mutual interests. -Patrick Moore

ELECTION COMMITTEE FOR POLISH NONPARTY REFORM BLOC. At a meeting
with representatives of employee share-ownership programs in
the Silesian coal-mining town of Sosnowiec on 18 June, President
Lech Walesa described his proposed Non-Party Bloc to Support
Reform (BBWR) as "an offer to all those who have not lost faith
in the sense of political reforms." PAP quotes Walesa as saying
that the BBWR's election program would move away from the futile
political in-fighting of the recently dissolved Sejm and reinforce
Poland's democratic achievements with economic development and
citizens' welfare. The chairman of the Union of Employee Ownership,
Jacek Adam Lipinski, informed those present that his organization
that same day founded a BBWR election committee with headquarters
in Warsaw. Walesa's campaign plan focuses on four lobbies (workers,
businessmen, agricultural workers, and local administrators),
each of which would draw up a list of priorities in its sphere,
according to a report in Rzeczpospolita of 19 June. Gazeta Wyborcza
claims that business groups and the chairmen of the president's
seven social councils are still considering his offer to join
the bloc. -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka

POLISH PRIVATE BROADCASTERS CALL FOR A RESPITE. Responding to
warnings by the head of Poland's National Broadcasting Council,
Marek Markiewicz, that they make themselves liable to criminal
proceedings if they continue broadcasting after 1-July, Poland's
private commercial broadcasters appealed on 18 June to President
Lech Walesa and Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka to find a solution
that would enable them to continue broadcasting until such time
as their applications for a license can be processed. "It is
unfair to penalize broadcasters for the lawmakers' sluggishness,"
they said. PAP quoted Walesa as saying in Katowice on that day
that he is opposed to any ban on private broadcasting. Head of
the prime minister's office, Jan Maria Rokita, said that the
government rejects any interpretation of the law on broadcasting
that would violate the constitutional principle of freedom of
speech. Gazeta Wyborcza quoted representatives of the State Radio
Communications Agency as saying it was not their business to
report to the prosecutor's office on who was broadcasting without
a license because licenses are issued by the NBC. -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka


POLISH BISHOPS INSTRUCT CATHOLICS ON CIVIC DUTY. At the end of
a two-day conference in Olsztyn, the bishops reminded believers
that it is their moral duty to take part in the forthcoming elections
and thus help to shape the common good. "One cannot be a good
Catholic if one is not a good citizen," they said, according
to an RFE correspondent's report on 20 June. Although the Church
does not identify with or support any political group, the bishops
indicated that the way forward includes a multiparty political
system, a free market economy, and social security for all groups.
At the same time, they warned against those candidates who "stop
short at criticism and negation," and expressed concern lest
"the consolidation of postcommunist tendencies" lead people to
forget "the painful experiences of the recent past." -Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka


NATO SUPREME COMMANDER IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC. Gen. John M. Shalikashvili
arrived in Prague on 20 June for a three-day visit. CTK reports
that on the same day the NATO Supreme Commander discussed with
Foreign Minister Jozef Zieleniec cooperation between the Czech
army and NATO. They agreed that in four weeks the NATO will establish
a mission in Prague composed of high military officers, who would
coordinate cooperation and offer military expertise to the Czech
army. Shalikashvili is also scheduled to meet with President
Vaclav Havel and Defense Minister Antonin Baudys. -Jiri Pehe


SLOVAK MINISTER RESIGNS. Slovak media reported on 18 June that
Minister of Education and Science Matus Kucera submitted his
resignation to President Michal Kovac. Following the no-confidence
vote against him and Privatization Minister Lubomir Dolgos in
a 12 June meeting of the ruling Movement for a Democratic Slovakia,
Kucera initially refused to resign. He has been offered the position
of ambassador to Croatia. -Sharon Fisher

HUNGARIAN SOCIAL DEMOCRATS (RE)UNITE. In a 19 June joint statement
the leaders of Hungary's three social democratic parties-Hungarian
Social Democratic Party, Independent Social Democratic Party,
and Social Democratic People's Party-declared their intention
to run as a unified social democratic party in the 1994 general
elections. The name and common program of the party are to be
decided at a joint congress in October, MTI reports. The move
was motivated by pressure from the parties' memberships and the
realization that none would have much of a chance were it to
run alone in the election. -Alfred Reisch

HUNGARIAN-ROMANIAN OPEN SKIES FLIGHTS. Romanian armed forces
personnel are carrying out another aerial surveillance flight
over Hungary under the terms of the two countries' bilateral
open skies agreement, following a Hungarian flight over Romania
between 15 and 18 January 1993, Radio Budapest announced on 20
June. This brings the total for this year to two of the four
flights permitted annually for each country. -Alfred Reisch

ILIESCU IN SWITZERLAND. On 19-20 June Romanian President Ion
Iliescu attended the fourth Crans-Montana international forum.
At a press conference on 19-June, Iliescu said that his country
has made considerable progress in reforming economy despite the
difficult situation inherited from Nicolae Ceausescu's regime.
Iliescu further dismissed as "fabrications" charges leveled by
miners' leader Miron Cosma against Romania's secret police. Cosma,
who recently attended an ILO conference in Geneva, stated in
an interview that rampages by vigilante coal miners in 1990 and
1991 had largely been the product of manipulation by the Romanian
Intelligence Service, the successor to Ceausescu's Securitate.
Iliescu insisted that Romania is the only East European country
to have abolished its communist-style secret service. Asked about
a possible coalition government in Romania, Iliescu welcomed
the idea but added that, for the time being, there are no plans
to reshuffle-or replace Nicolae Vacaroiu's minority cabinet.
-Dan Ionescu

ANOTHER FORMER CEAUSESCU AIDE RELEASED. According to Adevarul
of 19/20 June, Emil Bobu, a former top Ceausescu aide, was released
from jail on 18-June. The 65-year-old Bobu was convicted to life
imprisonment three years ago on charges of complicity in genocide.
Last April the Supreme Court reduced his term to 10 years. The
decision to free him on age and health grounds was taken by Bucharest's
municipal court. Romanian courts have already set free numerous
former communist officials, including Ceausescu's son Nicu, who
had been a communist party secretary in Sibiu County. -Dan Ionescu


SECRET POLICE FILES REAPPEAR ON BULGARIAN POLITICAL AGENDA. Against
the backdrop of allegations that the current National Assembly
and President Zhelyu Zhelev stand under the influence of former
communists and state security officials, calls for an investigation
of the secret police files of top politicians have become more
frequent. Parliamentary Chairman Aleksandar Yordanov, deputies
of the New Union for Democracy caucus, and Zhelev himself have
in the last few days demanded that a solution be found. On 17-June
former Deputy Prime Minister and member of the NUD Dimitar Ludzhev
told BTA that a probe would show that several UDF leaders, including
chairman Filip Dimitrov, participated in "dirty games" prior
to 1989. Pointing out that most NUD legislators have blocked
previous attempts to settle the matter, UDF deputy Hristo Biserov
said the faction probably regards the demand as a way of extending
the lifetime of the current parliament. -Kjell Engelbrekt

GOVERNMENT CRISIS IN UKRAINE. Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma has
reiterated his intention to resign, various agencies reported
on 18-21 June. Kuchma had already presented his resignation to
parliament twice because he had not been given the powers to
proceed with his economic reforms, but deputies refused to accept
it and persuaded him to continue in office. His latest attempt
to resign was prompted by President Leonid Kravchuk's decree
on 16 June in which he announced that he was taking over as head
of government and created a special committee to deal with Ukraine's
economy with Kuchma as its head. Kuchma was openly critical of
these actions saying they strip him of his powers and effectively
eliminate his post. In response on 20 June Kravchuk offered to
amend his decree. -Ustina Markus

FRENCH FIRM TO ENTOMB CHERNOBYL REACTOR. The French engineering
firm Campenon Bernard SGE won a competition to design and build
a new "tomb" to encase the fourth reactor in Chernobyl's nuclear
power station. Ukraine's government opened the competition last
year after determining that the structure currently entombing
the reactor had cracks totaling 1,000 sq. m., and would remain
safe for no more than seven years. The new enclosure will cost
$250 million, Reuters reported on 18 June. -Ustina Markus

PAN-RUSSIAN GROUPS CELEBRATE BENDERY VICTORY. On 18-20 June the
"Dniester republic" and supporters from Russia celebrated the
first anniversary of the victory of "Dniester" forces and elements
of Russia's 14th Army over Moldova in Bendery, Basapress reports.
Russian Supreme Soviet Deputy Sergei Baburin, who headed a group
of Russian parliamentarians at the celebrations, told rallies
in Tiraspol and Bendery that "the internationalist people of
the Dniester were the first on the territory of the USSR to wake
up." A delegation from Moscow of the Russia-Dniester Solidarity
Committee delivered greetings from coleaders Vladimir Zhirinovsky
and Viktor Anpilov. Black Sea Cossack Ataman Aleksandr Bulgakov,
who commands a unit in Bendery, said that Russian Cossacks "will
continue to maintain the Russian empire's borders from the Pacific
to the Baltic Sea" and "do not recognize any republics or independent
states on this territory," but that "the Dniester people has
won through fighting the right to its own state formation." Viktor
Dyukarev, a deputy in the dissolved Congress of People's Deputies,
a member of the Soyuz group, and leading member of the Dniester
delegation for talks with Moldova, called for the prosecution
of Moldova's leaders as "war criminals." Gen. Aleksandr Lebed,
commander of Russia's 14th Army, which props up the "Dniester
republic," declared it to be "invincible." -Vladimir Socor

HEATED EXCHANGES OVER CIVIL RIGHTS IN ESTONIA. On 18 June the
Russian Foreign Ministry accused Estonia of "aggressive nationalism"
and warned that "the line of confrontation taken by Tallinn"
may have serious consequences, not only for Estonia but also
for the Baltic region. The statement spoke of "an interethnic
explosion" stemming from discrimination against Russian citizens
and servicemen in Estonia. On 19 June thousands of ethnic Russians
in Narva protested against a draft law on foreigners, especially
the stipulation that foreigners should apply for a residence
permit within one year of their arrival in Estonia. The demonstrators
also threatened to hold strikes. That same day Estonian Premier
Mart Laar accused Russia of "crude interference" in Estonia's
affairs and denied Moscow's claims that under the law people
would lose their jobs and be denied their residency permits.
-Dzintra Bungs

RUSSIAN TROOP WITHDRAWAL FROM LATVIA SUSPENDED? ILGONIS UPMALIS,
DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OVERSEEING RUSSIAN TROOP WITHDRAWAL FROM
LATVIA, TOLD DIENA ON 18 JUNE THAT IN ACCORDANCE WITH YELTSIN'S
ANNOUNCEMENT OF 10 JUNE, THE PULLOUT OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS
FROM AND THE TURNOVER OF MILITARY FACILITIES TO LATVIA HAS STOPPED.
Upmalis linked the suspension to Yeltsin's announcement of the
10th in which the Russian president linked troop withdrawals
to Russian rights in Estonia and Latvia and the lack of housing
for returning troops in Russia. Concerning the Russian military
exercises scheduled to take place this week, but reportedly postponed
until 10 July, the situation is unclear because, as Diena reported
on 20 June, some 28 Russian officers are to arrive in Latvia
around 23-24 June. -Dzintra Bungs

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Stephen Foye and Charles Trumbull



THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal
mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions,
or additional copies, please contact: in North America: Mr. Brian
Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907; Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783;
Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse 67, 8000
Munich 22, Germany;.Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2624; Fax:
(+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG 1993, RFE/RL, Inc.
All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole