Old age is the most unexpected of all the things that happen to a man. - Leon Trotsky
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 113, 17 June 1993







RUSSIA



YELTSIN ADDRESSES CONSTITUTIONAL ASSEMBLY. In his speech at a
plenary session of the Constitutional Assembly on 16 June, President
Boris Yeltsin called on its delegates to finalize their views
on the procedure of adopting a new constitution and make a statement
on the principles of the new constitution before adjourning for
ten days, Russian Television reported. ITAR-TASS quoted Yeltsin
as saying the final text of the constitution, which is currently
emerging from the debates at the assembly, contains the best
provisions of the presidential and the parliamentary drafts.
The same day, Yeltsin issued a decree asking a special commission
to complete the final draft of the constitution by 26 June, when
the next plenary session of the assembly convenes. He expressed
hope that the text of the constitution will be ready for adoption
by the end of June. Vera Tolz

ASSEMBLY ADOPTS DECLARATION ON THE DRAFT CONSTITUTION. The Constitutional
Assembly approved a declaration on 16 June that designated Russia
a secular state, ruled by law, whose "highest value is the individual
and his inalienable rights," ITAR-TASS reported. Meanwhile, delegates
at the assembly continued to discuss different ways of adopting
a new constitution. The following proposals were made: a new
constitution can be adopted by a) the Congress of People's Deputies;
b) the Constitutional Assembly; c) a new parliament if earlier
elections are held; d) the Congress and the Assembly together.
Most delegates agreed that if the Constitutional Assembly fails
to reach consensus on the issue, all these proposals should be
put on a nationwide referendum. ITAR-TASS also reported on 16-June
that after the Constitutional Assembly finishes debating on questions
concerning the constitution, it will turn to a new law on elections
to the highest organs of power. Vera Tolz

STATUS OF REPUBLICS AND REGIONS STILL UNRESOLVED. The declaration
on the draft constitution approved at the plenary session of
the Constitutional Assembly on 16 June left one of the thorniest
questions, namely the status of Russia's republics and regions,
still unresolved. At Yeltsin's suggestion the sentences in the
draft declaration stating that the republics were sovereign states
and the regions state-territorial formations were deleted, Russian
and Western media reported. The statement that all the subjects
of the federation were equal in their relations with the federal
authorities was retained, however. Tatarstan president Mintimer
Shaimiev told Reuters afterwards that he had abstained on the
grounds that the declaration "by-passed the most important issues."
Sakha (Yakutia) and Dagestan voted against. Ann Sheehy

IZVESTIYA ON MODALITIES OF SHAPOSHNIKOV APPOINTMENT. Izvestiya
on 17 June suggested that the appointment of Evgenii Shaposhnikov
as Secretary of the Security Council was aimed both at increasing
Boris Yeltsin's influence on that body and at strengthening the
President's position vis a vis the legislature. The commentary
warns, however, that the appointment may run into stiff opposition
from Yeltsin's opponents in the parliament. Shaposhnikov, viewed
as a strong supporter of Yeltsin, replaces Yurii Skokov, a representative
of Russia's industrial lobby whose views had clashed increasingly
with the President's. Meanwhile, Shaposhnikov told the newspaper
that other CIS leaders had been consulted and approved his move
from the CIS command to the Security Council and that in his
new duties he would continue to work for closer military integration
among CIS states. He also said that he would continue to control
the "nuclear button," but that he expected CIS leaders eventually
to transfer it to the Russian leadership. Shaposhnikov said he
does not intend to retire from the armed forces. Stephen Foye


ICAO ISSUES REPORT ON KAL SHOOTDOWN. On 14 June the International
Civil Aviation Organization issued a report on the causes of
the September 1983 shooting down of KAL flight 007. The report
is based on new sources, including the contents of KAL-007's
"black box." According to Western press agency summaries of the
report, it concluded that the flight crew of KAL-007 had erred
by switching the autopilot to follow a constant magnetic course
heading, rather being guided by the on-board inertial navigation
system (INS). This resulted in the flight straying hundreds of
miles off course into Soviet airspace. The report concluded that
the KAL-007 crew were apparently unaware of the large deviation
from the correct flight path. The ICAO also noted that Russian
air defense forces failed to make a positive identification of
the aircraft before opening fire. The air defense forces believed
the intruder to be a reconnaissance aircraft, although two senior
officers did question whether it might be a passenger aircraft
some ten minutes before the shootdown. John Lepingwell

FIRST DEPUTY HEAD OF PRESIDENT'S STAFF APPOINTED. President Yeltsin
has named Sergei Krasavchenko as the first deputy head of his
presidential staff, ITAR-TASS reported on 16 June, citing the
president's press service. Krasavchenko, who will work under
Sergei Filatov, the influential head of the presidential administration,
was formerly the chairman of the parliamentary Committee on Economic
Reform and Property Ownership. He was a member of the parliament's
Coalition for Reform bloc, which consists largely of members
of the Democratic Russia and Radical Democrats factions; and
used to work as the deputy editor of an economics journal. Wendy
Slater

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



CHAOS IN AZERBAIJAN. Rebels loyal to Surat Huseinov ignored an
appeal by President Abilfaz Elchibey to surrender and continued
their eastward advance and took the towns of Akhsu and Geokchai
on 16 June, ITAR-TASS reported. Elchibey sent National Independence
Party leader Etibar Mamedov to negotiate with Huseinov; the outcome
is not known. An armed group under the control of former deputy
Minister of Defense Alikram Gummetov took control of the town
of Lenkoran close to the Azerbaijan-Iranian border and called
on Elchibey to resign. Meanwhile Armenian forces in Nagorno-Karabakh
took advantage of the unrest to launch a new attack, occupying
eight villages; the Turan News Agency quoted a spokesman for
the Azerbaijan Ministry of Defense as stating that the strategic
town of Agdam east of Karabakh was in danger of falling. On 16
June President Elchibey appealed to the CSCE to call for a halt
to the new Armenian offensive, according to The Guardian of 17
June. Iranian Foreign Minister Ali-Akbar Velayati and parliament
speaker Ali Akbar Nateq-Nouri have both congratulated Heidar
Aliev on his election as Azerbaijan parliament chairman; Velayati
expressed the hope that this would "lead to the strengthening
and expansion of relations between the two countries, Reuters
reported. Liz Fuller

DIRE ECONOMIC STRAITS IN CAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA. The Vienna-based
Institute for International Economic Comparisons has issued 1992
economic indicators for the CIS; these were published in Die
Presse of 15 June. The figures show that Armenia, Tajikistan,
Azerbaijan and Kyrgyzstan, already among the poorest CIS republics,
had the largest GNP decline in the CIS, with Armenia's economy
shrinking by 42.6% and Tajikistan's by 31% (compared to 1991).
These two republics also had the worst industrial and agricultural
performance, respectively; Armenian industrial output sank by
52.5%, while Tajikistan's agricultural output declined by 45%.
Two Central Asian republics, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, had
among the most positive economic figures; Turkmenistan's GNP
decline of "only" 10% was the best result among CIS states. Kazakhstan
posted the best results in agriculture, with virtually no decline
in production compared to 1991. While the Caucasus and Central
Asia had markedly lower inflation rates than the other republics,
this was mostly due to the fact that fixed prices for many goods
have not been lifted. [Georgia, which is not in the CIS, was
not included in the statistics.] Keith Martin

RAKHMONOV DEFENDS TAJIKISTAN'S HUMAN RIGHTS RECORD. Tajikistan
president Imomali Rakhmonov has defended his country's human
rights record in a statement sent to the UN Human Rights Conference
in Vienna, ITAR-TASS reported on 15 June. While admitting that
there were human rights problems in Tajikistan, he blamed these
on the civil war, and stated that the government remains committed
to its obligations under the UN and CSCE. Tajikistan has been
sensitive to the issue since Amnesty International published
a report in May, the first report on a specific CIS republic,
which charged that there were large-scale human rights abuses
by the government and its Popular Front supporters. Opposition
parties have been banned and independent journals closed. Rakhmonov
did not repeat his Interior Ministry's charges against Amnesty
International; the ministry had called the organization a "spy
organization created to conduct subversive activities against
socialist countries." Keith Martin

COMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES



YELTSIN AND KRAVCHUK MEET TODAY. The Russian and Ukrainian presidents
Boris Yeltsin and Leonid Kravchuk, the prime ministers Viktor
Chernomyrdin and Leonid Kuchma, and the defense ministers Pavel
Grachev and Konstantin Morozov are to meet today outside of Moscow,
various news agencies reported on 17 June. One of the principal
topics of discussion will be the Black Sea Fleet, various agencies
reported on 16 June. Prior to the meeting Yeltsin announced that
a draft agreement on the future of the fleet and its headquarters
in Sevastopol had been reached which he hoped would be signed
during the meeting. He said it would resolve the fleet issue
as well the status of its headquarters and other Russian military
installations on Ukrainian territory. Last year an agreement
was signed in Dagomys which placed the fleet under joint command
while negotiations on its division in 1995 proceeded. Since then
a third of the ships have raised the Russian St.Andrew's flag
in protest over pay discrepancies between Russian and Ukrainian
sailors. A further point of contention had been Russian claims
to port facilities and installations on Ukrainian territory.
Despite Ukraine's earlier rejection of allowing any foreign military
installations in the country, recently there had been signs that
a number of deputies have become more flexible over this point.
Ustina Markus

CIS URGED TO EXPEDITE NATIONAL CURRENCIES, WILL PAY MORE FOR
GAS. At a news conference in Moscow on 16 June, Deputy Prime
Minister Aleksandr Shokhin urged the other former Soviet republics
to speed up the issue of their national currencies or to adhere
more strictly to Russian guidelines on monetary policies, Russian
TV on 16 June and Kommersant-Daily on 17 June reported. Shokhin
warned that IMF standby loans were tied to the introduction of
national currencies and that the first tranche of IMF credits
($1.5 billion) would be jeopardized if Russia could not meet
its commitments on inflation, interest rates, and issuance of
credits. He also stated that Russian credits to other former
Soviet republics would be sharply reduced. Shokhin also announced
on 16 June that Russia intends to double prices for natural gas
to both domestic and CIS customers to "not less" than 42,000
rubles a cubic meter, according to Reuters. The domestic price
for gas is reportedly 15,600 rubles a cubic meter. Keith Bush
and Erik Whitlock

RUSSIAN AND KAZAKHSTAN SECRET SERVICES COMPLAIN OVER "WESTERN
ESPIONAGE." The Chief of Military Counterintelligence of the
Russian Ministry of Security, Aleksei Molyakov accused the Western
secret services of strengthening "military espionage" in the
Russian defense sector. Molyakov told Komsomolskaya pravda of
16 June that in 1992 his service had arrested 11 Russian servicemen,
who had been "exposed as the Western agents." He gave no names.
Talking about contraband and corruption in the Army, Smolyakov
revealed that his service initiated criminal cases against 66
army officers and generals. The Chief of Kazakhstan Committee
for National Security, Bulat Baenkenov also expressed concerned
about intelligence gathering activity of the Western secret services
in his country. Baenkov said that his agency had exposed about
"ten" foreign intelligence agents including those of "the former
socialist countries," ITAR-TASS reported on 16 June." In contrast
to their Russian colleagues, however, Kazakhstan's "chekists"
chose to resolve the case through diplomatic channels. Victor
Yasmann

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



SERBIA AND CROATIA TABLE PLAN FOR BOSNIA. International media
on 16-17 June report from the Geneva Yugoslav talks that Serbian
President Slobodan Milosevic and Croatian President Franjo Tudjman
have proposed a redivision of Bosnia into three distinct ethnic
areas while preserving the formal existence of the Bosnian state.
The project would limit the Muslims to an area of central Bosnia
around Sarajevo, Zenica, and Tuzla, along with a separate zone
around Bihac, together with access to a free port in the Croatian
town of Ploce. The two presidents promised more details and perhaps
maps in the next few days, but Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic
was noncommittal and left the talks early, reportedly as a protest
against Serb attacks on Gorazde. Most media commentary has suggested
that the new plan would, in effect, legalize the existing situation
on the ground and pave the way for the incorporation of the Serb
and Croat units into those two neighboring republics. Croatian
moderates have repeatedly warned Tudjman that Croatia cannot
expect international backing for its own territorial integrity
if it joins in a partition of Bosnia. Patrick Moore

BOSNIAN UPDATE. Late on 16 June UN observers arrived in Gorazde
in what was seen as a test of the Serbs' willingness to honor
their promises made to that international body. The BBC's Serbian
Service also reports that Amnesty International wants more international
aid for refugees, while on the same day the UN high commissioner
for refugees said her organization does not have enough money
to pay for its existing tasks and cannot take on new ones. Reuters
meanwhile reports that 500 Bosnian Muslims will leave Croatia
for Pakistan at the invitation of the Islamabad authorities.
The AI report argues that Croat-Muslim tensions have become such
that other countries should ease the way for Muslims to leave
Croatia and seek asylum in those other countries. In Bosnia itself,
Muslim troops overran the central Bosnian town of Kakanj, which
led to a mass flight of local Croats. Finally, Reuters reported
that Pope John Paul II hopes to visit Sarajevo soon. Patrick
Moore

DINAR DEVALUED; GOVERNMENT FACES NO-CONFIDENCE VOTE. On 16 June
rump Yugoslavian Prime Minister Radoje Kontic announced a devaluation
of the national currency in an attempt to boost hard-currency
reserves and combat black-market exchange rates. The new official
rate is 700,000 dinars to the German mark and 1.1 million dinars
to the US dollar, which is in line with black-market rates. This
is the seventh devaluation since April 1992, but such moves have
not stamped out the thriving black-market dealers. Kontic also
introduced a draft federal budget bill which earmarks 75.5% for
the Yugoslav Federal Army. He also told the Federal Assembly
that his government plans to introduce some short-term controls
on basic food items but provided no details. The president of
Serbia's National Assembly, Zoran Lilic, announced that a vote
of no-confidence in the republican government will be taken on
17 June after Prime Minister Nikola Sainovic introduces his government's
plan on solving Serbia's social and economic problems. Lilic
also said there will be discussion of the shorthand notes from
the Federal Defense Council's controversial session on 27 May,
attended by former President Dobrica Cosic whose remarks at that
session apparently lead to his ousting on 1 June. Radio Serbia
and Politika carried the reports. Milan Andrejevich

TENSE SITUATION IN KRAJINA. Radios Serbia and Croatia report
on 16 June that the referendum on Serbian unity organized by
the self-declared Republic of Serbian Krajina for this coming
weekend has created an extremely tense situation in Croatia.
Several deputies of the "Serbian Krajina assembly" and other
local officials are apprehensive and would like to postpone unification.
Radio Croatia quotes leaders of the Serbian Peoples' Party, which
is not represented or affiliated with the Krajina Serb initiatives,
as saying that the Krajina Serbs have no right to secede from
Croatia despite the fact that Croatia has done little to reassure
them of their civil rights. Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic
indicated on 16 June that he will put off unification of the
self-proclaimed Serb republic in Bosnia and its Croatian counterpart
to avert further bloodshed in Croatia. But Karadzic added that
he recommends postponing the referendum on unification, but said
that Serbs in Bosnia and Croatia will unite "if the peace process
fails." Zagreb has denounced the referendum as illegal. Milan
Andrejevich

BOBAN PROTESTS FOREIGN RECOGNITION OF IZETBEGOVIC. Radio Croatia
reports on 16 June that Bosnian Croat leader Mate Boban has sent
a protest to France, Germany, Austria, Turkey, and Great Britain
because of official invitations for Alija Izetbegovic to visit
these countries as "President of Bosnia." The letter stated that
Izetbegovic represents only the Muslims in Bosnia and has no
right to represent Bosnia as a whole. Milan Andrejevich

MORE WEU POLICE IN BULGARIA. On 16 June officials of the Western
European Union reported that additional Spanish police officers
have arrived in Ruse. According to BTA, a current total of 33
officers from Germany and 46 from Spain will be charged with
the task of helping to make certain that sanctions imposed against
rump Yugoslavia are enforced. The police forces will cooperate
with UN officials based in Bulgaria since January. The police,
along with customs officials, will run boat patrols along the
Danube and detain any barges suspected of attempting to contravene
the UN sanctions. Stan Markotich

CZECH PARLIAMENT PASSES LAW ON CONSTITUTIONAL COURT. On 16 June
parliament passed a law that spells out the functions of the
Constitutional Court and stipulates how the judges are to be
named. The Constitution, adopted in December 1992, contains only
general provisions for the court, but the new law is more detailed
and opens the way for establishing the body when the law takes
effect on 1 July. The seat of the court will be Brno. Judges
will be named by the president, with the consent of the Senate,
the upper chamber of parliament (which, however, has not been
set up yet.) If the Senate fails to vote on the president's nominee
within 60 days, the president's choice is considered accepted.
The law also defines treason by the president as acts "aimed
against the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the state
as well as against its democratic order" and sets specific conditions
under which the president can be tried by the Constitutional
Court. The definition of treason in the original draft was vague,
prompting President Vaclav Havel to indicate that he would veto
such a law. Jiri Pehe

POSSIBLE CHANGES IN SLOVAK GOVERNMENT. TASR reports that during
a 16 June visit to eastern Slovakia, President Michal Kovac stated
that once the new coalition is created between the Movement for
a Democratic Slovakia and the Slovak National Party (SNS), the
SNS could be given as many as three ministerial posts-economy,
health care, and education. Kovac also announced the creation
of a new post of minister without portfolio to deal with commerce
and tourism. Also on 16 June Premier Vladimir Meciar discussed
possible ministerial shifts after his meeting with SNS Chairman
Ludovit Cernak. While Meciar and Kovac both plan to accept the
resignation of Privatization Minister Lubomir Dolgos, Minister
of Education Matus Kucera has refused to resign and to accept
the position of ambassador to Croatia. Meciar stated that the
position of Health Care Minister Viliam Sobona is also "questionable."
Sharon Fisher

HDF DISCUSSES FUTURE. At its 16 June session the presidium of
the Hungarian Democratic Forum discussed the party's situation
in the aftermath of the national steering committee's decision
to oust presidium member Istvan Csurka and some of his followers,
MTI reports. HDF spokesman Karoly Herenyi said that reactions
registered by the party's county steering committees show that
the great majority of party rank-and-file welcomed the decision.
Most members stressed the importance of party unity and expressed
the hope that the HDF will emerge strengthened from its current
crisis, Herenyi said. He also reported that since the decision
to oust Csurka, 50-60 HDF members have announced that they will
leave the party but there have been just as many new applications
for membership during the same period. Edith Oltay

WEIZSAECKER IN HUNGARY. German President Richard von Weizsaecker
paid a one-day visit to Budapest to attend the anniversary celebrations
of Collegium Budapest, an institute set up a year ago with Western
funds that offers research opportunities to scholars from Central
and Eastern Europe. Weizsaecker met with President Arpad Goncz,
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall, and representatives of the German
minority in Hungary. Weizsaecker told reporters that Germany
continues its strong support for Hungary's bid to become a member
of the European Community and expressed the hope that the coming
EC summit in Copenhagen will send a clear signal on this question.
Edith Oltay

ROMANIAN RAILWAY STRIKE ENDS. A two-day railway strike was officially
suspended on 16 June after a settlement was reached between unions
and the government over pay demands. Leaders of unions representing
engine drivers and maintenance staff said that the Romanian National
Railway Society has agreed to grant extra pay for employees performing
dangerous work and to introduce a higher pay scale based on seniority
beginning next month. Radio Bucharest reports that railway traffic
continued to be rather chaotic in the early hours of the morning
following the end of the strike. Dan Ionescu

ILIESCU IN GENEVA. In a speech delivered at the conference on
disarmament in Geneva on 16 June, Romania's President Ion Iliescu
called for "transparency" in conventional weapons trade and suggested
the adoption of an international code of conduct for weapons
sales. Such a code is necessary, he said, in view of regional
conflicts like those in former Yugoslavia and some former Soviet
republics. Iliescu later addressed an ILO conference on social
protection at which he outlined Romania's social policy. Both
speeches were broadcast live by Radio Bucharest. Dan Ionescu


PARLIAMENTARY COMMISSION TO OVERSEE INTELLIGENCE SERVICE IN ROMANIA.
On 16 June the two houses of parliament agreed in joint session
by a vote of 271-4-7 to establish a special legislative commission
to look into "specific activities" of the Romanian Intelligence
Service, an organization set up in March 1990 to replace the
communist secret police, Radio Bucharest reports. The Romanian
Intelligence Service has been repeatedly criticized for eluding
parliamentary control and for perpetuating the methods of the
former Securitate. Dan Ionescu

FIRST PRIVATE TV CHANNEL IN ROMANIA. The director of Romania's
first private television station, Adrian Sirbu, said that "Channel
31" will broadcast around the clock. He said that the station,
which will be funded solely by advertising, will broadcast two
hours of news and four hours of sports news. The remaining program
will be taken from the Cable News Network and dubbed into Romanian.
Dan Ionescu

KRAVCHUK CREATES EMERGENCY COMMITTEE ON ECONOMY. Ukrainian President
Leonid Kravchuk issued a decree on 16 June creating an extraordinary
committee of the Cabinet of Ministers for the "operational management"
of Ukraine's economy, Ukrinform reports. The committee is headed
by Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma and is charged with slowing down
inflation, stabilizing production, and increasing social protection
for low-income groups. The decree also gives "direct leadership"
of the government to Kravchuk and subordinates to the president
all central bodies of the executive branch in the nonproduction
sphere. Roman Solchanyk

ESTONIAN INTERIOR MINISTER SURVIVES CONFIDENCE VOTE. On 16 June
parliament endorsed Lagle Parek as Minister of Internal Affairs
by voting down a proposal by 29 deputies to oust her from office,
Baltic media report. The principal criticism of Parek was her
dismissal of Andrus Oovel, General Director of the Border Guard
Department, which is under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of
Internal Affairs. Some deputies felt that the dismissal was politically
motivated. Dzintra Bungs

BRAZAUSKAS MEETS MITTERRAND. On 15 June Lithuanian President
Algirdas Brazauskas met French President Francois Mitterrand
in Paris, BNS reported on 16 June. In their discussions of various
aspects of bilateral relations, the two leaders focused on economic
and cultural cooperation, as well as the Lithuanian desire to
become an associate member of the European Community. Brazauskas
is to conclude his visit to France on 18 June. Dzintra Bungs


FRANCE TO HELP LATVIAN DEFENSE FORCES. Upon his return to Riga
from Paris on 15 June, Latvian Defense Minister Talavs Jundzis
told the press that France will be sending a military adviser
both to Latvia and Lithuania. Jundzis added that a general military
cooperation accord between Latvia and France is being prepared
and that the French Defense Minister Francois Leotard is expected
in Latvia on 2-4 July, BNS reported on 16 June. Dzintra Bungs


UN TO OBSERVE TROOP WITHDRAWALS IN BALTIC. The Lithuanian Foreign
Ministry announced that UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali
has approved sending UN observers to Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
to monitor the pullout of Russian troops. In preparation UN representatives
will visit the three Baltic capitals and Moscow in the near future
and will submit a report to the UN General Assembly session that
will convene on 27-September, BNS reports. Dzintra Bungs

MOLDOVA REJECTS YELTSIN'S PROPOSAL ON MILITARY BASES. In a statement
issued on 16 June and carried by Basapress, Moldova's Foreign
Ministry rejected as "unacceptable under any circumstances" the
proposal made by Russian President Boris Yeltsin last week for
establishing Russian military bases in Moldova and other newly
independent states under agreements with their governments. Moldova
reiterated its demand for the prompt and unconditional withdrawal
of Russian forces and called for the early signing of an agreement
to that effect. This statement is at variance with recent concessions
apparently made under pressure by President Mircea Snegur and
other Moldovan officials, who seemingly accepted the deferral
of the withdrawal and its linkage to the resolution of the Dniester
conflict and of the future political status of eastern Moldova,
also accepting Russian arbitration of these issues. This latest
statement may reflect either a major reappraisal or divided counsels
in Chisinau. Vladimir Socor

MOLDOVAN DETAINEES ON HUNGER STRIKE IN TIRASPOL. Five Moldovan
Popular Front members facing the death penalty on charges of
terrorism by an unlawful court in the "Dniester republic" are
now in the second week of a hunger strike, Basapress reports
from Tiraspol. In statements made to the court on 16 June, the
five again rejected all charges and demanded to be turned over
to the lawful Moldovan judicial authorities. Council of Europe
General Secretary Catherine Lalumiere, in a statement made public
by the Moldovan government last week, also called for the observance
of the defendants' rights and for their remanding to the lawful
Moldovan authorities in order to ensure due process of law. Vladimir
Socor

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Dzintra Bungs and Charles Trumbull







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