Our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children's future. And we are all mortal. - John F. Kennedy
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 86, 06 May 1993







RUSSIA



US-RUSSIAN JOINT STATEMENT. Following talks with US Secretary
of State Warren Christopher on 5 May in Moscow, Russian President
Boris Yeltsin urged the Bosnian Serb parliament to accept the
proposed peace plan. Yeltsin warned: "Russia will render firm
support to all those honestly following the peace way on the
basis of the Vance-Owen plan, but will not indulge anyone in
trying to escape the plan fulfillment. In this light we will
actively support the U.N. peacemaking operation to implement
the Vance-Owen plan, a decision on which will be taken by the
U.N. Security Council." In a joint statement signed by Christopher
and his Russian counterpart, Andrei Kozyrev, Washington and Moscow
said that if the plan was rejected, they would "immediately resume
their discussion on new and tougher measures," ITAR-TASS reported.
-Suzanne Crow

KOZYREV ON REJECTION OF PLAN. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev was sharply critical of the Bosnian Serb parliament's
rejection of the peace plan. On 6 May, Kozyrev said the rejection
could result in "monstrous bloodshed." He also expressed the
hope that the Serbian people of Bosnia would "correct" the parliament's
decision, Reuters reported. Russia's assertion of its willingness
to participate in military operations to implement the Vance-Owen
plan represents a reversal of Russia's previous stance. Suzanne
Crow

OFFICIAL REFERENDUM RESULTS. On 5 May the Central Electoral Commission
released official results of the April referendum, ITAR-TASS
reported. 69.2 million of Russia's 107.3 million eligible voters
participated. Of them, 58.7% had confidence in President Yeltsin;
53% approved of his economic reforms; 31.7% wanted early presidential
elections and 43.1% favored early parliamentary elections. Thus,
under the conditions set by the Congress and the Constitutional
Court, the latter two questions were not passed since they had
attracted under half the potential votes. Government spokesman
Sergei Yushenkov told reporters that Yeltsin had been awaiting
the official results to sign a series of decrees which included
support for the media, changes to the government, and implementing
"elements" of Yeltsin's 20 March speech, when he proposed to
introduce special rule. -Wendy Slater

DEPUTIES PLAN MASS EXODUS FROM CONGRESS. The parliament's pro-Yeltsin
bloc, the Reform Coalition, called on deputies to bring about
the dissolution of the Congress of People's Deputies and the
parliament, Russian and Western agencies reported on 5 May. About
350 deputies would have to resign from the Congress to deprive
it of a quorum; currently about 200-were prepared to resign their
mandates. The deputies planned a meeting in mid-May discuss their
plans. The coalition confirmed its support for Yeltsin's new
draft constitution and for his plans to debate it in the Council
of the Federation, which comprises local representatives, rather
than at the Congress which is entitled to adopt a new constitution
according to current law. -Wendy Slater

GAIDAR TO RETURN TO GOVERNMENT? TWO TOP GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
HAVE OPENLY DISCUSSED THE POSSIBILITY THAT, FOLLOWING YELTSIN'S
VICTORY AT THE REFERENDUM, THE REFORMIST EX-PRIME MINISTER EGOR
GAIDAR, WHO WAS FORCED OUT OF OFFICE IN DECEMBER, MAY RETURN
TO GOVERNMENT. First Deputy Prime Minister Vladimir Shumeiko
told journalists on 5 May that Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin
would meet soon with Gaidar to discuss the possibility of the
latter's return to the cabinet, ITAR-TASS reported. Deputy Prime
Minister Aleksandr Shokhin also considered Gaidar's return to
office. Chernomyrdin also said that the government administration
would be purged of former employees of Soviet structures whose
presence was impeding reform. -Wendy Slater

AFTERMATH OF 1 MAY DEMONSTRATIONS. The OMON officer seriously
injured during the 1 May demonstrations died in the hospital
on 5 May, Russian TV said. On the same day, the Moscow city authorities
banned opposition groups from marching on 9 May (Victory Day).
The National Salvation Front's co-chairman Mikhail Astafev said
his organization would defy the ban. The Officers' Union and
National Officers' Assembly were given permission to rally, although
not in Red Square as they had requested, according to RIA. The
prosecutor's office, meanwhile, requested that three of the defendants
in the trial of the failed August 1991 coup, who had attended
the May Day march, be "subjected to restrictions," according
to ITAR-TASS. -Wendy Slater

RUSSIA CALLS FOR NUCLEAR TEST BAN. Russia has renewed its call
for a comprehensive nuclear test ban in a statement made at a
meeting of the UN Disarmament Commission on 5-May. An RFE/RL
correspondent noted that the Russian delegate also called for
the ratification and implementation of the START-1 treaty, which
is still under consideration in the Ukrainian parliament. Russia
is currently observing a moratorium on nuclear testing which
is due to expire in July The Russian statement comes during a
period when Western media are reporting debates in US defense
circles over whether to agree to a comprehensive test ban. -John
Lepingwell

NUNN, LUGAR MEET WITH RUSSIAN PARLIAMENTARIANS. US Senators Sam
Nunn and Richard Lugar met with Russian parliamentarians on 5
May to discuss the START-2 ratification process, according to
a Reuters report. Senator Nunn observed that the START2 ratification
process has been slowed down by the ongoing political struggles
in Russia. According to Senator Lugar, there is no timetable
for ratification of the treaty. The Russian parliamentarians
reportedly raised the question of compensation for the cost of
weapons dismantling. While Russia is to receive assistance under
the Nunn-Lugar bill, estimates of the total cost of implementing
the treaty are much higher than the aid allocated by the US.
-John Lepingwell

GRACHEV ADDRESSES MILITARY GATHERING. On 6 May, Russian Defense
Minister Pavel Grachev addressed a meeting of "servicemen-internationalists"-troops
who have served in Afghanistan and other areas outside the former
Soviet Union. The meeting was also attended by high-ranking officers
and representatives from the parliament and president's office.
According to an account published in Krasnaya zvezda on 6 May,
Grachev outlined the current military reform program and drew
special attention to the increasing personnel shortfall caused
by the rise in draft-dodging. Characterizing the personnel situation
as "almost catastrophic", he attributed part of the responsibility
for it to the failure of the military-patriotic education system.
Grachev also argued that the ongoing political struggle must
not involve the army and stated that the military "must remain
a force acting as the guarantor of the preservation of Russian
statehood and stability in society." The meeting subsequently
adopted a resolution calling for troops "not to fall for the
provocations of bellicose politicos and extremists." -John Lepingwell


TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



CONSTITUTION ADOPTED IN KYRGYZSTAN. Western and Russian news
agencies reported on 5-May that Kyrgyzstan's Supreme Soviet had
adopted the country's first post-independence constitution. Parliamentary
debate of the draft had continued for several months, with deputies
arguing with each other and with President Askar Akaev over nearly
every article. The adoption of the constitution, reported to
have been unanimous, was apparently the result of a compromise
between the legislature and Akaev, who agreed that the new constitution
will not go into effect until the mandate of the current Supreme
Soviet expires in 1995. Akaev also agreed to give up his title
of head of government and to allow the prime minister to take
full responsibility for running the government. The Supreme Soviet,
in turn, bowed to Akaev's wishes and dropped a phrase from the
constitution requiring adherence to the moral values of Islam.
-Bess Brown

NAZARBAEV REJECTS CONFEDERATION OF CENTRAL ASIAN STATES. Speaking
to a group of information media officials in Alta-Ata, Kazakhstan's
President Nursultan Nazarbaev said that there will be no confederation
or single state uniting the Central Asian region on any other
principles, because "every person wants to live not in a communal
apartment but in his own room." The new states of Central Asian
cherish their sovereignty, according to Nazarbaev, though the
leaders of all these states are promoting regional economic cooperation.
Nazarbaev also appealed for the creation of a strong political
party in Kazakhstan committed to democratic reform. -Bess Brown


ANOTHER UZBEK OPPOSITION LEADER ASSAULTED. Officials of Uzbekistan's
opposition Erk Democratic Party and Birlik Popular Front Movement
told RL's Uzbek Service on 5 May that Birlik Co-Chairman Shokhrat
Ismatullaev was beaten in Tashkent and hospitalized with a fractured
skull. A nurse at the hospital told the Service that Ismatullaev
had been beaten but had suffered only cuts and bruises. The attack
appeared to be a replay of an assault on Birlik's other Co-Chairman,
Abdurakhim Pulatov, last June. Ismatullaev was one of several
Birlik members who were forced by Uzbek authorities to sign promises
that they would not attend a congress of Kazakhstan's Social
Democratic Party at the beginning of May. The congress formally
protested to Uzbekistan's President Islam Karimov. Uzbekistan
has also come under fire for human rights violations from the
US-based Helsinki Watch, which has just released two reports
on abuses in Uzbekistan. -Bess Brown

KYRGYZSTAN'S PRESS IN ROW OVER UZBEK MILITARY EXERCISES. Several
Kyrgyz newspapers are raising a scandal over a military exercise
conducted by Uzbekistan on the territory of Kyrgyzstan in March,
ITAR-TASS reported on 5 May. Kyrgyzstan's presidential press
office confirmed that the Uzbek troops had conducted their exercises
in Osh Oblast without having obtained the permission of Kyrgyzstan's
State Defense Committee or any other government department. The
commander of the exercises was reported to have told an inquisitive
law enforcement officer that Uzbek use of Kyrgyz territory had
been agreed upon by the akims (governors) of Osh and Fergana
Oblasts. A member of Kyrgyz President Akaev's staff complained
to ITAR-TASS that the presence of foreign troops should be a
matter of agreement at the highest levels. In addition, the proximity
of the area where the Uzbeks held their exercises to Tajikistan
could have led to "negative consequences." -Bess Brown

NAGORNO-KARABAKH ROUNDUP. In an extensive interview published
in Nezavisimaya gazeta on 5-May, Azerbaijani President Abulfaz
Elchibey expressed confidence that the population of Armenia
was ready to accept a peace settlement in Nagorno-Karabakh that
would guarantee the rights of the enclave's Armenian population
but added that if extremist forces in Armenia did not agree to
such a settlement Azerbaijan would continue fighting rather than
become the first country to abandon the principle of the inviolability
of existing frontiers since to do so "would plunge the whole
world into chaos." Elchibey proposed a complete demilitarization
of Karabakh, joint control over the Lachin corridor linking Armenia
and Karabakh, and the deployment of peacekeeping forces. Meanwhile,
in a letter to the UN Security Council, Armenia has accused Azerbaijan
of violating the ceasefire that came into effect in mid-April
by initiating largescale military operations against the civilian
population of villages close to the Armenian-Azerbaijani frontier,
according to an RFE/RL correspondent. -Liz Fuller

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



BOSNIAN SERB ASSEMBLY FAILS TO RATIFY PEACE PLAN. In a stormy
17-hour session, deputies of the Assembly of the self-proclaimed
Serb Republic of Bosnia, meeting in the resort village of Pale
near Sarajevo, rejected the Vance-Owen peace plan for a third
time. The Assembly decided instead to vote on a 26 April decision
calling for a Bosnian Serb referendum either to reject or approve
the peace plan. Scheduled for 15-16 May, it is not clear how
the referendum will be held under conditions of war. Bosnian
Serb President Radovan Karadzic told reporters that the assembly's
decision is not a rejection of the Vance-Owen plan; the referendum,
he said, "will be the people's response to what the plan has
to offer." Momcilo Krajisnik, chairman of the Assembly, commented
that the Bosnian Serb leadership will "explain to the international
community why our deputies made this decision. We will intensify
diplomatic activities and contacts in an attempt to evade the
threats facing us." During the debates, Serbian President Slobodan
Milosevic, federal Yugoslav President Dobrica Cosic, Montenegrin
President Momir Bulatovic and Greek Prime Minister Constantine
Mitsotakis all made personal appeals to the deputies to ratify
the peace plan. Moments before the vote, Milosevic told the Bosnian
Serbs, "you have to understand that I can't help you anymore,"
and Cosic remarked "we cannot continue fighting this war." Serbian
and international media carried the reports on 6 May. -Milan
Andrejevich

FIRST REACTIONS FROM PALE, BELGRADE. Dobrica Cosic remarked that
the assembly had taken the "worst possible decision" and added
that Serbs are embarking on a road of "great uncertainty." Mitsotakis
told reporters, "our efforts proved fruitless, the Vance-Owen
plan was rejected, despite the last appeal by the Belgrade and
EC leaders. He added, however, that Serbia-Montenegro " waged
a decisive battle to avert this development. I believe this is
a very important fact, which puts Serbia and Montenegro in the
right direction. Belgrade's independent radio B92 and Studio
B TV say the initial reactions among Belgrade residents is of
bitter disappointment and resentment. Over the past week, state-owned
Belgrade TV has been repeatedly showing footage of the Allied
bombing of Belgrade in April 1944 and many residents fear a further
tightening of sanctions. A Politika commentator told RFE/RL that
the Bosnian Serbs "continue to hold Serbia hostage." -Milan Andrejevich


OTHER DEVELOPMENTS IN THE YUGOSLAV CRISIS. The 6 May Los Angeles
Times quotes Mitsotakis as telling the Pale parliament that "the
whole Balkans is in your hands," and, indeed, other developments
on 5 May showed that problems abound on many fronts. The Washington
Post on 6 May reports that Bosnian Serbs refused to admit UN
observers to the embattled east Bosnian enclave of Zepa, which
is considered to be a possible candidate to become a protected
"safe haven" if the UN establishes such zones. Local Muslim ham
radio operators and the Bosnian government said that the Serbs
had shelled the town heavily, but the Serbs charged that the
Muslims had provoked them in hopes of attracting international
intervention. Meanwhile in Zvornik, UN commander Gen. Philippe
Morillon said that he will travel to another Muslim enclave,
Srebrenica, to complete its demilitarization by 10 May, Politika
reports on 6 May. Elsewhere, international media state that US
Secretary of State Warren Christopher will hold talks in Brussels
with NATO and EC officials in the latest leg of his tour of key
capitals to discuss possible military intervention in Bosnia.
Finally, Serbian media report a clash on 5 May between ethnic
Albanians and Serb police in the Djakovica area of Kosovo. The
Serbs said that armed Albanians provoked the fight by running
a police roadblock, but Reuters quotes Albanian leaders as charging
that the Serbs set up the incident as an excuse to launch an
assault with tanks, artillery, and helicopters on the village
of Bregovac. The Albanians have often accused the Serbs of arranging
such incidents and attacks as part of a campaign to intimidate
Kosovo's more than 90% Albanian majority. -Patrick Moore

GREEK-MACEDONIAN NEGOTIATIONS. Bilateral discussions between
Greece and the Republic of Macedonia under the auspices of the
UN continue. According to Greek journalists and MILS, Greece
is demanding that Macedonia change its name, its flag, and the
wording of its constitution concerning Macedonians residing outside
of the republic. Greece also demands a halt to "anti-Greek propaganda".
For its part, Macedonia says that Greece should abide by international
agreements it has signed and wants to conclude an understanding
to regulate traffic on the Macedonian-Greek border. Skopje also
wants Athens to respect the rights of Macedonians living in Greece.
Officials in the Macedonian capital argue that the constitution
cannot be changed, while Greeks deny the existence of a Macedonian
minority within its borders. As to the names, evidently the front-running
choices are "New Macedonia" and "Upper Macedonia." Officials
in both capitals are unwilling to predict whether the negotiations
will be successful. The current political turmoil in Greece may
auger ill for the outcome of these talks. -Duncan Perry

TWO POLISH MINISTERS RESIGN. The two remaining ministers from
the Peasant Alliance (PL), the small party that withdrew from
the ruling coalition in protest at the government's agricultural
policy, resigned on 5-May. The two will likely not be much missed:
Zygmunt Hortmanowicz, the environment minister, faced near-universal
criticism, while Jerzy Kaminski held a low-profile liaison post
created to give the PL its share of cabinet seats. Prime Minister
Hanna Suchocka has not yet acted on the resignations, which are
bound up in ongoing negotiations over the party's possible return
to the coalition. The PL continued to equivocate on 5 May, despite
a conciliatory gesture from the government on grain prices. The
PL convenes again on 6 May. Meeting late into the night on 5
May, the remaining coalition parties pledged closer cooperation
in achieving government's five priority programs. The PL's parliamentary
leader attended the meeting as an observer, but PAP reports that
former agriculture minister and PL chairman Gabriel Janowski,
who prompted the party's departure from the coalition, was refused
admittance. -Louisa Vinton

SOLIDARITY THREATENS GENERAL STRIKE. Solidarity claimed that
more than 300,000 teachers and health care workers answered the
union's strike call on 5 May. The government set participation
at a lower level. The union is demanding that the government
submit a revised 1993 budget to parliament with increased spending
on education and health care. A general strike by the budzetowka
(employees paid from the state budget) is threatened for 10-May.
In a letter to the prime minister on 5 May, Solidarity Chairman
Marian Krzaklewski charged the government with deliberately antagonizing
the union and "playing with fire." He threatened to call a general
strike or ask the Sejm to hold a no-confidence vote in the government.
Labor Minister Jacek Kuron responded on TV's "Panorama" that
the strike is a sign of weakness rather than strength and charged
that Solidarity has failed to find a way both to pursue reform
and defend workers. Krzaklewski is to meet with President Lech
Walesa on 6 May. -Louisa Vinton

LIECHTENSTEIN SEEKS COMPENSATION FROM CZECHS. Liechtenstein's
ruler, Prince Hans-Adam II, told journalists on 5 May that his
country is still seeking compensation for land seized by the
former Czechoslovakia 75 years ago, CTK reports. He stressed
that if the matter were handled in strict accordance with international
law, the claim would now be worth some $1-billion. He conceded,
however, that this sum is not realistic and that Liechtenstein
is willing to discuss compensation of 300 million Swiss francs
(about $210-million). The 1,600 sq km of land involved in the
dispute is ten times larger than the Principality of Liechtenstein
itself. Prince Hans-Adam said that if no agreement can be reached
between the two states, the dispute should be put to the International
Court of Justice in the Hague for a ruling. -Jan Obrman

CZECHS NOTE RISE IN ILLEGAL BORDER CROSSINGS. According to Western
agency reports from 5-May, in April alone, Czech border police
detained close to 5,500 people who tried to cross the Czech Republic's
border illegally. An Interior Ministry spokesman said that the
vast majority of them were heading into Germany. According to
the reports, Yugoslavs made up the largest group, followed by
Romanians and Bulgarians. In the first four months of 1993, Czech
police detained almost 17,500 illegal migrants. It is unknown
how many people actually succeeded in reaching German territory,
but it is estimated that the number by far exceeds that of people
who were prevented from crossing the border. -Jan Obrman

MORE ON ROMANIAN STRIKES. On 5 May hundreds of thousands of workers
responded to calls for strike by some of Romania's main trade
union confederations. Participation in the strikes, however,
differed widely from branch to branch and county to county. Drivers
were among the most active, with some 100,000 walking out nationwide.
More than 10,000 dock workers and sailors were said to be on
strike in Black Sea and Danube ports, and work stopped at three
of Romania's largest oil refineries in the Ploiesti region. In
Bucharest, subway workers continued a strike started on 3 May,
while health care personnel struck in some hospitals. Talks between
unions and the government on averting a general strike that could
cripple the economy continued with some success. Union representatives
stated yesterday night that they had won some concessions from
the government, but they postponed for 12 hours a final decision
on calling off the general strike scheduled to start on 7 May.
Miron Mitrea, the leader of the Fratia confederation, said that
the current strikes will go on until the agreement with the government
is perfected. Romania's Premier Nicolae Vacaroiu told reporters
after the talks that the agreement will hold only as long as
the unions do not resort to new work stoppages. -Dan Ionescu


SHUSHKEVICH BEGINS ROMANIAN VISIT. On 6-May President Stanislau
Shushkevich of Belarus begins a two-day official visit to Romania.
Radio Bucharest reported that his agenda includes talks with
Romania's President Ion Iliescu and meetings with Prime Minister
Nicolae Vacaroiu and other high-ranking Romanian officials. Romania
and Belarus are expected to sign a mutual cooperation treaty
initialed on 1 March in Minsk during a visit paid there by Romanian
Foreign Minister Teodor Melescanu. In July 1992 Iliescu made
a one-day stopover in Minsk. -Dan Ionescu

QUEEN ELIZABETH IN HUNGARY. MTI quoted Elizabeth II as telling
the Hungarian parliament in a televised speech that, after a
peaceful political change, Hungary has now relit the flame that
was brutally suppressed in 1956. The country now has to struggle
with the years of destruction. She called the European Community
the central force securing the continent's security and prosperity
and expressed the hope that Hungary will be able to join, "because
you have the right to occupy your place in the mainstream of
European history and culture." The Queen's speech was warmly
received by the deputies. -Karoly Okolicsanyi

COUNCIL OF EUROPE CHAIRMAN IN SOFIA. BTA reports on the visit
by Miguel Martínez, Chairman of the Parliamentary Assembly of
the Council of Europe, to Sofia. In an address to parliament
on 5 May, marking one year since the country's election into
the Council of Europe, Martínez said Bulgaria has emerged as
a "recognized, active and responsible" member of the council.
He also praised Sofia's handling of sharp domestic political
differences, as well as problems linked to ethnic and religious
minorities. -Kjell Engelbrekt

KRAVCHUK PROPOSES SECURITY COOPERATION WITH SLOVAKIA. In an interview
published by the Slovak daily Pravda on 5 May, Ukrainian President
Leonid Kravchuk said that he favors an informal security alliance
between Ukraine, Slovakia, and "other states of the region."
Kravchuk made it clear that no new organizational structure,
nor a close security system was needed. He made it clear, however,
that "Slovakia and Ukraine as well as other Eastern and Central
European countries should coordinate their efforts in the promotion
of their common interests." He pointed out that the Conference
on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) represents the best
forum for their common activities. The change of this forum into
an effective security system is within their common interest,
he said. Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar repeatedly stressed
his interest in close cooperation with Ukraine. -Jan Obrman

UKRAINE ON CIS. In the same interview, Kravchuk said that at
the moment the development of the CIS should be preserved. Should
the CIS fail to justify its existence, he said, a new form of
relations among the former Soviet republics will have to be found.
Kravchuk once again reiterated Ukraine's well-known position,
namely, that Kiev favors economic integration but is opposed
to political and military ties. The interview was summarized
by ITAR-TASS on 5-May. -Roman Solchanyk

MOLDOVAN POPULAR FRONT LEADERS QUIT. On 5 May the Executive Committee
of the Popular Front accepted the request of Mircea Druc, the
former Prime Minister of Moldova, to be relieved of his position
as chairman in connection with his move to Romania and assumption
of Romanian citizenship, Basapress reports. At the same meeting
the nine-man Executive Committee announced that four of the committee's
former members and founding leaders of the front, including Druc's
predecessor as chairman, Ion Hadirca, plus the chairman of the
front's parliamentary group and the editor in chief of the Writers'
Union weekly Literatura si arta (until recently the Popular Front's
unofficial organ and the most influential publication in Moldova),
had forfeited their membership in the front. Those individuals
recently joined the Congress of Moldovan Intellectuals, which
also promotes unification with Romania but, unlike the front,
accepts the need for gradualism. Front Vice-Chairman Iurie Rosca,
head of the faction that calls for immediate unification with
Romania and rejects Moldovan statehood, became acting chairman.
The departure of these leaders marks another milestone in the
front's isolation and disintegration. -Vladimir Socor

US ON NEW ESTONIAN DEFENSE CHIEF. On 5 May State Department spokesman
Joe Snyder confirmed to reporters that the request by retired
US Col. Alexander Einselm for permission to head the Estonian
defense forces had been rejected, a RFE/RL correspondent in Washington
reports. Permission is required from both the Defense Department
(which had given its approval) and the State Department. The
US government has not decided whether it will take any action
against Einselm, such as depriving him of his US citizenship
or his military pension. Snyder said that the State Department
refusal was made since the US is "very concerned about any steps
that could be misinterpreted about US intentions in the region."
-Saulius Girnius

EUROPARLIAMENT DELEGATION IN LATVIA, LITHUANIA. Kirsten Jensen,
head of a European Parliament delegation visiting Latvia, told
the press on 5-May that the group has established that there
are no grounds for the recent accusations by Russian President
Boris Yeltsin and other Russian leaders of massive and grave
violations of human rights in Latvia. This was the main topic
for the parliamentarians' two-day visit, BNS reports. The delegation
also visited Lithuania, where on 4 May parliament unanimously
passed a resolution on Lithuania's membership in the Council
of Europe and the following day ratified the council's 1949 statute,
BNS reports. -Dzintra Bungs

LOCAL STATIONS IN ESTONIA AND LITHUANIA REPLACE RUSSIAN TV. On
5 May Estonian Culture and Education Minister Paul-Eerik Rummo
handed out licenses for broadcasting on the channels previously
used by Russian and St. Petersburg TV, BNS reports. Eesti Video
and Taska Ltd. will share the St. Petersburg slot while RTV received
the Russian slot. Tele-3, headed by Lithuanian-American Liucija
Baskauskaite, who won the Russian TV slot, began its own broadcasts
on 1 May. Programs were chosen on the results of questionnaires
and will include movies and features from Western satellite channels.
Some of the more popular Russian TV programs will also be retained.
-Saulius Girnius

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Ustina Markus and Charles Trumbull











THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal
mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions,
or additional copies, please contact: in North America: Mr. Brian
Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907; Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783;
Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse 67, 8000
Munich 22, Germany;.Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2624; Fax:
(+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG 1993, RFE/RL, Inc.
All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


©1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole