We are all apt to believe what the world believes about us. - George Eliot
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 79, 27 April 1993







RUSSIA



NO LARGE-SCALE VOTING IRREGULARITIES. The chairman of the central
electoral commission Vasilii Kazakov and the Russian Prosecutor
General's office both issued statements on 26 April denying that
there had been any large-scale violations of voting regulations
during the referendum, according to ITAR-TASS. Only isolated
violations were reported, which would not affect the final result.
The statements were supported by foreign monitors of the voting,
according to Western agencies. The evidence counters unsubstantiated
claims by Russian parliamentary chairman Ruslan Khasbulatov who
had told reporters as he voted that fraud had influenced results
in the Russian Far East. -Wendy Slater

KHASBULATOV ON REFERENDUM RESULTS. Parliamentary speaker Ruslan
Khasbulatov, in his first comments after the referendum, accused
the electronic and state-subsidized print media of propaganda
and compared the chief of the Federal Information Center, Mikhail
Poltoranin, with Hitler's chief propagandist Josef Goebbels.
Khasbulatov stated that if he had three more days to prepare
for the referendum, he wouldn't have lost it, ITAR-TASS reported
on 26 April. Presidential spokesman Vyacheslav Kostikov dismissed
Khasbulatov's statement and said it demonstrated the speaker's
lack of respect for the people. He warned the leadership of the
parliament to refrain from attacks on freedom of speech. St Petersburg
mayor Anatolii Sobchak also denounced the "slighting tone" of
Khasbulatov's statement and said that the speaker was irritated
because people have rejected neo-bolshevik claims on power. He
urged Khasbulatov and the parliament to resign. -Alexander Rahr


POLTORANIN RESPONDS TO CRITICISM OF THE MEDIA. The head of the
Federal Information Center Mikhail Poltoranin issued a statement
on 26 April, rebuffing Khasbulatov's attack on the Russia media
in connection with their pre-referendum reporting. ITAR-TASS
quoted Poltoranin as stating that after losing the referendum,
anti-reformist people's deputies would probably take "actions
of revenge" against the state-financed electronic media. The
statement predicted that at its next session the parliament would
adopt new resolutions aimed at putting the electronic media under
parliamentary control. Poltoranin said any actions aimed at limiting
press freedom would not be permitted by the president. -Vera
Tolz

PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM ST. PETERSBURG. The RFE/RL correspondent
in Russia's second city reported on official voting figures on
26 April, which were based on preliminary results from 16 districts.
They show overwhelming support for Boris Yeltsin: over 70% expressed
confidence in the president, and 67% in his economic reforms;
only 22% voted for early presidential elections and some 50%
for early legislative elections. The additional questions put
to St. Petersburg voters on whether a convention should be called
to write a new Russian Constitution and whether the city's status
should be upgraded to give it more autonomy also reportedly gained
between 70% and 80% support. -Wendy Slater

KOZYREV REGRETS ABSTAINING ON UN VOTE. Russian Foreign Minister
Andrei Kozyrev said on 26-April that Russia will support tightened
sanctions against the rump Yugoslavia. Kozyrev's statement came
amid reports that Bosnian Serbs were again rejecting an international
peace plan for Bosnia. Kozyrev commented: "It seems they have
made their choice in support of war." Kozyrev also said he felt
"sick at heart" over the fact that Russia had abstained in the
vote for additional sanctions held by the UN Security Council
on 17-April. He attri-buted Russia's stance on the vote to the
influence of Russia's conservatives. He said that "this decision
was probably correct in principle, but in the future we must
vote not with the national-patriots, but with those who support
the civilized solution to issues," ITAR-TASS reported. -Suzanne
Crow

YELTSIN PROPOSES THAT ARMY AID IN CRIME FIGHTING. Russian Radio
Mayak reported on 26-April that the Presidium of the Russian
parliament had that day examined a draft resolution, submitted
by Boris Yeltsin, on employing military units in the fight against
crime. A note that accompanied the President's proposal reportedly
said that the measure had been prompted by insufficient staffing
levels in Interior Ministry forces and by the widespread nature
of crime in Moscow. In their public statements to date, military
leaders have generally opposed the use of military units in crime
fighting activities. -Stephen Foye

IMF PROJECTION FOR FORMER SOVIET UNION. In its semi-annual staff
review of the global economic outlook that was released on 27
April, the International Monetary Fund projects a continuing
recession in the former Soviet republics for 1993, Reuters reported.
Output is expected to decline by nearly 12%, after an 18.5% drop
in 1992. Inflation should fall from 1,200% in 1992 to about 600%
in 1993. For 1994, the IMF estimates that the drop in output
could slow to 3.5% and price increases to 66.5%. The Fund puts
Russia's budget deficit in 1992 at 22.5% of GDP.-Keith Bush

UAE COMPANY GETS OIL CONCESSION. The Gulf Interstate Oil Company,
based in the United Arab Emirates, received a concession for
extracting oil in the Stavropol region of southern Russia, ITAR-TASS
reported on 26 April. The company's subsidiary, Gulf Russia,
is expected to begin operations in May leading to the exploitation
of the area's estimated reserve of over 300-million-barrels.
-Erik Whitlock

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



CSCE DISCUSSES KARABAKH SITUATION. Senior CSCE diplomats meeting
in Vienna on 26 April held an emergency meeting to discuss the
Karabakh conflict at the request of Azerbaijan, and set up a
working group including Armenia, Azerbaijan, Turkey, Russia and
the US that will try to agree on conditions for a ceasefire and
the resumption of negotiations, according to an RFE/RL correspondent.
US delegate John Kornbluem condemned the seizure of Azerbaijan's
Kelbadzhar raion by Armenian forces and rejected Armenian government
denials of any involvement in the fighting. Turkish Television
reported on 26 April that agreement had been reached to extend
the ceasefire in Karabakh until 28 April, but AzerTadzh quoted
an Azerbaijani Ministry of Defense spokesman as claiming that
Armenian forces shelled Azerbaijani villages in Agdam and Kelbadzhar.
The Azerbaijani Ambassador to the UN, Hassan Hassanov, has appealed
to the UN Security Council to impose "all appropriate sanctions"
on Armenia and compel Armenia to withdraw from all territory
it has occupied, an RFE/RL correspondent reported. -Liz Fuller


TAJIK ANTI-GOVERNMENT FORCES IN AFGHANISTAN. Khovar-TASS reported
on 26-April that in the previous two days ten members of Tajik
armed groups opposed to the present government in Dushanbe had
been killed while attempting to cross into Tajikistan from Afghanistan.
The Tajik government has repeatedly protested to Kabul about
the existence of training camps for Tajik opposition fighters
in Afghanistan. Russian border guards stationed on the Tajik-Afghan
border claim that the border is now effectively sealed, but reports
of clashes between border troops and illegal border-crossers
remain a frequent occurrence. The 26-April Khovar-TASS report
reported that one of the Tajik opposition forces operating from
Afghanistan is headed by former vice-premier Davlat Usmon, a
leader of the Islamic Renaissance Party. -Bess Brown

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



BOSNIAN UPDATE. The BBC's Serbian Service on 27-April reported
on tensions between UNPROFOR and the Serb forces around Srebrenica
the previous day. Local Serb commanders demanded that the 145
Canadian troops in the town leave and made clear that they continue
to regard the UN-supervised disarming of the Muslim troops as
a sham, arguing that the Muslims took their best weapons and
left for surrounding villages. Serb commanders near Sarajevo,
moreover, stopped UN personnel at checkpoints in what the UN
said was harassment in response to the Security Council vote
for tougher sanctions on Serbia-Montenegro. Finally, major American
dailies report on April 27 on what is expected to be a new and
tougher US Balkan policy, which may be announced in the coming
days. -Patrick Moore

BELGRADE REACTIONS TO BOSNIAN SERBS. Vuk Draskovic, head of the
Serbian Renewal Movement (SPO), assessed the Bosnian Serb rejection
of the Vance-Owen peace plan as "irresponsible from the human
point of view and is more than catastrophic for Serbia, Montenegro,
and the entire Serbian people." According to Draskovic, Bosnian
Serb leader Radovan Karadzic and his supporters "are not afraid
of the Vance-Owen plan but of peace, because they know that in
peacetime judgments will be made about the war and that there
will be trials for warlords on all sides." Draskovic also slammed
Karadzic for having deceived Serbs and the international community
by claiming that Bosnia's Serbs, Muslims, and Croats cannot live
together. Draskovic stated "these unfortunate people are already
living together in refugee camps in Serbia and throughout the
world, which shows that they can live together wherever there
are no Milosevics, Tudjmans, and Izetbegovics." Draskovic also
stated that the new UN sanctions suit Serbian President Slobodan
Milosevic because now, "Serbia will adopt a war economy and the
government will rule in conditions of war." The ruling parties
in Serbia and Montenegro, the Socialists and Socialist Democratic
Party, and all major opposition parties in Serbia-Montenegro
all expressed bitter disappointment at the outcome of Bosnian
Serb vote. Radio Serbia carried the report on 26 April. -Milan
Andrejevich

SERBS "WILL FIGHT TO THE BITTER END." Radio Brod on 27 April
reported the parliament of the self-proclaimed Serb Republic
in Bosnia, after having rejected the Vance-Owen peace plan, also
adopted a proclamation calling on the Serbs "to defend its fatherland
unshakably, close its ranks, and bring the struggle to an end."
Vojislav Seselj, leader of the Serbian Radical Party, said the
peace plan is being forced on the Serbs and that the Bosnian
Serbs made the right decision. He reiterated his warning that
should NATO bomb Serb positions, Serb forces attack will UNPROFOR
units. He told Vecernje novosti on 26 April that a military solution
of the crisis would take between 10 to 50 years and require a
million soldiers. In an interview published in the latest issue
of Der Spiegel. Federal Yugoslav Chief of Staff, Gen. Zivota
Panic boasted that Serbia is ready to fight "to the bitter end,
" adding that the West "can send in 200,000 soldiers-we are 10
million Serbs." -Milan Andrejevich

CROATIAN OPPOSITION DEMANDS REPLACEMENT OF TV DIRECTOR. Vecernji
list reported on 26 April that the opposition Liberals plan to
ask for the removal of HTV general director Antun Vrdoljak at
the next session of parliament. Vrdoljak is also a top official
of the ruling Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ) and is widely
regarded as having turned HTV into a loyal propaganda mouthpiece
of the HDZ. Croatian dailies in recent days have also reported
at length on President Franjo Tudjman's appeal to the Croats
and Muslims in Bosnia to stop fighting each other and on Tudjman's
efforts at damage control as a result of the conflict between
the two nominal allies. Finally, Slobodna Dalmacija on 26 April
discussed the regular session of the Croatian Bishops' Conference
the previous week. The Roman Catholic Church is only slowly emerging
from the effects of 45 years of communist hostility and apparently
does not yet feel strong enough to wage major political battles
against abortion and for religious instruction in public schools.
Instead, the bishops concentrated on their own religious instruction
and media plans, but also issued a warning against the proliferation
of "non-Christian sects" and against the misuse of religious
symbols. -Patrick Moore

BULGARIA ON TIGHTENED SANCTIONS. The Bulgarian government on
26 April declared that it is ready to enforce tighter sanctions
against rump Yugoslavia in accordance with UN Resolution 820.
In the past few days, however, Bulgarian officials have stepped
up their criticism of the UN for its reluctance to compensate
states that are suffering economically from the embargo, such
as Bulgaria itself. While government experts told a Western agency
that since May 1992 the country is estimated to have lost some
$1.8 billion in revenues, Deputy Premier Neycho Neev raised the
matter of compensation with US embassy officials. On the previous
day President Zhelyu Zhelev had suggested that the sharpened
sanctions might do more damage to Bulgaria than to Serbia. -Kjell
Engelbrekt

ALBANIA RECOGNIZES MACEDONIA. Reuters on 26-April said that Tirana
has formally recognized Macedonia's independence and called on
Skopje to resolve the problems involving the rights of the republic's
large Albanian minority, which makes up at least 20% of the population.
Tirana had previously withheld recognition pending a clarification
of the minority's status, but it was popularly believed in Albania
that Tirana was really holding off so as not to offend Greece,
which might seek to respond by expelling the several hundred
thousand Albanians illegally working in that country. -Patrick
Moore

HAVEL IN BONN. Czech President Vaclav Havel met with German Chancellor
Helmut Kohl and President Richard von Weizsaecker on 26 April,
the final day of his three-day visit of Germany. Havel and Kohl
agreed to further develop reconciliation between their countries.
Speaking to journalists after the meeting, Havel said Germany
plans to pay reparations to victims of Nazi tyranny in the Czech
Republic and that Kohl promised to support closer ties between
the Czech republic and NATO. Havel said that the Czech Republic
is ready to begin a dialogue with the Sudeten Germans aimed at
understanding. Earlier in the day Havel told reporters that ministers
in Prague are considering possible forms of compensation for
Sudeten Germans. However, he stressed that these working papers
only contain ideas and nothing more. During their meeting the
presidents agreed that friendly relations between the two countries
are of special importance for the future in Central Europe. -Jiri
Pehe

SLOVAK PARLIAMENT BACKS GOVERNMENT PROGRAM. Parliament approved
a resolution on 26-April backing the program of the Meciar government.
The resolution says that the government has succeeded in taking
steps which "fundamentally changed international and internal
affairs of Slovakia" and implemented new policies in areas that
were previously administered by federal organs, such as the economy,
social affairs, and finance. In the 150-member parliament 104
deputies voted for the program. Meciar outlined his program in
a two-hour speech on 22 April. He reiterated support for measures
to strengthen currency reserves, prevent uncontrolled price rises,
and continue the privatization process, although at a slower
pace and with different methods than in the Czech Republic. -Jiri
Pehe

CZECH ARMED FORCES TO BE CUT. Speaking to reporters in Brno on
26 April,Czech Defense Minister Antonin Baudys said that the
Czech Republic is to cut its army's enlisted personnel by 40%
by 1995-from the current total of 106,500 to 65,000. Baudys said
that the restructuring of the armed forces is to start on 1 July
1993. It will do away with the Czech Army's division-based structure,
which is incompatible with the armies of NATO, which the Czech
Republic hopes to join. The reformed services will be based on
a brigade structure. -Jiri Pehe

HUNGARY'S MILITARY INDUSTRY TO BE PRIVATIZED. Jeno Laszlo, chairman
of the Military Industry Office, announced on 25 April that a
government draft program for the privatization of Hungary's military
industry has been completed, MTI reports. Ten firms would be
involved in the management of the office's assets and participate
in the manufacture of some 60% of the Hungarian Army's military
equipment in 5 to 8-years' time. Until 1988, Hungary's military
industry produced 30 billion forint ($350 million) worth of goods
annually, but since then its output has plummeted to only 3 billion
forint a year. -Alfred Reisch

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ANTALL AND CSURKA CONTINUE. In a speech before
the ruling Hungarian Democratic Forum's national board on 24
April, Prime Minister and HDF Chairman Jozsef Antall dealt with
the party's relationship to national populist writer and board
member Istvan Csurka, Radio Budapest and Magyar hirlap report.
Antall saw three alternatives in dealing with Csurka and the
latter's Hungarian Road foundation: resolve the problem within
the HDF by ending all extremist statements; try to maintain some
sort of duality within the party-a very difficult task; or a
peaceful separation. For Antall, the HDF's political line remains
the one set by its sixth national congress in January 1993, and
which the Hungarian Road has failed to strengthen. According
to HDF Vice Chairman Sandor Lezsak, the party will still need
its radically thinking membership during the 1994 general elections,
but not the extremist wing associated with Csurka's person and
style. Csurka, who did not attend the board meeting, told a gathering
of Hungarian Road circles in Pecs that should the HDF cooperate
with the liberal parties , he would leave it and set up his own
political party for the 1994 elections. According to the 26 April
issue of Nepszabadsag, Csurka, as a result of being squeezed
out of the HDF, now hopes to win over to the Hungarian Road the
more radical supporters of all three government coalition parties.
-Alfred Reisch

HUNGARIAN PARLIAMENT DEBATES GABCIKOVO DOCUMENT. Debate ended
on 26 April on ratification of the document, submitted by Foreign
Minister Geza Jeszenszky, asking for the International Court
of Justice in the Hague to adjudicate Hungary's dispute with
Slovakia over the joint Gabcikovo-Nagymaros hydroelectric project
on the Danube. All parliamentary parties expressed their support
for the document, which has already been ratified by the Slovak
parliament. Several deputies also stressed the need to solve
the relevant ecological and water management problems jointly
with Slovakia and to depoliticize the dam issue. -Alfred Reisch


ROMANIAN PREMIER IN GREECE. On 26 April Nicolae Vacaroiu started
a two-day visit to Greece. Radio Bucharest said the visit is
aimed primarily at boosting bilateral ties and especially mutual
trade. Vacaroiu held talks Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis,
and was received by President Constantine Karamanlis. Radio Bucharest
reported that Vacaroiu asked Mitsotakis to support Romania's
efforts to be admitted to the Council of Europe as soon as possible.
He also discussed with both Mitsotakis and Karamanlis the war
in Bosnia and the situation in former Yugoslavia. Both sides
pledged to avoid any military involvement in the region. The
Romanian and Greek delegations exchanged the ratification instruments
of a bilateral friendship and cooperation agreement. -Dan Ionescu


ROMANIAN COURT REDUCES CEAUSESCU'S AIDES JAIL TERMS. On 26 April
the Supreme Court reduced jail sentences given to four top aides
of former communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The four defendants
are former Deputy Premier Ion Dinca, former Interior Minister
Tudor Postelnicu, former Ceausescu deputy Emil Bobu and former
State Council Vice President Manea Manescu. They had been sentenced
to life imprisonment in 1990 on charges of genocide for having
not opposed Ceausescu's orders to shoot at demonstrators during
the December 1989 uprising. Radio Bucharest said that the court
decided to change charges to complicity to aggravated murder
for all four defendants; it also agreed to reduce the sentences
to 17-years for Postelnicu, 15 years for Dinca and 10 years for
Bobu and Manescu. -Dan Ionescu

ROMANIAN PROSECUTOR BANS SALES OF HITLER'S BOOK. Reuters reported
on 26 April that the chief prosecutor in Sibiu has banned the
sale of thousands of copies of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf, saying
that he fears the book might spread racist ideas among young
people in Romania. Prosecutor Andrei Tulbure said that some 10,000
Romanian-language copies of the book have been sealed in a printing
shop warehouse in Sibiu. Oliviu Tocaciu, a lawyer who financed
the translation and publishing of Mein Kampf, described the decision
as a purely propagandistic. -Dan Ionescu

SOLIDARITY REVISES REFERENDUM PLANS. Solidarity's national leadership
conceded on 26 April that the union lacks sufficient funds to
conduct its own national referendum on property issues. The union
had resolved on 31 March to hold a referendum, which would propose
distributing to the public half of the assets now controlled
by the state, verifying the provenance of property acquired from
the state since 1975, and confiscating assets acquired illicitly.
This proposal was part of the populist bidding war that erupted
after the Sejm defeated the government's mass privatization program.
Calculations showed, however, that a referendum would cost 2.4
billion zloty ($150,000) and bankrupt the union. The national
leadership thus demanded on 26 April that the state foot the
bill for the referendum. Solidarity leader Marian Krzaklewski
explained that abandoning the idea entirely would be an "admission
of impotence." Acknowledging that the referendum was a political
gesture, Krzaklewski commented that "the horses are already running,
and we too are part of this race for power." Solidarity activists
nonetheless bridled at government suggestions that the union's
approach is "anti-reform" or "communistic," and demanded clarification
from the prime minister. -Louisa Vinton

LATVIAN PRIME MINISTER IN WARSAW. Polish Prime Minister Hanna
Suchocka and her Latvian counterpart Ivars Godmanis signed an
agreement on promoting mutual investment in Warsaw on 26 April.
In the past two years Polish-Latvian trade has tripled, Polish
TV reports, but further growth is possible. The two prime ministers
also discussed construction of the Via Baltica, the highway designed
to link the Baltic States with Western Europe. Godmanis also
met with President Lech Walesa on 27 April. Latvian officials
stressed that Poland's experience offers an example to other
states pursuing economic transformation. -Louisa Vinton

MOSCOW POSTPONES LATVIAN-RUSSIAN TROOP TALKS. Baltic media reported
on 26-April that Sergei Zotov, chief of the Russian delegation
negotiating the withdrawal of Russian troops from Latvia, has
postponed indefinitely talks between the two sides. The latest
round of negotiations was to have taken place in Jurmala on 26-28
April. Zotov attributed the postponement to a proposal being
considered by the Latvian Supreme Council that would grant one-year
residence permits to active-duty and retired Russian military
personnel and their dependents. Following a conversation with
Zotov, the head of the Latvian delegation, Janis Dinevics, suggested
that talks might resume following a final decision by the Supreme
Council, Radio Riga reported. -Stephen Foye

LATVIAN REACTION. The Foreign Ministry expressed regret and noted
that recent statements by Russian leaders indicating that the
principal reason for the decision to suspend the talks on troop
withdrawals is based on an incomplete assessment of the situation
in Latvia. The ministry pointed out that it is essential to specify
the legal status of the Russian military presence, one of the
issues that had been on the agenda. It questioned the appropriateness
of Russia's decision to postpone the talks on the basis of what
is being discussed in the Latvian legislature, even before the
legislature has adopted a decision. The ministry also noted that
it is not possible to meet the demands of some Russian leaders
that Latvia grant citizenship automatically to Russians living
in Latvia; it stressed that there is no legal basis for Russian
officers and their families to assume that they have a right
to Latvian citizenship. In conclusion, the ministry noted that
Latvia has always been prepared to solve problems at the conference
table and is awaiting for a step in this direction from Russia.
-Dzintra Bungs

24 ORGANIZATIONS SUBMIT CANDIDATE LISTS IN LATVIA. Radio Riga
reported on 26-April that 24-organizations have submitted to
the Central Election Commission candidates for the elections
to the Latvian parliament, scheduled for 5-6 June. No more lists
can be submitted to the commission now. A final count of candidates
and lists running in the five election districts is not yet available
because the submitted information still had to be checked by
the commission. -Dzintra Bungs

LITHUANIAN GOLD IN WESTERN BANKS. BNS reported on 26 April that
Lithuania has 5.78 tons of gold in Western banks. Of this amount,
2.9 tons are kept in Great Britain, 2.2 tons in France, and over
0.5 ton in Switzerland. Before World War II, Lithuania also had
deposited 1.2 tons gold in Sweden, but last year the Swedish
government reimbursed Lithuania for the gold's value-$14 million.
The situation of the 2.5 tons of gold deposited in the US before
World War II has not yet been clarified. These gold reserves
are especially important for Lithuania now when it is making
plans to institute its own currency, the litas. -Dzintra Bungs


ESTONIAN DEFENSE FORCES STATISTICS. BNS reported on 22 April
that Estonian defense forces, consisting of defense, border defense
and militia units, consist of about 10,000 men. The 2,500-strong
Estonian defense forces include battalions and companies in Tallinn,
Voru, and Johvi. The 16 units of the Kaitseliit (home guard)
comprises about 6,000 men. About 2,000 men serve in the border
defense units under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Internal
Affairs; of these, 1,200 are servicemen and the rest are paid
border guards. Estonia has 12-frontier guard stations, 25 passport
checking offices, four border guard launches, and two border
defense planes. In addition, there are 270-servicemen and 70
policemen working under the Internal Defense Task Force and about
100 servicemen in each of the rescue regiments (under the auspices
of the Rescue Department) in Tallinn, Tartu, and Johvi. -Dzintra
Bungs

NATIONALITIES MINISTRY FORMED IN UKRAINE. Ukrainian President
Leonid Kravchuk has issued a decree forming a Ministry of Nationalities
Affairs and Migration, Radio Ukraine reports on 26 April. The
new ministry is based on the Committee on Nationalities Affairs
of the Cabinet of Ministers and will be headed by Oleksandr Yemets,
formerly a political and legal adviser to Kravchuk. -Roman Solchanyk


WHAT KIEVITES THINK ABOUT NUKES. A poll conducted in March in
the Ukrainian capital shows that the proportion of those favoring
a nuclear status for Ukraine has doubled since May of last year,
Visti z Ukrainy, No. 16 reports. Fifty percent think that Ukraine
should be nonnuclear, a figure that remains essentially unchanged.
However, only about 11% of those supporting a nonnuclear status
think that Ukraine should yield its nuclear armaments unconditionally.
Almost 90% say that Ukraine should be given international security
guarantees and financial compensation. -Roman Solchanyk

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by  John Lepingwell and Charles Trumbull







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