We have to understand the world can only be grasped by action, not by comtemplation. The hand is more important than the eye....The hand is the cutting edge of the mind. - J. Bronowski
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 60, 29 March 1993



RUSSIA



YELTSIN, KHASBULATOV SURVIVE VOTE OF NO CONFIDENCE. On 28 March
the Congress unexpectedly put to the vote a proposal for the
dismissal of both President Boris Yeltsin and parliamentary speaker
Ruslan Khasbulatov. 617 votes were cast in favor of removing
Yeltsin with 268 against. The motion failed as by law, a two-thirds
majority of all the 1,033 deputies elected--i.e. 689 votes--is
required to remove the president from power. A simple majority
(517 votes) was necessary to replace Khasbulatov, but only 339
deputies voted for this motion and 558 against. The Congress
also failed to pass two motions proposed on 28 and 29 March on
a draft resolution which arose from the meeting between Yeltsin
and Khasbulatov on 27 March. This resolution suggested holding
early elections of the president and the deputies in November
1993 instead of the referendum on 25 April proposed by Yeltsin.
The deputies opposed the resolution noting that almost all the
proposals in the document contradicted the constitution; they
also were outraged by the bribe implied in the suggestion that
current deputies could preserve their privileges until the end
of their terms in 1995. Julia Wishnevsky

CONGRESS BLAMES YELTSIN FOR CONSTITUTIONAL CRISIS. At the morning
session of 29 March the Congress adopted a resolution concerning
Yeltsin's TV address of 20 March and the decree which followed
it, described by Khasbulatov as "an attempted coup d'etat." The
resolution termed Yeltsin responsible for violations of the Russian
Constitution and for the growing confrontation in society. Julia
Wishnevsky

YELTSIN"S PRESS-SECRETARY DENOUNCES CONGRESS. Mid-way through
the 29 March morning session of the Congress, President Yeltsin's
press secretary issued a statement accusing the Congress of "widening
its sphere of anticonstitutional actions" and ignoring the peoples'
will. The statement claims that the Congress has violated "all...measures
of political decency and human morals: it continually insults
the president, ministers, government, Russians." It goes on to
suggest that the Congress is becoming a "communist inquisition"
preparing to restore a totalitarian state, and notes that the
Congress and its leadership would bear responsibility for its
provocative activities and for "destroying civil peace in Russia."
Yeltsin's press secretary often adopts tough positions from which
Yeltsin can later move toward compromise, but the statement suggests
that Yeltsin may feel strengthened by the support evinced by
Sunday's demonstrations in Moscow, and is trying further to weaken
popular support for the Congress. A summary of the statement
was carried by ITAR-TASS. John Lepingwell

YELTSIN'S BUMPER WELFARE PACKAGE. On 28 March, President Yeltsin
issued two decrees providing for substantial supplementary welfare
payments, ITAR-TASS reported. These had been foreshadowed in
the president's speech to the Congress on 26 March and followed
the Congress's resolution of 27 March on the indexation of savings'
deposits. Yeltsin's first decree was aimed at "protecting the
population's savings and increasing trust in the country's banking
institutions." The second decree provided for, inter alia, the
doubling of the minimum wage, increasing stipendia for students
and the disabled, improving health care funding for government
workers, and empowering regional governments to stabilize the
retail prices of staple goods. No price tag was given for these
measures which, if enacted, would greatly increase the combined
budget deficit beyond its already unacceptable level. Keith Bush


PRO- AND ANTI-YELTSIN DEMONSTRATIONS. Demonstrations were held
in many Russian cities on 28 March in support of Boris Yeltsin,
various Russian and Western agencies reported. The largest demonstration,
said to have numbered 100,000, took place near the Kremlin and
was addressed by Yeltsin. When news was received that the Congress'
vote to oust him had failed, the president thanked his supporters,
saying that "the communist coup has not succeeded." Meanwhile,
Yeltsin's opponents in the National Salvation Front together
with the neo-communist Working Moscow and Working Russia organizations
held a rival demonstration in Manezh Square, estimated to have
been attended by up to 30,000 people. In his report to the Congress
on 29 March, Moscow Mayor Yurii Luzhkov said that the anti-Yeltsin
meeting had infringed the law by altering its planned route,
and conflict with the Yeltsin supporters had only been prevented
by prompt action from the Mayor's office. Wendy Slater

DEPUTIES BEATEN UP. The morning session of Congress on 29 March
opened with complaints from deputies who alleged that they had
been beaten up the evening before by participants in the pro-Yeltsin
rally. One deputy wearing a bandage over his forehead informed
the gathering that he had been hit on head with an iron bar.
The deputies claimed that Yeltsin himself, Luzhkov, and Minister
of Internal Affairs Viktor Erin were responsible for the disturbances.
Julia Wishnevsky

DEPUTIES PROPOSE THE ABOLITION OF THE FEDERAL INFORMATION CENTER.
On 26 March a draft resolution was circulated at the Congress
that stipulated a temporary ban on interference by executive
authorities in the operations of state radio and TV companies.
According to ITAR-TASS, the draft specifically singled out the
Federal Information Center as one such executive body whose activities
should be suspended. The draft resolution suggested setting up
"observer councils on TV and radio broadcasting" that would be
attached to legislative bodies. In his 20 March decree on the
mass media, Yeltsin proposed the creation of similar councils,
whose membership, however, was to be approved by the president.
Vera Tolz

PARLIAMENT VOTES TO ESTABLISH TV/RADIO SERVICE. The parliament
voted on 25 March to create a parliamentary TV and radio service,
ITAR-TASS reported. The parliament's resolution said that the
new service should give fast and efficient coverage of parliamentary
sessions. Both Ostankino and Rossiya TV channels are currently
very critical of the parliament and the Congress. The parliament
did not suggest that both channels of Russian TV and Radio Rossii
should come under parliamentary supervision, as was stipulated
in the draft resolution on the state media, debated but not adopted
by the eighth Congress. The parliament said, however, that air-time
for the new service will come from Russian state TV and radio.
Russia's Information Minister Mikhail Fedotov told the parliament
that he supported the idea of the service but was concerned about
its financing. Vera Tolz

THE ARMY AND POLITICS: AN UPDATE. Continuing his efforts to build
support within the armed forces, Boris Yeltsin on 27 March ordered
the enactment of a priority program aimed at improving living
conditions for servicemen and their families. While the actual
document was not available, ITAR-TASS reported that it encompasses
a broad array of measures that touch upon military service regulations,
pension and insurance programs, and housing construction. In
other news, Defense Minister Pavel Grachev was quoted by the
Sunday Times of 28 March (according to ITAR-TASS) as saying that
Yeltsin had acted within his rights in calling for a referendum.
On 26 March Moskovsky komsomolets reported that participants
of a meeting of pro-reform officers had expressed their support
for Grachev and strongly condemned the actions of both Ruslan
Khasbulatov and Aleksandr Rutskoi. Krasnaya zvezda reported the
next day that military units across the country were following
normal routines; it denied Western reports that the Western Group
of Forces in Germany had been put on alert. Stephen Foye

WHERE DO THE AIRBORNE FORCES STAND? IN A NOTEWORTHY INTERVIEW
APPEARING IN ARGUMENTY I FAKTY, NO. 12 the Commander of the Russian
Airborne Forces, Col. Gen. Evgenii Podkolzin, warned that the
current political crisis in Russia is forcing the army to take
sides. Podkolzin criticized parliamentary deputies and Ruslan
Khasbulatov personally for having taken "unacceptable" stands
on various military issues and for, in his view, having consistently
insulted Defense Minister Pavel Grachev. Podkolzin at no point
said that he supported Boris Yeltsin, however, and a positive
reference that he made to the leadership qualities of generals
qua politicians suggested that his sympathies may in fact lie
with Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi. While admitting that his
forces face many of the logistical problems common to the rest
of the army, Podkolzin emphasized that the Airborne Forces divisions
currently based in Russia are fully manned, well trained, and
altogether battle worthy. Stephen Foye

ON GORBACHEV'S ROLE IN VARIOUS CRACKDOWNS. Podkolzin also alleged
that former USSR President Mikhail Gorbachev had been fully involved
in ordering the military crackdowns that took place in various
Soviet "hot spots" during his years in power, and accused him
of duplicity for having consistently denied knowledge of these
operations. According to Podkolzin, Gorbachev was behind the
suspicious movement of airborne units into and around the Moscow
region in September of 1990 (allegedly to help with the potato
harvest); he said that the Soviet leader had also issued the
order that sent troops to Baku in January 1991. In addition,
Podkolzin alleged that an estimated 4.5 billion rubles had been
allocated between 1987 and 1991 simply on transporting troops
to various "hot spots," and that those involved were well aware
that Gorbachev's approval was required for even the smallest
troop transfer. Podkolzin's remarks may be a warning that at
least certain elements in the army would oppose any attempt by
Gorbachev to reenter the political arena. Stephen Foye

US URGES IMF TO PROVIDE RUSSIA MORE AID. The Clinton Administration
is asking the IMF to increase its lending to Russia to $13.5
billion a year, the New York Times reported on 27 March. The
IMF extended only $1 billion of aid last year out of a proposed
$8.5 billion because of Russia's inability to control inflation
and hold a consistent course in its economic policy making. The
administration reportedly has also asked the IMF to impose less
rigorous conditions on its lending to Russia. The New York Times
quoted US Congressman Lee Hamilton as saying: "It's less important
that Russia meet a strict set of IMF targets, and it's more important
that it has a credible program moving in the right direction."
This would appear to characterize the Clinton Administration's
position on aid to Russia. Erik Whitlock

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

KOZYREV IN IRAN. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev flew
to Tehran late on 28 March for a two-day visit. A Russian Foreign
Ministry official told ITAR-TASS that talks would center around
bilateral relations with Iran, international problems, and Caspian
sea cooperation. Diplomats are also expected to complete work
on a new accord outlining the basis of relations between Russia
and Iran. Suzanne Crow

AZERBAIJAN FOREIGN MINISTRY PROTESTS AT FRONTIER DEMONSTRATION
BY LEZGINS. Over 10,000 Lezgins staged a demonstration on 25
March on the frontier between Daghestan and Azerbaijan to demand
the "unification" of the Lezgin people and to protest at the
deployment of frontier troops along the Russian-Azerbaijani frontier,
ITAR-TASS reported. In a protest note to the Russian Foreign
Ministry, the Azerbaijani Foreign Ministry condemned an attempt
by demonstrators to cross the river Samur and enter Azerbaijan
as "gross interference in Azerbaijan's internal affairs," and
accused the Lezgin movement for unification, Sadval, of exacerbating
tensions in the region. Liz Fuller

UZBEKISTAN TO PROTECT TAJIK AIRSPACE. Tajikistan's First Deputy
Prime Minister Makhmadsaid Ubaidulloev confirmed in an interview
published in the daily Jumhuriyat on 25 March that Uzbekistan
will take responsibility for protecting Tajik air space, Khovar-TASS
reported. Under the terms of an agreement reached at the CIS
Minsk summit, Uzbekistan, Russia, and Kyrgyzstan are helping
to secure the Tajik-Afghan border. Tajikistan itself is providing
for border guard duty a special brigade of its National Security
Committee (former KGB) and two battalions established by the
new Tajik Ministry of Defense. Russian media have reported that
Uzbek military planes have already provided assistance to the
Tajik government by bombing strongholds of the armed Tajik opposition.
Bess Brown

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



UN AID CONVOY FINALLY REACHES SREBRENICA. International media
said on 28 March that the UN convoy got through that day to the
besieged east Bosnian town with about 200 tons of food and medicines.
Serb forces had repeatedly held up this and other relief missions
despite agreements to let them through. The UN commander in Bosnia,
Gen. Philippe Morillon, said he has "secured peace" for Srebrenica,
and launched new talks with Serb leaders to open the way for
more convoys. On 27 March a French plane joined the US-led airdrop
mission in Bosnia, and a German aircraft took part as well the
following night. The Serbs had threatened to fire on any Germans,
but the mission was completed safely. Finally, a Bosnian cease-fire
that began on 28 March appears to be holding, although three
people were killed by Serb guns in Sarajevo just before the measure
came into effect. Previous cease-fires have generally proven
to be short-lived at best, and have been used by the warring
parties as an opportunity to rearm and regroup. Heavy snows may
also contribute to any success of this cease-fire. Patrick Moore


CROATIA TO REFILL DAMAGED RESERVOIR. Slobodna Dalmacija on 25
March said that the Croatian electric company has decided to
begin partially refilling the reservoir at the Peruca dam when
the rains begin this spring. The lake had been drained after
Serb mines badly damaged the structure following Croatia's attack
on Serb forces at the end of January. Many experts had warned
of an impending ecological catastrophe if the dam burst, but
Croatian authorities got matters under control. The experts have
now decided to begin limited use of the hydroelectric complex
in view of the drastic power shortage in Dalmatia, which has
crippled the economy there and led to widespread popular criticism
of the government. Patrick Moore

COMPLAINTS BY CROATIA'S MAGYAR MINORITY. Jozsef Csorgits, Chairman
of the Association of Hungarians in Croatia said on 27 March
in Budapest that his organization will join a nationwide protest
in Croatia against the UN peacekeeping forces' performance in
the Serbian-occupied areas of Croatia, MTI reports. Since the
outbreak of the Yugoslav crisis, 165 civilians have been killed
in those areas, 85 of them after the arrival of the UN forces,
and some 100 are missing, Csorgits said. Alfred Reisch

UKRAINE SEEKS COMPENSATION FOR SANCTIONS. Speaking at a press
conference at the UN on 26 March, Foreign Minister Anatolii Zlenko
said that Ukraine has lost $3-4 billion due to UN sanctions against
the former Yugoslavia, Ukrainian Radio reports. He called for
preferential treatment from economically stronger states to offset
the losses from the sanctions, and urged the UN to establish
a special compensation fund for countries seriously affected
by the consequences of the sanctions. Zlenko also asked for technical
assistance to help Ukraine enforce the sanctions in its ports.
Bohdan Nahaylo

MECIAR REELECTED MDS CHAIRMAN, KNAZKO RESIGNS. Prime Minister
Vladimir Meciar was reelected the chairman of the ruling Movement
for a Democratic Slovakia at its congress in Trnava, Slovak TV
reported on 28 March. For the first time, however, Meciar had
to run against a second candidate, namely former Foreign Minister
Milan Knazko. Meciar received 183 votes, Knazko 41. Prior to
the election, Knazko told delegates that the MDS is threatened
by political "bankruptcy." He said that the movement has lost
virtually all allies in Slovakia, including journalists and other
political parties. He pointed out that none of the parties represented
in the Slovak parliament is willing to enter a coalition with
the MDS and that journalists are disgusted with Meciar's efforts
to muzzle the media. Knazko also charged the prime minister with
using lies as a means of doing politics. After the election,
Knazko announced that he is leaving the movement and that he
will establish a new "liberal party." It is expected that up
to 17 MDS deputies in the Slovak parliament will join him. Jan
Obrman

KINKEL VISITS SLOVAKIA. On 26 March German Foreign Minister Klaus
Kinkel paid a one-day visit to Bratislava, Slovak Radio reports.
Kinkel met with President Michal Kovac, Prime Minister Vladimir
Meciar, and Foreign Minister Jozef Moravcik to discuss bilateral
cooperation between the two countries. He said that Germany will
support Slovakia's efforts to have an association treaty with
the EC as soon as possible and reportedly discussed the possibility
of full membership in both NATO and the EC. Probably the most
important single issue of his visit was the transit of asylum-seekers
through Slovak territory. Kinkel said that 50% of the 470,000
refugees who came to Germany in 1992, entered the country through
the former Czechoslovakia. Slovak authorities announced after
the visit that controls at Slovakia's eastern borders will be
considerably increased. Jan Obrman

US SUGGESTS MILITARY COOPERATION WITH CZECHS. The United States
has suggested the creation of a US-Czech team to consider joint
actions by the two countries' armed forces, CTK reported on 28
March. The report quoted Czech Defense Minister Antonin Baudys
as saying after a meeting with US Undersecretary of Defense William
Perry that this proposal represents a significant shift in American
policy, showing that the Czech Republic is considered a trustworthy
partner in Washington. Baudys said that the proposal will be
considered by the Czech government this week. He also suggested
to Perry that NATO representatives might operate in the Czech
Republic. Perry reportedly praised the Czech Republic for its
readiness to participate in a potential intervention in the former
Yugoslavia. Baudys is in Brussels to take part in a meeting of
defense ministers from member states of the North Atlantic Council
for Cooperation. Jan Obrman

PROGRESS IN POLISH-GERMAN ASYLUM TALKS. During a fourth round
of talks on revisions to Germany's asylum law on 27-28 March
in Warsaw, Polish Internal Affairs Minister Andrzej Milczanowski
and his German counterpart Rudolf Seiters agreed that asylum-seekers
who enter Germany from Poland before the new law takes effect
will not be deported. Seiters called the talks "friendly and
concrete" and predicted that a bilateral agreement will be signed
within the next two months, before the new law is adopted. The
German minister also agreed to specify the number of illegal
immigrants to be deported to Poland in 1993 and repeated pledges
to provide Poland with "administrative and technical assistance"
in processing refugees, PAP reports. Louisa Vinton

WALESA ENTERS PRIVATIZATION FRAY. In remarks to the Network (the
informal organization of Solidarity locals from Poland's largest
state industries) in Zdzieszowice on 26 March, President Lech
Walesa put the cat among the pigeons by supporting revisions
to the government's mass privatization program. Walesa said he
backs the Network's privatization concept, which proposes distributing
coupons worth 300 million zloty ($18,750) to each citizen for
use in the purchase of state assets. The president said he does
not want a conflict with the government, but "the time has come
to fix mistakes and devise a concept that satisfies everyone."
Visibly irritated, Privatization Minister Janusz Lewandowski
told PAP on 27 March that the president's remarks signal "the
entry of the dragon" and the disruption of the government's work
on mass privatization. He warned against raising public expectations
to levels the economy cannot satisfy, and suggested the Network's
economic proposals are based on wishful thinking. Walesa seems
to be treating the Network as a potential power base and counterweight
to the Solidarity leadership and established political parties.
During its 26 March meeting, the Network proposed the creation
of a "nonparty forum to support reform." Louisa Vinton

BULGARIAN PRESIDENT TO BUCHAREST. On 27 March Zhelyu Zhelev paid
a seven-hour visit to Bucharest. Zhelev discussed with his Romanian
counterpart Ion Iliescu the evolution of bilateral ties since
the signing of a Romanian-Bulgarian cooperation treaty in January
1992 as well as the situation in former Yugoslavia and the Russian
crisis. Speaking to reporters after the meeting, the two called
for a peaceful solution to the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina
and pledged not to allow their countries to be drawn into military
conflicts. Both presidents expressed support for Boris Yeltsin
and his reform course in Russia. In separate talks, officials
and experts from the two countries agreed on such matters of
mutual interest as improving the traffic between Romania and
Bulgaria to compensate for the closure of the Yugoslav route.
In addition, a protocol of cooperation between the foreign ministries
of the two countries was signed Dan Ionescu

US LEGISLATION INTRODUCED TO GIVE MFN TO ROMANIA. An RFE/RL correspondent
in Washington reports that a draft bill for granting Romania
most-favored-nation status was introduced in the House of Representatives
on 25 March. Congresswoman Barbara Kennelly said that Romania
has made significant progress toward creating a democratic society.
She added that it is important to encourage further development
of democracy by supporting Romania's private economy. In another
development, the US embassy in Bucharest announced that a credit
agreement will be signed on 29 March to allow Romania import
about 67,000 tons of wheat from the US under very favorable credit
terms. Dan Ionescu

CONTROVERSY OVER PREFECT NOMINATIONS IN ROMANIA. Radio Bucharest
announced on 26 March the government's decision to appoint new
prefects to the counties of Covasna and Harghita, where ethnic
Hungarians (Szeklers) are in majority. Both prefects, Vlad Adrian
Casuneanu and Dan Ioan Vosloban, are ethnic Romanians. On 27
March the radio reported that members of the Covasna County council
addressed an open letter to Premier Nicolae Vacaroiu protesting
Casuneanu's nomination and saying that both Hungarian and Romanian
residents in Covasna oppose that step. Casuneanu, who is member
of the ruling Democratic National Salvation Front, was criticized
by Radio Budapest on 25 March for having allegedly made nationalistic
remarks in his maiden speech in Miercurea Ciuc. The Hungarian
Democratic Federation of Romania called on 26 March for a campaign
of civic insubordination against Casuneanu and for the nomination
of ethnic Hungarian prefects in counties with Hungarian majority.
Last summer former Premier Theodor Stolojan tried to nominate
Romanian prefects to Covasna and Harghita, but later appointed
a mixed Romanian-Hungarian tandem in each of the counties. Dan
Ionescu

EC, WORLD BANK LOANS TO HUNGARY. Sir Leon Brittan, EC Commissioner
for Economic Affairs, visited Budapest on 26 March and announced
two 5 million ecu loans to Hungary in the framework of the EC's
PHARE aid program, MTI and Radio Budapest report. The first five
million are to be used by 1995 to help speed up the legal harmonization
measures needed for the carrying out of Hungary's association
agreement with the EC; the second loan is intended to modernize
four Hungarian border-crossing points. On the same day, the World
Bank announced a $90-million loan to Hungary, to be made available
by 1996-97, to rebuild highways and bridges and modernize traffic
safety. Alfred Reisch

HUNGARIAN SMALLHOLDERS' PARTY MEETS. The national board and national
assembly of the Independent Smallholders' Party met on 27-28
March, MTI reports. By overwhelming majorities both bodies elected
Chairman Jozsef Torgyan as the party's candidate for prime minister
in the spring 1994 general elections. The assembly called upon
Premier Jozsef Antall, whom Torgyan openly attacked in his speech,
to take immediate steps to turn over the land that can be cultivated
and provide long-term, interest-free loans to agricultural producers.
Alfred Reisch

KOZYREV TO KHASBULATOV ABOUT PARFENOV. Baltic media reported
on 27 March that Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev has
sent a request to the chairman of the Supreme Soviet for help
in obtaining prompt ratification of the Latvian-Russian treaty
dealing with, among other matters, the transfer of convicted
criminals to serve out their sentences in their homeland. Kozyrev
said that his request was motivated by the situation of convicted
Riga OMON leader Sergei Parfenov, who is currently in prison
in Latvia and whom Lithuania has asked to be transferred there
for questioning in connection with the killing of customs officers
at the Medininkai post in 1991. The Latvian prosecutor general
has not yet given a formal reply to Lithuania's request, nor
has the Latvian Supreme Council ratified the treaty. Dzintra
Bungs

RUSSIAN MILITARY PLANES WITHDRAWN FROM ESTONIA, LATVIA. Four
combat airplanes, the last of Russia's military aircraft in Estonia,
left the Amari airfield on 27 March, Baltic media report. On
26 March 15 MiG fighter planes left a military airfield near
Daugavpils, Latvia, and 14 more planes are scheduled to leave
the military airfield at Lielvarde, a Latvian Defense Ministry
official told RFE/RL in Riga, but he said it is not clear what
plans Russia may have for the combat planes at the military airport
in Jekabpils. Dzintra Bungs

NEW CHAIRMAN OF ESTONIAN ASSEMBLY PARTY. On 27 March the Estonian
Assembly Party elected former Prime Minister Tiit Vahi its chairman
and Jaak Tamm, Mart Opmann, and Peter Lorents deputy chairmen,
BNS reports. The party has 8 of 17 seats in Secure Home, the
largest opposition faction in the 101-member State Assembly.
It will hold a congress in May at which the party's name might
be changed. In the Tartu daily Postimees of 28 March, Vahi said
the party has to discuss similarities and differences with respect
to the present government coalition before it decides its future
political course. Vahi also saw no reason to criticize the present
government's results up to now. Saulius Girnius

PARIS CLUB WORKS TO SOLVE UKRAINE/RUSSIAN DEBT DISPUTE. Representatives
of the Paris Club of Western creditors met with top Ukrainian
officials on 26 March to help break stalled Ukrainian-Russian
negotiations over sharing the foreign debt and assets abroad
of the former Soviet Union, according to various news agencies
on 27 March. Although the Paris Club representatives expressed
optimism that the dispute would be resolved soon, no indication
was given whether the solution would take the form of Ukraine
assuming separate responsibility for its share--about 16%--of
these debts and assets or whether an arrangement would be made
for Russia to take over total responsibility for the debt. Russia
assumed the debts of other members of the former Soviet Union
last year through bilateral negotiations. For the time being
it was agreed that Ukraine does not have to make any debt payments
until it concludes a deal with Russia, Ukrainian Radio reported
on 27 March. The pressure for Ukraine and Russia to resolve this
obstacle to debt rescheduling may have increased due to Western
governments recently becoming more inclined to send aid to bolster
political stability in the region. Erik Whitlock

NEW UKRAINIAN ECONOMIC APPOINTMENTS. President Leonid Kravchuk
has appointed Deputy Prime Minister Vasyl Yevtukhov acting first
deputy prime minister, Ukrainian Radio reported on 26 March.
He replaces Ihor Yukhnovsky. On 27 March Ukrainian TV reported
that Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma asked "the architect of Poland's
economic reforms," Leszek Balcerowicz, who was in Kiev attending
an international conference on economic reform in Ukraine, to
serve as an economic advisor to the government. Speaking that
day on Ukrainian Radio, Balcerowicz said that Ukraine's hyperinflation
is a "serious illness" that needs "shock therapy" and political
stability to bring it under control. Bohdan Nahaylo

NEW UKRAINIAN-BELARUSIAN FRIENDSHIP SOCIETY MEETS. A new society
for promoting ties between the two neighboring states held its
first meeting in Kiev on 27 March, Ukrainian TV reports. Bohdan
Nahaylo

BELARUSIAN LEADER REJECTS PROPOSED UNION WITH RUSSIA. Stanislau
Shushkevich, the speaker of Parliament, has denounced a proposal
backed by Prime Minister Vyacheslau Kebich to form an economic
and military union with Russia, Reuters reported on 26 March.
Shushkevich pointed out that the proposed "confederation" would
mean that economic matters would be "determined in Moscow," where
a power struggle is taking place between the government and the
legislature. Bohdan Nahaylo

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Wendy Slater and Charles Trumbull























THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal
mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions,
or additional copies, please contact: in North America: Mr. Brian
Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC
20036 Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907; Fax: (202) 457-6992
or 828-8783; Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga
Hofer, Publications Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse
67, 8000 Munich 22, Germany;.Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or
-2624; Fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG 1993,
RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.

30 March 1993 1 30 March 1993 1 RFE/RL Research Institute RFE/RL Daily Report, No. 61 RFE/RL Research Institute RFE/RL Daily Report, No. 61 

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole