A man seldom thinks with more earnestness of anything than he does of his dinner. - Samuel Johnson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 75, 21 March 1993







RUSSIA



RUTSKOI SAYS HE WANTS TO STAND FOR PRESIDENT. Russian Vice President
Aleksandr Rutskoi, participating in a phone-in session with readers
of Komsomolskaya pravda of 20 April, said that he intends to
put forward his candidacy at the next presidential elections.
Rutskoi, for the first time, strongly criticized President Boris
Yeltsin personally for failing to solve the economic crisis in
the country and for changing his position too frequently. He
openly accused him of "robbing the people." He also claimed that
Yeltsin's entourage has appropriated the funds of the former
CPSU. Rutskoi praised the ideology of the centrist Civic Union
coalition as being based on "the Russian idea." He criticized
the fact that today one half of agricultural production is being
lost, and promised to devote himself to problems in this sphere
more seriously in future. -Alexander Rahr

STANKEVICH, KHASBULATOV ON YELTSIN'S FUTURE. Sergei Stankevich,
an advisor to Boris Yeltsin, said on 20 April that the president
will agree to early elections this year if he fails to win more
than half the votes cast in the forthcoming referendum, according
to RFE/RL's Moscow correspondent. Yeltsin could not "simply resign"
immediately, according to Stankevich, but would have to hand
power to his successor (i.e.-Aleksandr Rutskoi). Meanwhile, parliamentary
speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov, continuing a visit to Voronezh, said
that Yeltsin should resign immediately if he loses the vote of
confidence in the referendum, according to Russian agencies.
He claimed that Yeltsin could only win the vote through "manipulation,
perpetual intrigue and pressure," according to Radio Rossii.
He refused to exclude the possibility of convening a special
Congress shortly after the referendum. -Wendy Slater

FILATOV WARNS CONGRESS MAY BE CONVENED. The head of the presidential
administration, Sergei Filatov, told journalists on 20 April
that according to his information, Russian people's deputies
had been ordered to be in Moscow on 26 April (the day after the
referendum) ready for a session of the Congress. AFP said that
people's deputies contacted by its correspondents confirmed the
report. Filatov said that 64% of local soviets were hostile to
the president, because a strong element of the communist party
nomenklatura was still present in them, but that 80% of local
executives supported Yeltsin. He warned that the opposition was
undertaking provocative actions against supporters of the president,
and described the timing of Rutskoi's 16-April speech to parliament
as "not accidental." Filatov predicted a turnout of between 53%
and 70% in the referendum. His remarks were reported by Russian
and Western media. -Wendy Slater

IMF SETS UP NEW AID FACILITY. The International Monetary Fund
is creating a new lending program expected to channel $4 to 6
billion to countries of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe
over the next eighteen months. Russia may be the first beneficiary
of the new arrangement, called the Systemic Transformation Facility,
qualifying for about $3-billion in loans for imports of various
goods ranging from food to equipment. Gaining access to money
under the new facility will be easier than is normally the case
when borrowing from the IMF. Instead of meeting specific macroeconomic
targets, the governments will merely have to show commitment
to "significant" action towards stabilizing their economy. The
loans will be granted for a 10 year period on favorable interest
terms. -Erik Whitlock and Robert Lyle

MORDOVIAN PARLIAMENT CONTINUES TO IGNORE YELTSIN'S DECREE. On
20 April the Mordovian parliament completed the process of the
restoration of supreme executive power in the form in which it
existed before the presidency was instituted in December 1991,
ITAR-TASS reported. In forming the new council of ministers,
in which, in fact, only four of the 12 ministers are new faces,
the parliament completely ignored Yeltsin's decree insisting
that the president Vasilii Guslyannikov continue to fulfill his
functions. However, according to ITAR-TASS, some deputies believe
that Yeltsin could institute presidential rule in Mordovia if
he wins the referendum. This has aroused particular interest
in the referendum in the republic. -Ann Sheehy

YELTSIN MEETS RELIGIOUS LEADERS. At a meeting with leaders of
the Russian Orthodox and Baptist churches, Muslim, Jewish and
other religious organizations on 20 April, President Yeltsin
was urged by Russia's chief Rabbi Adolf Shaevich to take a clear
position against what the Rabbi said was increasingly "organized
and open" anti-Semitism in Russia. Yeltsin denied that there
was any anti-Semitism on a state level. The Patriarch of Moscow
and all Russia Aleksii II, as well as other religious leaders,
called for curbs on foreign missionaries coming to Russia, often
under the guise of tourism, and on the prevalence of US religious
broadcasting on Russian TV. Both leaders spoke out in favor of
a strong presidency. During the meeting, Yeltsin announced that
a department of religious affairs was to be established in the
Russian government, and would be headed by First Deputy Prime
Minister Vladimir Shumeiko. The department would be concerned
with giving "concrete assistance" to religious communities. -Wendy
Slater

YELTSIN CALLS FOR CHEMICAL WEAPONS DESTRUCTION. On 20 April President
Yeltsin released a statement, published by ITAR-TASS, calling
for the careful elimination of the former Soviet Union's chemical
weapons. In accordance with the 1992 Paris Treaty on chemical
weapons, Russia must eliminate its stockpile, the largest in
the world, within the next ten years. However, at present Russia
does not have any functional facilities for chemical weapons
destruction, and local governments have strongly opposed their
construction. Yeltsin's statement appears intended to reassure
the population by calling for extensive safety precautions, the
use of advanced technologies to reduce risks, and the minimal
possible transport of dangerous substances in Russia. The statement
calls for the authorities in Udmurtiya, Chuvashiya, and Saratov,
where most of the weapons are located, to participate in an environmental
impact study before further decisions are made. Yeltsin also
promised increased funds for health care, cultural facilities,
and infrastructure development in these regions. While a step
forward, the statement indicates that the destruction of the
weapons is becoming an increasingly complicated and expensive
task. -John Lepingwell

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE DENIES INVOLVEMENT IN "RED MERCURY" AFFAIR.
The Public Relations Office of the Russian Foreign Intelligence
Service (SVR) has issued a statement denying Pravda's allegations
that the SVR was involved in illegal dealing in "red mercury."
The radio station Ekho Moskvy on 20 April reported that the SVR
denied involvement in the affair and called for the Security
Ministry to investigate how a secret memorandum by SVR Director
Evgenii Primakov appeared in the "Yeltsingate" article published
in Pravda on 17 April. According to that article, Primakov reportedly
sent a memo to Yeltsin in early 1992 claiming that "red mercury"
could be used as an explosive in nuclear and conventional weapons
and is worth a dozen times more than gold. Pravda accused Yeltsin's
advisers, the SVR, military intelligence, and the Russian academic
community of setting up a "smoke screen" over "red mercury" while
promoting its covert export as a source of hard currency. According
to an ITAR-TASS report of 19 April, the SVR also denied that
a substance having the alleged properties of "red mercury" exists.
-Victor Yasmann and John Lepingwell

SITUATION REMAINS TENSE IN CHECHNYA. Meetings of supporters and
opponents of Chechen president Dzhokhar Dudaev continued in Groznyi
on 20 April, ITAR-TASS reported. In the run-up to the congress
of the Chechen people scheduled for 23 April, the agency said,
both sides are trying to win the support of the population, and
particularly of the clans. Observers in Groznyi note that by
appointing the head of the Vainakh Democratic Party Zelimkhan
Yandarbiev as vice-president and reinstating Elza Sharipova as
prosecutor general Dudaev has significantly increased his support
on the part of influential clans. In a speech in Voronezh on
20 April, reported by ITAR-TASS, the chairman of the Russian
parliament Ruslan Khasbulatov claimed that the Dudaev regime
was favored by Russian federal officials. Otherwise, according
to Khasbulatov, it would long since have collapsed. -Ann Sheehy


TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



TWO-DAY CEASEFIRE AGREED IN KARABAKH. A two-day ceasefire in
Nagorno-Karabakh took effect at midnight local time on 19 April
in order to allow for a visit of inspection to Karabakh and Kelbadzhar
by a group of CSCE officials, an Azerbaijani Foreign Ministry
spokesman stated on 20 April, according to Western agencies.
The ceasefire may be extended if the CSCE delegation remains
for a longer period. -Liz Fuller

IZVESTIYA CLAIMS KITOVANI PLANNING COUP AGAINST SHEVARDNADZE.
Renegade Georgian Defense Minister Tengiz Kitovani has held secret
meetings in western Georgia with the commander of the Georgian
forces loyal to ousted president Zviad Gamsakhurdia and with
a Russian state security general, possibly in preparation for
an armed coup against Georgian parliament chairman Eduard Shevardnadze,
according to an article in Izvestiya of 21 April. The author
hypothesizes that there are circles in both Russia and Georgia
intent on removing Shevardnadze and destroying Georgia's independence,
and that recent moves to weaken the leadership of Georgian forces
fighting in Abkhazia are intended to precipitate the fall of
the Abkhaz capital Sukhumi, which would engender widespread popular
dismay and serve as a pretext for ousting Shevardnadze and dissolving
the Georgian parliament. -Liz Fuller

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



HAVEL MEETS CLINTON. After an hour-long meeting with US President
Bill Clinton on 21-April at the White House, Czech President
Vaclav Havel told journalists that the Bosnian conflict could
spread and that the international community should find a quick
solution. Havel made it clear that it could become necessary
to "decide on more resolute steps" to end the conflict and that
the Czech Republic was prepared to support such steps. Replying
to a question at the news conference, Havel said that launching
air strikes against Serb positions would be "one of the alternatives."
-Jan Obrman

ILIESCU IN WASHINGTON. Romanian President Ion Iliescu said in
Washington there is now a "better climate" in American-Romanian
relations and this may lead to the return of the MFN trade status
for his country, an RFE/RL correspondent reported on 20 April.
Speaking to a group of American businessmen at the US Chamber
of Commerce, Iliescu said that in meetings with Congressional
leaders and business people he has found "a better understanding
of Romanian realities." Iliescu also met on 20 April with representatives
of the Romanian emigration in the USA, Radio Bucharest said on
the same day. He is expected to have a brief meeting with President
Clinton on 21 April. -Michael Shafir

ZHELEV: MILITARY MEANS MAY BE THE ONLY OPTION. On 20 April, during
his visit to the United States, Bulgarian President Zhelyu Zhelev
said Western military involvement in the conflict in ex-Yugoslavia
might be inevitable, an RFE/RL correspondent reports. Addressing
the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington,
Zhelev told US officials, academics, and businessmen that the
failure to punish Serbia could plunge the region into a series
of ethnic land-grabs and dangerously growing confrontation between
Christians and Muslims. Although he said it would probably be
premature to send in ground troops, the Bulgarian President suggested
that air strikes against factories, equipment, and supplies could
stop "those who are feeding the war machine." -Kjell Engelbrekt


TUDJMAN CALLS FOR CAMP-DAVID-TYPE BALKAN CONFERENCE. News agencies
on 20-April quoted Croatian President Franjo Tudjman in Washington
as urging that representatives from all six former Yugoslav republics
be invited to Camp David talks led by President Bill Clinton.
President Boris Yeltsin, he added, should also attend, since
Russia has strong influence with Serbia. Tudjman said that the
US should lead the international community in taking "resolute
steps" to deal with the Yugoslav situation, and that the international
community should launch "air strikes against all those unwilling
to participate in the process." Meanwhile in Croatia, 19 April
witnessed another round of price hikes as the cost of basic goods
keeps up with that country's Latin American style inflation.
The Croatian dinar has proven more stable than its Serbian counterpart
but not as firm as the Slovenian tolar. Croatian Prime Minister
Nikica Valentic is at pains to project an image of attacking
Croatia's social and economic problems in a concerted and intensive
fashion, as he demonstrated in his 15 April interview with Vecernji
list, but many Croats doubt that the government has the will
or the power to bring the situation under control in what remains
a wartime economy. -Patrick Moore

SREBRENICA DRAMA CONTINUES. The 21 April Los Angeles Times reports
that UN officials say they will need three additional days to
disarm the Muslim defenders of Srebrenica, but the Serbs apparently
demand that the disarming be completed on schedule. The UN is
trying to dispel the image that it has negotiated the surrender
of the town, arguing instead that it is trying "to stop the killing
and starvation." It is also seeking to make "safe havens" out
of the other two Muslim-held enclaves in eastern Bosnia, Zepa
and Gorazde. -Patrick Moore

CROAT-MUSLIM FIGHTING HITS NEW INTENSITY. The struggle continues
between the two nominal allies to secure and consolidate their
respective holdings in central Bosnia and the Mostar area. The
21 April Washington Post quotes an EC observer as describing
a Croatian assault on the mainly Muslim town of Konjic as involving
"house-to-house fighting worse than in a Rambo movie" and says
that "the latest fighting dwarfs all earlier strife between"
the Croats and Muslims. Atrocities have been committed by both
sides, but the New York Times quotes British observers as documenting
some particularly grisly Croatian attacks on Muslim civilians
in Vitez. Borba says that the situation has taken a "dramatic
turn," particularly where fighting in and around Mostar is concerned.
The Croats regard the town as the capital of their portion of
Herzegovina, but it has a large Muslim population and a historic
center that reflects centuries of Ottoman rule. Borba quotes
Bosnian Radio as charging the Croats with killing infants, children,
and leading intellectuals in Vitez, while it notes that Croatian
Radio reports that Muslim snipers are terrorizing parts of Mostar.
-Patrick Moore

HUNGARIAN REACTION TO UN SANCTIONS. At a press conference on
20 April, Foreign Ministry spokesman Janos Herman told reporters
about the adverse effects on Hungary of the stricter UN embargo
against Serbia-Montenegro, MTI reports. According to the new
regulations that go into effect on 26 April, prior permission
must be granted for any goods that are transported through the
area by train, truck, or boat. As a result of the embargo in
effect now, Hungary has already lost half a billion dollars,
and the stricter embargo will further hurt Hungarian industry
and other economic sectors. Despite its adverse effects, however,
Hungary will support the embargo, said Herman. -Judith Pataki


BEROV ENDS MOSCOW VISIT. On 20 April Bulgarian Prime Minister
Lyuben Berov left Moscow after what he said had been a useful
two-day working visit. Berov told ITAR-TASS he believed the results
of the bilateral talks, which were held with his Russian counterpart
Viktor Chernomyrdin, could help intensify trade relations between
the two countries. Apart from the signing of protocols on cooperation
in the fields of science, education, culture and law enforcement-as
well as the ratification of a new friendship treaty negotiated
last August-the Bulgarian premier singled out the decision to
set up a joint bank for clearing payments in national currencies
as an important achievement. Asked about the plans to dismantle
a Red Army monument in Sofia, Chernomyrdin said he hoped the
issue would be solved in a "civilized manner." Berov's next stop
is Ankara, where he will attend the funeral of President Turgut
Ozal. -Kjell Engelbrekt

KRAVCHUK DISMISSES NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISOR. Without offering
any explanations, Radio Ukraine reported on 19 April that Ukrainian
President Leonid Kravchuk has dropped his national security advisor,
Volodomyr Selivanov. The secretary of the President's National
Security Council was simply said to have been transferred to
another unspecified job. -Bohdan Nahaylo

UKRAINIAN PARLIAMENT DISCUSSES REVISED MILITARY DOCTRINE. On
20 April in closed session parliament discussed the revised draft
of the military doctrine, which sets out the principles on which
Ukraine's defense policy is to be based, Ukrainian TV reports.
Among the speakers were President Kravchuk, who, according to
Reuters, argued that Ukraine should become a nonnuclear state
but added that Kiev has the right to expect far greater compensation
to cover the costs of disarmament. The first draft of the military
doctrine was rejected after a stormy debate on 28-October 1992.
During the debate some deputies criticized the authors of the
draft for not identifying Ukraine's potential enemies and for
rejecting the idea of retaining a nuclear deterrent. Parliament
will resume the debate in plenary session on 22 April after Kravchuk
returns from the funeral of Turkish President Turgut Ozal. -Bohdan
Nahaylo

KRAVCHUK REJECTS CIS INTEGRATION. The president is quoted by
CIS sources on 20-April as saying that Ukraine will not sign
any documents on military, political, or diplomatic integration
of the CIS at its forthcoming summit in May. But in his address
to a closed session of parliament the Ukrainian leader is reported
as having favored economic integration and closer economic contacts
among CIS member states. Kravchuk explained that Ukraine's nonaligned
status precludes military and political integration. -Roman Solchanyk


GRACHEV ON BLACK SEA FLEET. Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev
has stated that if the Black Sea Fleet is to be divided Russia
expects the naval base in Sevastopol and naval aviation to be
divided as well. According to an ITAR-TASS report of 20 April,
Grachev's comment comes in response to a Ukrainian statement
that Russia will not be able to lease Ukrainian territory for
military bases. Grachev called for Sevastopol to become a joint
base for separate Ukrainian and Russian Black Sea Fleets. -John
Lepingwell

LANGUAGE ISSUES IN ODESSA. Demands for official status for the
Russian language in Odessa have evoked a sharp response from
the local Rukh organization, Radio Ukraine reports on 19 April.
The resolution "On the Language Situation in the City" adopted
by the Civic Forum of Odessa and the demand for a referendum
on the language issue resulted in a statement issued by Rukh
saying that the action represents an attempt to destabilize the
situation in Ukraine. -Roman Solchanyk

CONSTITUTIONAL TRIBUNAL RULES ON RELIGION IN POLISH SCHOOLS.
Poland's high court said on 20-April that the government's directive
introducing teaching of religion into Polish schools is in conformity
with the law. The tribunal added a number of caveats, however:
that the educational authorities must not require from students
a declaration that they either study religion as an extracurricular
subject or elect not to do so; that they must not issue a certified
grade in religion if the subject is taken as an extracurricular
one; and that they must not regard a decision of the religious
authorities to revoke a teacher's license to teach religion as
synonymous with the termination of the teacher's contract. The
tribunal said the government's directive allowing for the hanging
of crosses in schoolrooms as well as for the school prayers conforms
with the law. The ruling was prompted by a move by the ombudsman
asking for clarification of the directive's legality. Immediately
after the ruling was issued, the Polish media reported that the
ombudsman accepted the ruling. The government will have to amend
sections of its directive within three months. -Jan de Weydenthal


POLAND'S ECONOMY GROWING AGAIN. The government reports that industrial
production in the first three months of 1993 was 5.4% higher
than in the comparable period of 1992. Productivity rose by 10.1
%. The figures were supplied by the Central Planning Office,
a government agency, and were published in the Warsaw financial
paper, Nowa Europa, on 20-April. The report also notes, however,
that Poland is suffering from a growing deficit in foreign trade,
which reached $345 million in the first two months of 1993. -Jan
de Weydenthal

SLOVAK UNEMPLOYMENT GROWS. An unnamed Slovak official revealed
that the number of unemployed continues to grow, TA SR reported
on 20 April. The official said that the number increased by more
than 45,000 in the first three months of this year and reached
a total of more than 300,000. While the overall unemployment
rate is now 12.1%, there are regions with unemployment levels
of up to 20%, he said. -Jan Obrman

MDS' DROP OF POPULARITY HALTED. According to a new public opinion
poll, the dramatic decrease in popularity of Prime Minister Vladimir
Meciar's Movement for a Democratic Slovakia has bottomed out,
TA SR reported on 20 April. The opinion poll, conducted by the
Slovak Statistical Office in late March, revealed that the MDS
has the support of 20% of the Slovak population, a 2% increase
over February's results. According to the poll, President Michal
Kovac, with a favorable rating of 29%, is now the most popular
politician in Slovakia. He is trailed by Meciar with 27% and
Peter Weiss, chairman of the Party of the Democratic Left, with
24%. -Jan Obrman

HUNGARIAN DEFENSE MINISTER TO VISIT SLOVAKIA. Lajos Fur will
pay a one-day official working visit to Slovakia on 23 April
at the invitation of his Slovakian counterpart, Imrich Andrejcak,
MTI reports. Fur will present a cooperation proposal for the
defense ministries of the two countries and will discuss military
cooperation between the countries of the Visegrad Group and other
security questions. -Judith Pataki

FORMER INTERIOR MINISTERS ON TRIAL IN ROMANIA. Tudor Postelnicu
and Gheorghe Homostean are among nine people scheduled to go
on trial on 21-April in connection with the killing by the former
secret police of three people who tried to hijack a bus to the
West in 1981, Radio Bucharest and Reuters report. Postelnicu
is already serving a life sentence for his role in the repression
of the revolt that brought down the former regime in December
1989. A senior military judge said three of the defendants are
accused of murdering the hijackers after their capture near Timisoara.
Their bodies were never found. Six hostages were also killed
and twelve wounded when the secret police troops opened fire
on the hijacked bus. Postelnicu told investigators the hijackers
were captured alive but Ceausescu ordered that they be killed
on the spot. -Michael Shafir

ROMANIAN PRIVATIZATION VOUCHERS NOMINALLY PRICED. The Private
Ownership Fund announced on 21 April that the value of pre-share
voucher packages given to more than 15 million citizens has been
set at 135,000 lei ($225) each, Radio Bucharest and Reuters report.
The coupons account for 30% stakes in about 6,200 enterprises,
which will gradually pass into public hands. The majority 70%
stakes in these enterprises is held by the State Ownership Fund.
The two funds will eventually function as Western-type mutual
funds. Initially, the government wants to encourage citizens
to trade their coupons for shares in 2,600 small enterprises
that are up for privatization through worker-management buyout
schemes. A senior executive with the Private Ownership Fund said
that until the stock market is opened, the funds will give regular
quotations for pre-share vouchers, staring off from their nominal
value. Every three months, the funds will publish quotations
for the vouchers, whose value would depend on the performance
of the companies listed for privatization. The stock market is
planned to open next year. -Michael Shafir

LATVIAN-GERMAN COOPERATION ACCORDS SIGNED. Latvian and German
media reported on 20-April that earlier that day Foreign Ministers
Georgs Andrejevs and Klaus Kinkel met in Bonn and that four accords
were signed dealing with the principles of bilateral relations,
cultural and educational exchanges, and economic relations and
investments. Kinkel said that Germany will make a strong effort
to promote closer Latvian relations with the European Community
and the Council of Europe. Noting that Germany is Latvia's leading
Western trading partner and leads other countries in the number
of joint ventures (registered at 167) in Latvia, Kinkel stressed
that the new accord helps legally secure German investments.
-Dzintra Bungs

RUBIKS APPEALS TO LITTLE ROCK. Eager to enlist US support in
legal proceedings against him for allegedly trying to overthrow
the government of Latvia and supporting the failed coup in Moscow
in August 1991, former Latvian Communist Party leader Alfreds
Rubiks, has appealed to the residents of Little Rock, Arkansas,
to endorse his status as honorary citizen of that city. He was
given this title in February 1988 when he visited the city and
the mayor was Bill Clinton. The Rubiks case is expected to go
to court on 14 June. The Latvian Supreme Court met on 15 April
to review the testimony against Rubiks by about 2,000-witnesses.
Rubiks's attorney, Aleksandr Ogurtsov, told the press that the
court session will not allow Rubiks to be released from custody
until the trial starts as was done in the case of Rubiks's codefendant
Ojars Potreki, Baltic media and an RFE/RL correspondent in Riga
reported on 15 and 16-April. -Dzintra Bungs

DEMONSTRATION IN LATVIA OVER RESIDENCE PERMITS. Radio Riga reported
that about 200 demonstrators gathered near the Supreme Council
to voice disapproval of parliament's decision to suspend temporarily
the issuance of temporary residence permits to indivuals whose
stay in Latvia is necessiated by the provisional deployment of
Russian troops. The parliament wants to discuss the matter in
detail this week so that the Latvian delegation can bring up
specific proposals on the issue at the next session of the Latvian-Russian
talks, scheduled for 28 April in Jurmala. -Dzintra Bungs

300 MILITARY MEN BROUGHT TO LITHUANIA TO FACILITATE TROOP PULLOUTS.
About 300 additional Russian unarmed military men are being brought
to Lithuania to help with the withdrawal of Third Coastal Defense
Division of Russia's Baltic Sea Fleet. More than 100 men arrived
in Klaipeda on 15 and 16 April, and the rest are expected this
week. Their arrival has been approved by Lithuanian Minister
of Defense Audrius Butkevicius. -Dzintra Bungs

RADIOACTIVE WASTE IN ESTONIAN LAKE. Environment Minister Andres
Tarand has warned that a lake near the town of Sillamae poses
serious dangers for the population because of the radioactive
wastes dumped there during the postwar decades, Baltic media
reported on 20 April. Local enterprises have reportedly dumped
thousands of tons of substances, including thorium, radium, calcium
sulfate, chlorides, and uranium wastes. As a consequence, radioactive
contamination has been registered in the local drinking water,
along the Estonian coast, and the Gulf of Finland. -Dzintra Bungs


[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Wendy Slater and Charles Trumbull



THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
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