The absence of alternatives clears the mind marvelously. - Henry Kissinger
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 47, 10 March 1993

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.





RUSSIA



CONGRESS TO REVIEW CONSTITIONALITY OF YELTSIN GOVERNMENT. The
Eighth session of the Russian Congress of People's Deputies opened
in the Kremlin on 10 March and was broadcast live on Russian
Television. In his opening speech, chairman Ruslan Khasbulatov,
condemned those "high officials" who threaten society with using
unconstitutional means to resolve the current political and economic
crisis. (Khasbulatov's statement clearly referred to Russian
President Boris Yeltsin.) Yeltsin's supporters attempted to exclude
from the agenda discussion of whether Russia's top officials
have acted in accord with the Constitution; after two votes it
was decided by a small majority to include the issue on the agenda.
The Congress, however, rejected the suggestion of a conservative
deputy to schedule debate on appealing to the Constitutional
Court to review Yeltsin's public statements in an effort to determine
if they were in line with the constitution. Julia Wishnevsky


KHASBULATOV WARNS YELTSIN. On the eve of the Congress of People's
Deputies, Ruslan Khasbulatov told journalists that the leadership
of the parliament will seek a dialogue with the executive and
a way out of the political crisis, Ostankino TV reported on 9
March. Khasbulatov said that he personally agrees with the referendum
questions proposed by Boris Yeltsin but does not know whether
the Congress accepts them. He stated that Yeltsin must bear responsibility
for a possible failure of the referendum if too few people show
up at the polls. He added that a failure of the referendum will
further destabilize the political situation in Russia. Alexander
Rahr

YELTSIN DENIES INTENTION TO DISSOLVE THE CONGRESS. At a meeting
with Russian lawmakers on 9 March, Yeltsin denied that he intends
to break up either the Congress of People's Deputies, the parliament,
or local soviets, Russian TV reported on 9 March. Yeltsin claimed
that the allegations of that sort are "planted" by his conservative
opponents in order to discredit reformers. According to Yeltsin,
when he told his radical supporters that the president had a
"third" and unconstitutional option to resolve the current constitutional
crises, he had not meant a military coup but rather something
like the adoption of a law on government. At a separate press
briefing, Ruslan Khasbulatov dismissed the idea of such a law,
saying that Russia already had the law on government, i.e., the
Constitution. Julia Wishnevsky

ROUNDTABLE URGES RESTRAINT. Representatives of the four main
political blocs of Russia (Civic Union, New Russia, Democratic
Choice and Russian Unity) organized a "roundtable" meeting on
9 March in preparation for the start of the Congress of People's
Deputies. ITAR-TASS described the "roundtable" as "unusually
representative," since it was attended by figures from groups
as diverse as the revived Communist Party and the most radical
wing of Democratic Russia. The participants adopted an appeal
to President Yeltsin and the Congress, in which, warning of the
threat of dictatorship, they called on both sides to show "maximum
responsibility and caution and to restrain from any actions which
flout the constitution." Wendy Slater

ASSURANCES OF THE ARMY'S NEUTRALITY. In remarks to reporters
on 9 March, Defense Minister Pavel Grachev gave assurances once
again that the army would remain neutral during the Congress
of People's Deputies. ITAR-TASS and Russian television quoted
Grachev as saying that the Army had not put a single unit on
alert before the last Congress and that it would follow the same
procedures for this one. He denied rumors that the Defense Ministry
and Air Force commands were preparing a missile attack against
key targets during the proceedings. Stephen Foye

YELTSIN PLANS TO HOLD PLEBISCITE. First Deputy Prime Minister
Vladimir Shumeiko told reporters on 9-March that President Yeltsin
is preparing to go ahead with a plebiscite if the Congress cancels
the 11 April referendum and rejects the president's new power-sharing
proposals, Russian and Western news agencies reported. Shumeiko
said that a governmental commission had already made preparations
for such a plebiscite and had drafted the necessary presidential
and governmental decrees. The vote, he said, may include questions
in addition to those already proposed by Yeltsin. Shumeiko noted
that although the plebiscite would not have the force of law,
it would act as "a powerful lever" and would "allow the president
to lean on the opinion of the people." Wendy Slater

PARLIAMENT DISMISSES YELTSIN'S QUESTIONS. At its last session,
held on 9 March, the parliament refused to pronounce judgment
on the questions suggested by Yeltsin to be put on the 11 April
referendum. Instead, the parliament ruled that this problem should
be decided by the Congress of People's Deputies, Russian TV reported.
Julia Wishnevsky

MEETING OF COUNCIL OF HEADS OF REPUBLICS. The meeting of the
Council of Heads of Republics on 9-March chaired by Yeltsin discussed
both the imminent Eighth Congress of People's Deputies and the
implementation of the federal treaty, ITAR-TASS reported. According
to Yeltsin, the Council decided to appeal to the Congress to
draw up and adopt a law on the principles of and mechanism for
implementing the treaty and suggested that a commission be set
up for this purpose chaired by the president. Ann Sheehy

LEADERS OF REPUBLICS, KRAIS, AND OBLASTS CALL FOR CANCELLATION
OF REFERENDUM. In appeals made on 9 March to the Eighth Congress
of People's Deputies, Yeltsin, deputies, and the Constitutional
Court, the heads of the soviets of the republics, krais, oblasts,
autonomous formations, and the cities of Moscow and St.-Petersburg
called for the cancellation of the referendum, ITAR-TASS reported.
They described the referendum as ill-prepared and said that the
resolution of the Seventh Congress decreeing the referendum had
not found mass support among the populace. They warned that the
holding of the referendum could have unforeseen consequences,
citing the negative results of Gorbachev's referendum of March
1991. Yeltsin told a meeting of deputies from a wide political
spectrum that the leaders of the republics, krais, and oblasts
were proposing that no referendums, elections, or other political
measures be held in 1993-4. Ann Sheehy

US ASSISTANCE TO CIS FOR NUCLEAR DISMANTLING ASSESSED. The New
York Times and Reuters reported on March 10 varying assessments
of the effectiveness of US efforts in assisting nuclear disarmament
in the former Soviet Union. Major General William Burns, responsible
for discussions with CIS states noted that there remained substantial
uncertainties concerning the disposition of the plutonium from
the weapons and that a final agreement for the US to purchase
highly enriched uranium from the warheads had not yet been signed,
despite earlier Russian reports that it had. Burns also noted
that negotiations were being hampered by Russia's continuing
concerns over secrecy and its belief that the plutonium from
the warheads has significant commercial value. John Lepingwell


FIRST CANDIDATES FOR BANKRUPTCY? ON 9 MARCH, THE INDUSTRIAL POLICY
COMMITTEE OF THE RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT DREW UP ITS FIRST LIST OF
ENTERPRISES TO BE CONSIDERED FOR BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS, ITAR-TASS
REPORTED. First Vice President Vladimir Shumeiko told a news
conference after the committee's session that 4-5 coal mines
and 4-5 enterprises in other sectors had been selected. (The
bankruptcy law came into effect on 1 March, although it is not
clear whether all of the enabling legislation is in place.) Keith
Bush

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

RUSSIAN MINERS POSTPONE STRIKE. Russian miners have decided to
postpone a strike planned for 10-March, AFP reported on 9 March.
By postponing the action, miners signal their intention to stay
out of the power struggle between Yeltsin and the Russian parliament,
expected to be played out at this week's session of the Congress
of People's Deputies. The miners already obtained pay hikes in
early February, but have put forward a further 18 demands concerned
with the future marketization of the coal industry. There have
been rumors that up to 20% of Russia's mines will have to be
closed once restructuring gets underway. Sheila Marnie

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

LIMITATIONS ON INFORMATION MEDIA IN TAJIKISTAN. Dushanbe's state
prosecutor has threatened to prosecute journalists who publish
"destabilizing" materials or incite interethnic or religious
hatred, ITAR-TASS reported on 9 March. The prosecutor, Salomiddin
Sharopov, said that much of the blame for the conflicts in Tajikistan
in 1992 can be attributed to the press and broadcast media. The
former dissident who headed the Tajik Radio and TV organization
under the coalition government that held power in Dushanbe through
much of the last half of 1992 has been arrested and charged with
inciting the civil war. According to the prosecutor, the editor
of the progressive newspaper Charogi ruz would have been arrested
too, but law enforcement officials have not apprehended him.
-Bess Brown

PRESSURE MOUNTS ON SERBS TO ACCEPT VANCE-OWEN PLAN. The 10 March
Los Angeles Times reports that the presidents of Russia, the
United States, and France have all urged the warring parties
in Bosnia to accept the two mediators' program to divide the
ethnically mixed republic into 10 highly autonomous regions.
The Bosnian government is apparently on the verge of agreeing
to it after receiving "certain assurances" from the US, according
to remarks to the Washington Post by the republic's UN ambassador.
The Serbs are balking, since they would have to renounce many,
if far from all of their conquests according to the plan. Yeltsin
said that "the parties to the conflict are confronted with the
choice between approving the basic components of that plan and
assuming responsibility for continued bloodshed." The Los Angeles
daily adds that his French counterpart pointed out that the agreement
"is not perfect, but we know of no better instrument of peace."
-Patrick Moore

BOSNIAN UPDATE. International media said on 9-March that a UN
relief convoy reached Gorazde in eastern Bosnia that day, but
that the Serbs had prevented another mission from reaching Konjevic
Polje. During the night American aircraft made their tenth airdrop
over the embattled republic, this time at Srebrenica. The town
has 4,000 refugees from Cerska, which the Serbs took last week.
The World Health Organization, moreover, wants to evacuate 96
critically injured people from there, but officials fear that
any move to evacuate people from Srebrenica could easily turn
into a mass exodus in the area. Elsewhere, the US government
has issued its sixth report on alleged war crimes in the former
Yugoslavia, most of which are attributed to Serbs. In New York,
the UN high commissioner for refugees said the Serbian policy
of ethnic cleansing has created a trail of "murder, torture,
mutilation, and rape" across the republic. -Patrick Moore

ANTIGOVERNMENT COMMEMORATION IN BELGRADE. Vuk Draskovic, leader
of the opposition Serbian Renewal Movement, addressed a rally
of about 1,000 people to mark the second anniversary of the 1991
opposition-led demonstrations against the government of Slobodan
Milosevic. Draskovic told the crowd "Milosevic's regime is living
its last months. The hungry will soon revolt, and we are tired
of war and destruction. Serbia is in a quagmire, but we will
rise again." A few hundred demonstrators tried unsuccessfully
to convince Draskovic to take over Belgrade's television station,
which they consider a mouthpiece for Milosevic. Draskovic had
asked his followers earlier not to demonstrate, fearing a clash
with police. The protesters then stoned the police after a popular
street singer was arrested. Several injuries were reported before
the protest ended. Radios Serbia and B92 carried the report.
-Milan Andrejevich

KOSOVO SITUATION UPDATE. Belgrade TV reported on 9 March that
Serbia's National Assembly supports a government proposal calling
for legislative elections in Kosovo patterned after the December
1992 elections in Vojvodina. The Democratic League, Kosovo's
main Albanian party, rejected the proposal, saying the Albanians
of Kosovo have already elected a parliament in unofficial elections
in May 1992. Albanians constitute more than 90% of Kosovo's population.
Borba's Pristina correspondent reports on alleged foreign intelligence
activities in Kosovo. Pristina police sources claim to have evidence
of German, Austrian, Turkish, and Albanian secret services working
locally to subvert Serbia with the aim of provoking outside intervention.
The Borba reporter's sources claim the agents travel together
with foreign parliamentary and human rights delegations. Meanwhile,
Jerlab Gorani, head of Kosovo Independent Trade Unions, charged
that Kosovo's 70% unemployment rate is due to Serbian ethnic
discrimination, Radio Serbia reports. -Milan Andrejevich

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTS IN SLOVAKIA. Speaking to reporters in London
on 8 March, Premier Vladimir Meciar said that Slovakia will not
hold a second round of voucher privatization but will sell enterprises
directly to foreign firms in public competition. He contradicted
Privatization Minister Lubomir Dolgos, who said in early January
that Slovakia would launch the second round of voucher privatization.
On 9 March Dolgos was quoted in the Journal of Commerce as saying
that voucher privatization takes much longer than anticipated.
The newspaper also said that the government is drawing up a package
of incentives, including tax holidays, for potential Western
investors. Also on the 9th, in an interview published in the
Czech daily Rude pravo, Peter Mihok, chairman of the Slovak Chamber
of Commerce, said that banks have been unable to issue credits
since October 1992. Banks have no funds to provide credits, Mihok
said, and if they could provide them they would have to charge
an interest rate of up to 28%. Mihok criticized a recent government
decision to reduce hard currency supplies to private business.
He said the step is likely to reduce imports and make them more
expensive. He argued that the Slovak Central Bank may be heightening
inflationary pressures. -Jiri Pehe

TALKS ON TIGHTENING CZECH-SLOVAK BORDER. Czech Foreign Minister
Josef Zieleniec and Slovak Foreign Minister Milan Knazko met
in Brussels on 9-March to discuss the Czech proposal for tightening
the Czech-Slovak border. CTK reports Zieleniec as saying that
the proposal seeks to fill gaps in the existing border arrangement.
According to Zieleniec, citizens from both republics living within
20-25 kilometers of the border would be permitted unlimited movement
across the border without special permits; other citizens could
also cross the border without restrictions but would need valid
passports. Foreigners and all goods would be allowed to cross
only at certain points. Meanwhile, the new Slovak ambassador
to Prague, Ivan Mjartan, who took up his post on 9 March, informed
the media that the Czech and Slovak Republics will soon start
talks on the new border regime. In Bratislava, Filip Sedivy,
the new Czech ambassador to Slovakia, who also took up his post
on 9 March, told the Slovak media that he had met briefly with
President Michal Kovac to discuss the Czech government's proposal
on tightening the border. -Jiri Pehe

POLISH-GERMAN ASYLUM TALKS. Official silence reigned in Warsaw
on 9 March after the third round of bilateral talks on planned
revisions to Germany's law on political asylum that would expel
refugees to the countries from which they entered Germany. The
communique issued after the talks said merely that an agreement
on "migrational movements" and Poland's "refugee infrastructure"
had been discussed. German negotiators quoted by Western agencies
said they are optimistic an agreement will be reached before
the revised law takes effect. Polish officials were more circumspect,
but suggested that the German side agreed not to expel to Poland
"pre-existing cases:" failed asylum-seekers already in Germany.
A fourth round of negotiations is scheduled for 5-6 April in
Bonn. -Louisa Vinton

PROSECUTOR TO CHARGE KACZYNSKI. The Polish prosecutor's office
announced on 9 March that it plans to press slander charges against
Center Alliance leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski in connection with
his repeated allegations that President Lech Walesa's closest
aide, Mieczyslaw Wachowski, was an agent of the communist secret
police. The prosecutor's office requested on 9 March that the
Sejm lift Kaczynski's immunity from prosecution. Kaczynski said
he would support this request. In a brief submitted to the Sejm
leadership, deputy prosecutor general Stanislaw Iwanicki charged
that "the information presented publicly by J. Kaczynski about
M. Wachowski's past is not true." The only evidence so far presented
by Kaczynski-a photo of men in soccer shorts who were participants
in a 1975 internal affairs ministry course-has been discredited.
Forensics experts recently concluded that the contested figure
in the photo was Lublin's police commissioner, not Wachowski.
Kaczynski nonetheless announced through an intermediary that
he upholds his charges and welcomes a trial. -Louisa Vinton

HUNGARIAN-UKRAINIAN MILITARY RELATIONS. Newly appointed Political
State Secretary of the Defense Ministry Laszlo Szendrei pays
a two-day official visit to Ukraine starting on 10 March to meet
with First Deputy Defense Minister Col. Gen. Ivan V. Bizhan,
MTI reports. The topics of discussion are expected to be regional
security, the Yugoslav crisis, and bilateral military cooperation.
Hungary has already signed several military cooperation agreements
with the Ukraine and a military attache was posted to Kiev last
year. Szendrei will also make preparations for the upcoming Ukrainian
visit of Defense Minister Lajos Fur. -Judith Pataki

DELORS WRITES ANTALL. EC Commission Chairman Jacques Delors has
written to Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall concerning
the Gabcikovo dam construction issue, MTI reported on 9 March.
Delors warns that the lack of agreement on the Gabcikovo issue
could heighten political tension and imperil cooperation among
the countries of the Visegrad Group. Delors says he finds the
Hungarian stand realistic and stands ready to help find a solution
to the present dead-end. Delors calls for political decisions
at the highest level are to find a solution. The Foreign Ministry
spokesman outlining the letter for the press added that Antall
still has not received an answer to his 5 February proposal for
a high-level meeting with his Slovak counterpart. The spokesman
stressed that Hungary expects Slovakia to state unequivocally
that it is ready to comply with the EC's 16 February proposals
prior to the high-level meeting. -Judith Pataki

ROMANIAN PARLIAMENT DEBATES ECONOMIC PROGRAM. On 9 March the
two houses in joint session debated the government's four-year
economic program, which was presented by Prime Minister Vacaroiu
on the 4th. The austerity program includes reforms aimed at ending
price subsidies for staples and services in May and gradually
cutting inflation over the next four years. It also calls for
privatizing 20% of state-owned industries. Opposition leaders
attacked the program as too confusing and called for parliamentary
vote. At the start of the debates, Corneliu Coposu, leader of
the National Peasant Party-Christian Democratic urged Vacaroiu
to assume responsibility for the proposed reforms. Under the
constitution the government is not bound to submit its program
to a vote automatically, but it may hold such a ballot if it
wishes. Radio Bucharest broadcast the debates live. -Dan Ionescu


GERMANY TO REMOVE TOXIC WASTE FROM ROMANIA. Two trains arrived
on 9 March to take back more than 400 tons of toxic waste to
Germany, Radio Bucharest reports. The trains, with 54 cars carrying
more than 3,000 special steel barrels, will load the waste, which
was illegally shipped to Romania last year and dumped at sites
near Sibiu. Environment Minister Aurel Constantin Ilie told Parliament
on 8 March that Bucharest allowed the material to enter because
it was presented as agricultural aid. Germany has agreed to pay
for the return of the waste. The costs of the operation are put
at some 2.3 million marks. -Dan Ionescu

BULGARIA, ROMANIA CONSIDER DANUBE DAM. Bulgaria and Romania are
investigating the possibility of building a dam and hydroelectric
power complex on the Danube, Reuters reported on 9 March. Ivan
Sotirov, Deputy Chairman of Bulgaria's National Electricity Company,
told the agency the two countries have agreed to approach an
international consortium to finance a feasibility study of the
project. Preliminary estimates suggest that total costs could
reach $2 billion, but foreign investments will only be invited
at a later stage. Sotirov said the project could lead to improvements
both for Danube shipping-since the dam would help to stabilize
the water level-and cross-river traffic-by combining it with
a road and rail link. The prime site is 300 km (190 miles) west
of the Black Sea, between the Bulgarian port of Nikopol and the
Romanian port of Turnu Magurele. -Kjell Engelbrekt

MOLDOVA'S MAJORITY PARTY OUTLINES VIEWS. Agrarian Democratic
Party leader Dumitru Motpan urged in the party's newly launched
newspaper, Pamint si oameni [Land and People], of 8 March that
the specific interests of the Gagauz and the nontitular population
in Transdniester be fully taken into account by Chisinau in devising
forms of local autonomy compatible with Moldova's integrity.
The solution in Transdniester also depends on Moldovan-Russian
cooperation, as "Russia has definite interests in the region
and Moldova can not afford to ignore them." Once the status of
Transdniester is settled and Russia's 14th Army withdraws, Moldova
will pursue "a policy of nonalignment," Motpan reaffirmed. A
political statement in the same issue dismissed the opposition
Popular Front's desire for unification with Romania as "out of
touch with the people" and vowed to realize Moldova's "unique
historic chance to be an independent state." Newly dominant in
the government and parliament, and best organized in the countryside,
the Agrarians enjoy a clear head start in the elections expected
for later this year. -Vladimir Socor

BELARUSIAN PRIME MINISTER PROPOSES CLOSER ECONOMIC UNION. Vyacheslav
Kebich told a press conference in Minsk on 9 March that he will
shortly propose that the CIS countries enter into a closer economic
union, Belinform-TASS reports. He said such a union is necessary
because the processes of disintegration are placing production
on the edge of catastrophe. Kebich said his ideas are shared
by Russia and Kazakhstan and that such a union would only strengthen
the commonwealth. Kebich added that he is more and more convinced
that without Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and some other republics
Belarus can not exist, let alone prosper. -Ann Sheehy

UKRAINIAN-RUSSIAN ENERGY DISPUTE EASES. Ukrainian Prime Minister
Leonid Kuchma and his Russian counterpart, Viktor Chernomyrdin,
have resolved the deadlock between their two nations over oil
deliveries for the moment, according to Reuters on 9-March. Last
month Russia threatened to cut off supplies, ostensibly because
Ukraine was not paying its bills (other political issues are
involved as well). No details of the agreement between Kuchma
and Chernomyrdin were given, but it appears to be quick-fix until
the two can discuss the issue more fully later this week. Beyond
this agreement, the Ukrainians reportedly also secured 7.1 million
tons of Russian oil with a commitment to invest some 6.4 billion
rubles (about $10 million) in Siberian oil facilities. -Erik
Whitlock

LITHUANIA'S GAS DEBT TO RUSSIA. The government is encountering
difficulties in fulfilling its pledge that the state enterprise
Lietuvos Dujos will pay its debts for natural gas to Lentrangaz,
a St. Petersburg concern, by 1 April, BNS reported on 9 March.
It has managed to pay back only $680,000 plus DM 179,000 (about
$110,000)-payment for about one day's supply. On 1 March the
debt was about 31 billion Lithuanian coupons and is increasing
due to fines of 0.05-0.15% each day If the debt is not paid,
Lentrangaz may cut off supplies. -Saulius Girnius

LATVIA, MOSCOW COUNCIL AGREE ON ECONOMIC COOPERATION. Diena reported
on 8 March that Evgenii Panteleev, head of the industry section
of the Moscow City Council, has signed an agreement on trade
and economic cooperation for 1993 with Latvia. Under the accord,
Latvia will provide the Russian capital with foodstuffs and medicine,
receiving in return rolled metal and rubber products. Moscow
also agreed to encourage the establishment of a Latvian school
there. The accord supersedes the decision initiated by Moscow
Mayor Yurii Luzhkov early in February to institute economic sanction
against Latvia and Estonia because of alleged human rights violations.
-Dzintra Bungs

BALTIC FOREIGN MINISTERS EYE TURMOIL IN RUSSIA. After an intensive
day of discussions in Tallinn on 9 March, Trivimi Velliste of
Estonia, Georgs Andrejevs of Latvia, and Povilas Gylys of Lithuania
signed a protocol pledging closer cooperation, notably on economic
and security issues. They agreed to meet twice a year to seek
solutions to issues of common concern. In a joint communique
they repeated demands for an early, orderly, and total withdrawal
of all foreign troops from their countries. More than 50,000
Russian troops are still estimated to be deployed in the Baltic
States. The ministers also expressed concern over the possible
consequences of the political turmoil in Russia for their countries,
Baltic and Western agencies report. -Dzintra Bungs

As of 1200 CET Compiled by Suzanne Crow and Charles Trumbull

THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal
mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions,
or additional copies, please contact: in North America: Mr. Brian
Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907; Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783;
Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse 67, 8000
Munich 22, Germany;.Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2624; Fax:
(+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG 1993, RFE/RL, Inc.
All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole