The sum of human wisdom is not contained in any one language, and no single language is capable of expressing all forms and degrees of human comprehension. - Ezra Pound
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 44, 05 March 1993

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.





RUSSIA



CONGRESS DATE SET. The Russian parliament has voted to convene
an extraordinary Congress of People's Deputies on 10 March, ITAR-TASS
reported on 5-March. The parliament's conservative majority wants
to use the Congress to annul the proposed referendum on the basic
principles of the future Russian Constitution and to strip President
Boris Yeltsin of most of his powers. Yeltsin needs the Congress
to adopt his proposal for a constitutional agreement, which would
preserve his own powers and reduce these of the legislature for
a period of stabilization. Yeltsin had rejected invitations from
the deputies to attend the parliamentary sessions on 4 and 5
March, but called a cabinet meeting for 5-March. -Alexander Rahr
and Wendy Slater

DEPUTIES PRESS YELTSIN ON MILITARY. On the initiative of hardline
deputy Sergei Baburin, the parliament at its 4 March session
asked President Yeltsin to present the deputies with stenographic
accounts of the meeting of the Security Council and Yeltsin's
meeting with representatives of the military, both held on 3
March. Some parliamentarians fear that Yeltsin had discussed
the introduction of emergency rule with the military, according
to ITAR-TASS on 4 March. Yeltsin has stated that if a constitutional
agreement is not reached with the legislature, he will pursue
a "final option," leading Yeltsin's opponents to think that the
president is planning a coup. Yeltsin also asked Foreign Minister
Andrei Kozyrev not to leave the country until the Congress meets
on 10 March. Meanwhile, Yeltsin expressed interest in meeting
leaders of the communist faction for a dialogue prior to the
Congress. -Alexander Rahr

SKOKOV DENIES COUP RUMOUR. The Secretary of the Russian Security
Council, Yurii Skokov, told parliament that Wednesday's meeting
of the Council had not dealt with the issue of introducing emergency
rule in the country, Western news agencies reported on 4-March.
Skokov said that he is being attacked from various sides, accused
of preparing a coup, but added that these accusations do not
concern him. Parliamentary speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov complained
that he has been isolated from the work of the Security Council.
He stated that if it turns out that the supreme military command
has sided with Yeltsin in the present political dispute, then
Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev will be sacked. The liberal
newspaper Izvestiya reported on March 3 that military leaders
had expressed concern over the continuing power struggle. -Alexander
Rahr

HARD-LINE OFFICERS WARN OF COUP. The leader of the militantly
nationalist Russian Officers' Union charged on 4 March that Yeltsin's
meeting with the military leadership was connected to preparations
for introducing a state of emergency and presidential rule in
Russia, AFP reported. Stanislav Terekhov, who was recently elected
chairman of an unofficial military association said to represent
the All-Union Officers Assembly, claimed to have obtained from
"secret but very reliable sources" plans for a coup that would
be launched by Yeltsin if the legislature refused to support
his plans for resolving the crisis of power in Russia. Terekhov
alleged that the Defense and Interior Ministries had also drafted
contingency plans for creating special military detachments to
reinforce police units. AFP also reported that Terekhov had met
with Valerii Zorkin, chairman of the Russian Constitutional Court,
to warn him of Yeltsin's plans. Terekhov has long called for
the ouster of Yeltsin and the dismissal of Russian Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev. -Stephen Foye

DATE OF CONGRESS CRUCIAL. The deputy parliamentary speaker, Nikolai
Ryabov, reminded deputies on 4 March that parliament had to convene
the Congress no later than 10 March in order not to be held responsible
for spoiling plans for the referendum, ITAR-TASS reported. By
law, the questions for the referendum must be decided upon 30
days before the voting, which is scheduled for 11 April. Conservative
deputies in the Russian Unity parliamentary faction had attempted
to convene the Congress on 17 March, which would have scotched
Yeltsin's plans to hold a referendum and allowed them to set
their own agenda for negotiating the future constitutional structure
of Russia. -Wendy Slater

US OFFICIALS CONCERNED OVER START TREATIES. Senior US government
experts have told Reuters of their apprehensions that Russia
may never approve the START-2 Treaty, the news agency reported
on 4 March. One expert said that the treaty had become a "symbol"
of the radical reform efforts that Yeltsin had backed, and that
growing opposition to it might lead to the treaty being voted
down in the Russian parliament. The experts also reportedly expressed
concern over the fate of the START-1 Treaty, pointing in this
instance to opposition to ratification in Ukraine. -Stephen Foye


COMBAT READINESS PLUMMETS IN PACIFIC FLEET. A naval captain tasked
by local authorities to investigate living conditions in the
Russian Pacific Fleet has told RIA that the fleet's battle worthiness
has plummeted and that servicemen are living under appalling
conditions. According to a Reuters report on 4 March, Viktor
Cherepkov said that approximately one half of the servicemen
serving on the remote island base of Russky were in the sick
bay or in hospitals. He charged that Pacific Fleet commanders
were guilty of criminal negligence. The investigation comes in
the wake of a report in early February that four conscripts in
the Pacific Fleet had died of pneumonia caused by malnutrition
and atrocious living conditions. On 2 March Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev warned that heads would roll for the negligence.
-Stephen Foye

KOKOSHIN IN ST. PETERSBURG. Russia's First Deputy Defense Minister
in charge of military-technical policy, Andrei Kokoshin, flew
to St. Petersburg on 4-March for consultations with military
and defense industrial leaders in the region. According to ITAR-TASS,
Kokoshin told a gathering of Leningrad Military District commanders
that an increase in government defense orders was necessary to
stabilize the situation in the defense industrial sector and
to ensure that Russia retained the capability to produce advanced
weaponry. He said that a 67% decline in defense procurement in
1992 had been the result in part of a decision to increase spending
on programs aimed at raising living standards for servicemen.
He added that the Defense Ministry had worked out a program for
arms production through the end of the decade. On 17 February
ITAR-TASS reported that Kokoshin had been named chairman of a
newly created independent council on military-technical policy.
-Stephen Foye

KOHL VISITS YELTSIN, DISCUSSES G-7 SUMMIT. On the evening of
3 March German Chancellor Helmut Kohl stopped off in Moscow while
returning to Germany from a visit to South Korea. Kohl met briefly
with Russian President Boris Yeltsin, and discussed Yeltsin's
current political difficulties. Western news agencies reported
that Kohl indicated that the G-7 countries would decide within
a week whether to invite Yeltsin to the forthcoming G-7 summit
in Tokyo. Russia has been hinting that it would appreciate such
an invitation, but any invitation needs to be approved by all
the G-7 members. Such a trip would provide Yeltsin with the opportunity
to discuss the Kuril islands and economic aid issues with Japanese
leaders, an opportunity missed after the cancellation of his
planned fall 1992 visit. -John Lepingwell

GAIDAR ON RUSSIAN UNEMPLOYMENT. Addressing a meeting in Washington
DC on 4 March, former acting prime minister Egor Gaidar confirmed
that unemployment in Russia is still mostly restricted to female
white-collar workers. He said that, thanks to the continuing
tendency of Russian enterprise directors to cut real wages and
working hours before shedding labor, unemployment still only
amounts to somewhere between 0.8% and 1.2% of the workforce.
(The figures are for 1 February 1993.) He said he believed that,
"under any kind of policy that we can realistically expect" in
Russia, unemployment is unlikely to rise above 4% of the workforce
by the end of 1993. -Elizabeth Teague

. . . HARD CURRENCY AND GOLD RESERVES. In answer to a question,
Gaidar said that Russia's hard currency reserves as of 1 January
1992 had been "virtually zero"; on 1 January 1993, they amounted
to US $2 billion. One billion of that was IMF money; the other
billion was money which the Gaidar government had managed to
accumulate. As for gold reserves, Gaidar said that they were
290 tons on 1 January 1992, and 380-tons on 1 January 1993-"not
a lot," Gaidar said, "but moving in the right direction." He
also said that the Russian Central Bank is thinking of raising
interest rates from 6% to 8% per month. This, he said, would
do nothing for the economy but would nonetheless be important,
since it would "raise expectations" of a further possible increase
and therefore send a significant signal. -Elizabeth Teague

RUSSIA'S FOOD PURCHASES ON THE WORLD MARKET. On 3 March Russian
First Deputy Prime Minister Aleksandr Shokhin left Washington
without any agreement on Russia's overdue payment for past US
grain deliveries. The total arrears for all CIS states is put
at over $400 million. On the same day, Australia announced that
it would resume selling grain to Russia, as Russia had resumed
payments for wheat shipped more than one year ago; and on 4 March,
the New Zealand agricultural minister told the Russian delegation
headed by Vice-President Aleksandr Rutskoi that Russia's outstanding
debt of about $200 million must be paid before further sales
of agricultural produce could be contracted. -Keith Bush

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



KAZAKHSTAN STATE COUNSELOR ON YELTSIN'S REMARKS. State Counselor
of Kazakhstan Tulegan Zhukeev commented in Alma-Ata on 4 March
on Yeltsin's remarks at his recent meeting with the Civic Union
on a special status for Russia within the CIS and confederative
ties, ITAR-TASS reported. Zhukeev said that in his view it was
best to drop talk of a confederation for the present and try
to strengthen the CIS institutions that already exist. He stated
that at the January summit in Minsk no real economic, let alone
political, steps had been taken. He also maintained that, if
the CIS states observed their existing agreements, there would
be no need for special powers and an appeal to the UN. Zhukeev
went on to argue in favor of the Hague-type interstate court
proposed by Kazakhstan's president Nursultan Nazarbaev six months
ago and now under consideration by CIS states. Zhukeev said that
such a body could deal with questions of preventing conflicts
on the territory of the former Soviet Union. -Ann Sheehy

NEGOTIATIONS IN TAJIKISTAN. Tajikistan's Foreign Minister Rashid
Alimov told an ITAR-TASS correspondent on 4 March that there
had been no fighting in the country for a week because a delegation
from Gorno-Badakhshan, the mountainous eastern region that has
supported the democratic and Islamic coalition against pro-Communist
forces during the 1992 Tajik civil war, has been negotiating
with government officials in Dushanbe. According to Alimov, the
Tajik government is leaving the problem of disarming anti-government
groups in Badakhshan to the region's own authorities. Alimov
also reported on Tajik government measures, including the opening
of a consular station on the Afghan border, to prepare for the
return of the thousands of refugees who fled to Afghanistan in
December and January to escape the supporters of Tajikistan's
present government. -Bess Brown

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



UN FACES DILEMMA IN EAST BOSNIA. International media reported
on 4 and 5 March that the UN said it had reached an agreement
with Bosnian Serb leaders for a cease-fire over the coming weekend
to allow Muslims to leave Cerska, Srebrenica, and Zepa. About
10,000 Muslims could be involved, almost half of whom are children,
sick, wounded, or elderly camping out in the open. While the
international organization wants to rescue these people, it is
again faced with the familiar dilemma that to evacuate refugees
from Serb-held areas is, in effect, to help ethnic cleansing.
One UN worker told the BBC that he did not like being part of
a "bus service for ethnic cleansing." Meanwhile, the Serbs pressed
their attacks in what UN human rights envoy and former Polish
Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki called "intensifying ethnic
cleansing." The 5 March Washington Post also quoted a local Serb
commander as calling his troops "the most civilized in the world."
Finally, Bosnian armed forces commander Sefer Halilovic told
Reuters that intervention by UN troops was necessary to stop
"the savagery of the chetniks." -Patrick Moore

CLINTON SAYS US WON'T BE INTIMIDATED. The 5-March Los Angeles
Times quotes president Bill Clinton as saying: "I don't think
the American people can afford to be afraid." He was referring
to veiled threats by Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic to
the effect that continued US relief missions to the Muslims could
prompt Serbian terrorism against America. Karadzic, who speaks
excellent English, later claimed that his thoughts had been mistranslated
and withdrew part, but not all, of his original statement. Elsewhere,
US Secretary of State Warren Christopher said that a grenade
attack on the US embassy in Belgrade would not affect American
policy. -Patrick Moore

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS IN THE YUGOSLAV AREA. The Washington Post
and New York Times on 5 March say that the Bosnian peace talks
have reached an impasse. Bosnian Muslim leaders are now not convinced
that the cease-fire they had earlier accepted goes far enough
to ensure UN control over Serb heavy weapons, and they , like
the Serbs, remain opposed to the plan to divide their republic
into ten cantons. Meanwhile in Bosnia, US aircraft made the fifth
airdrop in as many days, although Serbs continued to block land-based
convoys. In Geneva, some UN experts said they regretted that
the five-member war-crimes panel includes no women. The International
Herald Tribune quotes them as saying that this was a "defect,"
since the issue of mass rape as a Serbian political weapon against
primarily Muslim civilians is a major war-crimes issue. Finally,
the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reports that a UN investigation
team is slated to reach Vukovar in Serbian-occupied Croatia on
5 March. The forensics and other experts are looking into partially
confirmed reports that there are mass graves of sick and wounded
Croatian hospital patients and soldiers near Vukovar, which fell
to Serb forces in November 1991. -Patrick Moore

HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTER ON HUNGARIAN-SERB RELATIONS. Geza
Jeszenszky said in an interview with RFE/RL's Hungarian broadcasting
service on 4 March that Budapest's future relations with Serbia
depend upon the status of the large Hungarian minority in Serbia's
Vojvodina province. Jeszenszky also said that the situation of
minorities in Vojvodina had deteriorated a great deal lately
and that he does not understand why the Serbs oppose a form of
autonomy for Hungarians in Vojvodina. -Karoly Okolicsanyi

BULGARIAN MERCENARIES MAY BE PROSECUTED. In a declaration adopted
on 4 March, the Bulgarian government says it will prosecute any
of its citizens who have committed war crimes while fighting
in former Yugoslavia, BTA reports. Although there is no law which
explicitly prohibits Bulgarians from serving as mercenaries,
the government warns it will hold responsible those who "have
committed or ordered crimes against peace and humanity, offenses
against the laws and practice of warfare, as well as gross and
substantial violations of human rights." During the last couple
of months there have been occasional press reports suggesting
that Bulgarian citizens are taking part in the fighting in Bosnia,
but no definite proof has been presented. -Kjell Engelbrekt

SUCHOCKA APPEALS FOR BRITISH INVESTMENT. On the last day of her
official visit to Britain, Polish Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka
on 4 March urged the Confederation of British Industry, an organization
of 250,000 firms, to increase their investment in Poland. She
stressed that the risk is lower than her audience probably imagined
and that the Polish market is stable. Poland does not need a
"new Marshall Plan," she said, but rather is counting on better
access to Western markets and rapid integration with the EC.
Gazeta Wyborcza reports that Suchocka named 2002 as an appropriate
date for full EC membership. Poland is Britain's largest trade
partner in Eastern Europe, with imports from Britain worth $670
million and exports to Britain worth $560 million in 1992. -Louisa
Vinton

NEW DELAY FOR POLISH MASS PRIVATIZATION. Although a final vote
on the issue was scheduled for 4-March in the Sejm, yet another
hitch has developed in Poland's long delayed mass privatization
program. After a full day of debate, the mass privatization bills
were returned to commission because of the large number of amendments
proposed from the floor. The plan submitted to the parliament
proposes privatizing 600 firms through the distribution to the
public of shares in a dozen mutual investment funds. To participate,
citizens would pay a registration fee worth about 10% of the
average wage. Employees of privatized firms would receive 10%
of the shares in their firms free of charge. The program is designed
both to improve the management of the chosen firms and to give
the broader public a chance at ownership. The mass privatization
program is supported by the government coalition but opposed
by the rest of the parliament. The final vote, expected in the
next few weeks, is too close to call. -Louisa Vinton

BALCEROWICZ OFF THE HOOK. The Polish Sejm on 5 March voted down
a motion that would have forced former Deputy Prime Minister
Leszek Balcerowicz to face charges before the Tribunal of State.
The vote was 159 to 150 with 73 abstentions, PAP reports. A Sejm
commission had recommended charging Balcerowicz with improper
supervision of the "creation of legal acts" in connection with
"Schnappsgate," a scandal in which a legal loophole permitted
the tax-free import of huge quantities of alcohol in 1990. The
attempt to bring charges against Balcerowicz is highly politicized,
and two similar efforts were voted down in the past. The debate
on the issue, held on 4 March, was bitter and personal. Former
Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki protested that there was "a
horrible disproportion" in attempts to "trample [Balcerowicz]
in the same mud" as true criminals and urged the Sejm to rise
above "petty acts of revenge." A peasant deputy responded by
charging Mazowiecki with "escaping from a sinking ship" when
he resigned after his defeat in the 1990 presidential elections.
These remarks in turn drew indignant protests from Mazowiecki's
party. -Louisa Vinton

VACAROIU PRESENTS REPORT, PLAN TO PARLIAMENT. Prime minister
Nicolae Vacaroiu presented a report on 4 March to the two chambers
of the Romanian parliament on the government's activity in its
first 100-days and the future strategy for reforms. He said the
new planned strategy abandons what was termed as "classical liberalism"
and calls for more state intervention in the economy. The plan
calls for privatizing 20% of state industry and ending the last
subsidies on prices for foodstuff and services. Inflation, Vacaroiu
said in a speech carried live by Radio Bucharest, should be brought
down to 80% from the present 200% and by 1996 it should be no
higher than 15%. The parliament will start debating the plan
on 9 March. -Michael Shafir

LABOR UNREST CONTINUES IN ROMANIA. Thousands of workers demonstrated
again in Bucharest on 4 March, demanding wage rises and job security.
It was the second consecutive day that the Romanian capital was
besieged by workers' protests. This time, the demonstration was
organized by the Univers trade union confederation, which represents
175,000 employees in the communications, power, and gas industries.
Union leaders quoted by Radio Bucharest said they demanded that
the government double the minimum monthly pay. The Alfa and Fratia
trade union confederations announced on 4 March that sanctions
would be undertaken unless the government and the representatives
of the employers sign the country-wide collective working contract
by 5 March. The government said it would start negotiations over
pay rises and other labor demands next week. Also on 4-March,
the federation of trade unions representing teachers declared
a two-hour warning strike. -Michael Shafir

ROMANIANS FLOCK TO ARGENTINE EMBASSY FOR IMMIGRATION VISAS. Thousands
of Romanians have been crowding Argentina's embassy in Bucharest
this week for visa forms, after Argentina announced new immigration
opportunities. Reuter quoted an embassy official as saying about
11,000 people had come to the embassy since the announcement
was made on 1-March. The embassy was besieged despite heavy snowfalls
in Bucharest in the last two days. According to data released
by the ministry of interior on 3 March, 222,670 Romanian citizens
have applied for, and been granted, the right to settle abroad
since 1990. However, many more Romanians are known to have emigrated
without an official request. -Michael Shafir

MOLDOVA PROTESTS YELTSIN'S "SPECIAL POWERS" REQUEST. In a statement
issued on 4-March, Moldova's Foreign Ministry expressed "astonishment
and concern" over Russian President Boris Yeltsin's public request
on 28 February that Russia be given an international mandate
and "special powers" as "guarantor of peace and security" on
the territory of the former USSR. Russia's claim "contravenes
the norms of international law" and "Moldova will resolutely
reject any attempt at intervention in its internal affairs,"
the Moldovan statement said. "All disputed issues must be resolved
in accordance with international law and with the active participation
of international organizations including the UN and the CSCE,"
Moldova's statement said. -Vladimir Socor

MOLDOVAN PRESIDENT, RUSSIAN DEPUTIES FIRM UP CONSENSUS. Mircea
Snegur met on 4 March with the parliamentary deputies of the
Soglasie [Accord] Club, consisting of virtually all the Russian
and "Russian-speaking" deputies from the right bank of the Dniester,
where 70% of Moldova's Slavic population resides. The deputies,
who form a component of the parliamentary majority and whose
nominees sit in the government, reiterated their support for
Moldovan statehood and for Snegur's call for a referendum to
confirm Moldova's independence, Basapress reported. They also
urged that the question of administrative autonomy for the left
bank of the Dniester and the Gagauz-inhabited areas be resolved
in close linkage with the process of debating and adopting the
new Moldovan constitution, in order to ensure the latter's acceptance
by the left-bank Russians and the Gagauz. The deputies urged
the publication of native-language textbooks in greater print
runs and at lower prices in order to facilitate the Russian-speakers'
study of the state language. They further requested an extension
of the application deadline for Moldovan citizenship (non-natives
are automatically eligible for citizenship under Moldova's "zero
option," but most have not yet applied). The deputies also offered
to "build bridges" between the Moldovan parliament and Russia's
Supreme Soviet. Snegur promised to support the deputies' proposals
and requests. -Vladimir Socor

TURBULENCE IN BULGARIAN TV. Protests against the sacking of Stefan
Dimitrov, head of the first channel of Bulgarian TV, on 4 March
prompted the parliamentary Committee on Radio and Television
to demand a moratorium on personnel changes in the organization,
BTA reports. Dimitrov was fired by acting General Director Militsa
Traykova, who had replaced Asen Agov on 24 February as the result
of a parliamentary decision. While President Zhelyu Zhelev said
he was concerned that the Bulgarian TV is being "destabilized,"
trade union branches are demanding that Dimitrov be reinstated
immediately and argue that Traykova has no right to carry out
major changes as she only holds a temporary mandate. Twenty-two
intellectuals said the incident shows that freedom of expression
in Bulgaria is under attack from neocommunists. -Kjell Engelbrekt


KOZLOVSKY CALLS FOR END TO POLITICS IN ARMY. Belarus Defense
Minister Pavel Kozlovsky has put forward a proposal that would
forbid servicemen from taking part in political activities even
in their free time and when they are off-base. According to a
Belinform-TASS report on 4 March, Kozlovsky made the proposal,
which would involve an amendment to the law "on the status of
servicemen," before the parliamentary commission for national
security, defense, and crime fighting. The law now reads that
servicemen can take part in political activities on their own
time. The commission reportedly supported Kozlovsky, and the
proposal is to be discussed in the parliament. -Stephen Foye


RUSSIAN PLANES PREVENTED FROM WITHDRAWING TROOPS FROM ESTONIA.
Major Valerii Sinyavsky, head of the Russian garrison in Tartu
told RFE/RL on 4 March that Russia's 196th air transport regiment
is supposed to leave Tartu by the end of April, but that Estonian
officials have not enabled Russian planes to land to remove troops
and equipment. Sinyavsky was being sent from one office to another.
Urmas Tensing, head of the Estonian border guards in Tartu, confirmed
Sinyavsky's account and added that normally such permission is
granted in five days, but, in this case, already ten days had
passed since the authorization for the planes to land was requested.
-Dzintra Bungs

LATVIAN-RUSSIAN ACCORD ON EXTRADITION OF CRIMINALS. On 4 March
an agreement was signed in Moscow by Latvian General Prosecutor
Janis Skrastins and his Russian counterpart Valentin Stepankov
on the extradition of convicted criminals. The accord stipulates
that citizens of Russia and Latvia who committed crimes and were
convicted in the other country be sent back to their native land
to serve their sentences. The exchanges would be made with the
consent of the convicted criminal and after the court sentence
goes into effect. The country receiving the convicted criminal
would see that his punishment is continued., Baltic agencies
reported on 4 March. -Dzintra Bungs

DEMOCRATIC LABOR PARTY ANNOUNCES CANDIDATES FOR LATVIA'S PARLIAMENT.
Latvia's Democratic Labor Party has announced the first of about
50-candidates that it intends to field in the June parliamentary
elections. The initial list is headed by the party's chairman
Juris Bojars and deputy chairman Karlis Podnieks. The other candidates
are mostly professionals living outside Riga. Podnieks told Diena
of 3 March that party stands a chance of getting at least 15%
of the parliamentary mandates. -Dzintra Bungs

DIFFERENCES IN LITHUANIAN DEMOCRATIC LABOR PARTY. The unity of
the Lithuanian Democratic Labor Party (LDLP) may disappear now
that its chairman Algirdas Brazauskas has left the party on becoming
president. The party will elect a new chairman at its congress
in Vilnius on 17-18 April. The race is likely to be between acting
chairman Gediminas Kirkilas, a Seimas deputy, and Vilnius University
physicist Andrius Meskauskas who appears to have the backing
of many party intellectuals, the RFE/RL Lithuanian Service reported
on 4 March. In an unrelated matter, Lietuvos rytas reported that
a group of the more leftist LDLP members have formed an initiative
group to create a new party that plans to hold its founding conference
in the summer. The group believes that LDLP leaders have been
too passive, fearing to anger the party's right wing. -Saulius
Girnius

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Wendy Slater and Louisa Vinton







THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal
mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions,
or additional copies, please contact: in North America: Mr. Brian
Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907; Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783;
Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse 67, 8000
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(+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG 1993, RFE/RL, Inc.
All rights reserved.


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