If we are to live together in peace, we must first come to know each other better. - Lyndon B. Johnson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 37, 24 February 1993

	Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.







RUSSIA



ARMY DAY DEMONSTRATORS DEMAND YELTSIN'S OUSTER. Hard-line communists,
ultra-nationalists, and disgruntled military officers turned
the first Russian "Defenders of the Fatherland Day," celebrated
on 23-February, into a noisy anti-government demonstration. Western
and Russian press accounts, which put the number of participants
at between 20,000 and 40,000, reported that five of the leading
plotters from the 1991 attempted coup marched at the head of
the rally. A number of speakers reportedly called for the violent
overthrow of the government and in particular for the ouster
of President Boris Yeltsin and Defense Minister Pavel Grachev.
There were also calls for the creation of a national salvation
government; among those proposed as its leaders were Generals
Albert Makashov and Vladislav Achalov (the latter arrested for
his role in the coup, but in August 1992 named an aide to parliamentary
speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov). Perhaps the most worrying consequence
of the rally, which was attended neither by Yeltsin nor by Khasbulatov,
was the implicit threat that the Russian army could become even
more involved in politics. -Stephen Foye

DEPUTIES PREPARE TO CONVENE CONGRESS. A petition to convene an
extraordinary Congress of People's Deputies (Russia's highest
legislature) in early March has been signed by 222 people's deputies,
ITAR-TASS reported on 23 February. 208 signatures are sufficient
to call the Congress into session. The initiators of the move,
deputies from Moscow oblast, represent the Radical Democrats,
the Workers Union and the Democratic Russia factions. At a press
conference announcing the success of their petition, the deputies
said that the parliament's 25 February session would debate the
call to convene Congress, which, they said, in a brief session
should examine two points: the constitutional accord under negotiation
by representatives of President Yeltsin and parliamentary speaker
Ruslan Khasbulatov; and a moratorium on the 11 April referendum
and early elections. They voiced fears that to hold the referendum
might impair Russia's statehood. -Wendy Slater

YELTSIN SIGNS DEFENSE LAWS. In what will be interpreted as an
effort to shore up his support within the armed forces, Boris
Yeltsin on 23 February signed laws on military conscription and
service and on pensions for servicemen and their families. According
to ITAR-TASS, the latter piece of legislation provides for the
indexing of pension benefits and insures that the minimum pension
for serviceman cannot be lower than the minimum old age pension.
-Stephen Foye

DEFENSE MINISTER DEFENDS MILITARY LEADERSHIP. In interviews broadcast
by Russian TV and published by Izvestiya on 23 February Pavel
Grachev rejected charges leveled by critics at both ends of the
political spectrum that the army command is corrupt and that
it opposes reform. On the former issue in particular, Grachev
claimed that his office had disciplined over 3,000 officers,
including 46 generals, for their illegal involvement in commercial
activities. He dismissed charges that the high command has illegally
privatized dachas, saying that all such transactions have been
entirely legal and that the dachas are a justified reward for
long years of service. He harshly criticized the reactionary
Union of Officers and the convocation of an All-Army Officers
Assembly, saying that the activities of both bodies constituted
an inadmissible attempt to politicize the army. -Stephen Foye


RUSSIA, US SIGN URANIUM SALE ACCORD. ITAR-TASS reports that the
Russian Minister of Atomic Energy, Viktor Mikhailov, signed an
accord with the US Department of Energy on 19 February, calling
for Russia to sell 50 metric tons of uranium extracted from nuclear
weapons to the USA for processing and sale as nuclear reactor
fuel. The USA will reportedly pay Russia approximately $1 billion
over a five year period for the material. The deal comes after
several months of negotiations and may be the first step towards
a longer-term agreement to sell a total of 500 metric tons over
a 10 year period. The report did not indicate whether any of
the proceeds of the sale would be shared with Ukraine, Kazakhstan,
and Belarus. Ukraine has made payment for the uranium in the
warheads on its territory a key demand for START-1 ratification.
-John Lepingwell

SHAKHRAI'S ELEVEN-POINT NATIONALITIES POLICY. Sergei Shakhrai,
deputy prime minister responsible for nationalities policy, set
out the eleven theses of Russia's nationalities policy at the
22 February parliamentary hearings on Russia's integrity and
regional policy, Nezavisimaya gazeta of 23 February reported.
Among the eleven theses, which the newspaper lists, are the equality
of all peoples of the Russian Federation, federalism, territorial
unity and the integrity of the Russian Federation and its subjects,
the depoliticization of nationalities policy, reliance on the
legally elected bodies of power whether they are to the liking
of the center or not, the absolute priority of political methods
of solving conflicts, the principle of consistency in small matters,
and the need to take into account the complexity of the religious
composition of Russian society. -Ann Sheehy

RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT TO AMEND PRIVATIZATION POLICY? DEPUTY PRIME
MINISTER ANATOLII CHUBAIS TOLD A MEETING OF LOCAL HEADS OF GOVERNMENT
AND CHAIRMEN OF THE REGIONAL COMMITTEES ON STATE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
IN MOSCOW ON 23 FEBRUARY THAT THERE MAY BE SOME AMENDMENTS TO
RUSSIAN PRIVATIZATION POLICY. In particular, according to Kommersant,
the law on privatization checks and the 1993 privatization program
may be affected by a forthcoming division of state assets into
federal and local property. It is not clear how disruptive such
amendments would be to the privatization process in Russia. In
a sign of other possible changes, Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin
at the same meeting said that measures should be taken to prevent
privatized enterprises from cutting production, ITAR-TASS reported.
He suggested that the state should play a stronger role in controlling
privatization. -Erik Whitlock

ECONOMIC SITUATION DEEMED "UNTENABLE." In remarks at a recent
forum with congressional staff members, the managing director
of the International Monetary Fund described the current economic
situation in Russia as "clearly untenable," an RFE/RL correspondent
reported on 23 February. Michel Camdessus said that a national
consensus on economic reform is still lacking in Russia. The
Russian Central Bank "has not accepted the hard but indispensable
steps" to get inflation under control and to halt the depreciation
of the ruble. Camdessus declared that inflation at the current
rate of about 30% a month destroys confidence and encourages
capital flight, distorts prices, hurts the poor, and threatens
social consensus. -Robert Lyle and Keith Bush

KUZBASS MINERS VOTE FOR STRIKE. Coal miners in the Kuzbass region
have voted overwhelmingly in favor of strike action, according
to an RFE/RL correspondent on 23-February. 18,000 out of 20,000
miners voted for the strike, which will begin in March: on 1-March
deliveries of coal will be stopped, and on 10-March miners will
stop extracting coal. The miners are demanding payment of unpaid
wages, a new wage agreement, and state subsidies for the mine.
-Sheila Marnie.

DRAMATIC RESIGNATION OF OSTANKINO DEPUTY CHAIRMAN CRITICIZED.
Kirill Ignatev, an official at the Ostankino TV company, criticized
Igor Malashenko's letter of resignation as deputy chairman of
the company, Russian agencies reported on 23-February. The appointment
of Ignatev, a member of the Democratic Choice group, to Ostankino
was cited by Malashenko as an example of the attempt to subordinate
the company to the "Democratic Russia" movement and its daughter
organizations. Ignatev implied that Malashenko had to resign
because he had signed documents which ran counter to existing
legislation; specifically, the illegal registration of a joint
stock company of which he was head. Ignatev stated that the threat
of increasing official control over the media exists, but that
it comes from the Russian parliament rather than from the democrats.
-Vera Tolz

KANGAROO COURT VERDICT ON GORBACHEV. At the end of a "public
trial" which opened in Moscow on 18 February, the self-appointed
"People's Court," comprising hardliners and communist activists,
has sentenced former USSR President, Mikhail Gorbachev, to "eternal
damnation and disgrace," the Russian TV newscast, "Vesti," announced
on 23 February. -Julia Wishnevsky

NORTH OSSETIAN-INGUSH TALKS TO RESUME 2-MARCH. Anatolii Anikiev,
chairman of the Russian parliament's Commission on Repressed
and Deported Peoples, has rejected media reports that the third
round of North Ossetian-Ingush talks in Kislovodsk has been broken
off, ITAR-TASS reported. Speaking at a press conference in Moscow
on 23 February, Anikiev said that they would be resumed on 2
March. The talks were, in fact, suspended after North Ossetia
objected to Ingush arrangements for the Ingush presidential election
on 28-February which, in North Ossetia's view, implied that the
Prigorodnyi raion of North Ossetia is part of Ingushetia. As
a compromise it was greed that the talks would resume after the
election. - Ann Sheehy

TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA



SHEVARDNADZE CALLS FOR WITHDRAWAL OF RUSSIAN TROOPS FROM ABKHAZIA,
ADZHARIA. On 23 February the Georgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
sent a note to Russian Ambassador Vladimir Zemsky protesting
at the Russian airraid on Sukhumi on 20-February in which one
Georgian was killed, ITAR-TASS reported. Addressing a session
of the Georgian parliament on 23 February, chairman Eduard Shevardnadze
accused the Russian military leadership of seeking an armed conflict
with Georgia, and stated that if Russian troops are not withdrawn
from Abkhazia and Adzharia, Georgia may be constrained to announce
a general mobilization "to defend the country." Meanwhile Russian
Defense Minister Pavel Grachev told Radio Moscow that he had
given Russian troops in Georgia orders to "shoot to kill" in
order to defend themselves against attack by Georgian military
formations seeking to appropriate weapons. -Liz Fuller

WEAPONS SURRENDER CONTINUES IN TAJIKISTAN. Tajikistan's State
Prosecutor Makhmadnazar Salekhov has told a Dushanbe correspondent
that some 3,000 weapons have been surrendered to the authorities
in the government's drive to deprive both its opponents and its
supporters of unauthorized weaponry, Khovar-TASS reported on
23 February. The weapons surrendered so far have included 20
tanks and armored vehicles, according to Salekhov. More than
200 criminal cases have been started against persons who refuse
to give up their weapons voluntarily. The State Prosecutor's
Office has also set up a special team of investigators to look
into what Salekhov characterized as serious crimes perpetrated
by the democratic and Islamic opposition during the 1992 civil
war and to prepare cases against opposition leaders. He implied
that they would be charged with responsibility for all the casualties
and destruction of the war. -Bess Brown

UZBEKISTAN FINDS NEW COTTON MARKETS. A Danish firm, Jahn International,
has won a contract to build a jeans factory in Uzbekistan in
exchange for 16,500 tons of cotton, AFP reported on 23 February.
According to the report from Tashkent, Uzbek kolkhozes have entered
into barter deals with cotton importers in the Netherlands, Turkey
and several East European countries. An official of the state
cotton trading company Uzagroimpex was quoted as saying that
the firm is using the index of the Liverpool Commodities Exchange
to fix its prices and has chosen a few trading partners which
it considers reliable. As a result of its emergence onto the
world cotton market, Uzbekistan reduced its supplies to other
CIS states by about 40% last year. -Bess Brown

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



US AND UN AGREE ON BOSNIAN AIR DROPS. International media on
23 February said that President Bill Clinton and Secretary-General
Boutros Boutros-Ghali met at the White House and endorsed American
plans to begin temporary airdrops of supplies to encircled Muslim,
Serb, or Croat villages in eastern Bosnia. Washington is expected
to launch the operation soon, in which C-130 cargo planes will
drop bundles weighing up to about one ton from an altitude of
10,000 feet. Many US allies and UN officials, including the military,
have criticized the idea primarily on three grounds. They feel
that the high altitude (instead of a more usual 400 feet) may
enable the planes to escape rockets and gunfire but would severely
affect their ability to deliver supplies safely and accurately.
Second, critics charge that the missions would divert attention
from the need to resume political negotiations; and third, they
feel that to use US aircraft over a war zone is to invite a provocation.
President Clinton said nonetheless that the project involves
"no combat implications whatever," and, among the allies, at
least Turkey has pledged enthusiastic support. -Patrick Moore


SERBS CRITICIZE US PLANS, SHELL MOSQUE AT RAMADAN. The 24 February
New York Times quotes top Bosnian Serb military officials as
calling President Clinton's decision "the most dangerous development
yet in the military and political manipulations surrounding humanitarian
aid." The Serbs warned of "unforeseen consequences" and "provocations,"
but did not explicitly threaten to fire on the aircraft. A UN
official in Bosnia noted that Serbs who had been obstructing
land-based relief operations had undergone "an amazing change
of heart" and become cooperative once they learned of the American
plans for an airdrop. Meanwhile in Sarajevo, Serb gunners broke
the ceasefire by firing on the Muslim center in the old town
on 23-February, hitting a mosque as believers met for evening
prayers to mark the opening of Ramadan. Casualties totaled at
least 5 dead and 20 injured. Finally, international media reported
on 23 February that the UN Human Rights Commission again condemned
the Bosnian Serbs and their Serbian backers for war crimes including
rape, ethnic cleansing, indiscriminate shelling of towns, and
summary executions. The document also criticized the Croats and
Muslims for human rights violations, but singled out the Serbs
as the main culprits. -Patrick Moore

RUSSIA SLAMS MILOSEVIC. International media on 23 February quoted
a Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman as saying that Serbian President
Slobodan Milosevic should not have criticized Moscow's Balkan
policy in a recent Pravda interview. The ministry added that
Russia will not allow itself to be "slandered" and advised Milosevic
to choose his words more carefully. The Serbian leader had said
that it was shameful that Russia is backing international sanctions
against Belgrade. Meanwhile in that city, Tanjug carried yet
another Foreign Ministry protest against Turkish Balkan policy.
Serbia-Montenegro charged that President Turgut zal has sinister
motives for his recent visit to four Balkan countries, and that
the Turkish press is referring to the Serbian nation as "criminals,
murderers, and swine." Tanjug did not further substantiate its
charges against the Turkish press. Western countries have generally
regarded Turkey as a stabilizing factor in the Balkans and among
Islamic countries. -Patrick Moore

US SUPPORTS MACEDONIAN RECOGNITION IN UN. US UN Ambassador Madeleine
Albright said in Washington on 22 February that the US backs
the EC proposal for admitting the Republic of Macedonia to the
UN using the name "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia," Western
agencies report. While Macedonian President Kiro Gligorov has
rejected this idea, Security Council Chairman Ahmed Snoussi will
begin discussions in Greece and Macedonia on the topic. -Duncan
Perry

HAVEL ADDRESSES PARLIAMENT. On 23 February, in his first address
to Parliament since he became the president of the Czech Republic,
Vaclav Havel dealt with a variety of issues ranging from morality
in politics to social problems. Havel called on citizens to "breathe
a new spirit into politics," claiming that this was the most
important factor in resolving the serious problems faced by the
young republic. CTK reported that Havel also said that the rise
in crime, intolerance, racism, and xenophobia in the country
are typical manifestations of a society where totalitarian values
have collapsed and democracy has not matured yet. Havel further
said that one task that Czech people have not managed to accomplish
in the past three years is "to look our past in the face." He
argued that it is necessary to address past injustices but also
"provide space for forgiveness and repentance." Havel praised
the government's foreign policy as sound, but suggested the Czech
Republic should become more active in the UN and the CSCE. In
commenting on his role in politics, Havel said he saw himself
primarily as a guarantor of stability and continuity. -Jiri Pehe


CZECH PREMIER WRITES TO ROMANIES. Vaclav Klaus has sent a letter
to the Romany Democratic Congress, the largest Romany organization
in the Czech Republic, in which he informed the Romanies that
he has instructed the Ministry of Internal Affairs to prevent
organized violence aimed against Romanies. He pointed out, however,
that much of the violence is the work of informal groups not
subject to government control. Klaus rejected the RDK's charges
that the government has not done enough to protect the Romanies.
He also ruled out any changes in the citizenship law: the RDK
has demanded that dual Czech and Slovak citizenship be allowed
and calls for eliminating a provision in the citizenship law
under which only people who have not been sentenced for committing
a crime in the past five years can obtain Czech citizenship.
Klaus wrote that this provision applies equally to all applicants
for Czech citizenship and is not aimed against Romanies. A RDK-sponsored
demonstration is scheduled to take place on 24 February outside
the Czech government building. -Jiri Pehe

CZECH REPUBLIC GIVES UP RESPONSIBILITY FOR GABCIKOVO. The Czech
parliament approved on 23-February the government proposal that
leaves Slovakia as the legal owner of the Gabcikovo dam project.
CTK reports that the vote means that the Czech Republic will
have nothing more to do with the project. Czech Foreign Minister
told the deputies that their action conforms to the Czech-Slovak
agreements on the division of federal property because the entire
project lies in Slovakia. Zieleniec also said that should the
Czech Republic claim any rights, it could be drawn into a conflict
with Hungary, which opposes the project. Slovakia is expected
to defend the project at the International Court of Justice.
-Jiri Pehe

SUCHOCKA IN VIENNA. Polish Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka made
a two-day visit to Austria on 23 and 24-February. Suchocka's
visit was devoted primarily to encouraging Austrian investment
in Poland, which lags far behind that in Hungary and the former
Czechoslovakia. Suchocka also discussed the question of refugees
and political asylum with Chancellor Franz Vranitzky. "One must
convince investors that Poland is economically stable enough
to invest in," Suchocka told a press conference on her arrival
in Vienna. The Polish prime minister warned against the erection,
in the place of the Iron Curtain, of "another curtain that cuts
the continent into two regions, one rich and the other poor."
She cautioned that western Europe cannot "resolve the problem
of immigration and refugees unilaterally and by deferring the
responsibility for difficult decisions to the countries of our
region," Western agencies reported. -Louisa Vinton

SCATTERED STRIKES IN POLAND. Negotiations between the government
and Solidarity on public sector wages ended without agreement
on 22 February. The dispute is now in arbitration. Solidarity
wants the government to rescind an across-the-board 5% cut in
the public sector wage fund, which it says means mass dismissals.
The cut is part of the 1993 budget and the government says it
is legally binding. The education ministry nonetheless announced
on 23 February that no teachers will be dismissed. Solidarity
in the depressed Lodz region called a 48-hour general strike
for 25-February. The union says that the government has failed
to follow through on a promise to appoint a special plenipotentiary
to oversee regional restructuring. Labor Minister Jacek Kuron
told Solidarity officials that restructuring plans are not far
enough advanced to appoint a plenipotentiary. Meanwhile, a two-hour
strike called by Silesian railway workers for the morning of
23 February drew only a marginal response, according to PAP.
Fourteen of 209 passenger trains experienced minor delays. The
strikers were demanding wages equal to 118% of the national average
for railway workers. Regional police officials in Piotrkow announced
plans to impose misdemeanor fines on Solidarity activists who
staged a road blockade there on 19 February. -Louisa Vinton

EROSION OF BSP MEMBERSHIP. New estimates show that the Bulgarian
Socialist Party has a membership of 380,000, Socialist deputy
Krasimir Premyanov told a press conference on 23 February. Although
this is some 100,000 less than claimed at the 40th BSP congress
in December 1991-as well as 40,000 below the figure mentioned
in November 1992-Premyanov said membership has now stabilized.
He told BTA that the estimate is based on a recent inventory
of the entire party organization. Premyanov also acknowledged
that only 30% of the present members are below 44 years of age,
while as many as 40% are pensioners. -Kjell Engelbrekt

ILIESCU ATTACKS "CARPATHIAN EURO-REGION" PACT. At a press conference
carried by Radio Bucharest on 23 February, Romanian President
Ion Iliescu harshly criticized a plan for setting up a "Carpathian
Euro-Region." At a meeting earlier this month, the foreign ministers
of Hungary, Ukraine, and Poland signed a declaration of intent
for regional cooperation, with Slovakia opting for associate
membership. The plan envisages cooperation of local governments
from three Hungarian provinces, the Transcarpathian region of
Ukraine, two provinces in Poland, and seven Slovak districts.
Iliescu said the action raises "suspicions," and explained that
Hungary is promoting the idea without acknowledging that the
bulk of the Carpathian region lies in Transylvania. Iliescu is
apparently suspicious that the pact envisages a Transylvanian
association, which would highlight the region's distinctness
from the rest of Romania. -Michael Shafir

ILIESCU, LUCINSCHI, MEET. Petru Lucinschi, chairman of the Moldovan
parliament, met in Bucharest on 23 February with President Ion
Iliescu and other Romanian officials, Radio Bucharest reports.
Lucinschi was on his way to attend a meeting in Istanbul of Black
Sea littoral nations. He said Moldova has two priorities: economic
improvement and a new constitution. Iliescu told his guest that
regardless of how Romania and Moldova develop in the future,
their bilateral ties must be close and friendly. Lucinschi said
at a press conference after the meeting that the presence of
the 14th Russian army in Moldova was not discussed. Rompres says
there are plans for a Moldovan parliamentary commission to visit
Bucharest and for a meeting between Iliescu and Moldovan president
Mircea Snegur. -Michael Shafir

14TH ARMY DIGGING IN. Against the background of deadlocked negotiations
on the withdrawal of Russia's 14th Army from Moldova, the Army
itself appears to be digging in. It has for the first time held
maneuvers on the territory of independent Moldova, ignoring the
latter's protests; it continues its integration with local Russian
insurgent forces, as evidenced also by the latter's participation
in the maneuvers; and it conscripts local residents of Moldova
in violation of international law. The 14th Army this month launched
its own newspaper, Soldat otechestva ("Soldier of the Fatherland"),
a title reflecting the penchant of "national-patriotic" circles
to consider the "Dniester republic" an outpost of a revived union
or a Greater Russia. The "Dniester republic" and the 14th Army
celebrated "Soviet Army and Navy Day" on 23 February under the
old title and Soviet symbols. "Dniester president" Igor Smirnov
and the Army commander, Lt.-Gen. Aleksandr Lebed, reviewed a
joint parade of "Dniester" and Army units, Basapress reports
from Tiraspol. -Vladimir Socor

UKRAINIAN LAWMAKERS SPLIT ON RATIFYING START-1. Ukrainian Radio
reported on 22 February that the question of the ratification
of the START-1 treaty and also of Ukraine's accession to the
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty has been placed on the agenda
of the seventh session of the current parliament, due to begin
on 3 March. According to a member of the parliamentary Commission
on Defense and State Security, Ihor Derkach, the special parliamentary
commission which has been set up to scrutinize these issues remains
split between those advocating a nonnuclear status for Ukraine
and supporters of Ukraine's retaining a nuclear deterrent. Derkach
and a military specialist who was also interviewed during the
broadcast stressed that concern for guaranteeing Ukraine's security
remains paramount and has not been allayed by Western assurances
of diplomatic support for a nonnuclear Ukraine in the event of
a nuclear crisis. -Bohdan Nahaylo

SAFETY OF NUCLEAR REACTORS DISPUTED. During his four-day visit
to Ukraine and Russia, German Environment Minister Klaus Tpfer
has repeatedly aired concern over the reliability of nuclear
reactors in these countries, Western agencies reported on 23
February. The minister claimed that the Ukrainian authorities
have promised permanently to close down the Chernobyl plant before
the end of 1993. But at a news conference in Moscow, Yurii Vishnevsky,
the director of the Russian State Nuclear Inspectorate, rejected
Tpfer's criticisms. He suggested that Western spokesmen are
bad-mouthing reactors of the Chernobyl type in order to promote
their own reactors. -Keith Bush

LITHUANIA PASSES 1993 BUDGET. On 23 February the Seimas approved
the republic's 1993 budget by a vote of 68 to 37 with 4 abstentions,
Radio Lithuania reports. The budget had been discussed a long
time and its passage so soon after the presidential elections
gives credibility to charges that the Lithuanian Democratic Labor
Party, which enjoys a majority in the parliament, delayed its
passage for the elections. -Saulius Girnius.

FRENCH DEFENSE MINISTER VISITS LITHUANIA. On 23 February Pierre
Joxe completed a short visit to Lithuania at the invitation of
his Lithuanian counterpart Audrius Butkevicius, Radio Lithuania
reports. He arrived on 22 February and had dinner with President-elect
Algirdas Brazauskas and met with defense officials. Butkevicius
said that the visit was "very efficient" and, being the first
by a high Western official after the presidential elections,
shows the good will of France towards Lithuania. -Saulius Girnius.


RUSSIAN PEACE MARCHERS MARK ARMY DAY IN RIGA. A group of Russian
veterans and TV journalists, claiming to be peace marchers, arrived
in Latvia on 22-February. On the 23rd they joined Russian Ambassador
Aleksandr Rannikh, Commander of Russia's Northwestern Group of
Forces Leonid Mayorov, and leaders of Soviet veterans organizations
in laying flowers at Riga's monument commemorating the Soviet
victory over Nazi Germany. Later they attended an unauthorized
demonstration at the monument to Soviet soldiers. Organized by
the Veterans' Defense League, the demonstration attracted about
3,000 participants and onlookers. Despite calls by the Latvian
political organization Tevzeme to interfere in such demonstrations,
the day passed peacefully, local agencies report. -Dzintra Bungs


ESTONIA PROTESTS RUSSIAN SHIP'S VISIT. Estonia has sent a diplomatic
note to Russia protesting the illegal presence of a Russian troop
ship in its territorial waters. According to BNS of 23 February,
the Shuya entered the port of Paldiski on 22 February without
an entry permit and without giving notification before anchoring.
The Russian government has not yet commented on the affair. -Riina
Kionka

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Wendy Slater and Charles Trumbull







THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the
assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA).
The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV (RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU),
on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal
mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions,
or additional copies, please contact: in North America: Mr. Brian
Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907; Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783;
Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or Elsewhere: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications
Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse 67, 8000
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(+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG 1993, RFE/RL, Inc.
All rights reserved.


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