Words that open our eyes to the world are always the easiest to remember. - Ryszard Kapuscinski
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 8, 14 January 1993











RUSSIA


RUSSIA SUPPORTS ALLIED AIR STRIKES AGAINST IRAQ. The Russian
Foreign Ministry (MFA) issued a statement at midday on 14 January
in support of the Allied air strikes against military targets
in Iraq on the previous day. "We had hoped that Iraq would respec
t the will of the international community and military action
could be avoided," the MFA statement said, adding: "unfortunately,
that did not happen." Commenting further on Baghdad's stance,
the Russian statement expressed the hope that "this time the
Ira qi leadership will listen to .-.-. the UN Security Council,"
Reuters reported. Russia's response came significantly later
than the responses from other capitals around the world, indicating
possible disagreement among members of the government on how
to respond. Illustrative of the diversity of opinions in Russia
was a vote in the Russian parliament on 14-January to debate
the withdrawal of two Russian warships from the allied force
in the Gulf in protest of the 13 January raid. Suzanne Crow

SECURITY COUNCIL DISCUSSES NORTH CAUCASUS. A session of the Russian
Federation Security Council on 13 January discussed the need
to stabilize the situation in the North Caucasus. According to
Presidential Press Secretary Vyacheslav Kostikov, it was unders
cored at the meeting that human rights must be defended in the
North Caucasus, regardless of nationality. At the same time,
the session highlighted the need to protect the territorial integrity
of the region as well as its public institutions, Interfax re
ported. Suzanne Crow

RUSSIAN GENERAL ON WITHDRAWAL FROM GEORGIA. Russian Deputy Defense
Minister Georgii Kondratev on 13 January called for conclusion
of an interstate treaty between Georgia and Russia that would
determine the status of Russian troops in Georgia, Interfax re
ported. While suggesting that Russian troops ought to be withdrawn
from Georgia soon after such an agreement is reached, Kondratev
cautioned that Moscow was not prepared to remove military units
from Abkhazia in the immediate future, as Tbilisi has demand
ed. Kondratev also said that, in accordance with a Russian parliament
resolution of 25 December, Russian units would not hand over
weapons to the Georgian side until the Georgian-Abkhazian conflict
is resolved. He said that the situation for Russian tr oops in
Georgia is becoming increasingly intolerable. Stephen Foye

RUSSIAN OFFICERS' UNION PLANS MEETING; CHARGES FIRINGS POLITICAL.
The organizing committee set up by the Russian Officer's Union
on 10 January called for a national meeting of military officers
in Moscow in mid-February. Interfax reported that this national
meeting would be preceded by meetings in all the military units
throughout Russia, to be held prior to 10 February. The report
said that the national meeting would discuss armed forces reform
and receive reports on the implementation of social security
p rograms for military personnel. On 12 January, some 50 present
and former officers claiming to represent the organizing committee
held a press conference at which they charged that some 25,000
officers had recently been fired from the Russian military becaus
e of political disagreements with the government. Western agencies
quoted the group as accusing Defense Minister Pavel Grachev of
engaging in policies which led to the dismantling, disorganization,
and demoralization of the military. Doug Clarke

RUSSIAN OFFICERS UNION REJECTS START-2, DISARMAMENT. The leader
of the Russian Officer's Union, Stanislav Terekhov, predicted
that officers participating in a future national meeting would
decisively reject the START2 Treaty and "the entire process
of disa rmament," Russian radio ("Ekho") reported on 13 January.
Terekhov was a member this past fall of the organizing committee
for the forming of the National Salvation Front, which is largely
composed of hard-line communists and extreme nationalists, and
he h as, on various occasions, called for the ouster of Defense
Minister Grachev and for the overthrow of the Russian government.
Stephen Foye

RUSSIAN AND UKRAINIAN LEADERS MEETING. The prime ministers of
Russia and Ukraine are meeting in Moscow on 14 January and are
expected to sign bilateral agreements on energy and economic
relations, Russian and Ukrainian media report. Their meeting
will be followed by a Russian-Ukrainian summit meeting in Moscow
on 15 January. Economic issues and problems connected with nuclear
arms are reported to top the agenda. Bohdan Nahaylo

RUSSIAN-UKRAINIAN DISPUTE DELAYS RESCHEDULING. A US Treasury
official has said that the dispute between Russia and Ukraine
over the assumption of the external debt of the former Soviet
Union is delaying a deal that would reschedule repayment of more
than $ 15 billion's worth of that debt service, Western agencies
reported on 13 January. Russia has announced that it cannot meet
this week with the Paris Club of Western creditor-nations because
the dispute has not yet been resolved, but indicated that a meeti
ng later this month may be possible. Keith Bush

RUSSIA TO SELL ENERGY WITHIN CIS AT WORLD PRICES. Effective 1
January, the Russian government has decided to sell oil and gas
at world prices to the members of the Commonwealth of Independent
States, Georgia, and the Baltic nations, Interfax reported on
1 3-January. The prices will be based on an exchange rate of
425 rubles to the US dollar during the first quarter of 1993.
This means that the selling prices of petroleum, diesel oil,
and fuel oil will be 85,000 rubles, 68,000 rubles, and 34,000
rubles a ton respectively. "World prices will, however, be paid
only by those republics of the former Soviet Union with which
Russia does not have inter-governmental agreements establishing
special price levels." Interfax did not specify which former
Soviet republics currently have agreements with Russia establishing
special prices, but it is known that Russian and Ukraine do have
such an agreement. Keith Bush

RUTSKOI AND RUMYANTSEV JOIN FORCES. The People's Party of Free
Russia, led by Russian Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi, and
the Russian Social-Democratic Center, headed by Oleg Rumyantsev,
have signed an political cooperation agreement, Rossiiskaya gazeta
reported on 13 January. Representatives of both parties stressed
the need to consolidate centrist forces and stated that their
aim is to change the structure of the cabinet so that it is no
longer completely subordinated to the president. Rumyantsev told
journalists that new mechanisms should be created to influence
political decision-making. The pact between Rutskoi and Rumyantsev
also strengthens the Civic Union. (Alexander Rahr)

YELTSIN ORDERS STRENGTHENING CONTROL OVER PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS.
President Yeltsin issued a decree on 13 January "On Strengthening
Control over the Creation and Activities of Public Organizations,"
ITAR-TASS reported. Among other groups, political parties are
also called "public organizations" in Russian bureaucratic language.
The decree orders that federal and local government officials
be more careful than previously in checking whether the founding
documents of public organizations applying for registra tion
are constitutional. It instructs Russia's procurator general
to keep close track of whether public organizations are observing
laws. The decree also recommends that the Russian parliament
speed up its work on legislation concerning the activities of
public organizations. These activities are still regulated by
Soviet law. Vera Tolz

FOREIGN POLICY COMMISSION APPROVED. At the 13 January session
of the Russian Federation Security Council, the Security Council
approved a provision on the operation of an Inter-Departmental
foreign commission headed by Security Council Secretary Yurii
Sko kov, Interfax reported. The commission was established by
a decree signed by Boris Yeltsin on 16 December. Previously,
Yeltsin had decreed that the Russian Foreign Minister would be
responsible for coordinating Russian foreign policy among the
various gov ernment departments. Suzanne Crow

RUSSIA SIGNS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION. Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev signed the United Nations Convention of Chemical Weapons
on behalf of Russia in Paris 13 January. In remarks quoted by
ITAR-TASS, Kozyrev said that the convention was an outstandin
g achievement of multilateral diplomacy which laid the basis
for openness, verification, and cooperation in the field of security
on a global scale. He likened the convention and the recently-signed
START-2 strategic arms agreement to the "seizing of tw o Bastilles."
Doug Clarke

US AND RUSSIA TO "SYNCHRONIZE" TREATY RATIFICATION. Interfax
on 13 January reported that it had been told by a member of the
Russian Foreign Ministry that, "for a number of reasons," the
Russian and American governments planned to "synchronize" the
rat ification process of the START-2 strategic arms treaty in
the Russian parliament and the U.S. Congress. The report added
that the treaty would probably be included in the agenda of the
Russian parliament session scheduled for the week of 18 January.
Do ug Clarke

TRANSCAUCASIA & CENTRAL ASIA


RUSSIA AND UKRAINE SIGN ARMS PRODUCTION AGREEMENTS. Viktor Antonov,
Ukraine's minister for machine-building, the military-industrial
complex, and conversion, and Viktor Glukhigh, the chairman of
the Russian committee on the defense branches of indust ry, were
reported by Interfax on 13 January to have signed several agreements
on cooperation in the fields of defense production and conversion.
Missile construction, radio-electronics, communications equipment,
and civilian production were listed as some of the topics covered.
Antonov was said to have told journalists that a similar package
of documents had been signed last April, but the "pro-Russia"
command of the CIS Joint Armed Forces had impeded their implementation.
Doug Clarke 

TAJIK OFFICIAL DENIES EXECUTION STORIES. The Deputy
Chairman of Tajikistan's Supreme Soviet, Abdurakhmon Mukhtashev,
told Interfax on 13 January that reports of executions of opposition
members in Dushanbe are false. Western correspondents have repo
rted numerous eyewitness accounts of such executions since the
present Tajik government installed itself in Dushanbe in early
December. According to the Interfax report, members of the Tajik
opposition repeated the charges at a recent press conference
in Moscow. ITAR-TASS reported on 13-January that Tajik government
forces have taken control of the town of Rogun, site of a major
hydroelectric project. Meanwhile, 30,000 refugees are reported
to still be on the Afghan border. Bess Brown

REPORT OF PLANNED TBILISI COUP ATTEMPT DENIED. Georgian Defense
Minister Tengiz Kitovani told "Vesti" on 13 January that rumors
he had planned a coup attempt against Georgian parliament chairman
Eduard Shevardnadze were totally without foundation, ITAR-T ASS
reported. A similar denial was made by Shevardnadze himself to
the Georgian parliament. Georgian National Democratic Party chairman
Giorgi Chanturia had claimed in an article printed in Svobodnaya
Gruziya on 12 January that Kitovani had planned to se ize power
on 7 January but had abandoned the idea at the last minute for
unknown, reasons. Liz Fuller

OVERHAUL OF GOVERNMENTAL ECONOMIC STRUCTURES IN KAZAKHSTAN. A
National Council for Economic Reform has been created in Kazakhstan
to oversee the reform of the country's economy and institute
anticrisis measures, Interfax reported on 13 January. The new
c ouncil is to consist of the Ministers of Finance and Economy,
the chairman of the board of Kazakhstan's National Bank, and
the chairmen of the Committees on State Property and Antimonopoly
Policies. On 1 January a new ministry of the economy was cr eated
to replace the former State Economic Committee, and Beisenbai
Izteleutov, who chaired President Nursultan Nazarbaev's Supreme
Economic Council, which drew up the guidelines for Kazakhstan's
reforms, has been appointed Minister of the Economy. Bess Brown


CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



REACTIONS IN BELGRADE TO BOSNIAN PEACE PLAN. Political parties
in Serbia are divided between total support and condemnation
of the decision of Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic to accept
the UN-EC mediated peace plan for Bosnia-Herzegovina subject
to a pproval by the Assembly of the self-proclaimed Serb Republic
in Bosnia. Karadzic said the assembly should rule on the matter
within seven days. Vuk Draskovic, head of the Serbian Renewal
Movement, said he supports Karadzic's move and called his action
a h opeful step toward ending war. He warned that the proposed
map dividing Bosnia into ten provinces is unacceptable and that
Bosnia's Serbs will have to insist on a more equitable division
of territory. Vojislav Seselj, head of the Serbian Radical Party,
de scribed Karadzic's acceptance of the plan as tantamount to
asking the Bosnian Serb assembly to "dissolve itself and abolish
the Bosnian Serb Republic." He warned if the Bosnian Serbs are
not guaranteed a corridor linking northern Bosnia with the self-proc
laimed Serb Krajina Republic in Croatia and Serbia proper "there
will be more war." Milos Radulovic, president of the Chamber
of Republics of the federal parliament, welcomed Karadzic's action,
saying it reduces the risk that the war will spread. Radio Se
rbia carried the report on 13 January. -Milan Andrejevich

REACTIONS IN BOSNIA. Karadzic said that approval by the Bosnian
Serb assembly will be difficult to achieve, but feels that the
plan will pass. Biljana Plavsic, vice president of the Bosnian
Serb assembly, told reporters that the assembly will not accept
t he plan. Bosnian Foreign Minister Haris Silajdzic told the
BBC that the Bosnian Muslims have agreed in principle to the
plan but are opposed to the map dividing the republic because
it favors the Bosnian Serbs and gives them territory which "the
Serbs hav e ethnically cleansed." Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic
claimed a victory over the Serbs, saying that the Serbian side
had to give up its demand for an independent Bosnian Serb republic.
Radio Bosnia commented "In sum, whoever does not sign the remain
ing Geneva documents will regret it-but so will the one who does
sign." Radios Bosnia and Serbia carried the reports on 13 January.
-Milan Andrejevich

CLASHES BETWEEN BOSNIAN MUSLIMS AND CROATS. On 12 and 13 January
Croatian TV and Radio Bosnia reported clashes in the central
Bosnian town of Gornji Vakuf between Muslim and Croatian forces.
Local Muslim leaders fear the spread of violence around the Most
ar region in Herzegovina. To alleviate the tension and prevent
clashes between the units of the Croatian Defense Council and
the units of the Muslim-dominated Bosnian Army in central Bosnia,
a commission has been formed to work with UNPROFOR representativ
es in an attempt to calm the situation. Several local Croat and
Muslim leaders are claiming that the incidents are instigated
by Bosnian Serb forces. -Milan Andrejevich

ROMANIA CALLS FOR UN HELP TO FREE DETAINED SHIP. A Foreign Ministry
spokeswoman said on 13-January that Romania has asked the UN
Security Council for urgent help to free five of its ships detained
by Serbian authorities in ports on the Danube. Belgrade agr eed
last week to free the vessels but later refused to release them
allegedly because of sailing conditions on the Danube made difficult
by ice floes. The Serbs suggested that the vessels would have
to spend the winter in port. The ships were detained earli er
this month in the ports of Belgrade, Bezdan and Novi Sad in what
is seen as an act of retaliation for Romania's enforcement of
the UN sanctions against the rump Yugoslav state. -Dan Ionescu


EC ACTION URGED ON MACEDONIA. On 13 January Danish Foreign Minister
Uffe Ellemann-Jensen called for EC countries to press Greece
to end its campaign against recognition of the Republic of Macedonia.
In Paris to chair a special meeting of EC foreign minist ers,
Ellemann-Jensen noted that he would ask his Greek counterpart
"very serious questions," AFP reports. He also expressed the
hope that the UN Security Council will act expeditiously on Macedonia's
application for United Nations membership. -Duncan Per ry

MEDIA WAR DIVIDES HUNGARIAN JOURNALISTS. On 13 January the presidium
of the National Federation of Hungarian Journalists issued a
statement protesting government encroachments on the independence
of radio and TV, MTI reports. The federation, which was con trolled
by the communist party until 1988, charges that preparations
for a personnel purge have already begun. The Federation of Hungarian
Journalists, a postcommunist journalists' association that is
ideologically close to the government, reacted by decl aring
that two years after the multiparty elections the radio and TV
continue to misinform the public and that "a change of regime"
in these areas is needed. The federation greeted the resignations
of the media chiefs as "an encouraging first step" toward objective
reporting. -Edith Oltay

ROMANIAN NATIONALISTS URGE BAN ON ETHNIC HUNGARIAN PARTY. In
a statement broadcast by Radio Bucharest on 13 January, the ultranationalist
Party of Romanian National Unity (PRNU) urged authorities to
ban the Hungarian Democratic Federation of Romania (HDFR ), a
party representing the country's ethnic Hungarian minority. The
HDFR is expected to start a three-day congress in Brasov on 15
January. The PRNU statement, signed by its controversial chairman,
Cluj Mayor Gheorghe Funar, accuses participants in the p lanned
congress of seeking "to achieve territorial autonomy and tear
Romania apart." HDFR leader Geza Domokos rejected the accusations
as a diversion meant to shift public attention from Romania's
current problems. -Dan Ionescu

UNEMPLOYMENT IN HUNGARY. According to the latest data published
by the Ministry of Labor and reported by MTI 663,000 people were
out of work at the end of 1992, which corresponds to an unemployment
rate of 12,2%. This is a significant increase over 1990 a nd
1991, when the number stood at 80,000 and 406,000, respectively.
Only 450,000 persons are receiving unemployment benefits, and
as of 1 January the jobless are entitled to benefits only for
12 months. Previously benefits were paid for 24 and 18 months.
Unemployed no longer entitled to benefits will be able to apply
to the local governments for social aid. The Ministry predicts
that the number of unemployed will continue to climb reaching
900,000 by the end of this year. -Edith Oltay

SLOVAKIA, AUSTRIA SIGN ECONOMIC COOPERATION ACCORD. Slovak Economy
Minister Ludovit Cernak and Austrian Economy Minister Wolfgang
Schuessel signed a wide-ranging agreement on economic cooperation.
Reuters reported on 13 January that the agreement focuses on
environmental technology, energy, chemicals, petrochemicals,
and research. The agreement is the first to be signed by Slovakia
since it became an independent state on 1 January. Austria is
Slovakia's third biggest trading partner and the biggest investo
r in Slovakia. At a press conference in Vienna, Cernak praised
the agreement. He also confirmed that Slovakia plans to privatize
the Gabcikovo hydroelectric power plant on the Danube as well
as its nuclear power plant at Mochovce. -Jiri Pehe

BULGARIA UNDER IMF REVIEW. An IMF team arriving in Sofia on 13
January will spend ten days discussing Bulgaria's financial outlook
with officials in the new government. New Minister of Finance
Stoyan Aleksandrov stated recently that the IMF's policies are
too restrictive and indicated that Bulgaria might withdraw from
the world organization, Western and Bulgarian sources report.
Aleksandrov's proposed budget includes an 18,000-million deficit,
well above the level desired by the IMF. -Duncan Perry

IMF DELAYS POLISH AGREEMENT. Gazeta Wyborcza reported on 13 January
that the IMF has decided to postpone final approval for its new
agreement with Poland because of recent Sejm votes that called
into question the agreed ceiling for the 1993 budget deficit
. Rzeczpospolita said that the Polish government agreed to the
postponement at the beginning of January. Polish negotiators
said that final agreement is unlikely before the Sejm votes its
approval for the 1993 budget, which is not expected before February
. The reports may be intended to induce fiscal self-discipline
in the Sejm. -Louisa Vinton

MAJOR POLISH PRIVATIZATION DEALS. In the largest debt-relief
operation so far undertaken in Poland, the government has agreed
to transfer control of the Szczecin Shipyard, which employs 5,000,
to a consortium of banks and firms. The shipyard's debts of 1,
800 billion zloty ($115 million) will be cut by a third; in return,
four banks will receive 30% ownership. Employees, investors,
and the state treasury will take over the rest. Polish Development
Bank president Wojciech Kostrzewa told Polish TV on 13 Janu ary
that the transfer of management oversight from bureaucrats to
banks is an step forward economically. The deal saves the shipyard,
which has an abundance of new orders, from bankruptcy. The government
also announced the sale of a majority stake in the prospering
Rafako boiler factory to a company formed of employees and management.
The state budget will earn at least 100 billion zloty ($6.5 million)
from the transaction. -Louisa Vinton

POLISH POLICE EJECT SOLIDARITY UNIONISTS. Police expelled a Solidarity
protest committee from a government building in Czestochowa on
the night of 12-January, PAP reports. Unionists complained that
force was used, but the government's press office said 67 protesters
left when ordered to by police; three others were carried out.
Solidarity's Czestochowa region has demanded an extension of
unemployment benefits and the ouster of the government's regional
representative. Negotiations conducted on 13 January at the labor
ministry yielded a government pledge to consider the union's
grievances. Officials ruled out concessions on unemployment benefits
as too costly, however. -Louisa Vinton

4,124 RUSSIAN SOLDIERS IN POLAND. As of 1-January 4,124 Russian
soldiers were still stationed in Poland, PAP reports, but all
combat equipment has been removed. Polish officials reported
on 13 January that the Russian troop withdrawal has proceeded
withou t incident, but that the Russian side has resisted fulfilling
obligations agreed upon in the withdrawal treaty. Such conflicts
were settled through "diplomatic channels," officials report.
Russia has nonetheless failed to pay current rental fees of over
1 02 billion zloty ($6.6 million). All Russian forces are to
leave Poland by the end of 1993. PAP also reports the arrest
of an Opole resident for the illegal resale of thousands of tons
of gasoline purchased from Russian bases over the past two years.
-Lo uisa Vinton

ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN TALKS CONTINUE. The latest round of negotiations
between Estonia and Russia are focused on troop withdrawal issues,
BNS reports. The three-day session, which began on 13 January
outside Moscow, will also cover economic and humanitarian is
sues. -Riina Kionka

RESPONSIBILITY FOR 1991 VILNIUS DEATHS. On 12 January Prosecutor
Juozas Gaudutis said over Radio Lithuania that the investigation
of the events of 13-January 1991, when the Soviet military attacked
an unarmed crowd at the Vilnius TV tower, is nearly compl eted.
Information obtained from the KGB and other Soviet sources suggest
that Soviet KGB head Vladimir Kryuchkov, Deputy Interior Minister
Nikolai Demidov, Deputy Defense Minister Vladislav Achalov and
leaders of other military units arrived in Vilnius on 8 January
and oversaw the operation. Arrest warrants have been issued against
Lithuanian Communist Party First Secretary Mykolas Burokevicius
and LCP secretary Algimantas Naudziunas, who are now residing
in Russia. -Saulius Girnius

DISCUSSIONS OF PARFENOV'S FATE. On 13 January in Riga Russian
Deputy Procurator-General Evgenii Lisov and members of his staff
discussed with their Latvian counterparts the fate of Sergei
Parfenov, recently sentenced to two years of corrective labor
for a buse of power while serving as OMON deputy commander in
Riga. Parfenov had been extradited from Russia to stand trial
in Riga-a move protested by his sympathizers in Russia, BNS reported
on 13 January. -Dzintra Bungs

LANDSBERGIS APPOINTED CE REPRESENTATIVE. On 12 January the Seimas
appointed former Supreme Council chairman Vytautas Landsbergis
as the fourth representative of Lithuania for 1993 to the Council
of Europe, BNS reports. On 5 January the Seimas appointed Al
girdas Gricius of the Lithuanian Democratic Labor Party (LDLP),
Aloyzas Sakalas of the Social Democratic Party, and Zbigniew
Semenowicz of the Union of Poles. -Saulius Girnius

LATVIAN INDUSTRY MINISTER RETAINS HIS POSITION. After stormy
debates at the Latvian Supreme Council on 13 January, Minister
of Industry and Energy Aivars Millers managed to retain his position.
Recently Millers had been severely criticized for illegal or
questionable economic activities of his ministry. Criticism included
questions about the manufacture and sale abroad of amphetamines
by the Latvbiofarm plant. In December three top Latvbiofarm officials
were detained in Germany for drug trafficking. -Dzi ntra Bungs


LITHUANIAN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION IN 1992. The Lithuanian Statistics
Department announced that the volume of industrial production
in Lithuania in 1992 decreased 51.6% from the level of the previous
year, Baltfax reported on 13 January. The greatest declin es
were in the fuel industry (70%); woodworking, pulp, and paper
(52%); construction materials (52%); machine building (48%);
food (39%); and light industry (34%). Prices for these products
increased 16 times in 1992. Some 61% of the products went to
the domestic market, with exports to the former USSR republics
comprising 28% of total sales (against 35% in 1991) and 11% to
countries for hard currency (4% in 1991). -Saulius Girnius

FIRE AT CHERNOBYL. A fire broke out at the Chernobyl nuclear
power plant near Kiev, Reuters reported on 13-January. The blaze,
located in a building between the plant's first and second reactors,
was put out after an hour and did not cause any injuries or increase
in radiation. Two reactors at the plant are still in operation.
-Bohdan Nahaylo

MOLDOVAN-"DNIESTER" TALKS. Moldovan President Mircea Snegur disclosed
to Molodezh Moldovy of 7 January that he recently met in Bendery
with "Dniester" Russian leader Igor Smirnov to start a dialogue
on a political status for the left bank of the Dniester within
Moldova. Shortly afterward Chisinau offered to grant the area
"self-governing territory" status as well as that of a free economic
zone, with obligations to observe human and ethnic rights under
international norms. The "Dniester republic Supreme S oviet"
rejected the offer, insisting on recognition of the "Dniester
republic" with its own government and army in a confederation
of Moldovan, Dniester, and Gagauz republics, Moldovan and Russian
media report. Representatives of both sides met again in B endery
on the 13th but succeeded only in agreeing to meet again, Interfax
reports. -Vladimir Socor

DRUC DENOUNCES "GREATER MOLDOVA" IDEA. In an interview with Romanian
Radio, cited by Rompres on 11 January, Mircea Druc, chairman
of the rump Moldovan Popular Front and former prime minister
of Moldova, accused some Moldovan intellectuals and politicians
(singling out literary patriarch, Ion Druta) of aspiring to form
a "Greater Moldova" at the expense of Romania by uniting the
Republic of Moldova with Romania's northeastern province of Moldova.
Together the two areas form roughly the historic Moldovan pr
incipality. The idea of "Greater Moldova" has in fact occasionally
and informally surfaced in the Republic of Moldova both during
and since Soviet rule. Druc, a leader of the movement for Moldovan-Romanian
reunification, last year moved his base of operati ons to Romania
and with his warning may be seeking to add to Romania's growing
misgivings about Moldovan independent statehood. -Vladimir Socor


[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Charles Trumbull













THE RFE/RL DAILY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE RFE/RL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (A DIVISION OF RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, INC.) with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs Division (NCA). The report is available by electronic mail via LISTSERV ( RFERL-L@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU), on the Sovset' computer bulletin board, by fax, and by postal mail. For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions, or additional copies, please contact: in USA: Mr. Jon Lodeesen or Mr. Brian Reed, RFE/RL, Inc., 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC-20036 Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6900; fax: (202) 457-6992 or -202-828-8783; Internet: RIDC@RFERL.ORG or in Europe: Ms. Helga Hofer, Publications Department, RFE/RL Research Institute, Oettingenstrasse 67, 8000 Munich 22; Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2642; fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648, Internet: Pubs@RFERL.ORG 1992, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved. RFE/RL Daily Report

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