To get rid of an enemy, one must love him. - Leo Tolstoy
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 248, 29 December 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

CALLS FOR MORE INTEGRATION AT CIS ASSEMBLY MEETING. At a meeting
of the CIS Interparliamentary Assembly in St. Petersburg, parliamentary
leaders of the seven CIS states which have joined this body adopted
in principle accords calling for greater coordination in laws
covering constitutional reform, citizenship, the economy and
the environment, Russian news agencies reported on 28 December.
The chairman of the Russian parliament, Ruslan Khasbulatov, was
quoted as calling for the Interparliamentary Assembly to become
more effective and for a common development policy to be worked
out for the CIS. Among others who urged greater integration were
CIS Armed Forces commander Yevgenii Shaposhnikov and the chairman
of the St. Petersburg municipal council, Aleksandr Belyaev. The
latter pointed out that the CIS "resembles more a committee for
the elimination of the former Soviet Union than a powerful stimulus
for integration." (Bohdan Nahaylo)

SHAPOSHNIKOV WANTS CIS DEFENSIVE ALLIANCE. Marshal Evgenii Shaposhnikov,
the commander in chief of the CIS Joint Armed Forces, proposed
on 28 December that the CIS set up a defensive military alliance
in his remarks to the CIS interparliamentary assembly in St.
Petersburg. Interfax quoted him as telling the delegates that
"military integration was no infringement on the independence
of sovereign states," but rather a vital necessity. Shaposhnikov
complained that only six CIS states had signed the collective
security system agreement, and only three of these had yet ratified
it. He expressed concern about the combat readiness of his forces,
and warned that the "process of disintegration" could not be
stopped without taking effective measures for the common defense.
(Doug Clarke)

MOVEMENT FOR DEMOCRATIC REFORMS CALLS FOR CLOSER CIS INTEGRATION.
The International Movement for Democratic Reforms held a congress
in Moscow on 26-December. Ostankino TV said 86 delegates and
46 observers from Russia and other unidentified countries of
the former Soviet Union attended the congress, which adopted
an appeal to the people and leaders of the countries of the CIS
urging them to stop "fratricidal wars" and to make the defense
of human rights their top priority. Congressional delegates said
that the main goal of the Movement for Democratic Reforms is
the transformation of the CIS "from a mechanism of civilized
divorce into a mechanism of consolidation of new states." The
movement was set up in Moscow in 1991 by leading Russian reformist
politicians, including Aleksandr Yakovlev, Eduard Shevardnadze,
Gavriil Popov and Anatolii Sobchak. At the time the movement
had a goal that proved unrealistic: the unification of the democratic
forces of the entire USSR. (Vera-Tolz)

KIEV GRAPPLES WITH ECONOMIC CRISIS. The Ukrainian cabinet of
Ministers is meeting on 29-December to discuss further measures
to deal with the grave economic crisis in which Ukraine finds
itself, Ukrainian Radio reported. Reuters also reported that
the Ukrainian parliament has also cut short its winter break
and will resume its work in early January. After protests by
workers against the recent sharp price increases, Ukrainian cabinet
members and parliamentary deputies met on 28 December with workers
from the Kiev Arsenal factory and trade union leaders, Ukrainian
TV reported. Meanwhile, on 28 December, Interfax reported that
Ukraine's deputy foreign trade minister, Leonid Steshenko, and
two of his aides have been arrested on corruption charges involving
the illegal export of "strategic" goods," including oil. (Bohdan
Nahaylo)

MOSCOW CONDEMNS MURDER OF RUSSIAN SERVICEMEN IN TAJIKISTAN. The
Russian Foreign Ministry issued a strongly worded condemnation
of the murder of three servicemen of the Russian 201st Motorized
Division that is stationed in Tajikistan, Interfax reported on
28 December. The bodies of the three were found on 26 December
near the town of Kofarnihon, a stronghold of the Tajik opposition.
The servicemen had been taken hostage by an anti-government group
two weeks earlier. According to the report, the three had been
shot and their bodies showed signs of torture. Interfax added
that retreating Islamic Renaissance Party supporters had killed
civilian hostages. In response to the discovery of the three
Russians, the same source reported on 26 December, the Tajik
government appealed to the officers of the 201st Division not
to leave the country as they had earlier threatened to do if
Russian servicemen were attacked. (Bess Brown)

IMF RELEASES FORECAST FOR FORMER SOVIET UNION. A summary report
of the International Monetary Fund on the world's developing
and former centrally-planned economies predicts continued, if
abated, decline in the region of the former Soviet Union. The
report, released on 22 December, shows real gross domestic product
in the area falling by 7.6% in 1993 as opposed to the 18.6% decline
this year. Although export volume is expected to rise by 17%
in 1993, the current account balance will worsen, dropping 20.4%
in dollar terms. With regard to Russia, the report was critical
of the relaxation of monetary policy in the region, but also
cited, as a positive development, hardening budget constraints
on enterprises. (Erik Whitlock)

RUSSIAN EXPORTS FALL 26%. Citing figures of the Russian Committee
for Statistics, ITAR-TASS reported on 28 December that the volume
of Russian exports between January and November was 26% lower
than the corresponding period in 1991. Although the numbers by
themselves were not encouraging, they seemed to support claims
that exports have been stabilizing in recent months. The figures
for the first half of this year indicate that Russian exports
were much worse, down 35% from the corresponding period last
year. (Erik Whitlock)

DEMOCRATIC RUSSIA TO SUPPORT YELTSIN IN APRIL REFERENDUM. A leader
of the Democratic Russia movement, Father Gleb Yakunin, told
a press conference in Moscow on 28-December that his organization
plans to form a coalition to support President Yeltsin in next
April's referendum on a new Russian constitution. Yakunin was
quoted by Western and Russian agencies as saying Democratic Russia,
in coalition with other pro-democratic movements, intends to
launch an campaign in support of a draft constitution favored
by Yeltsin. In addition to Democratic Russia, the coalition would
certainly include the Republican Party and the Radical Democrats
faction in the Russian parliament. Yakunin said he also hoped
that the Russian Movement for Democratic Reforms, the New Russia
coalition, and the Party for Economic Reforms will join the Democratic
Russia in support of Yeltsin. (Vera Tolz)

MORE ON RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT AND THE MEDIA. The new Russian Federal
Information Center will exercise authority over Ostankino TV,
the federal TV company Rossiya, 89 regional TV centers, and the
wire services ITAR-TASS and RIA-Novosti, according to the full
text of President Yeltsin's decree, published by ITAR-TASS on
27 December. Led by a long-time Yeltsin confidant, Mikhail Poltoranin,
the new agency will promote support for the reform process in
the media. At the same time, the Ministry of Information, led
by another Yeltsin ally, Mikhail Fedotov, will control the licensing
of publishers and broadcasters. Although the Russian government
this year contributed approximately 100-billion rubles to the
mass media, the general public is poorly informed about this
governmental support, according to Poltoranin as quoted by ITAR-TASS
on 26 December. (Victor Yasmann).

NEW INFORMATION MINISTER OUTLINES HIS POLICY. Mikhail Fedotov,
new Russian Minister for Information and Mass Media, told journalists
on 29-December that the defense of the rights of journalists
and mass media against "discrimination, monopolization and interference
in the internal life of editorial offices" was the main goal
of his ministry. ITAR-TASS reported that when asked about the
new Russian Federation Information Center created by President
Yeltsin, Fedotov said he saw it as "a consultative-analytical
body of the presidential structure" which directs mass media
on the president's behalf. Critics have charged that the creation
of the Information Center marks a step toward censorship. The
charge was rebuffed by the center's head, former information
minister, Mikhail Poltoranin, who said on 27 December that the
center would in no way infringe on journalists' rights. (Vera
Tolz)

START TALKS IN GENEVA. Both U.S. Secretary of State Lawrence
Eagleburger and Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev expressed
satisfaction with their talks in Geneva on 28-December to finalize
START 2. Eagleburger refused to predict whether the treaty would
be completed during meetings on 29-December, but a spokesman
for the American side said that US President George Bush remained
hopeful that the accord could be finished, Russian and Western
agencies reported. (Suzanne Crow)

RADIOACTIVE WATER LEAKS INTO RESERVOIR. Radioactive water from
the Beloyarsk nuclear power station in the East Siberian Altai
Krai has polluted the water in the Beloyarsk reservoir, ITAR-TASS
reported on 28 December. The agency quoted the Russian State
Atomic Supervisory Commission as saying that the water was not
polluted severely enough to endanger people living in the area.
The commission is investigating the incident. (Vera Tolz)

CHINA WANTS RUSSIAN HELP IN BUILDING CARRIERS. Interfax on 23
December quoted a "high-ranking" CIS naval official as saying
that China had recently asked for Russian technical assistance
in the construction of two Chinese aircraft carriers modeled
on the Soviet Kiev-class. The official discounted rumors that
the Chinese wanted to buy two such ships, the Minsk and Novorossiisk.
Both are in poor condition: Minsk is in the reserve fleet and
ready for the scrap yard, while Novorossiisk is soon "to be put
on the redundant list." He did say that a delegation of Chinese
sailors and shipbuilders had recently visited the Novorossiisk
to study its design. Mayak Radio on 25 December reported that
the Chinese Foreign Ministry also denied that China was hold
talks with Russian on the sale of the two ships. (Doug Clarke)


YELTSIN DECREE ON SOCIAL SECURITY FOR MILITARY. Interfax on 28
December announced that President Yeltsin had issued a decree
"on measures for the social security of servicemen, ex-servicemen
and members of their families." The decree calls for the creation
of a new social organization, the "Inter-State Association Legion."
It indicates that this association will participate in running
new enterprises-apparently privatized "military-technical property"
and military plants converted to civilian use-which will benefit
those covered by the decree. The Russian government was also
tasked to propose a draft law whereby employment in these enterprises
could be an alternative to military service. (Doug Clarke)

TAJIK ARMS SURRENDER DEADLINE EXTENDED. Chairman of Tajikistan's
Supreme Soviet Imomali Rakhmonov has extended the deadline for
anti-government forces to surrender their weapons to 4-January,
Interfax reported on 28 December, quoting Tajik TV. The original
deadline was 28 December, and government officials had threatened
reprisals against those who failed to comply. The same day Rakhmonov's
deputy told Interfax that only 3,000 small arms had been confiscated
so far; official sources estimate the number of unregistered
weapons circulating in the country at 18,000, while unofficial
sources claim 30-35,000. (Bess Brown)

AZERBAIJAN AND IRAN TO BROADEN CONTACTS. An Azerbaijani delegation
led by Secretary of State Panakh Guseinov departed for Iran on
28 December to sign agreements broadening relations between Iran
and Azerbaijan, an RFE/RL correspondent reported on the same
day quoting Interfax. The documents reportedly concern the expansion
of trade, economic, scientific, and cultural relations between
the two countries. Meanwhile, on the same day, Russia handed
turned over to Azerbaijan 19 border posts and a checkpoint on
the border with Iran and Turkey as part of an agreement signed
last October, an RFE/RL correspondent reported. (Hal Kosiba)


RUSSIAN PARLIAMENT CANCELS WARSAW PACT TREATY. The Russian parliament
on 23 December ratified the protocol that canceled the 1955 Warsaw
Treaty which spawned the Warsaw Treaty Organization or Warsaw
Pact. According to Interfax, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister
Vitalii Churkin told the deputies that the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization (NATO) no longer represented the threat it used
to be. One hardline deputy, Vladimir Isakov, called on his colleagues
not to ratify the protocol, arguing that "sooner or later" the
former Pact members would want to cooperate and it would then
"be difficult to restore the treaty." (Doug Clarke)

NEW RUSSIAN ARMY GROUP TO BE FORMED. Russian Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev has announced that a "new Russian army grouping"
would be set up on the basis of the Leningrad Military District.
As reported by Baltfax on 27 December, Grachev said that the
new organization would combine the best units to be withdrawn
from the Baltic states and Germany. The Leningrad Military District
would become a "border district" covering the northwest of Russia,
and would thus have several "strategically important tasks."
(Doug Clarke)

RUSSIANS REVEAL COMBAT LOSSES SINCE 1918. The Russian military
publishers Voyenizdat have just published a statistical study
of all Soviet combat losses from 1918 through 1989. According
to Interfax on 28 December, the press service of the Russian
Defense Ministry said that this data had previously been regarded
as "sensitive" material. The study says that 8,668,400 military
personnel-including border guards and interior troops-were killed
during the Great Patriotic War. Over 139,100 military personnel
lost their lives in combat operations between the two World Wars,
including 8,931 in the 1939 campaign against Japan in the Far
East, and 126,875 in the Soviet-Finish war of 1939-1940. The
study claims that 16,100 Soviet servicemen lost their lives while
doing their "internationalist" duty between 1950 and 1989. These
included 14,453 killed in Afghanistan. (Doug Clarke)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BREAK IN THE SARAJEVO SIEGE IN THE OFFING? International media
report on 29-December that UN sources have identified a large
massing of Bosnian troops to the south of the encircled capital.
From another direction, Bosnian and Croatian forces appear to
be grouping, prompting speculation that the Bosnians might seek
to realize their hope of ending the eight-month siege. Muslim
leader Alija Izetbegovic has long called on the Croats to help
break the Serbian hold on the town, but has also stressed that
the Muslims could do the job themselves if properly armed. This
has been a major reason behind his request that the UN arms embargo
be lifted on his republic. Meanwhile in Geneva, talks between
Muslims and Croats on Bosnia's political future ended without
agreement. (Patrick Moore)

CANADIAN UN TROOPS REACH MACEDONIA. Reuters said on 28-December
that the first troops of what will be a Canadian force of 150
have arrived in Macedonia. They will stay until a larger Scandinavian
group comes in mid-February. Other UN personnel have been in
Macedonia since 15-December. This will constitute the first case
in the Wars of the Yugoslav Succession that peace-keeping troops
have been stationed without fighting having broken out. Meanwhile,
international media report that Albania has again called on Macedonia
to grant full equality to its 20-to-40% Albanian minority as
a prerequisite for diplomatic recognition, which Tirana is otherwise
eager to extend. Greece, however, is continuing its campaign
against international recognition of Macedonia, and the foreign
minister has returned to Athens to direct the operation. Macedonia
is seeking international backing through the UN after nearly
a year of failing to overcome a Greek veto of recognition by
the EC. (Patrick Moore)

ROMANIAN VOLUNTEERS FIGHTING FOR SERBIA? In an interview broadcast
on Radio Bucharest on 28-December National Defense Minister Nicolae
Spiroiu denied Romanian officers are fighting as volunteers on
Serbia's side. The denial came in the wake of a declaration made
in Geneva by Croatian President Franjo Tudjman and reported by
AFP and Hungarian Radio. Spiroiu said that there are no Romanian
volunteers or Romanian military personnel in Serbia or elsewhere
on the territory of former Yugoslavia. (Michael Shafir)

PROTEST STRIKE AT INDEPENDENT CROATIAN NEWSPAPER. Western news
agencies said on 28-December that employees of the Split daily
Slobodna Dalmacija have staged a one-day warning strike in protest
against government attempts to control editorial policy. The
paper is the only one of Croatia's three main dailies that is
not in effect subordinated to the government and the ruling Croatian
Democratic Community (HDZ), but the authorities have tried for
several months to influence or control editorial policy by setting
up a "privatization board" in what really amounts to an attempted
takeover. The employees and their editors say they can run and
manage the paper themselves, and want to abolish the board. The
HDZ-dominated government of President Tudjman controls the broadcast
media, the national news agency, and a weekly news magazine.
It has forced one independent weekly news magazine out of business
and has taken legal measures against two other weekly newspapers.
(Patrick Moore)

DEVELOPMENTS PRIOR TO THE SPLIT OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA. CTK reports
that on 28-December Czechoslovak Foreign Minister Jozef Moravcik,
Czech Foreign Minister Josef Zieleniec, and Slovak Foreign Minister
Milan Knazko signed agreements that will govern the division
of Czechoslovakia's fixed and movable assets abroad between the
Czech Republic and Slovakia. In another development, Czech authorities
have begun building provisional check-points at future border
crossings between the Czech Republic and Slovakia. According
to Czech Interior Ministry officials, only trucks "suspected
of smuggling" will be checked at the border. Passenger cars will
be checked randomly. CTK reports Slovak officials as saying that
Slovakia will not build similar installations before 1-January
1993. (Jiri Pehe)

SLOVAKS ASK FOR CZECH CITIZENSHIP. A CTK report on 26 December
said that the Czech Interior Ministry is receiving more than
3,000 applications a day from Slovaks for Czech citizenship.
Czechoslovak TV reported earlier that some 30,000 Slovaks have
so far applied and that the Czech Interior Ministry is only able
to process about 100 applications a day. More than 300,000 Slovaks
live on the territory of the Czech Republic. According to the
new Czech citizenship law they have until 31 December 1993 to
opt for Czech citizenship. (Jan Obrman)

END TO POLISH STRIKES IN SIGHT? Talks between representatives
of Solidarity and Finance Ministry officials on 28-December brought
the first signs of a successful conclusion to the collective
dispute over rising living costs in which Solidarity and the
government have been involved since August 1992, PAP reports.
The government forecasts a 3-4% percent increase in real wages
in the production sector in 1993. Agreement would also satisfy
some demands of the striking miners and railway workers. Separate
talks between lignite miners, employers, and government representatives
on 28 December led to initial agreement in several areas, including
a framework for restructuring of the industry. Industry Minister
Waclaw Niewiarowski was quoted by PAP as saying that if the talks
continue as they have begun, the threat of strikes would disappear.
Talks between Silesian railway workers and labor ministry officials
also resumed on 29-December amid expectations of a successful
outcome. (Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)

SKUBISZEWSKI ON NORTH ATLANTIC COOPERATION COUNCIL. Polish Foreign
Minister Krzysztof Skubiszewski told reporters on 23-December
that the North Atlantic Cooperation Council, which includes foreign
ministers of the NATO countries and 15-East European countries,
discussed the possibility of involving member states in peace
operations under the auspices of the UN and CSCE and that consultations
in this respect would be continued. The program adopted by the
NACC for next year includes political consultations and practical
discussions on such topics as the structure of the armed forces
and its adaptation to cooperation with NATO; defense policy,
training, and command systems. Military contacts are to be expanded
and bilateral contacts will help forge links between NATO and
the non-NATO countries. Skubiszewski told PAP that the program
suits Poland's needs and hopes for broader cooperation with NATO.
(Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)

BEROV PRESENTS MAIN OBJECTIVES. On 28-December Bulgarian prime
minister-designate and economics professor Lyuben Berov outlined
his views on the overall aims of the government he wants to form.
BTA summarized Berov's statement, in which he said that in the
economic sector he will concentrate on promoting large-scale
privatization, supporting private business, and introducing legislation
to regulate bankruptcy and the administration of state-owned
companies. He also discussed the need to step up crime-fighting
measures, strengthen national security arrangements, and launch
an active labor market policy. While the BSP and MRF parliamentary
groups said they are generally satisfied with the declaration,
the UDF leadership refused even to meet with Berov. At the same
time, in a tentative cabinet lineup just made public, the majority
of new ministers are UDF legislators, two from the current acting
government. Berov, who has said he would go on implementing the
UDF platform from the October 1991 elections, promised not to
rewrite any of the key laws introduced by the previous UDF government.
(Kjell Engelbrekt)

ROMANIANS PROTEST HANDLING OF KING'S VISIT. Over 130-Romanian
politicians, cultural figures, and scientists signed a protest
against the government's handling of the aborted visit of former
King Michael to Romania over Christmas. The protest was sent
to Rompres and quoted by Radio Bucharest on 28-December. The
signatories said the government has "once more displayed antidemocratic
behavior," demonstrating "obstacles specific to totalitarian
regimes" may also be "encountered on the path to democracy."
(Michael Shafir)

PROGRESS ON HUNGARIAN REFERENDUM. MTI reports that over 81,000
signatures have been collected so far by the Association of People
Living Below Minimum Standards. This ad hoc group is hoping to
turn over to the speaker of the parliament 200,000 signatures
in January 1993, thereby forcing parliament to call a nationwide
referendum on whether or not to dissolve parliament and call
for new elections before the next scheduled general elections
in March 1994. The group cited falling living standards and general
political dissatisfaction as reasons for their drive. Some legal
experts, however, question the constitutionality of recalling
parliament by referendum. (Karoly Okolicsanyi)

RUSSIAN PULLOUT FROM VILNIUS COMPLETED. On 28-December the 107th
Motorized Rifle Division of the Russian Army completed its withdrawal
from the base in Northern Town in Vilnius, Baltfax reports. The
papers officially transferring the base to Lithuania will be
signed on 29 December by Russian army officials and Col. Stasys
Knezys, the Lithuanian government commissioner for army withdrawal.
(Saulius Girnius)

NEW DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF LITHUANIAN RADIO & TV. At an extraordinary
meeting on 28-December the Seimas by a vote of 68 to 24 with
9-abstentions approved the appointment of Laimonas Tapinas, former
film critic and head of the journalism department of Vilnius
University, as director-general of Lithuanian Radio and TV, Radio
Lithuania reports. The newly appointed board of Lithuanian Radio
and TV, headed by former Supreme Council deputy Gediminas Ilgunas,
approved the nomination on 27-December.

ESTONIAN BANK TO BE AUCTIONED. On 28 December the liquidation
commission of the Tartu Commercial Bank announced that the bank's
property, including claims, will be sold at an auction on 15-January,
BNS reports. The bank is one of three whose operations were suspended
on 18-November. On 18 December it was decided to dissolve the
bank, which failed due to mismanagement and possible credit fraud.
Some bank officials are under investigation. (Saulius Girnius)


BULGARIAN CENSUS CONFIRMS LARGE-SCALE EMIGRATION. The first results
of the Bulgarian census, held between 4 and 14 December this
year, have confirmed a sharp population decrease as a result
of large-scale emigration, BTA reports. Released by the National
Statistical Institute on 28-December, the aggregate figures for
population and housing show that the total population, now standing
at 8,472,724, has decreased by 476,000 since 1985. There are
3,061,000 dwellings in the country, and 67.1% of the population
live in cities. (Kjell Engelbrekt)

BULGARIA RAISES INTEREST RATE. On 1 January Bulgaria's prime
interest rate will rise from 41 to 47%, Reuters reported on 28
December. The decision to raise the lending rate was taken by
the Bulgarian National Bank, which said the move was motivated
by "political instability, a forecast inflation rise, and the
lack of an approved 1993 budget law." During 1992 the prime interest
rate has hovered between 54-and 41%, while year-on-year inflation
was recently estimated at 90%. (Kjell Engelbrekt)

DECLINING FOOD CONSUMPTION, RISING UNEMPLOYMENT IN ROMANIA. A
study released by the National Statistics Board of Romania, quoted
by Rompres on 14-December, shows a steady decline in food consumption.
The study, based on a representative sample of working families,
shows that average monthly consumption in the first half of 1992
was lower than in the same period in 1991. Romanians eat less
fresh meat and meat products, fish and fish products, eggs, sugar,
potatoes, and fruit. Consumption among pensioners is even lower
than the average. Expenditures on food, on the other hand, grew
among wage-earners from 51.6% in 1991 to 56.5% in 1992 and among
retired persons from 61.7% to 66.6%. Romania lags behind other
former communist countries, such as Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland,
and Czechoslovakia in food consumption. According to data released
on 28 December by the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection
and carried by Radio Bucharest and Rompres on the same day, the
number of unemployed persons in Romania has risen to 1,043,780-9.4%
of the total work force. (Michael Shafir).

PLANNED POLISH-PAKISTANI TANK DEAL. Poland's Foreign Economic
Relations Ministry confirmed reports that Poland and Pakistan
are interested in a contract that would call for the export of
320-Polish T-72 tanks to Pakistan. Quoting a ministry spokeswoman,
PAP said on 28 December that the sum of $450-million mentioned
in some Pakistani papers would be considered by the Poles as
the Pakistanis' starting offer. (Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)

KURDISH REFUGEES IN ESTONIA. The fate of 125-Kurdish refugees
who entered the country from Russia and were detained in Parnu
and Tallinn on 21-and 22 December remains unsettled, BNS reported
on 27 December. Their expulsion was supposed to have taken place
on 23 December. The refugees are being held at border guard barracks,
where living conditions are described as "abnormal." Only 14
of the Kurds have decided to go to Latvia or Russia, while the
rest seek political asylum in Estonia or are requesting to be
sent to Sweden. (Saulius Girnius)

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Charles Trumbull








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