It matters not how a man dies, but how he lives. - Samuel Johnson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 247, 28 December 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

UKRAINE RAISES PRICES. As the result of a government decree on
22 December, Ukrainian consumers have found their cost of living
sharply increased, Western news agencies reported on 26-December.
For example, in Kiev, the price of bread rose six times, a subway
ticket ten times. According to Interfax on 25 December, Ukrainians
can expect further price hikes at the start of the new year,
including a 50% rise in train tickets, a doubling of costs for
communications services and a 60% increase in housing rents.
(Erik Whitlock)

PROTESTS IN KIEV AGAINST PRICE INCREASES. Several thousand people
protested against price increases in Kiev on 26 December, CIS
and Western agencies reported. In a televised speech shown that
evening, the Ukrainian Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma defended
what he described as "these unpopular measures," saying that
the government had no choice. "We have spoken for a long time
about the need for drastic economic reform in Ukraine, but instead
of planned action we have been passively following catastrophes
in the economy," he said. "We can wait no longer." That same
afternoon, his deputy, Viktor Pynzenyk, announced that the minimum
salaries for December would be increased from 2,300 Ukrainian
karbovantsi per month to 3,400. On 27 December, according to
INTERFAX, a Ukrainian delegation headed by energy minister Yulii
Yoffe left for Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan to try and ensure
adequate fuel supplies in the coming year. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

NEW RUSSIAN CABINET; OPPOSITION IS CRITICAL. Prime Minister Viktor
Chernomyrdin selected a cabinet that is only slightly different
from the old one, ITAR-TASS reported on 23 December. All key
ministers, including Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev, remain.
Two new deputy prime ministers-Boris Fedorov and Yurii Yarov-
have been appointed. Fedorov will be responsible for reform strategy;
Yarov for economic relations with other CIS states. Parliamentary
speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov and the Civic Union leaders Vasilii
Lipitsky and Aleksandr Vladislavlev complained that President
Yeltsin had exerted too great an influence over the choices and
that Chernomyrdin had been "deprived" of the opportunity to form
his own government in order to implement a new economic reform
program. (Alexander Rahr)

FEDOROV: RUSSIA WILL CONTINUE REFORM POLICY. Russia's new deputy
prime minister in charge of economic strategy, Boris Fedorov,
said that he wants to continue pursuing the economic reform policy
of former Acting Prime Minister Egor Gaidar. ITAR-TASS on 25
December quoted Fedorov as saying that there is no need to write
a new economic program. He stated that he might seek cooperation
with economist Grigorii Yavlinsky, who had some differences with
Gaidar. Yavlinsky and Fedorov worked together on the famous "500
days program" for the transition to a market economy in 1990.
Both had been members of the first Russian government under the
leadership of Boris Yeltsin. Gaidar praised the appointment of
Fedorov. Fedorov has served as Russia's executive director at
the World Bank in Washington and managing director of the European
Bank for Reconstruction and Development in London. (Alexander
Rahr)

BUT FEDOROV'S POSITION IS NOT ENTIRELY CLEAR. Although economics
minister Boris Fedorov told ITAR-TASS on 25 December that the
Chernomyrdin government should hold to the "general line" of
Egor Gaidar's economic reform program, rather than coming up
with one of its own, it was not clear exactly what he had in
mind. While pointing to inflation as the leading problem in Russia,
he called for "softening the blows" on the state sector in its
transition to a market economy. He also urged an elimination
of the dollarization of the Russian economy, but suggested that
actions taken towards this end in the near future would not be
effective. (Erik Whitlock)

RUSSIAN FEDERAL INFORMATION CENTER CREATED. President Yeltsin
has decreed the creation of a new Russian Federal Information
Center to control Russia's state-financed mass media, ITAR-TASS
reported on 26 December. Mikhail Poltoranin was appointed head
of the center and given the status of a first deputy prime minister.
Poltoranin resigned from his previous post as information minister
last month to appease hardliners on the eve of the Congress.
His comeback is a clear sign that Yeltsin is unwilling to surrender
his power to the opposition. The center will be subordinated
directly to the president and, according to Poltoranin, will
ensure that the media provide accurate and truthful information
concerning the reforms. (Alexander Rahr)

RIGHT-WING POLITICIAN TO STAND FOR MOSCOW MAYOR. The extreme
Russian nationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky announced on 26 December
that he would run for the post of Moscow mayor. Elections are
expected in February 1993. In 1991, Zhirinovsky finished third
in Russian presidential elections. ITAR-TASS reported that Zhirinovsky
handed out free tea and cakes at a rally in Moscow, and urged
Muscovites to elect him mayor and "in future, president of Russia."
Zhirinovsky calls for the recreation of the Russian empire within
its pre-February 1917 borders. (Vera Tolz)

KOZYREV OPPOSES UN MILITARY ACTION VS. SERBS IN BOSNIA. Russian
Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev stated on 26 December that "there
was no alternative to the peace process" in Bosnia, and that
UN military action would "lead nowhere," Western agencies reported.
Kozyrev said that the use of force would be counterproductive,
have unpredictable consequences, and that it would increase human
suffering in the region. (Hal Kosiba)

CIS INTERPARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY MEETS IN ST. PETERSBURG. The
CIS Interparliamentary Assembly is holding its second plenary
meeting in St.-Petersburg on 28-December, ITAR-TASS reported.
Among the participants are the heads of the Russian and Kyrgyz
parliaments, Ruslan Khasbulatov and Medetkan Sherimkulov. Only
seven of the CIS states (Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan,
Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Armenia) signed the agreement last
March on the establishment of this body, and they are regarded
as the members that would be prepared to accept a greater measure
of integration. On his arrival from Moscow on 27 December, Khasbulatov
announced that from now on meetings of the CIS Interparliamentary
Assembly would be held in St. Petersburg, the city designated
to serve as its headquarters. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

KRAVCHUK CONDEMNS INTEGRATIONIST PRESSURE ON CIS MEMBERS. On
23-December, on his return from an official visit to Egypt, Ukrainian
president Leonid Kravchuk criticized the CIS as an ineffective
organization and said that there had not been sufficient groundwork
for the CIS summit scheduled for 24 December, but postponed until
22-January. According to Radio Ukraine, Kravchuk said that the
CIS charter that was being proposed "is close to the [Union]
treaty of 1922." With the "main problems" still not settled,
he said, it is "impermissible to resolve all these things by
pressure." Kravchuk contrasted this with the approach to European
integration. He pointed out that the question of the entry of
European states into a European community was being decided by
referendums and the wishes of the respective states were being
taken into account. In any case, he added, the CIS had "shown
itself to be fully ineffective in resolving complex issues,"
and he doubted if it could be "reanimated." "If anything has
been settled," the Ukrainian president stressed, "it is only
in the framework of bilateral relations." (Bohdan Nahaylo)

NIYAZOV WANTS CIS TO BE CONSULTATIVE BODY ONLY. Turkmenistan's
President Saparmurad Niyazov told a plenum of the political council
of his Democratic Party (formerly Communist Party) that Turkmenistan
is interested in the Commonwealth of Independent States only
as a consultative body, ITAR-TASS reported on 23 December. He
rejected the proposals of other CIS leaders that the Commonwealth
assume a larger coordinating role, at least in economic matters.
Niyazov still wants relations between CIS member states to be
bilateral, and has warned that his country might withdraw if
central coordinating bodies are set up. (Bess Brown)

GORBACHEV ON BREAKUP OF THE UNION, YELTSIN AND THE CONGRESS.
In an interview on the Ostankino TV on 27 December, former Soviet
President Mikhail Gorbachev called the breakup of the Soviet
Union a "tragic mistake." He claimed that "what happened was
not dictated by necessity and had very hard consequences for
the whole country, for all of the republics." He said the CIS
failed to meet expectations as a successor to the USSR. Gorbachev
denied accusations that he left behind a legacy that included
a crumbling economy and ethnic conflicts. Instead, he blamed
his successors for the trouble. His main criticism was leveled
against President Yeltsin. The former Soviet leader praised the
latest Russian Congress of People's Deputies and said it offered
a welcome centrist alternative to the impulsive Yeltsin and the
radicals on both sides. When his interviewer pointed out that
the Congress is largely regarded as conservative, Gorbachev called
such a description "dishonest." (Vera Tolz)

RUSSIAN SOCIAL SECURITY: NEW LAW AND NEW FIGURES. The Russian
parliament passed a law on 25 December defining contributions
business are to make to the national social security fund, Interfax
reported. State and non-state firms alike will be required to
pay 5.4% of their wage bill to the fund. In a related story,
the Chairman of the Russian Pension Fund, Aleksandr Kostin, said
that 50 million Russians qualified for pensions, but only 35.5-million
were receiving support. No explanation was given for the difference.
In other socio-economic news, Trud reported on 23 December that
the number of officially unemployed in December rose to 518,000.
This is up from 61,900 at the beginning of the year and 367,000
in October. (Erik Whitlock)

MB STAFF HEADQUARTERS WILL BE DIRECTED BY KGB VETERAN. President
Yeltsin has appointed Nikolai Golushko chief of staff in the
Ministry of Security (MB) and the first deputy of the Minister
of Security, according to Krasnaya zvezda of 25 December. This
is the first official mention of the existence of a staff unit
within the structure of the MB (the former KGB) A similar unit
was set up within the old KGB by General Filipp Bobkov in 1988;
then it exercised operative command over the troops attached
to the KGB. Newly appointed General Nikolai Golushko was the
chairman of Ukrainian KGB during the perestroika period; he was
also a member of the KGB's top administrative body, the Collegium.
After the disbanding of the USSR in 1991, Golushko joined the
MB as a deputy to its minister, Viktor Barannikov. Creation of
the MB staff unit suggests that the ministry already has or will
have paramilitary troops under its command. (Victor Yasmann)


UKRAINE TO DESTROY SOME STRATEGIC MISSILES. Ukrainian President
Leonid Kravchuk on 23-December said that the 130 Russian-built
SS-19 missiles on Ukrainian territory would have to be dismantled
with Russian assistance, but "if the situation aggravates" the
46 SS-24 missiles in Ukraine would be destroyed by the Ukrainians.
(The solid-fueled SS-24s were built at Pervomaysk, Ukraine.)
According to Interfax, Kravchuk repeated Ukraine's intention
to become nuclear-free. He spoke with U.S. President George Bush
on 24 December by telephone regarding Ukraine's ratification
of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). Interfax reported
that the two presidents "attached great importance" to Russia
and Ukraine reaching an agreement allowing Russian experts to
maintain the strategic weapons on Ukrainian territory. (Doug
Clarke)

REMINDER ON SURRENDER OF ANTI-GOVERNMENT TAJIK FORCES. The deadline
of 28-December has been set by Tajikistan's government for anti-government
fighters to surrender their weapons, pro-government military
leader Sangak Safarov reminded the opposition on Tajik TV, Interfax
reported on 27 December. Talks are also expected to begin between
Tajik government representatives and Afghan officials on the
fate of the thousands of Tajik refugees who have fled to Afghanistan.
Tajik Prime Minister Abdumalik Abdullodzonov said in an interview
published in Nezavisimaya gazeta on 23 December that there are
some 800,000 refugees and homeless people in Tajikistan. Tajik
Supreme Soviet Chairman Imomali Rakhmonov was quoted by Interfax
on 25 December as saying that anti-government fighters were forcing
people to go to Afghanistan, a claim denied by the refugees themselves.
(Bess Brown)

POLICE BEAT DEMONSTRATORS IN BAKU. Demonstrators who demanded
suspension of a parliamentary decision to rename Azerbaijan's
state language "Turkish" were beaten by police and some were
arrested on 25 December in Baku, an RFE/RL correspondent reported.
The demonstration was organized by Azerbaijan's Social Democratic
Party. The following day, the chairman of the party, Araz Alizade,
told an RFE/RL correspondent in an interview that state prosecutors
are prosecuting him for slander because he allegedly called President
Abulfaz Elchibey a fascist. Azerbaijan's foreign minister said
on 23 December that the language name-change was unconstitutional.
Some oppositionists have called for a referendum on the issue.
(Bess Brown)

MOLDOVAN BACKLASH AGAINST ROMANIAN CALLS FOR UNIFICATION. Addressing
Moldova's Parliament on 24 December, President Mircea Snegur
decried the recent statements of Romanian officials and of the
opposition Moldovan Popular Front pressing for Romanian-Moldovan
unification. Describing these statements as "a campaign against
Moldovan statehood," Snegur implied that Moldova should hold
a referendum over the question of independent statehood vs. unification
with Romania. The parliament's Vice Chairman, Victor Puscasu,
who is an organizer of the pro-Snegur, pro-independence and anti-unification
Moldovan Republican Party, told Interfax on 27 December that
a referendum should be held shortly. Such a referendum has long
been advocated by anti-unification Moldovan groups and is being
opposed by the pro-unification Popular Front. (Vladimir Socor)


CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

MILOSEVIC REELECTION CONFIRMED. International media report that
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic's reelection has been officially
confirmed. New ballots are to be held in about 200 voting places
in response to charges of irregularities, but even if challenger
Milan Panic were to take all of the votes in those precincts,
it would not be enough to affect the overall result of the election.
Milosevic's Socialists lack an absolute majority in Parliament,
but are expected to govern in an alliance with the ultranationalist
Serbian Radical Party of Vojislav Seselj, which made huge gains
in the latest contest. The socialists went from 194 to 101 seats
out of 250, while Seselj's party rose from one to 73 deputies
to become the second largest group in the legislature. Five seats
went to the party around the freebooter known as Arkan, who,
together with Seselj and others, has been named by US Secretary
of State Lawrence Eagleburger as a likely candidate for eventual
war-crimes trials. DEPOS, the leading opposition party, won about
50 seats; in addition the Hungarian minority won 9 seats, and
the Muslims 1, the 28-December Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
reports. The Socialists and Radicals are similarly the two largest
Serbian delegations in the new rump Yugoslav parliament as well.
The presidential election in Montenegro, however, will require
a second round. (Patrick Moore)

US WARNS SERBS OVER KOSOVO; OTHER DEVELOPMENTS. The 28 December
New York Times reports that the American leadership has warned
its Serbian counterparts both orally and in writing against extending
the war to Kosovo. The written message said that "in the event
of conflict in Kosovo caused by Serbian action, the United States
will be prepared to employ military force against the Serbs in
Kosovo and in Serbia proper." The paper added that rump Yugoslav
President Dobrica Cosic is particularly upset by the American
message. Meanwhile, Tanjug on 25 December said that rump Yugoslav
Prime Minister Milan Panic has accepted an invitation to attend
the inauguration of President- elect Bill Clinton on 20-January.
Western news agencies on 26-December reported that $236,000-worth
of equipment intended for the independent Serbian TV station
Studio-B was hijacked. Station officials said that the theft
was politically motivated since their broadcasts are critical
of the Milosevic government. (Patrick-Moore)

UPDATE FROM THE YUGOSLAV AREA. International media on Christmas
day reported two mortar attacks on the UN headquarters in Sarajevo.
UN officials said the shelling was deliberate and blamed Bosnian
forces. On 27 December Croatian President Franjo Tudjman said
that there has been progress in his Geneva talks with Muslim
leader Alija Izetbegovic on the future political shape of Bosnia
and its frontiers. Tudjman is representing Bosnian and Herzegovinian
Croats, while Izetbegovic's term as Bosnian president expired
on 22 December. Elsewhere, Western news agencies quoted Macedonian
President Kiro Gligorov as saying that the cost of nonrecognition
has been "enormous" for his republic, which is now going to the
UN rather than the EC in search of a diplomatic opening. Greek
officials told reporters in Athens that Greece is sending representatives
to key capitals abroad to present the case against recognition.
Reuters on 24 December quoted Macedonia's interior minister as
saying that his republic would close its border with Kosovo if
war breaks out there. (Patrick Moore)

SKUBISZEWSKI COMMENTS ON BALKAN CONFLICT. At a press conference
on his return from the US and Belgium on 23 December, Polish
Foreign Minister Krzysztof Skubiszewski said that he and the
foreign ministers of Austria, Hungary, and Slovenia, members
of the Central European Initiative, presented a joint stand on
the Balkan conflict to the UN secretary-general, the chairman
of the Security Council and the US President. PAP quoted Skubiszewski
as saying that the four argued in favor of using force to implement
Security Council resolutions in the region where CSCE standards
are increasingly neglected. Skubiszewski said that warning measures
should precede any direct use of force. He advocated preventive
measures to avoid escalation of the conflict in Macedonia and
Kosovo. (Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)

ROMANIA TO RELEASE EMPTY YUGOSLAV VESSELS. Radio Bucharest announced
on 24-December that Romania will release all those vessels belonging
to rump Yugoslavia which were sailing without cargoes and which
were halted in Danube ports in the past month in observance of
UN sanctions. The radio carried a statement by the Foreign Ministry
saying the release of the vessels is in line with a decision
adopted by the UN sanctions committee at Bucharest's request.
Romania has been complaining that its Danube ports are jammed.
The ministry statement said nothing about the fate of the rump
Yugoslav and other vessels carrying goods and detained by Romania.
(Michael Shafir).

CZECH AND SLOVAK REPUBLICS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. The
Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry expects no problems with the integration
of Czechoslovakia's successor states into international organizations,
CTK reported on 25 December. A majority of organizations, including
the IMF, the CSCE, the World Bank, the EBRD, and the North Atlantic
Council (uniting NATO members and nonmembers) have already decided
to admit both republics on 1 January 1993. The UN is expected
to admit the two new states in January and both will automatically
become members of many of the UN's sub-organizations, including
UNESCO. The Czech Republic is, moreover, a candidate for temporary
membership on the UN Security Council (to be elected in September).
The Council of Europe will decide about the admission of the
two states at its May session. The association agreement between
Czechoslovakia and the EC (which has been signed but not ratified
by all EC members) will apparently not be automatically transferred
to the two successor states, and some observers expect that individual
EC members will insist on a renegotiation in order to lower the
two new states' export quotas. (Jan Obrman)

CZECHS, SLOVAKS AGREE ON GAS PIPELINE. On 23 December Czech Minister
of Industry and Trade Vladimir Dlouhy and his Slovak counterpart,
Ludovit Cermak, reached agreement on the controversial gas pipeline
that has been providing natural gas from the former Soviet Union
to both republics, agencies reported. The Czech and Slovak state-
owned gas companies will jointly establish a subsidiary and each
of the two partners will control 50% of its shares. The subsidiary
will have the exclusive right to handle contracts with third
parties involved in the transactions, namely Russia, which is
delivering the gas, and Ukraine, through whose territory the
pipeline runs. The ministers hailed the agreement as an important
breakthrough that takes into consideration the strategic and
economic interests of both republics. (Jan Obrman)

KLAUS, MECIAR MEET IN BRATISLAVA. The prime ministers of the
Czech Republic and Slovakia, Vaclav Klaus and Vladimir Meciar,
met in Bratislava on 27-December, Czech Radio reports. They confirmed
that the privatization methods applied in their republics will
differ in the future. In the Czech Republic the system of voucher
privatization will enter its second round, but it will be terminated
in Slovakia after 1-January 1993. Klaus made it clear, however,
that all property that remains in the hands of the Czech state
after the second round of voucher privatization will be sold
off by "standard methods of privatization." Klaus also said after
the meeting that the position of the Czech ambassador to Slovakia
will be more significant than that of a Czech minister. He announced
a state visit to Slovakia for the first week of January. (Jan
Obrman)

SILESIAN STRIKES RESUME AFTER CHRISTMAS BREAK. On 28 December
miners in the 65-Silesian coal mines resumed the industrial action
that was begun on 14 December to protest delays in the restructuring
of the mining industry and the Silesian region. Over Christmas
the action had been transformed into an "absentee strike," with
the miners staying at home and only essential service workers
and representatives of the strike committees present in the mines.
Reduced amounts of coal are being mined for the needs of heating
plants, coke plants, and steelworks. The Silesian railway strike
on the other hand was suspended on 24 December after talks among
government, railway management, and unions led to the establishment
of a mixed commission to determine means of settling the most
important of the railway workers' 12 demands and agree upon deadlines.
The next round of talks will take place on 29 December. (Anna
Sabbat-Swidlicka)

POLISH MINIMUM WAGE IN 1993. At a 23 December meeting between
representatives of Solidarity and the National Trade Union Alliance
on the one hand and the Ministry of Labor and Social Policy on
the other, it was agreed that the minimum wage in the first three
months of 1993 will be 1.5 million zloty, PAP reports. The government
believes that in 1992 the minimum wage has risen faster than
the average national income and has proposed talks on new methods
of indexing the minimum wage. (Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)

MICHAEL CANCELS VISIT. In a press release on 23-December Romania's
exiled King Michael announced that he has been forced "to postpone"
his planned Christmas visit to Romania. The statement said the
authorities in Bucharest imposed unacceptable conditions at the
last minute. Among other things, they demanded that the king
formally recognize the country's republican institutions and
submit to a body search at the border; the statement called these
"neo-Stalinist methods." Romanian TV carried the text of the
message on 23-December. The following day the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs denied that new conditions had been imposed for the king's
visit, apart from insistence that it be "of a private character,"
but admitted that officials had discussed with a representative
of the king what were called "problems concerning the regulation
of the king's citizenship and his ties with the Romanian state."
(Michael Shafir)

LANGUAGE REGULATIONS FOR HUNGARIAN MINORITY IN UKRAINE. MTI reported
on 23-December that Mykhailo Krayilo, the Ukrainian president's
plenipoteniatry representative in the Transcarpathia region,
has issued new regulations promoting widespread use of minority
languages. The regulations implement the Ukraine's laws on language
and minorities. Leaders of the Transcarpathian Hungarian minority,
numbering more than 150,000, as well as the Hungarian government
welcomed the news. The new regulations require street and office
signs in minority languages in places where most of the population
is not Ukrainian. In these areas state employees will be required
to have facility in the minority language. (Karoly Okolicsanyi)


FIVE CHARGED IN BULGARIAN LABOR CAMP KILLINGS. The prosecutor's
office of the Bulgarian armed forces has charged five former
communist officials with responsibility for a large number of
deaths in two labor camps operating between 1959 and 1962, Standart
wrote on 24 December. The defendants, former Interior Minister
Mircho Spasov and four senior camp officials, could face 20 years
imprisonment or death sentences. Bulgarian media broke the story
of the brutal regime in the Lovech and Skravena camps in the
spring of 1990, and later a government commission concluded that
147 of 1,235 inmates had died there. Despite efforts to prove
the involvement of ex-dictator Todor Zhivkov, a court source
told AFP there is "not enough evidence" to bring him to trial.
(Kjell Engelbrekt)

LATVIA APPROVES AMENDMENTS TO STATE BUDGET. On 23 December the
Supreme Council approved amendments to the 1992 budget proposed
by the Council of Ministers, Baltfax reports. The state budget
deficit was increased to 3.8 billion Latvian rubles and the hard
currency deficit to $16 million. The spending deficit is connected
with rising energy prices and the need to pay state allowances
of 1,500 rubles a month to enable less well-off residents to
pay for heating. (Saulius Girnius)

ELECTIONS IN LITHUANIA. On 22 December the Lithuanian Seimas
adopted a law on the elections of a president to be held on 14
February, BNS reports. The opposition did not take part in the
vote, accusing the majority of acting unconstitutionally since
the law provides for creating a special commission for presidential
elections to replace the existing Supreme Elections Commission.
The Seimas also decided to change the date of local council elections
in Vilnius, Salcininkai, and Visaginas (the former Snieckus)
raions from 23 January to 14-February. (Saulius Girnius)

LITHUANIAN MEMBERSHIP IN COUNCIL OF EUROPE. On 23 December Gret
Haller, the head of a delegation of the Human Rights Subcommittee
of the Legal Affairs and Human Rights Committee of the parliamentary
assembly of the Council of Europe, told a press conference in
Vilnius that the human rights situation in Lithuania is good
enough for it to join the Council of Europe, Baltfax reports.
She said that the Lithuanian authorities should ensure the full
independence of the republic's judicial system, abolish the death
penalty, improve conditions in Lithuanian prisons, and provide
better opportunities for women to take part in political affairs.
The Council of Europe plans to discuss granting its recommendations
on Lithuania's membership on 5 February 1993. (Saulius Girnius)


[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Charles Trumbull






[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole