Everyone knows it is much harder to turn word into deed than deed into word. - Maxim Gorky
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 237, 10 December 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

CONGRESS REJECTS GAIDAR, LIMITS YELTSIN'S POWERS. Acting Prime
Minister Egor Gaidar failed by a very narrow margin to obtain
confirmation from the Congress of People's Deputies for his nomination
by President Yeltsin to become prime minister. In a secret ballot,
467 deputies voted for him, 486 against. Hardliners scored another
victory over President Yeltsin by approving overwhelmingly a
constitutional amendment which would automatically strip the
President of his powers if he orders a dissolution of the Congress
or the Supreme Soviet, Radio Rossii reported on 9 December. Congress
also approved an amendment submitted by Yeltsin as a conciliatory
gesture to Congress, making four major ministerial posts subject
to approval by the parliament. (Alexander Rahr)

YELTSIN CALLS FOR REFERENDUM, REGRETS PREVIOUS CONCESSIONS. In
a speech which was broadcast live on Russian TV on 10 December,
President Boris Yeltsin called for a state-wide referendum next
month to let the people decide whether they want the parliament
or the president to lead the country. Yeltsin blamed himself
for having made unjustified concessions to seek a consensus.
He accused parliamentary speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov of "re-establishing
the old communist system rejected by the people." He said a dictatorship
of the legislature is emerging and added that the coup d'etat
which had not succeeded in August of last year is succeeding
now. Yeltsin further stated that he will ignore Congress' rejection
of Egor Gaidar as prime minister and will continue with reform.
(Alexander Rahr)

CONGRESS FEARS BEING DISBANDED BY YELTSIN. Parliamentary speaker
Ruslan Khasbulatov told Congress that he thought he had been
personally insulted by President Yeltsin, and in response he
was offering his resignation, Russian TV reported on 10-December.
After Yeltsin's call for a referendum, there were dramatic scenes
in the hall. Some deputies demanded that the parliamentary guards
should be reinforced to protect the Russian parliament building
from a possible hostile seizure by forces loyal to the president.
Yeltsin had told Congress previously that he had no intention
of dissolving it. Security Minister Viktor Barannikov told the
Congress that the security forces are not planning a coup. He
said that they will protect the Constitution against any violation.
Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi stated that people are tired
of confrontation and called for a centrist compromise. (Alexander
Rahr)

GAIDAR'S LOSS: REVENGE OF CIVIC UNION? An RFE/RL correspondent
quoted a leader of the Civic Union, Nikolai Travkin, as saying
on 9 December that Yeltsin had broken his promise to the Union
in his address to the Congress of the Intelligentsia on 29-November.
Travkin referred to Yeltsin's statement that he did not actually
sack "his own people"-namely, former Information Minister Mikhail
Poltoranin and State Secretary Gennadii Burbulis-and that their
removal was merely a temporary tactical move on the eve of the
Congress. The removal of Burbulis and Poltoranin were on the
list of demands presented by the Civic Union as a basis for compromise
with Yeltsin. (Julia Wishnevsky)

HARD-LINERS WANT ENTERPRISE DIRECTOR AS PRIME MINISTER. A spokesman
for the opposition faction "Russian Unity," Vladimir Isakov,
told ITAR-TASS on 9 December that he and his supporters wanted
to propose enterprise director Georgii Kostin as prime minister
instead of Egor Gaidar. ITAR-TASS described Kostin, who is the
director of a machine-building enterprise in Voronezh, as a "completely
unknown man in Russia." The agency said he participated in drawing
up an economic program called "The Manageable Russian Economy,"
which reportedly closely resembles the program of the Civic Union.
(Vera Tolz)

CONGRESS ENACTS LEGAL REFORMS. On 8 December, the Congress took
a major step towards enacting important legal reforms by introducing
into the Constitution amendments seeking to guarantee universally
recognized judicial principles, such as trial by jury and life-time
appointments for judges. The latter provision gained the support
of the chairman of the Russian Supreme Court, Vladimir Lebedev,
but was opposed by Justice Minister Nikolai Fedorov, whose ministry
currently controls Russia's judiciary. (Julia Wishnevsky)

RUSSIAN CONGRESS CONCERNED OVER ARMS AGREEMENT WITH US. After
an often heated debate that lasted nearly one hour, the Congress
of Peoples' Deputies on 9 December tasked the Russian parliament
with examining the 17 June 1992 agreement between Presidents
Yeltsin and Bush on the provision of US aid in the dismantling
of Russian nuclear warheads. The agreement was defended by Viktor
Mikhailov, the Russian Nuclear Energy Minister. He welcomed the
$400 million worth of equipment and assistance the United States
had pledged, and said that it had removed a burden of 40 billion
rubles from the country's "already overloaded budget." Evgenii
Ambratsumov, the chairman of the parliamentary committee for
international affairs and foreign trade, suggested that Russian
concerns over the text of the agreement might be alleviated by
an exchange of notes between the two governments so that the
accord could be corrected "without blowing it up." (Doug Clarke)


FIRST VOUCHER AUCTION IN MOSCOW LAUNCHED. The voucher privatization
of the confectionery factory "Bolshevik" began on 9 December,
according to Russian and Western news agencies. Some 44% of the
factory will be sold for vouchers through a two week long auction
that is the first of its type in Moscow. Issued at a nominal
price of 1000 rubles per share, the number of shares ultimately
acquired per voucher depends on the quantity of shares demanded
by voucher holders in the bidding process. The first day of the
auction, prepared with significant Western assistance, reportedly
proceeded smoothly. Some three hundred bids were accepted by
mid-afternoon. The factory's workers obtained 51% of the shares,
a controlling interest, before the auction was organized. (Erik
Whitlock)

US FINANCIER TO SUPPORT FORMER SOVIET SCIENTISTS. George Soros,
a Hungarian-born US financier, has pledged to provide $100 million
to support research projects by scientists in the former Soviet
Union over the next two years. As reported by the New York Times
on 10 December, Soros will establish an International Science
Foundation, which will provide $6 million for research projects
in early 1993, and will have $85 million available by mid-1993.
The remaining funds will be spent on administration. Soros' plan
complements the recently established International Center for
Science and Technology (ICST), funded by Western governments.
The Soros project will cover all areas of the former Soviet Union
and a wide range of scientific projects, while the ICST will
concentrate on developing collaborative projects with former
weapons and defense industry scientists in Russia and Ukraine.
(John Lepingwell)

SIXTEEN NUCLEAR SMUGGLERS ARRESTED. German and Austrian police
have arrested 16 smugglers of nuclear material in a large undercover
operation. Ten members of one gang were arrested in Germany in
possession of 383 metal disks containing a total of one gram
of plutonium. The gang of six arrested in Austria had a small
quantity of radioactive cesium-137. According to reports from
Reuters and other Western press agencies of 10 December, the
radioactive material had been smuggled out of the former Soviet
Union. (John Lepingwell)

COSSACKS WOULD DEFEND RUSSIA'S BORDERS. Representatives of twelve
Cossack armies announced at a Moscow press conference on 9-December
that the Cossacks formed a force that is able to "to cover Russia's
borders and to defend the single and indivisible Russia . . .
. " According to Interfax, the Cossacks said that they had presented
a number of proposals to Russian authorities on such subjects
as state service of the Cossacks and the state program of Cossack
revival. Ivan Rybokon, head of the Kuban Cossack army, said that
the representatives stood for the creation of a Cossack force
directly subordinate to the President as they had been under
the command of the Tsar in pre-Revolutionary times. (Doug Clarke)


KRAVCHUK CRITICIZES RUSSIAN LAWMAKERS. Ukrainian President Leonid
Kravchuk told a press conference in Kiev that the main difficulties
in Ukrainian-Russian relations stem from the legislative branch
of the Russian government, Ukrinform-TASS reported on 9-December.
The Ukrainian leader cited the resolution earlier this year by
the Russian Supreme Soviet to review the 1954 transfer of the
Crimea to Ukraine and the decision by the current Russian Congress
of People's Deputies to have the parliament review the status
of Sevastopol. It turns out, said Kravchuk, that the lawmakers
are interfering in Ukrainian internal affairs, specifically in
such an important sphere as the territorial integrity of Ukraine.
(Roman Solchanyk)

UKRAINE'S PARLIAMENTARY PRESIDIUM ON RUSSIAN TERRITORIAL CLAIMS.
The Presidium of the Ukrainian parliament sharply criticized
a recent decision by the Russian Congress of People's Deputies
to examine the status of the Crimean city of Sevastopol, Interfax
reported on 9 December. The statement said that the decision
could only be seen as an attempt to make territorial claims on
Ukraine, characterizing it as a gross violation of Ukrainian-Russian
agreements. Sevastopol is the home of the disputed Black Sea
Fleet. (Roman Solchanyk)

UKRAINE REQUESTS MORE RUSSIAN OIL. According to Interfax of 9
December, Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk has appealed to
Russian President Boris Yeltsin for an additional oil quota of
2.4 million tons in December, together with increased bank credits
to the value of 100 billion rubles to pay for oil and gas deliveries.
The appeal referred to the "critical situation" in Ukraine's
fuel supply. The Ukrainian government is said to be hoping for
45-million tons of oil from Russia in 1993. If the report is
accurate, this hope would appear to be unrealistic. (Keith Bush)


SOME RUSSIAN TROOPS FROM GERMANY TO RESETTLE IN UKRAINE. Interfax
on 9-December reported that Russian President Boris Yeltsin had
directed Defense Minister General Pavel Grachev to reach an agreement
with Ukraine on building apartments in the republic for members
of the Western Group of Forces returning from Germany. The report
said that Ukraine would receive DM 755 million out of the DM
7.8 billion Germany has pledged to provide for such construction.
It said that the plans were to build 680 apartments in Novohrad-
Volynskyi and 1,100 in Kiev by the end of next year. (Doug Clarke)


UZBEK OPPOSITION LEADER ARRESTED IN BISHKEK. The chairman of
Birlik, Uzbekistan's Popular Front movement, and two of his associates
were arrested in Bishkek on 8 December by officials of Uzbekistan's
Ministry of Internal Affairs who removed them to Tashkent, Interfax
reported. Pulatov had told a human rights conference organized
by the United Councils for Soviet Jews that the Uzbek leadership
is using the threat of Muslim fundamentalism to persuade Russia
and the West to tolerate dictatorial regimes in Central Asia.
Kyrgyz human rights representatives promptly held a press conference
to denounce the arrests and complain that officials in Kyrgyzstan
had done nothing to prevent the arrests. (Bess Brown)

UZBEKISTAN TO SEND PEACEKEEPERS TO TAJIKISTAN. At its 9 December
session Uzbekistan's Supreme Soviet voted for an Uzbek battalion
to participate in the multinational peacekeeping forces to be
sent to Tajikistan under CIS command, Interfax reported. Uzbekistan
had offered to provide a peacekeeping force in September. The
CIS peacekeeping force is to comprise Russian units, including
the 201st Motorized Division already stationed in Tajikistan,
and units from Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. It remains
uncertain whether Kyrgyzstan's Supreme Soviet, now involved in
a heated debate over the country's constitution, will reverse
its earlier rejection of Kyrgyz participation in military actions
in Tajikistan. (Bess Brown)

OIL FROM KAZAKHSTAN. The Kazakhstan government estimates that
exports of crude oil will amount to about 4,750,000 tons per
year once the new oil pipeline from the Tengiz oil field to the
Russian export terminal of Novorossiisk is opened next year according
to an article in the Journal of Commerce of 8 December. This
will rise to 5,250,000 tons in 1994, and 5,500,000 by the year
2000. However, construction of the 610 kilometer pipeline has
just begun. Details of an agreement with the Chevron corporation
to develop the Tengiz field, involving investments of billions
of dollars, are now being finalized. K.K. Baikenov, Kazakhstan's
Fuels and Energy Resources Minister, claims that the country's
current oil production is 27,100,000 tons a year, and that output
will rise to around 45,000,000 within six years. (Sheila Marnie)


MORE FALLOUT IN MOLDOVA FROM ROMANIAN CALLS FOR UNIFICATION.
Interviewed by Moldovan Radio on 8 December, Moldovan President
Mircea Snegur again rebutted the recent remarks by Romanian Foreign
Ministry officials anticipating Romanian- Moldovan unification.
Reiterating his government's determination to "consolidate Moldovan
independent statehood," Snegur said that the Romanian officials'
remarks "are probably aimed at discouraging potential foreign
investors" in Moldova. In Bucharest, the Romanian Foreign Ministry's
spokeswoman was cited by ITAR-TASS as telling journalists that
"the Romanian side can not be blamed for a possible deterioration
in [Romanian-Moldovan] bilateral relations" and that Romania
"hopes that its efforts to develop relations with Moldova will
be met with the necessary understanding" by the Moldovan government.
(Vladimir Socor)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

PANIC-MILOSEVIC CAMPAIGN IN FULL SWING. Radio Serbia reports
on 9-December that Serbia's Constitutional Court (has ruled that
federal Prime Minister Milan Panic can run for president of Serbia.
It is the second time that the high court has overruled the republic's
election commission, which rejected Panic's candidacy on the
grounds that he failed to meet a one-year residency requirement.
The court's decision is now final. Meanwhile Panic and Milosevic
have been campaigning in the province of Vojvodina and western
Serbia. Independent Politika TV reports that recent polls show
that Panic is strongest in those areas. Newscasts on Belgrade
TV news-controlled by Milosevic's Socialist Party-did not even
mention Panic's campaign stops, however, while Milosevic's visits
to a factory and village were given 20 minutes. Panic has challenged
Milosevic to a TV debate next week. He told supporters that Serbia
has had enough of war and pledged to bring peace and the lifting
of UN sanctions. Milosevic told a rally that Serbia will "neither
suffer from hunger or cold . . . we will survive the sanctions
by accelerating development of our own resources." On 10 December
Panic is expected to address union leaders in Nis, a Milosevic
stronghold. (Milan Andrejevich)

BOSNIA ROUNDUP. Radio Croatia reports on 9-December that fighting
in and around the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo is not as intense
as in previous weeks. More deaths have been reported nonetheless:
five people in a bread line were killed by a missile that Bosnian
officials say came from a nearby Serb position. Serb tanks also
withdrew from the only road linking the airport and Sarajevo.
A UN military spokesman said that relief flights will likely
resume on 10 December if rival groups around the airport give
assurances to hold their fire. An RFE correspondent reports that
the UN Security Council will consider stronger measures against
Bosnian Serbs if relief supplies are not allowed through to Sarajevo.
The Security Council's statement mentioned no specific measures,
but only said action would be taken "as soon as possible." A
meeting of NATO ministers opens today in Brussels. High on the
agenda will be the conflict in the former Yugoslavia and a discussion
of plans for training and deploying troops for eventual peacekeeping
missions. (Milan Andrejevich)

SECOND ATTEMPT TO FORM BULGARIAN GOVERNMENT FAILS. Petar Boyadzhiev,
former dissident and prime minister-designate of the Bulgarian
Socialist Party, has failed to form a new government, BTA reported
on 9 December. At a press conference presidential spokesman Valentin
Stoyanov said President Zhelyu Zhelev had cancelled the BSP's
mandate because Boyadzhiev did not present a cabinet within one
week as prescribed by the constitution. According to Stoyanov,
another reason why Zhelev could not support the BSP candidacy
in the National Assembly was that Boyadzhiev apparently still
holds dual citizenship; French authorities could not confirm
Boyadzhiev's claim that he had asked to renounce his French citizenship.
Later Zhelev's legal advisor, Plamen Bogoev, told reporters that
the third largest parliamentary group, that of the mainly Turkish
Movement for Rights and Freedoms, will be next to try to form
a government. Meanwhile, following a motion by 51-BSP deputies,
the Constitutional Court will try to clarify the legal ways out
of the current government crisis, and has called for written
statements from the presidency, the National Assembly, and the
acting cabinet. (Kjell Engelbrekt)

CZECH GOVERNMENT SETS RULES ON CITIZENSHIP. The Czech government
set the rules for the acquisition of Czech citizenship on 9 December,
CSTK reports. The draft law rules that Slovak citizens desiring
Czech citizenship will have to apply no later than 31 December
1993 and must have lived on Czech territory continuously for
at least two years. Other foreigners applying for Czech citizenship
will have to prove that they have lived for at least five years
in the Czech Republic. All applicants for Czech citizenship may
not have been convicted for "premeditated criminal activity"
within the past five years and must renounce citizenship in any
other country. The draft law has yet to pass the Czech National
Council. Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar offered the 50,000
Czechs living in Slovakia a dual citizenship but it is unclear
whether the measure will indeed be realized. (Jan Obrman)

US CONSULATE WAS ACTIVELY BUGGED UNTIL LAST MONTH. The US Embassy
in Prague released a statement on 9 December saying that its
Consulate General in Bratislava was bugged until an electronic
sweep discovered well-concealed listening devices last month.
Contrary to earlier assurances that the listening devices had
been deactivated, it said, "someone was actively using them as
recently as November 1992." The statement also claimed that there
is "indisputable evidence that the devices were not disconnected
as some reports have stated." Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir
Meciar claimed earlier that the bugs were deactivated after the
ousting of the communist regime in November 1992. (Jan Obrman)


RIGHT-WING PRAGUE WEEKLY LISTS CZECH JEWS. Politika published
a list of Jews active in Czech cultural life last week, prompting
alarm and angry reactions among Czech Jews and others. The 168
names appeared under the headline "Partial List of Jews and Half-Breeds
in the Current Culture of the Czech Republic." Several persons
listed, including former Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel,
are not Jewish. Havel described the list as a very serious and
extremely dangerous thing, Western agencies reported on 9 December.
Karol Sidon, Chief Rabbi of Prague, called for action to stop
such expressions of anti-Semitism: "such things must be nipped
in the bud before it is too late." Even before the publication
of the list, Martin Savel, the owner of Politika, was charged
with inciting racial hatred and will have to stand trial. He
faces a maximum of five years in jail. (Jan Obrman)

ROMANIAN PRINTERS ON STRIKE. The printers' trade union declared
a one-day warning strike on 9-December, Radio Bucharest reports.
Dailies and weeklies due out on the 10th will not be printed.
The union said that if its demands for the doubling of salaries
and better working conditions are not met, a one-week strike
to begin on 16 December will be declared . (Michael Shafir)

ROMANIA, HUNGARY AND THE EXTRADITION OF DRAGHICI. Romanian Prosecutor-General
Mihai Ulpiu Popa Cherecheanu now admits that Hungary did not
actually refuse to extradite former Romanian Interior Minister
Alexandru Draghici, but asked for additional information in order
to make its decision. In an interview broadcast on Radio Bucharest
on 9-December Cherecheanu said Romania will provide the requested
information. One day earlier the Ministry of Justice had claimed
that Hungary had turned down the request, but the claim was denied
in Budapest. (Michael Shafir)

ETHNIC HUNGARIANS IN ROMANIA PROTEST AGAINST FUNAR. The Hungarian
Democratic Federation of Romania issued a statement protesting
against the latest measures by the Romanian nationalist mayor
of Cluj, Gheorghe Funar, Western agencies reported on 9-December.
The protest expressed anger against "the illegal decisions of
the mayor, and mainly against the incitement to aggression against
the monument to King Mathias." The HDFR says that "if legality
is not restored and if the government fails to condemn the mayor's
anti- Hungarian provocations," it will be forced to seek protection
from the European Parliament and the United Nations. (Michael
Shafir)

HUNGARIAN PARLIAMENT APPEALS TO ROMANIA. The Foreign Relations
Committee of parliament sent a letter to its counterpart in Romania,
expressing concern about the recent anti-Hungarian events in
Cluj, MTI reported on 9 November. The committee said that it
hopes that problems can be solved in spirit of good neighborliness
and European values. The committee also expressed the hope that
the political forces behind the recent ethnic tensions in Cluj
will not hamper Romania's European integration. (Karoly Okolicsanyi)


HUNGARIAN GOVERNMENT SUSPENDS TV CHIEF. Hungarian President Arpad
Goncz has once again refused to endorse Prime Minister Jozsef
Antall's request to fire the heads of Hungarian TV and Radio
and proposed a new way to nominate and recall media chiefs, MTI
reported on 9 December. Goncz's action was not unexpected and
his proposal was accordingly rejected by the government. The
cabinet also endorsed the Justice Minister's call to suspend
Elemer Hankiss, head of Hungarian TV, indefinitely. Earlier the
government initiated an investigation into charges of financial
mismanagement by Hankiss. The Association of Free Democrats,
the largest opposition party in parliament, called the government's
action a gross violation of the law and the constitution. The
government maintains that Hungarian TV and Radio are under opposition
influence. (Karoly Okolicsanyi)

POLAND EXPELS GERMAN NEO-NAZI. The Polish provincial administrator
of Opole decided on 9 December to expel a German neo- Nazi activist
from the country. According to a PAP report, Guenther Boschuetz,
a member of the German neo-Nazi group National Offensive was
to leave Poland by 11 December because he failed to secure a
residence visa. Several members of the group have recently arrived
in Poland to spread anti-Polish propaganda. Their activities
prompted complaints by the media and the political establishment.
(Jan de Weydenthal)

TRUCK PLANT STRIKE ENDS IN POLAND. Workers in the Star truck
plant decided on 9-December to end their strike. The decision
came after the management assured workers that the government
will support the plant's reorganization and provide financial
aid. PAP reported that plans for changes in the plant's structure
and operations were presented to the government officials on
8 December. (Jan de Weydenthal)

ELECTION COMMISSION CHOSEN IN LATVIA. The Supreme Council confirmed
members of the election commission, suggesting that national
elections could possibly take place in mid-May 1993 (i.e. at
least five months after the formation of the commission). Supreme
Court Chairman Gvido Zemribo chairs the commission, the members
of which are Austra Bolsevica, Girts Krumins, Atis Kramins, Harijs
Vizla, Silvija Dreimane, Vilhelms Kozlovskis, and Inara Raudone,
Diena reported on 8 December. (Dzintra Bungs)

RUSSIA DROPS LINKAGE AT NACC. Russia's delegate to the North
Atlantic Cooperation Council has withdrawn a proposal that would
link the observance of human rights to troop withdrawals from
the Baltic States. Estonia's NACC representative Clyde Kull told
BNS on 9-December that Russia earlier had pushed inclusion of
the linkage proposal in the organization's final document, set
for approval on 18-December at the NACC foreign ministers' meeting.
In withdrawing the proposal, Kull said the Russian representative
had made mention of the recent Moscow meeting between Estonian
Foreign Minister Trivimi Velliste and his Russian counterpart
Andrei Kozyrev. The NACC move may mark the end of Russia's practice,
ongoing since last June, of linking human rights to troop withdrawals
in international forums. (Riina Kionka)

CHIEF RABBI IN ESTONIA. During a 9 December visit in Tallinn
with Estonian Prime Minister Mart Laar, Scandinavian Chief Rabbi
Melchior said he is satisfied with the government's treatment
of ethnic minorities. Melchior said he supports the Estonian
government's plan to restore the principles of the 1925 Cultural
Autonomy Law on a constitutional basis, and said recent assaults
against the government in the foreign press by some members of
the local Jewish community were "regrettable." (Riina Kionka)


THE PRICE OF OIL IN LITHUANIA. Russian Deputy Prime Minister
Aleksandr Shokin told reporters on 9-December that Russia is
having more trouble in selling energy to Lithuania than to the
other two Baltic States. According to BNS, Shokin said Estonia
and Latvia have been buying supplies at world prices, whereas
Lithuania, which imports more petroleum products from Russia
than the other two, is "insisting on" prices below the world
level. Shokin said the two sides have reached agreement by which
Russia will sell oil at around 10-15 dollars per barrel less
than the world price in return for lower transit tariffs for
energy supplies to Kaliningrad via Lithuania. (Riina Kionka)


US-LATVIAN TRADE ACCORD. On 9 December US Ambassador Ints Silins
and Latvian Prime Minister Ivars Godmanis signed an agreement
on basic principles of mutual trade and investments, BNS and
Baltfax report. The document sets the course for development
of Latvian-US economic relations, including future agreements
on trade, investments, tax policy, and intellectual property
rights. (Dzintra Bungs)

ROMANIA SEEKS TO IMPROVE IMAGE ABROAD. Romania has hired the
British advertising agency Saatchi and Saatchi to improve the
country's image and help attract foreign investors. Dana Simion
of Romania's National Agency for Privatization told Reuters on
9 December that the British firm won the bid for a public relations
project to begin this month. The project will cost more than
one million dollars and will be financed by funds from the European
Community. Among other things, the project will publicize Romania's
plans to privatize more than 6,000 state enterprises. (Michael
Shafir)

As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Charles Trumbull








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