Fear of life in one form or another is the great thing to exorcise. - William James
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 232, 03 December 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

GAIDAR'S SPEECH TO THE CONGRESS. Addressing a largely hostile
and in part uncomprehending Congress of People's Deputies on
2 December, Acting Prime Minister Egor Gaidar defended his administration's
record over the past year and vowed to maintain a course of radical
economic reform, Russian and Western agencies reported. Among
the successes listed were the absence of massive and widespread
unrest, a slowing down in the fall of production, and some recent
orders for arms sales. Gaidar conceded failures in limiting the
budget deficit, and warned that the greatest danger now facing
Russia was hyperinflation. (Keith Bush)

WILL GAIDAR REMAIN IN OFFICE? After listening to Egor Gaidar's
speech, hardliners said that they will intensify efforts to oust
him and the cabinet, an RFE/RL correspondent reported from Moscow
on 2-December. Reformist deputies stated that the chances for
Gaidar's remaining in office were 50:50. Christian democratic
leader Viktor Aksyuchits proposed replacing Gaidar with Vice
President Aleksandr Rutskoi, Interfax reported the same day.
A leader of the Civic Union, Arkadii Volsky, suggested that the
Russian ambassador to France, Yurii Ryzhov, be selected to become
prime minister. Another Civic Union leader, Nikolai Travkin,
asserted that President Yeltsin had already spoken to Ryzhov
about this possibility. (Alexander Rahr)

RUTSKOI PRAISES CIVIC UNION; CRITICIZES GAIDAR. In an interview
with Literaturnaya gazeta of 2 December, Vice President Aleksandr
Rutskoi suggested that the Civic Union had become the main centrist
force in Russia capable of striking a balance between the extreme
right and left. Rutskoi himself is a member of the Union, and
his People's Party of Free Russia is one of the three main original
cofounding organizations in it. Rutskoi said that the Gaidar
government was overtly optimistic about the country's economic
situation, and insisted that the Civic Union was offering an
important and realistic appraisal of current problems. When he
spoke at the Congress, Rutskoi also attacked Gaidar. The same
day, in an interview with an RFE/RL correspondent, another leader
of the Civic Union, Nikolai Travkin, also attacked the cabinet,
and claimed that Gaidar was not suitable as prime minister. An
RFE/RL correspondent in Moscow said that Yeltsin and members
of the Civic Union are currently conducting confidential talks
concerning a new prime minister. (Vera Tolz)

DEVELOPMENTS AT CONGRESS. The chief economist of the Civic Union,
Iosif Diskin, has detected "serious conceptual differences between
the economic visions" of Egor Gaidar and President Yeltsin. He
told a news conference that Yeltsin had stated clearly his acceptance
of the main policy positions of the Civic Union, whereas Gaidar
was not seeking such a compromise with the political center,
Reuters reported on 2 December. In his speech to the Congress,
Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi complained that both conservative
and liberal forces have disrupted his efforts to implement agricultural
reform, ITAR-TASS reported the same day. He said that without
government credits, reform in the agricultural sector will end
this spring. (Alexander Rahr)

DEMOCRATIC DEPUTIES LOBBY FOR CONSTITUTIONAL ASSEMBLY. A group
of deputies from democratic factions intend to suggest to the
Congress the creation of a special body to write and adopt a
new Russian Constitution. The deputies, Aleksei Manannikov, Vyacheslav
Volkov and Marina Sale, began collecting signatures on 2 December
to support the proposal which calls on the Congress to set up
a Constitutional Assembly, an RFE/RL correspondent in Moscow
reported. Sale, a leader of Democratic Russia, and Gavriil Popov,
a leader of the Russian Movement for Democratic Reforms, earlier
proposed the creation of the Assembly to replace the Congress;
now they do not suggest the Congress' disbandment. They think
that the assembly might not be an elected body, but could instead
be formed through consensus between Yeltsin and the Congress.
They say that after a new Russian Constitution is adopted, the
assembly could be dissolved and the Congress would be in charge
of adopting laws, including those concerning the constitution.
(Vera Tolz)

CONGRESS TO END ON SATURDAY? On 2 December "Vesti" quoted Russian
parliamentary speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov as saying that the current
session of the Congress of People's Deputies will end on Saturday,
5 December. The Congress was originally expected to last until
9-December. "Novosti" noted that the current session is unusually
quiet, so much so that the deputies have subjected Khasbulatov
and Acting Prime Minister Egor Gaidar to no questioning whatsover.
This apparent passivity on the deputies' part was explained by
the "Vesti" anchor, who quoted an unidentified Civic Union leader
as saying that all important political issues are being settled
behind the scenes. Consequently, the deputies have very little
work to do in the main hall of the Congress. (Julia Wishnevsky)


TATARSTAN VICE-PRESIDENT COMMENTS ON ZORKIN'S SPEECH. Tatarstan
Vice-President Vasilii Likhachev said in Kazan on 2 December
that the main difficulty in Tatarstan's relations with Russia
was a process whereby "a dynamically changing political reality
comes into contradiction with legal conservatism," Interfax reported.
Likhachev was commenting on the speech at the Russian Congress
of People's Deputies on 1 December by the chairman of the Russian
Constitutional Court Valerii Zorkin. Zorkin had called in strong
terms for observance of the existing Russian constitution, pointing
out that it made no provision for the status of an associated
state, which Tatarstan claims in its new constitution. Clearly
concerned at signs that the Russian leadership may be prepared
to reach a compromise over Tatarstan's status, Zorkin argued
that unless the deputies made sure that the existing constitution
was observed there would never be any need for a new constitution.
(Ann Sheehy)

NUCLEAR SAFETY VIOLATIONS IN UKRAINE. A deputy chairman of Ukraine's
Atomic Energy Inspection Agency told AFP on 2 December that the
safety systems at the South Ukraine nuclear power station were
switched off at least three times this year in order to boost
electricity generation. On the occasions when the safety systems
were turned off, no record was made of the dates or the names
of those who had authorized the action. Part of the problem in
identifying such breaches of nuclear safety was that Ukraine
could not afford to pay adequate salaries to safety inspectors.
Three out of five inspectors left during the past year. (Keith
Bush)

OPPONENT SAYS YELTSIN/BUSH NUKE DEAL ONE-SIDED. An opposition
politician on 2 December charged that an agreement dated 17 June
1992 between Presidents Bush and Yeltsin, which promised U.S.
help in dismantling Russian nuclear weapons, was an act of Russian
unilateral disarmament. Mikhail Astafev, a member of the "Russian
Unity" faction, said that a document he was given proved that
the agreement would allow U.S. servicemen free access to any
part of Russia and its installations, making Russia "an occupied
territory." Sergei Yastrembsky, head of the Russian Foreign Ministry's
information department, said that "this totally false assertion
indicates that the people who made it are either legally incompetent
or cannot read what is written in black and white." The exchange
was reported by Interfax and ITAR-TASS. (Doug Clarke)

NUMBER TWO MAN IN GRU DIES IN CAR CRASH. The number two man in
the GRU (military intelligence), Col. General Yurii Gusev, has
died in a head-on, "frontal" car crash on a highway near Moscow,
ITAR-TASS reported on 1 December. His driver and wife were slightly
wounded. According to the Moscow traffic police, the reason for
the crash was negligence on the part of the other car's driver,
who also died in the crash. The death of Gusev is the second
recent unnatural death of a high-ranking military intelligence
officer. On 26 November, five youths murdered the colonel of
the eighth administration of the Russian general staff, Vladimir
Zenin. Zenin was responsible for internal security and classification
on the general staff. According to the Moscow police, the five
youths stated that they killed the colonel in order to steal
his car. (Victor Yasmann)

UNEMPLOYMENT HITS WOMEN HARDEST. According to a report presented
to the Congress of People's Deputies by the Russian State Committee
for Statistics (Goskomstat), the level of unemployment on 1 October
was only 0.45%, but 50-75% of the unemployed are said to be women,
Interfax reported on 2 December. The number of registered unemployed
was 367,500, of whom 219,000 were receiving unemployment benefits.
Every third unemployed person was under 29 years old, and above-average
levels of unemployment were recorded in the Yaroslavl, Kostroma,
Pskov, Ivanov and Sakhalin Oblasts, the Mordov SSR, the city
of St.-Petersburg, as well as the North Caucasus. Above- average
figures in the latter region cannot, however, be attributed to
the reform process, since a lack of jobs there was already a
problem in the pre-reform period. (Sheila Marnie)

UKRAINE WANTS ITS SOLDIERS OUT OF HOT SPOTS. Ukrainian President
Leonid Kravchuk signed a decree on 1 December calling for the
repatriation of all Ukrainian officers and men serving in Georgia
and Tajikistan. According to Interfax of 2 December, the cabinet
of ministers has been directed to guarantee the return of the
soldiers by February 1993, and of the officers when their tours
of duty are up. Apparently, the host republics have not fully
agreed to these terms, as the agency reports said that delegations
from the ministry of defense and two public committees supporting
servicemen would be required to visit Georgia and Tajikistan
for negotiations on the return of the servicemen. (Doug Clarke)


AZERBAIJAN CLAIMS RIGHT TO DEFEND CO-NATIONALS IN GEORGIA. Addressing
the National Council on 1 December, Azerbaijan parliament speaker
Isa Gambarov claimed that the human rights of the 300,000 strong
Azerbaijani minority in Georgia have been violated, and that
Azerbaijanis there are threatened with mass deportation, Assa-Irada
reported on 2 December. Gambarov argued that Azerbaijan has the
right to defend its conationals "at any cost." The National Council
will send a delegation to Georgia to discuss the situation. Azerbajanis
in Georgia addressed an appeal to the Azerbaijani parliament
in the spring of this year. (Liz Fuller)

TAJIK LEGISLATURE APPROVES NEW GOVERNMENT. The Supreme Soviet
of Tajikistan approved most of Prime Minister Abdumalik Abdullodzhonov's
nominees for a new Cabinet of Ministers on 2 December, but rejected
the appointment of former Supreme Soviet Chairman and Acting
President Akbarsho Iskandarov to head the State Committee for
Foreign Economic Relations, according to ITAR-TASS and Radio
Dushanbe. Appointments for the posts of minister of defense and
internal affairs and of chairman of the national security committee
(formerly KGB) were apparently not announced. Only four of the
ministerial appointees had held posts in the previous Government
of National Reconciliation. (Bess Brown)

AGREEMENT ON TROOP PULLBACK ALONG BORDER WITH CHINA. Russia,
Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, and Tajikistan-forming a single delegation
at the eighth round of border talks, held in Beijing-agreed with
China to pull most of their troops back 100 kilometers on each
side of the 7,500-kilometer border between China and the four
CIS states. According to Izvestiya of 3 December, the parties
would be allowed to keep a limited number of troops in the border
zone. Large cuts will be made in offensive weapons in the zone.
The paper reported that the cuts would be spread out over a fairly
long period, perhaps up to the year 2000. A ninth round of talks
will be held in Moscow, but the date was not announced. (Doug
Clarke)

KAZAKHSTAN'S INTERIOR MINISTERS WANTS BANK OVERSIGHT RIGHTS.
Kazakhstan's Ministry of Internal Affairs has asked President
Nursultan Nazarbaev for the right to oversee large-scale bank
transactions, Interfax reported on 1 December. The ministry's
proposal calls for banks to be required to report transfers to
private accounts of sums exceeding 100,000 rubles in order to
verify the legality of the activity that generated the payment.
The ministry also wants the right to obtain information about
ongoing financial operations ad the amount of money in individual
accounts and those of legal entities such as enterprises. The
reason given by Minister of Internal Affairs Vladimir Shumov
for the request is the amount of money Kazakhstan has lost in
questionable financial transactions: 8,200,000,000 rubles in
1992 alone. (Bess Brown)

FROM RUSSIAN TO "DNIESTER" ARMY IN MOLDOVA? As cited by Interfax,
Nezavisimaya Moldova reported on 2 December from "reliable sources"
that an operation on the transfer of equipment from Russia's
14th Army to "Dniester" forces is in progress; and that the Army's
commander, Lt. General Aleksandr Lebed, has signed relevant documents
with "Dniester republic president" Igor Smirnov. This would be
consistent with the position of the Russian delegation headed
by Col. General Eduard Vorobev, Deputy Chief of Staff of Russia's
Armed Forces, at the talks in Chisinau on 18-20 November; with
Vorobev's and Lebed's interviews on Tiraspol TV on 21 November,
and with Lebed's interview in Dnestrovskaya Pravda of 25 November
and speech to the "Dniester republic Supreme Soviet" on 2 December.
In all of these statements it was announced that the equipment
of 14th Army units slated for eventual withdrawal from Moldova
would be turned over to the "local authorities" in the "Dniester
republic" or "sold" locally and that the units themselves would
be "disbanded" locally instead of being withdrawn (thus facilitating
personnel transfers to the "Dniester" forces). (Vladimir Socor)




CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

LUBYS ELECTED LITHUANIAN PRIME MINISTER. On 2 December the Seimas
approved the nomination of Bronislavas Lubys as prime minister
by a vote of 87-to 0 with 40 abstentions, Radio Lithuania reports.
The abstentions were by the right-of-center Homeland Concord,
whose 52 deputies noted that they have nothing against Lubys
personally but feel he might have to follow the policy of the
Lithuanian Democratic Labor Party, against which they have pledged
to be a constructive opposition. (Saulius Girnius)

CONTROVERSIAL BULGARIAN DISSIDENT ASKED TO FORM GOVERNMENT. On
2 December former dissident and political prisoner Petar Boyadzhiev
was tapped by President Zhelyu Zhelev to form a government. Despite
his optimism, the prime minister- designate is believed to have
little prospect of carrying out his task. Most political observers
seem to believe that the mere fact that he was nominated by by
the Bulgarian Socialist Party (successor of the communist party)
would probably be enough to guarantee that he would not succeed,
After a meeting with the new nominee, UDF Chairman and Acting
Prime Minister Filip Dimitrov told BTA that the coalition remains
committed not to support a BSP candidate. Shortly after his return
from French exile in 1991 to set up a nationalist-oriented party,
the 51-year-old Boyadzhiev emerged as a controversial political
figure, partly for his sharp criticism of the mainly Turkish
MRF party. MRF leader Ahmed Dogan commented that the BSP nomination
was unacceptable and ridiculed the idea of a "government of national
accord." Boyadzhiev will need at least partial backing from either
the UDF or the MRF parliamentary group. He has seven days to
create a new cabinet. (Kjell Engelbrekt)

ISLAMIC CONFERENCE ISSUES DECLARATION ON BOSNIA. International
media report from Jidda on 3 December that foreign ministers
of member states in the Organization of the Islamic Conference
have agreed to admit Albania, Kyrgyzstan, and Zanzibar, and have
issued a declaration on Bosnia. The text calls on the UN to intervene
militarily to end Serbian aggression and to lift the arms embargo
on Bosnia to enable it to defend itself against the much better
armed Serbian forces. The ministers also want the UN to block
the flow of arms from Montenegro and Serbia to Serb troops in
Bosnia. The declaration urges the Security Council to act on
the Bosnian crisis by 15 January, and the BBC said that observers
took this to mean that OIC countries could then feel free to
arm Bosnia if the UN fails to intervene by then. Iran, like Serbia,
has been trying to portray the conflict as a religious one, while
Turkey, like Bosnia and Croatia, has stressed that the war is
about land and power. Turkey has urged the UN to consider intervention
and has already offered to provide a force. (Patrick Moore)

LEADING BOSNIAN JOURNALISTS WIN AWARD. Reuters on 1 December
said the International Women's Media Foundation in New York presented
its courage-in-journalism award to two editors of the Sarajevo
daily Oslobodjenje, Kemal Kurspahic and Gordana Knezevic. Kurspahic
told reporters that the award "is a symbolic sign that what we
do is not unnoticed." The daily has managed to appear fairly
regularly throughout the conflict under the most trying of human
and material circumstances. Elsewhere in the Bosnian conflict,
the latest issue of the German weekly Stern runs a cover story
the plight of the Muslim women who are victims of systematic
rape by Serbian militiamen. The article notes that some of the
women are refusing to yield to despair and resignation, and shows
a photo of some of them praying in the Muslim fashion and wearing
the uniform of the Bosnian army. (Patrick Moore)

TENSION BETWEEN ROMANIA AND RUMP YUGOSLAVIA. In separate interviews
with Radio Bucharest on 2 December, Romania's Deputy Foreign
Minister Traian Chebeleu and Transport Minister Paul Teodoru
suggested that tension between Romania and rump Yugoslavia is
increasing over recent Romanian moves to enforce the UN embargo
against Serbia and Montenegro. Three Yugoslav-flag ships sailing
on the Danube with cargoes of fuel oil and coal were detained
by Romania between 27 November and 2-December. Belgrade retaliated
by holding a Romanian tugboat and six barges returning from Germany.
It later brought Danube shipping to a halt by closing a sluice
at the Iron Gates hydroelectric dam. Teodoru said that halting
river traffic could have "extremely grave consequences" for Romania.
A second sluice, on the Romanian side, is closed for repair work.
(Dan-Ionescu)

ROMANIAN OFFICIAL ON UNION WITH MOLDOVA. Adrian Dohotaru, an
undersecretary of state with the Romanian Foreign Ministry, said
on 1 December that his country hopes to unite with the former
Soviet republic of Moldova within a few years. During Dohotaru's
visit to Washington Western agencies quoted him as saying that
Bucharest favors a policy of gradual integration with the neighboring
republic rather than a quick "German-style" unification. Dohotaru
stressed that his government has no target date for reunification,
and unforseeable developments in the former Soviet Union could
speed up the process, but Dohotaru said he personally believes
it could happen within eight years. (Dan Ionescu)

ROMANIAN LEFTIST LEADER MEETS CHINESE PARTY OFFICIAL. The leader
of Romania's Socialist Labor Party, Ilie Verdet, met a top Chinese
communist official in Beijing on 2 December and praised China's
economic policies. Verdet, who was prime minister under Nicolae
Ceausescu from 1979 to 1982, was received by Li Ruihuan, standing
committee member of the Communist Party Central Committee. Xinhua
reports that Verdet hailed the "profound changes" which have
taken place in China. The SLP, which is the successor to the
Romanian Communist Party, won 13 seats in the Chamber of Deputies
and 5 in the Senate in this autumn's parliamentary elections.
(Dan Ionescu)

CZECHOSLOVAK PARLIAMENT VOTES TO DISSOLVE FEDERAL MEDIA. On 2
December, the Federal Assembly approved the dissolution of Czechoslovak
Television, Czechoslovak Radio, and the Czechoslovak Press Agency
(CSTK) on 1 January 1993, when Czechoslovakia is to split into
two states. While Czechoslovak TV and Radio will continue to
operate until 31 December 1992, CSTK was abolished de facto in
November, when its assets were divided between two newly established
republican press agencies-the Czech Press Agency (CTK) and the
Press Agency of the Slovak Republic (TA SR). CTK reports that
on 2 December the Federal Assembly also voted to dissolve the
Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences as of 1 January 1993 and transfer
its assets to the Czech Academy of Sciences and the Slovak Academy
of Sciences. (Jiri Pehe)

POLAND READIES COAL RESTRUCTURING PLAN. At a press conference
on 2 December, Industry Minister Waclaw Niewiarowski outlined
the government's plans to restructure the ailing Polish coal
industry. Employment is to be reduced by nearly half (150,000
miners will lose their jobs) over ten years, while coal extraction
will continue at the same level. Productivity is to double. No
plan yet exists to create new jobs for displaced miners. The
mines, which now operate as independent financial entities, will
be grouped into seven holding companies, a measure that will
force the profit-makers to support the bankrupts. Only 22 mines
operate at a profit; 41-are loss-makers. The government anticipates
that the mines themselves will cover some restructuring costs,
which is likely to mean higher prices for coal. (Louisa Vinton)


POLISH FARMERS FORM PROTEST COMMITTEE. Four farmers' unions,
including Rural Solidarity and the radical Self-Defense union,
banded together in Warsaw on 2 December to form a joint protest
committee. The meeting was originally called to organize protests
against competition from foreign food imports, but the agenda
quickly grew to include the farmers' ritual demands: debt-relief,
"social control" over the privatization of state farms, guaranteed
minimum purchase prices, and bigger budgetary subsidies. PAP
reported that the nature of the protests was left undefined,
but Polish TV said on 2-December that the farmers had not ruled
out blockades at border crossings. (Louisa Vinton)

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION FALLS IN HUNGARY. According to a report
by the Ministry of Industry and Trade based on data released
by the Central Statistical Office, industrial production fell
by 22.2% in the first nine months of the year compared to the
same period last year, MTI reports. The pace of decline has slackened,
however, dropping from 19.5% in the first quarter to only 5%
in the third quarter. Production in the pharmaceutical, gas,
silk, and fur industries fell, while growth was registered in
heavy industry and the chemical, oil, and paper sectors. The
ministry blames the fall on a sharp decline in domestic demand.
(Edith Oltay)

HUNGARIAN STUDENTS DEMONSTRATE. University and college students
held demonstrations throughout Hungary on 1 December to protest
government plans to introduce a uniform monthly tuition of 2,000
forint in 1993, MTI reports. The students demanded that the introduction
of tuition be coupled with a comprehensive reform of the higher
education system and that student loans be made available. The
students also urged that revenue from tuition be earmarked for
financing higher education. (Edith Oltay)

UN FINDS NO VIOLATIONS OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN LATVIA. According to
a summary report of the fact-finding mission by a team from the
UN Human Rights Commission issued after a visit to Latvia on
27-30 October 1992 and published by the UN, no gross or systematic
violations of human rights were found. The report noted, however,
that among some of the national minorities there is a sense of
insecurity that stems from concern about "the future status and
the civil, political, and economic rights of the non- ethnic
population of Latvia, as well as for the present draft law on
citizenship, the application of the language law and the registration
of Latvia's inhabitants." After examining Latvia's citizenship
laws and draft legislation, the commission said that "Latvia
is not in breach of international law by the way it determines
the criteria for granting its citizenship" and noted that "no
one has as yet been deprived of citizenship and no segment of
the population has been disenfranchised." (Dzintra Bungs)

MAJORITY OF RUSSIANS IN LATVIA WANT LATVIAN CITIZENSHIP. According
to a recent poll conducted by the All-Russian Center for Public
Opinion Research, 75% of the Russians living in Latvia believe
that over the last 2-3 years the attitude towards them has worsened
in Latvia; 32% of the respondents believe that a mass exodus
of Russians from Latvia will begin in the near future, Interfax/Baltfax
reported on 30 November. Nonetheless, the same poll shows that
69% of the Russian respondents questioned want to adopt Latvian
citizenship. (Dzintra Bungs)

MIGRATION FIGURES FOR LATVIA. According to a BNS report of 30
November, the number of emigrants from Latvia exceeded by about
30,000 the number of immigrants during the first 9 months of
this year. About 33,000 of the 35,000 emigrants went to the republics
of the former USSR: for example 16,116 to Russia, 7,012 to Belarus,
and 6,297 to Ukraine. Among those who left Latvia, 20,173 were
ethnic Russians and 5,478 were Ukrainians. Also 833 Latvians
left Latvia, while 913-Latvians have returned. Some 406 persons
emigrated to the United States, 250 to Israel, and 176-to Germany.
(Dzintra Bungs)

ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN TALKS. On 2 December at a press conference in
Moscow, Estonian and Russian Foreign Ministers Trivimi Velliste
and Andrei Kozyrev called their talks a "very successful beginning
of an intensive dialogue." Velliste told the RFE/RL Estonian
Service that Russia has dropped its objections to Estonia's Citizenship
Law as discriminatory. He said Russia has apparently acknowledged
the need for an Estonian-language requirement and expressed
interest in practical questions such as the objectivity of the
language exams for naturalization. Velliste said that his government
is considering simplifying the language exam for some old and
handicapped people. Moreover, since unemployment benefits can
be counted as a source of income, Russian-speaking residents
need not fear that they will be refused Estonian citizenship
should they lose their jobs. The foreign ministers signed a consular
treaty and discussed opening consulates in Narva and St. Petersburg.
(Saulius Girnius)

PROGRESS IN DEPARTURE OF RUSSIAN TROOPS FROM LITHUANIA. On 2
December Lietuvos rytas reported that already there is no Russian
military presence in Vilnius, but Col. Valerii Frolov, the Russian
army commander in Vilnius, told BNS that the newspaper was "a
bit too early," for the act of transfer of territory of the 107th
Infantry Division would only be signed on 3 December. The withdrawal,
he said, is proceeding according to the schedule signed by the
Russian and Lithuanian Defense Ministers on 7 September, that
calls for the complete withdrawal of the 107th division from
Lithuania by 15 December. (Saulius Girnius)

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Charles Trumbull






[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

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