When two people communicate, they each can be enriched - and unlike traditional resources, the more you share the more you have. - U.S. Vice President Al Gore
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 226, 24 November 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES OF THE USSR

UKRAINE TO BE COMPENSATED FOR NUCLEAR WARHEADS. At a press conference
on 23-November Senators Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar announced
that Ukraine will receive financial compensation for dismantling
its nuclear warheads. The US has already agreed to purchase up
to five billion dollars worth of uranium from warheads dismantled
in Russia, and Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan are also to be
paid a share of the proceeds. Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk
has been insisting that before Ukraine ratifies the START treaty
it must receive assurances from the West that it will be provided
both financial assistance for dismantling, and payment for the
contents of the weapons. Both these conditions now appear to
have been met, although the third condition, that the West provide
security guarantees, has not. Nevertheless, these assurances
may help speed the ratification of the START treaty. The news
conference was reported by Western news agencies and Interfax.
(John Lepingwell,)

YELTSIN TO PROPOSE NEW ARMS CUTS. Senators Nunn and Lugar also
reported that President Yeltsin had informed them that he plans
to make new proposals for reductions in strategic nuclear arms
in the near future. Yeltsin had suggested, in a post-election
phone call to President-Elect Bill Clinton, that the US and Russia
move forward on completing the draft of a START II treaty. According
to Interfax, Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev stated during the
press conference that Russia will consider the START treaty to
be in force only after both the treaty and the Lisbon protocol
have been ratified by all the CIS nuclear weapons states. (John
Lepingwell)

RUSSIA ASSUMES UKRAINIAN DEBT OBLIGATIONS. Russia and Ukraine
negotiators have come to an agreement over payment of the $70-80
billion foreign debt of the former Soviet Union, Reuters and
Interfax reported on 23 November. According to the agreement
signed in Moscow on Monday, Russia will take over Ukraine's approximately
16% share of the debt in return for the latter renouncing its
claim on debt owed to the former USSR by third world countries.
The deal resembles those Russia made with the other members of
the CIS, and it means that Russia now bears full responsibility
for the debt. With the issue of liability greatly simplified,
Russia and Western creditors may now be able to finalize a payments
schedule over which they have been struggling for months. (Erik
Whitlock)

PREPARATIONS FOR RUSSIAN CONGRESS. Certain groups within the
Civic Union and the parliamentary block "Russian Unity" (which
is led by Sergei Baburin and whose membership includes numerous
hardline opponents of the Yeltsin government) are discussing
conditions under which they would support the government's economic
program at the upcoming Congress, Vesti reported on 22 November.
The two groups wish to support the joint economic program of
Acting Prime Minister Egor Gaidar and the Union of Industrialists
and Entrepreneurs, but they will also demand the replacement
of State Secretary Gennadii Burbulis, Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev, and deputy prime ministers Mikhail Poltoranin and Valerii
Makharadze. Meanwhile, some communist deputies, including Sergei
Baburin, claimed in an article in Sovetskaya Rossiya on 22 November
that the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has infiltrated
Russian politics. In response, presidential spokesman Vyachselav
Kostikov called Baburin and his followers "political scum," according
to Western and Russian news agencies on 23 November. (Alexander
Rahr)

YELTSIN MEETS WITH RUSSIAN HIGH COMMAND. Russian President Boris
Yeltsin met with the Russian Ministry of Defense Collegium and
the commanding officers of military districts, fleets, and other
major units on 23 November. The meeting was also attended by
Vice President Rutskoi and Ruslan Khasbulatov. In his address
Yeltsin emphasized the military's role in ensuring state security
and stability, singling out the recent events in North Ossetia
as an example. Yeltsin declared his support for the military
but noted that military reform must proceed rapidly to prevent
disorder and loss of discipline. According to Yeltsin the Russian
military will have been reduced by 200,000 troops by the end
of 1992. Yeltsin also confirmed that the overall military budget
will remain the same in 1993, although procurement will increase
by 10%. The meeting appeared to be an attempt to solidify Yeltsin's
support within the military in advance of the Congress of Peoples'
Deputies meeting in December. The meeting was covered by Interfax
and Western news agencies.(John Lepingwell)

BURBULIS SUPPORTS CONCEPT OF "ASYMMETRICAL FEDERATION." State
Secretary Gennadii Burbulis, who heads the Russian delegation
in the negotiations with Tatarstan, said on 23 November that
he supports the idea of an "asymmetrical federation," in which
each subject of the Russian Federation exercises its powers in
its own way, Interfax reported. Burbulis was speaking after a
meeting of the Russian parliament's commission for constitutional
structure and a working group of the Constitutional Commission
that met to discuss the recently adopted Tatarstan constitution
and the treaty delimiting powers between Tatarstan and Russia.
Burbulis said he supported the compromise proposal put forward
by Oleg Rumyantsev, secretary of the Constitutional Commission,
calling for the Tatarstan parliament to bring the new constitution
into conformity with the Russian constitution and at the same
time appealing to the Russian Congress of People's Deputies to
grant Tatarstan a higher status. (Ann Sheehy)

CHUBAIS ON RUSSIAN CENTRAL BANK. Deputy Prime Minister Anatolii
Chubais suggested in an interview with Interfax on 23 November
that the government's fight to control inflation would only be
successful if it gained control of Central Bank policies. The
recent presidential decree making the chairman of the bank a
member of the government was a move in that direction, Chubais
said. He also warned that inflation was accelerating; November's
rate would be higher than the 25% of October. The Ministry of
the Economy has reported (Izvestiya on 17 November) a 28% inflation
in October and predicted a 30% rise in food prices in November
(Erik Whitlock)

RUSSIANS' REACTION TO PRIVATIZATION VOUCHERS. About one quarter
of the Russian population has now received privatization vouchers.
Distribution of the vouchers began on 1-October. At the end of
October, the Moscow polling organization VTsIOM polled 1,500
Russians to find out their attitudes toward the vouchers, according
to Interfax and western press agencies on 23 November. The results
of the poll showed that 58% of the respondents were not interested
in investing in vouchers, and most planned to sell their vouchers
for cash. Only 15% wanted to buy vouchers. The potential buyers
tended to be under 25, male, and in good private or state sector
jobs. Interest in buying vouchers was also markedly higher among
those with salaries of over 10,000 rubles a month.(Sheila Marnie)


CHECK ON NUCLEAR STRATEGIC FORCES. Radio Moscow on 20 November
reported that the high command of the CIS Joint Armed Forces
had been that week conducting checks on the units of the strategic
forces deployed in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine. The radio
said that this was the first time that CIS high command had conducted
such inspections. Their purpose was to check the training and
daily routine of the strategic forces with an emphasis on nuclear
safety and installation defense. (Doug Clarke)

IRAN RECEIVES RUSSIAN SUB. On 23 November, Iran formally inducted
into its navy a Kilo-class submarine sold to it by Russia in
a deal initially made by the Soviet government. While the US
government had protested the sale, and the Russian government
appeared to waver on the issue, the sale quietly proceeded. A
second submarine is under construction, and Iran has an option
on a third, according to Western news agencies Interfax on 19
November reported that a payment dispute between Iran and Ukraine
has prevented the delivery of support equipment for the submarine,
but this does not appear to have prevented the formal transfer
of the submarine. (John Lepingwell)

RUSSIAN NAVY TO KEEP A WARSHIP IN THE GULF. Interfax on 23 November
reported that it had learned from the Russian Defense Ministry
that a second warship would be sent to the Persian Gulf when
the destroyer presently on duty there ends its two-month tour
in early December. The replacement, the Admiral Trebuts, is a
Udaloy-class anti- submarine guided-missile destroyer and a sister-ship
of the vessel now in the Gulf. The "high-ranking military official"
in the ministry said that Kuwait and some other Persian Gulf
countries had indicated they were looking at the possibility
of expanded military cooperation with Russia. (Doug Clarke)

CORRUPTION REPORTED AMONG HIGH-LEVEL RUSSIAN DEFENSE OFFICIALS.
Air Forces Maj. General Vladimir Rodionov and his deputy, Colonel
Georgii Iskrov, have been arrested by the military procuracy
on corruption charges in the eastern military district, according
to ITAR-TASS on 20 November. Rodionov, who was commander of a
large military transport base in Ussuriisk, allegedly permitted
the use of his planes for his own private profit. Meanwhile,
the right-wing nationalist weekly Den (no. 45) has accused Russian
Minister of Defense Pavel Grachev of exploiting his official
position for personal business profit, in part through his co-ownership
of a joint stock aviation enterprise called "Aviakon-Info." The
weekly went on to assert that other Aviakon-Info owners included
the chief of the information administration of the defense ministry,
Valerii Manilov, the head of the state committee for civil defense,
Sergei Shoigu, and the chairman of the Russian military-industrial
association "Konversiya," Aleksandr Temerko. (Victor Yasmann)


POLITICAL APATHY INVALIDATES 11 UKRAINIAN BY-ELECTIONS. The preliminary
results about the 27 parliamentary by-elections held in Ukraine
on 22 November, which Ukrainian TV has provided, reveal that
in 11 of the constituencies the turnout was so low that the elections
were invalid. New elections in ten of these constituencies have
been scheduled for 6 December. The turnout was especially low
in Kiev, where all three by-elections were invalid. Ukrainian
Radio noted on 22 November that the difficult economic situation
in Ukraine was having a considerable impact on public attitudes
and that political apathy was on the rise. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

FORTY-NINE INGUSH HOSTAGES HANDED OVER. Forty-nine Ingush hostages
were handed over to Russian MVD troops and militia on 23 November,
ITAR-TASS reported. There were no reports of the release of Ossetian
hostages. Sergei Shakhrai, the Russian interim administrator
in North Ossetia and Ingushetia, had said that the Russian military
would act if all the hostages were not released by midnight.
Shakhrai and the chairman of the North Ossetian parliament Akhsarbek
Galazov flew to Moscow on 23 November, where Galazov is said
to be intending to address the Russian parliament on the North
Ossetian- Ingush conflict. The same day Chechnya strongly protested
the planned construction of an airport for Ingushetia in Sunzha
raion, ITAR-TASS reported. The statement, issued by the chairman
of the Chechen parliament's committee for foreign affairs, Yusup
Soslambekov, claimed that the planned site of the airport is
on Chechen territory. (Ann Sheehy)

SHEVARDNADZE CHRISTENED. In an interview on Tbilisi radio on
23 November Georgian Head of State Eduard Shevardnadze revealed
that he had recently been christened and had received the church
name of Georgii, ITAR-TASS reported. He would, however, continue
to use the name Eduard for most purposes. Shevardnadze added
that he now had an icon of the Virgin in his office. In the same
interview Shevardnadze said he was very pleased with the first
round of Georgian-Russian talks that had just ended, and hoped
that the second round, due to start in Moscow on 7 December,
would be even more successful. Shevardnadze said that the number
of Russian troops in Georgia had been more than halved recently,
but it was in Georgia's interest that Russian anti-aircraft and
frontier units should remain. (Ann Sheehy)

RUSSIAN ARMY CONSCRIPTING MOLDOVAN RESIDENTS. Marking the Russian
Army's "Conscript Day," Lt. General Aleksandr Lebed, commander
of Russia's 14th Army in eastern Moldova, addressed a festive
gathering of local draftees just conscripted into the 14th Army,
Dnestrovskaya pravda reported on 17 November. Flanked by "Dniester
republic" officials, Lebed instructed the conscripts to defend
the Russian homeland and peace on the Dniester. The "Dniester
republic" military commissar, Colonel Aleksandr Moroz, told the
conscripts that 80% of them will serve with the 14th Army and
20% with the "Dniester" forces. Basapress cited Moroz as announcing
that 1,500 conscripts are being inducted this autumn, for a monthly
salary of 3,000 to 4,000 rubles. The event represents the latest
and clearest indication of a gradual fusing of the 14th Army
and "Dniester" forces and of the Russian military's view of the
"Dniester republic" as a defacto extension of Russia. (Vladimir
Socor)

RUSSIAN-MOLDOVAN TROOP NEGOTIATIONS IN IMPASSE. The third round
of negotiations on the withdrawal of Russia's 14th Army from
Moldova ended on 20 November in Chisinau without results, the
Moldovan media reported. The Russian side proposed the "disbandment,"
rather than outright withdrawal, of some units on the left bank
of the Dniester and the transfer of their assets to "local authorities,"
i.e. to the "Dniester republic." Chisinau, however, demanded
that the units be withdrawn from Moldova, renewed its protest
against the transfer of 14th Army equipment and personnel to
the "Dniester" forces; and condemned the drafting of left-bank
residents of Moldova for service with Russia's Army as a "gross
violation of international law." The Russian chief delegate,
Col. General Eduard Vorobev, was quoted as warning that disputed
issues will ultimately be "settled by Russia on its own," which
the Moldovan delegation termed "yet another demonstration of
disrespect for Moldova's independence and territorial integrity."
(Vladimir Socor)



CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BLOCKADE HALTS SHIPS IN THE ADRIATIC. On 23 November, the first
full day of the UN-authorized sea blockade of Serbia-Montenegro,
Western warships stopped three merchant freighters, inspected
their cargoes, and let them proceed after finding nothing suspicious.
International media added that the UN has registered over 100
violations of its no-fly zone over Bosnia involving mainly Serbian
but also some Croatian aircraft. Heavy Serbian pressure was reported
against Bosnian and Croat-held Bosnian towns including Travnik,
Gradacac, Brcko, and Tesanj. Travnik is under bombardment from
Serb artillery on nearby Mt. Vlasic, while Austrian TV said that
FROG missiles have been brought within range of Gradacac, although
apparently not yet fired. Western agencies added that the UN
High Commissioner for Refugees has suspended food aid to Serbs
in eastern Bosnia until those Serbs permit long-delayed convoys
to reach the Muslim towns of Gorazde and Srebrenica in the area.
The 24 November International Herald Tribune reports that pop
singer Michael Jackson has given $2.1 million to aid Bosnian
children through his Heal the World Foundation and AmeriCares.
Jackson's aid is expected in Bosnia next week. (Patrick Moore)


GREECE MIGHT CLOSE BORDER WITH MACEDONIA. In a letter to the
EC, Greek President Constantinos Karamanlis noted that Greece
may be forced to close its border with the ex-Yugoslav Republic
of Macedonia to protect "its security and national dignity."
He explained that such a move may happen if Macedonia's independence
is recognized before that republic changes its name. Karamanlis
describes as groundless the argument by some EC partners that
recognition would prevent the spread of hostilities. he pointed
out that recognition of Croatia and Slovenia did not solve the
problem. He said that once the problem of recognition is resolved,
Greece will provide Macedonia with political support and economic
aid. Meanwhile, Greece lifted an effective ban on fuel supplies
to Macedonia "for humanitarian reasons" on 22 November. Greek
Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis told reporters on 23 November
that Athens authorized the move after talks with the cochairmen
of the Yugoslav peace conference, Lord Owen and Cyrus Vance.
Greece halted all oil shipments from its northern port of Thessaloniki
to Macedonia in early October. Foreign Minister Michalis Papakonstantinou
said Greece could "not be held responsible if the oil is shipped
elsewhere because there are no customs controls" between Macedonia
and Serbia. Macedonia, which has been increasingly complaining
of the devastating effect the Greek blockade has been having
on its economy and ultimately upon its political stability. Radios
Serbia and Macedonia carried the reports. (Milan Andrejevich)


CROATIA ACCUSES SERBIA OF STEALING OIL. Croatia's major oil company
INA has accused Serbia of "systematically pillaging" crude oil
and natural gas from its oilfields in Serb-controlled eastern
Croatia, where UN peacekeeping troops are stationed. According
to Radio Croatia on 23 November, company officials estimate that
400 tons of crude oil were being taken daily from five of its
wells in Slavonia, an area of Croatia seized by Serbs. The Serbian
shipments were being carried out "right under the nose" of the
UNPROFOR, which is supposed to keep a watch on the borders, the
officials said, calling the smuggling a flagrant violation of
UN sanctions against rump Yugoslavia. (Milan Andrejevich)

NEW CZECH-SLOVAK AGREEMENTS. Czech and Slovak government leaders
met in Bratislava on 23 November to discuss new draft agreements
that will govern Czech-Slovak relations after the dissolution
of Czechoslovakia on 1 January 1993, including an agreement on
the division of army archives and an agreement on cooperation
in defense matters. CTK reports that the leaders also signed
nine agreements they had discussed two weeks ago. The two governments
failed to agree on how to divide fixed property belonging to
federal institutions. The Czech side insists that such property
remain in the possession of the republic on which territory it
is located--as stipulated by the 13 November constitutional law
on the division of the federation's assets. Since such property
in the Czech Republic amounts to more than double the property
in the Slovak k republic, the Slovaks want financial compensation
in addition, so that the division of such property reflects the
2:1 population ratio between the two republics. The issue will
be discussed at the next meeting. (Jiri Pehe)

SLOVAKIA STOPS WORK AT GABCIKOVO. CTK reports that Slovakia has
complied with an agreement sponsored by the European Community
and stopped work on the Gabcikovo hydroelectric dam project to
enable an EC commission to study the environmental and social
impact of the project. However, an official of the company that
is building the dam said the stoppage might cause flooding, as
the EC limitations do not allow work on an overflow channel that
is designed to keep the reservoir from overflowing its banks.
Czechoslovak and Hungarian representatives are to meet with EC
representatives in Brussels on 27 November. (Jiri Pehe)

HUNGARIAN RAIL WORKERS HOLD WARNING STRIKE. A two-hour warning
strike was called on 23 November in order to press workers' demands
for job security and higher wages. The strike was organized by
five unions and involved about 25,000 workers on duty during
the time of the strike. The stoppage affected 687 Hungarian locals
and 19 international passenger trains. The strike followed weeks
of negotiations between the rail unions and government. The government
has refused to grant union demands for higher wages, fewer layoffs,
and more financial help because freight traffic dropped by 50%
and passenger traffic by 23% during the past three years, while
the average pay doubled. The reports about the strike were carried
on 23 November by MTI and Radio Budapest. (Judith Pataki)

NEW ROMANIAN PREMIER MEETS THE PRESS. Nicolae Vacaroiu held his
first press conference on 23 November, three days after his cabinet
was sworn in. Radio Bucharest quoted him as saying that his government
is preparing a long-term strategy for economic and social reforms.
Vacaroiu disclosed that new cuts in subsidies for certain goods
and services will take place soon, since, he argued, subsidies
have been a perpetual source of embezzlement and corruption.
He also pledged to promote foreign investments in Romania. On
the other hand, Vacaroiu insisted on the need for increased state
intervention in the economy. Foreign Minister Teodor Melescanu,
who also attended the conference, described closer ties with
the European Community and NATO as the main aim of Romania's
foreign policy. He called for intensifying efforts directed at
improving Romania's image abroad. (Dan Ionescu)

POLISH PEASANT PARTY FOR "THIRD WAY." The opposition party, a
former communist satellite that reverted to prewar agrarian and
national traditions in 1989, held its third congress on 21 and
22 November. The congress called for a "third way" of national
development to harmonize economic and social goals and prevent
"the absolute subordination of the human being to free-market
mechanisms." Incumbent Waldemar Pawlak, interim prime minister
during the June 1992 government crisis, was reelected chairman.
Politicians of all parties praised Pawlak and offered to cooperate
with his party, the third largest in the Sejm. (Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)


WALESA PROPOSES GOVERNMENT PLENIPOTENTIARY FOR WARSAW. President
Lech Walesa has formally proposed the establishment of a government
plenipotentiary to administer the eight local government councils
in Warsaw from 1 January 1993 until the confusion reigning at
present can be regulated by law, PAP reported on 23 November.
Walesa's proposal is in line with the recommendations of the
Warsaw voivod, a central government official. Elected councilors
plan to defend their autonomy. (Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)

MIELEC STRIKE SUSPENDED. The strike in the crisis-ridden aviation
plant in Mielec that has been continuing on and off since spring,
1992, was suspended on 23 November after Industry Minister Waclaw
Niewiarowski came to Mielec in person and presented the government's
proposals for the region, PAP said. As an area of structural
unemployment, Mielec qualifies for special government aid. Labor
unrest keeps breaking out because of the plant's inability to
pay wages on schedule. (Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka)

LOCAL COUNCIL ELECTIONS IN "POLISH" RAIONS OF LITHUANIA. On 22
November elections were held to the local councils in the Polish
inhabited raions of Vilnius and Salcininkai that had been dissolved
after the failed coup against Gorbachev in August 1991. The RFE/RL
Lithuanian Service reports that due to a voter turnout of less
than 50%, the elections were valid in only 18 of the 29 districts
in Salcininkai and only 3 of 47 in Vilnius. A date for new elections
has not been set, but they must be held within two months. In
the meantime, direct rule will remain. (Saulius Girnius)

LDLP CONTESTS FOUR SEATS. On 22 November the presidium of the
Lithuanian Democratic Labor Party protested the decisions of
the Main Election Commission in four single-mandate districts
in the Seimas elections on 15 November. These were districts
in which LDLP candidates who led in the preliminary results lost
the elections, BNS reports. They will protest to the Lithuanian
Supreme Court, claiming that the decisions of the Sajudis-dominated
commission should be annulled. The LDLP still maintains a majority
of 73 of the 141 deputies in the Seimas, which will hold its
first session on 25 November. (Saulius Girnius)

RUSSIAN PARLIAMENT PRESIDIUM APPROVES TREATY WITH LITHUANIA.
On 23-November the presidium of the Russian Supreme Soviet approved
the Russian- Lithuanian treaty on legal assistance, signed in
July, and sent it to Parliament for ratification, ITAR-TASS reports.
The treaty establishes the principle of mutual recognition and
implementation of court decisions in the two countries. It also
states that citizens of both countries enjoy equal legal protection
in the other country and calls for both sides to provide assistance,
including legal documents needed in criminal court cases.(Saulius
Girnius)

RUSSIA TO DISCUSS BALTIC HUMAN RIGHTS. The Human Rights Committee
of the Russian Supreme Soviet has scheduled a discussion of human
rights in Estonia and Latvia for 28 November, BNS reports. The
discussion will involve committee members, representatives of
several other parliamentary committees, and independent experts.
The ambassadors from Estonia and Latvia have also be invited
to participate. (Riina Kionka)

LATVIAN IMMIGRATION DIRECTOR REGAINS JOB. Overturning the decision
of lower courts, the Latvian Supreme Court ruled that Maris Plavnieks
be restored to his former position as director of the Latvian
Immigration and Citizenship Department, BNS reported on 21 November.
Since Plavnieks' dismissal in May, in accordance with the demand
of Minister of Justice Viktors Skudra, Viesturs Karnups had been
serving as acting director of the department. (Dzintra Bungs)


DINEVICS MEETS WITH CLINTON TEAM. While visiting the US, Latvian
Minister of State Janis Dinevics discussed the necessity for
a speedy and complete withdrawal of Russian troops from Latvia
with UN officials and members of the transition team of US President-elect
Bill Clinton. Dinevics told Diena of 21 November that the discussions
had been positive and that the next round of Latvian-Russian
talks might possibly take place even before the Congress of People's
Deputies, which is to convene on 1 December. (Dzintra Bungs)


JURKANS TO ESTABLISH WELFARE FUND. On 19 November Janis Jurkans,
Latvia's former minister of foreign affairs, announced that he
is establishing a foundation to warm and feed Latvia's population,
BNS reports. The foundation, also backed by former economics
minister Janis Aboltins, deputy Vladlen Dozortsev, and Minister
of Internal Affairs Ziedonis Cevers, awaits financial backing
from businessmen in Latvia and hopes to receive support also
from abroad. It is expected that Jurkans will use the foundation
as a way to resume his political activity in Latvia. (Dzintra
Bungs)

A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME. The Estonian Communist Party is considering
changing its name, BNS reports on 23 November. In a recent poll
conducted among party members, over 90% favored a name change.
The ECP is scheduled to discuss the name change and a number
of other issues--including party reform, a new platform and preparations
for the upcoming congress--at a central committee plenum on 24
November. In September's parliamentary elections, the ECP-backed
election coalition Left Opportunity failed to clear the 5% barrier
(of the national vote) needed to win representation in parliament.
(Riina Kionka)

UNEMPLOYMENT IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA DROPS. The Federal Statistical
Office announced on 23 November that the unemployment rate in
Czechoslovakia was 5% at the end of October--a drop of more than
2% in comparison with January 1992. The unemployment rate in
the Czech Republic stood at 2.5% in October, while in Slovakia
it was 10.4%. In January the unemployment rate in the Czech republic
was almost 4% and in Slovakia almost 13%. (Jiri Pehe)

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Charles Trumbull


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

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