The world is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion. - Thomas Paine
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 212, 03 November 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

STATE OF EMERGENCY DECLARED IN NORTH OSSETIA AND INGUSHETIA.
On 2 November Yeltsin issued a decree declaring a state of emergency
in North Ossetia and Ingushetia for a period of one month, ITAR-TASS
and Interfax reported. The decree was a reaction to an attempt
by Ingush irregulars to join the Prigorodnyi raion of North Ossetia
to Ingushetia. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Georgii Khizha was
named as head of the temporary administration. Russia's interior
ministry said that the quick deployment of Russian troops in
North Ossetia had successfully stabilized the situation, but
it remains tense and shooting continues. The Russian parliament
approved Yeltsin's decree, as did the North Ossetian parliament,
but only after protests that the chairman of the North Ossetian
parliament had not been consulted and that the decree was a violation
of the federal treaty and North Ossetian sovereignty. The clash
between the Ingush and Ossetians is the first outbreak of armed
interethnic violence in the Russian Federation. The Ingush have
been trying since 1957 to get back Prigorodnyi raion which they
lost to North Ossetian when they were deported in 1944. (Ann
Sheehy, RFE/RL Inc.)

SHEVARDNADZE CONDEMNS GEORGIAN SEIZURE OF RUSSIAN ARMS. Eduard
Shevardnadze on 2 November criticized Georgian army units who
earlier that day had seized a large cache of Russian arms stored
at a depot in the town of Akhaltsikh, Interfax reported. Shevardnadze
warned that such disputes with the Russian army could "cost us
dearly." The arms seizure apparently took place in the early
hours of 2 November when some 200 troops backed up by five armored
personnel carriers reportedly descended on the Russian base.
According to Interfax, Russian guards did not respond with fire
because they feared an explosion of what was said to be a large
cache of ammunition at the site. (Stephen Foye, RFE/RL Inc.)


LITHUANIAN-RUSSIAN WITHDRAWAL AGREEMENT VOIDED? Aleksandr Udaltsov,
identified as a deputy chief of the Russian Foreign Ministry's
Second European Department, said on 2 November that the 8 September
Lithuanian-Russian troop withdrawal agreement had been "formally
voided" by President Yeltsin's 29 October directive suspending
the Baltic pull-out. That agreement had specified that all Russian
troops would be out of Lithuania by 31 August, 1993. Udaltsov
said that temporary agreements containing social guarantees for
Russian servicemen were being prepared by the Russian government
and would be presented to the Baltic governments shortly, and
that Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Vitalii Churkin would soon
visit Tallinn to discuss Yeltsin's instructions. He said that
Russia would defend firmly the rights of Russians in the Baltic
States. His remarks were reported by Baltfax. (Stephen Foye,
RFE/RL Inc.)

NEWSPAPER WARNED FOR PUBLISHING SALVATION FRONT DOCUMENTS. The
Russian Information Ministry issued an official warning to a
Moscow opposition newspaper which published documents describing
the goals of the National Salvation Front. The front, set up
by pro-Communist and Russian nationalist activists last month,
has recently been banned by President Yeltsin on the grounds
that it called for the violent overthrow of the Russian government.
On 2 November, ITAR-TASS quoted the Information Ministry as saying
that the newspaper, Den, has gravely violated the press law,
which specifically bans the publication of material calling for
the government's overthrow. The ministry was quoted as saying
that if it has to warn the newspaper again, it may seek court
action to close the newspaper. (Vera Tolz, RFE/RL Inc.)

FIRST LAND AUCTION HELD IN RUSSIA. An experimental auction of
land was held on 31 October in the Moscow suburb of Ramenskoe,
Interfax of 31 October and The Wall Street Journal of 2 November
reported. The auction drew seventeen potential buyers who bid
for nine of twelve designated plots of land. The highest price
realized was over three million rubles. Under the recent presidential
decree, the land may be used only for private housing construction.
Participation was limited to Russian citizens who are permanently
resident in Moscow or Moscow oblast. The decree allows buyers
to pass on the land to heirs, but does not permit resale. (Keith
Bush, RFE/RL Inc.)

RUSSIAN PARLIAMENT APPROVES FIRST DRAFT OF LAND LAW. The Russian
Parliament's Council of Republics adopted the first version of
the draft law on land on 2 November, ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported.
The draft envisages a reduction in the moratorium on the sale
of land from ten to five years for farmers, and to three years
for farms and market gardens attached to factories. Moreover,
the moratorium is eliminated for the land used for dachas, garages,
and individual small-holdings. Foreign citizens may acquire land
for investment purposes. The draft sets minimum and maximum sizes
of lots. Land rent duration is increased from fifty to ninety-nine
years. (Keith Bush, RFE/RL Inc.)

RUSSIAN LAW ON CURRENCY CONTROL COMES INTO FORCE. Important legislation
broadening the rights of Russian citizens and enterprises to
hold foreign currency and defining responsibility for subsequent
state policy-making on such currency matters is to come into
force on 3 November, Interfax reported. The preparation and final
passage of the law have taken months. The latest obstacle to
President Yeltsin signing parliament's most recent draft into
law was the virtual exclusion of the administration from policy-making
in hard-currency exchange. The final law gives the government
the right to determine the amount of hard-currency earnings Russian
exporters are required to sell to the domestic banking system.
(Erik Whitlock, RFE/RL Inc.)

RUSSIAN COUNCIL ON INDUSTRIAL POLICY MEETS. The consultative
body that Prime Minister Egor Gaidar promised industrial managers
on his recent visit to Tolyatti held its first meeting on 2 November,
ITAR-TASS reported. The purpose of the council, Gaidar said,
was to realize "practical interaction between enterprise managers
and the government of the Russian Federation and the consolidation
of their efforts for developing production and state support
of entrepreneurial activity." The council is to have twenty-five
members, primarily representing the biggest enterprises in Russia,
according to Interfax. The first meeting discussed organizational
matters. (Erik Whitlock, RFE/RL Inc.)

TALKS BETWEEN GOVERNMENT AND TRADE UNIONS POSTPONED. The conciliatory
commission of representatives of the Russian government and of
the Federation of Independent Trade Unions (FITU) has had to
postpone a scheduled meeting due to the failure of the government
side to prepare documentation on the social effects of defence
industry conversion, and on a new minimum wage, according to
an Interfax report of 2 November. The commission was set up to
work out compromises between trade unions and the government
on the pace and effects of economic reform. The trade unions
are threatening strike action if talks break down. (Sheila Marnie,
RFE/RL Inc.)

AGENDA FOR CIS DEFENSE MINISTERS. Valerii Manilov, a spokesman
for the CIS joint armed forces, said on 2 November that participants
of a meeting of CIS Defense Ministers planned for 3 November
intend to examine draft documents on the composition of the CIS
Strategic forces and on protecting victims of armed conflicts.
The Council, which is preparing for next month's summit of CIS
Heads of State, will also discuss provisions on the functioning
of the CIS joint forces command, ITAR-TASS reported. (Stephen
Foye, RFE/RL Inc.)

RUSSIAN COMMANDER BEMOANS ARMY'S PROBLEMS. Colonel General Yurii
Grekov, the commander of the Urals Military District, complained
in an interview with Uralsky rabochii on 31 October that enduring
anti-military sentiment in Russia continues to cause problems
for the army. Grekov claimed that up to 70% of all young men
in Russia were now avoiding military service (he did not specify
if this was a result solely of draft evasion or if it included
the granting of deferments), and that desertion had reached proportions
unknown either in the Russian or the Soviet armies. He criticized
social organizations and media organizations that, he said, continued
to encourage draft evasion. (Stephen Foye, RFE/RL Inc.)

ARRESTED SCIENTIST'S CLAIMS ON CHEMICAL WEAPONS. Vil Mirzayanov,
the scientist charged with violating security laws in connection
with an article that he coauthored on Russia's chemical weapons,
claimed that the Soviet Union was turning out such weapons long
after former USSR President Mikhail Gorbachev declared an end
to such production. The article was confiscated from the editorial
office of Argumenty i fakty by the Russian Security Ministry
but published by Nezavisimaya gazeta on 30 October. One of its
assertions was that Gorbachev secretly awarded Lenin Prizes to
"a group of comrades" in April 1991 for developing Soviet "binary"
chemical weapons and organizing their industrial production at
a plant in Volgograd. In December 1987, the Soviet Union declared
that it had halted the production of chemical weapons. (Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.)

PARLIAMENTARIANS WORRIED ABOUT "DISARMED" RUSSIAN ARMY. Interfax
on 2 November reported that the Russian Defense Ministry late
this summer had sent a message to all military districts instructing
them to place all soldiers' weapons in warehouses. Units were
only allowed to have on hand enough small-arms ammunition for
two details of armed guards. The agency quoted "a well-informed
source in the Russian Supreme Council close to the Russian military
circles." Yurii Voronin, the deputy chairman of the parliament,
was said to have made an official appeal to Russian Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev to explain the order. Grachev reportedly said the
order was only sent to units which were known to lose weapons.
(Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.)

UKRAINIAN DEFENSE DEVELOPMENTS, PROBLEMS. Ukrainian Defense Minister
Konstantin Morozov has issued a decree disbanding one of the
Kiev Military District's operational groups, Interfax reported
on 2 November. The move was said to be connected with the reorganization
of the Ukrainian armed forces. The Defense Ministry press bureau
stressed that officers discharged in connection with the change
would be provided for, and repeated Kiev's plans to replace the
existing three military districts with two operational commands.
Meanwhile, the acting Chief of Staff of Ukraine's army, Georgy
Zhyvytsa, said on 2 November that several thousand conscripts
have deserted since the beginning of this year. According to
Reuters, quoting Ukrinform-TASS, the general called for tougher
conscription enforcement laws and for higher pay to create a
"financial incentive" for those serving. (Stephen Foye, RFE/RL
Inc.)

OPPOSITION TO UNITE WITH GEORGIAN GOVERNMENT ON ABKHAZIA? Georgian
Deputy Prime Minister Aleksandr Kavsadze informed ITAR-TASS on
1 November that there have been high-level discussions between
Georgian government officials and leaders of the Georgian opposition.
One of the results of these talks is that opposition military
forces will serve with the regular army in Abkhazia. According
to Kavsadze, despite the personal ambitions of opposition leaders,
they came "to an understanding of the need to take the road of
compromise and to unite." (Hal Kosiba, RFE/RL Inc.)

ISKANDAROV TO MOSCOW. Tajikistan's acting President Akbarsho
Iskandarov paid a surprise visit to Moscow on 2 November, ITAR-TASS
reported, and met with acting Prime Minister Egor Gaidar to discuss
the Russian motorized division stationed in Tajikistan. Iskandarov
and other Tajik leaders would like for the division to assume
a peacekeeping role, but some government supporters, particularly
in the Islamic Renaissance Party, believe that the Russian division
is supporting antigovernment fighters. A meeting of Central Asian
leaders to discuss the civil war in Tajikistan is scheduled for
3 November; the Tajik legislature, scheduled to meet on 4 November
to discuss the legality of President Rakhmon Nabiev's resignation,
has been asked to defer the session. (Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.)


TAJIKISTAN ECONOMIC SITUATION WORSENS. The food situation in
both oblasts of southern Tajikistan has dramatically worsened,
Khovar-TASS reported on 2 November. A government blockade of
Kulyab Oblast, where anti-government forces are concentrated,
was having severe effects on the food supply more than a month
ago, but now Kurgan-Tyube, the site of much of the fighting between
pro- and antigovernment forces, is also in a desperate situation.
There is no fuel to run cotton-harvesting machinery. Even in
Dushanbe the food situation is reported to be a problem, with
little available and kolkhoz market prices rapidly rising. (Bess
Brown, RFE/RL Inc.)

TURKIC SUMMIT ENDS. A summit meeting of heads of state from Kazakhstan,
Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan and Turkey closed
in Ankara on 31 October with the participants signing a declaration
to improve economic relations, Western news agencies reported.
They agreed to develop transportation and telecommunication links
and to cooperate in developing industry, agriculture, oil and
gas extraction and mining. The six also agreed to hold annual
meetings. Tajikistan, although not a Turkic-speaking state, was
also invited to attend the Ankara summit but the civil war in
that country prevented Tajik participation. On 1 November ITAR-TASS
reported that Turkish and Turkmen officials had signed an agreement
to study construction of a gas pipeline across Turkish territory
to ship Turkmen gas to Europe. (Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

PANIC SUFFERS SETBACK. Radio Serbia and international media reported
on 2 and 3 November that the lower house of the rump Yugoslav
Federal Assembly's Chamber of Citizens passed a vote of no confidence
in Prime Minister Milan Panic's government. Of 117 deputies,
93 deputies voted against the government and only 24 in his favor.
The lower house is dominated by Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic's
Socialist Party and the ultranationalist Radical Party. Both
parties accused Panic of betraying the Serbian cause by his policy
of compromise with Croatia and his well publicized efforts to
restore some autonomy to Kosovo, a region with a 90% Albanian
population. The upper house, the Chamber of the Republics, is
scheduled to vote on the motion of noconfidence on 3 November.
If the motion is passed, the mandates of Panic and the federal
government will cease. Montenegro's deputies appear to continue
their support of Panic and could serve to block the motion. (Milan
Andrejevich, RFE/RL Inc.)

JAJCE EPIC CONTINUES. International media reported on 2 November
that up to 40,000 mainly Muslim refugees from Jajce continued
to pour into Travnik in the biggest single exodus in Europe since
the World War II era. Some have stayed out of exhaustion in the
overcrowded town, while others have gone on to Vitez and Zenica,
which are also controlled by Bosnian and Croatian forces. Most
of the refugees are without shelter at a time when the harsh
Bosnian winter is setting in, and Reuters said that UN relief
workers would send in 100,000 blankets, 1,000 winter tents, and
other supplies. UN officials complained about local commanders
of the various factions holding up relief supplies, noting that
there was "a complete lack of cooperation among the parties to
the conflict." (Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.)

HAVEL FORESEES NO PROBLEMS IN COOPERATION WITH KLAUS. Former
Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel said that he shared many
of Vaclav Klaus' views and that they could cooperate without
abandoning their respective ideals. Havel made the statements
at a meeting with journalists on 2 November. He said that he
had somewhat different views on foreign policy, as Klaus wanted
to pursue predominantly what he considered to be Czech interests,
while the former president believed it necessary to take up "broader
responsibility" for world events which would have a positive
impact on the Czech Republic's image abroad. Havel added that
he would place more emphasis on close relations with Poland and
Hungary. Klaus's Civic Democratic Party recently pledged its
support for Havel should he decide to run for president. It is
not yet clear whether the first Czech president will be elected
by popular vote or by parliament. (Jan Obrman, RFE/RL Inc.)

CZECH CONSTITUTION "ALMOST READY." Czech Prime Minister Vaclav
Klaus said on 2 November that the Czech constitution was "almost
complete," CSTK reported. Klaus made the announcement after an
extraordinary session of the Czech government. He said the only
parts that were still under discussion involved issues related
to minorities and the protection of their rights. He also made
it clear that the draft constitution contained nothing that would
restrict the opposition's rights and hoped it could be passed
before the dissolution of Czechoslovakia on 1 January 1993. Klaus
indicated that the draft would be presented to the Czech parliament
by the end of this week. Slovakia already has a new constitution.
It went into effect on 1 October. (Jan Obrman, RFE/RL Inc.)

ROMANIA STILL WITHOUT A GOVERNMENT. Another round of talks aimed
at forming a new government in Romania failed to produce results
on 2 November, more than one month after the parliamentary elections.
However, judging from several declarations made on Radio Bucharest
by party leaders who participated in the talks with president
Iliescu, it seems that the next prime minister is likely to again
be an economist, and possibly one who, like outgoing premier
Theodor Stolojan, has no official party affiliation. There were
unconfirmed rumors in Bucharest on 2 November that the choice
might fall on Misu Negritoiu, who heads the Romanian Agency for
Development. (Michael Shafir),

BULGARIA REJECTS CLAIMS OF PLUTONIUM SALE. Bulgaria's Interior
Ministry on 2 November rejected allegations of an international
conspiracy to provide Iraq with weaponsgrade plutonium via Bulgaria,
BTA reported. According to the British Sunday Express on 1 November,
the conspiracy was to have involved Western businessmen, as well
as Russian and Bulgarian military and excommunist officials,
who were planning to smuggle 300 kilograms of plutonium from
Russia to the Iraqi Embassy in Sofia. The Bulgarian Interior
Ministry announced that the alleged plutonium 239--kept in 140
slightly radioactive capsules deposited at a Sofia hotel--contained
less than one gram of a residual product of nuclear fuel, considered
"unsuitable for making atomic weapons." The ministry said that
the capsules, which were normally used to analyze combat gas,
had been stolen from a warehouse in December last year. In a
letter to BTA, the Iraqi Embassy in Sofia also denied the allegations.
(Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL Inc.)

VISEGRAD TRIANGLE DISCUSSES FREE TRADE ZONE. Representatives
of Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia are meeting in Budapest
in the Ministry for International Economic Relations in order
to discuss the possibility of establishing a free trade zone.
The report was carried by MTI on 2 November. Hungary and Poland
are particularly interested in such an agreement which they would
like to take effect as soon as possible. At a meeting of Polish
and Hungarian government leaders in September, it was decided
that the two countries would go ahead with a separate bilateral
agreement if no agreement could be signed with the Czech and
Slovak partners. (Judith Pataki, RFE/RL Inc.)

PARTY POLITICS IN ESTONIA. The Estonian National Independence
Party has decided not to join forces with the election coalition
Pro Patria, which is set to become a unified party on 21 November.
At the fifth ENIP Congress, held over the weekend in Parnu, the
party decided that since it had competed with Pro Patria in the
elections, to unite now would mean cheating the voters. According
to Rahva Haal of 2 November, the party voted to continue cooperating
closely with Pro Patria in the ruling government coalition, and
to join forces with Pro Patria in upcoming local and municipal
elections. (Riina Kionka, RFE/RL Inc.)

GORBUNOVS CALLS FOR INTEGRATION OF MINORITIES IN LATVIA. In his
address to Latvia's diplomatic corps on 30 October, Supreme Council
Chairman and head of state Anatolijs Gorbunovs analyzed Latvia's
internal and external political situation, Radio Riga reported
that day. He stressed that Latvia should work harder to integrate
its minorities in order to ensure a cohesive citizenry, rather
than a bipolar population consisting of Latvians, on the one
hand, and Russians and Russianspeakers on the other. He proposed
that the Supreme Council adopt a law on citizenship and naturalization
and that this law be endorsed by a referendum. Gorbunovs noted
that even if such a law were to be adopted soon, it was unlikely
that all of the potential voters could take part because of the
time required for the naturalization process. Gorbunovs also
reiterated his view that the residency requirement should be
10 years and each prospective citizen should have command of
the Latvian language, and swear an oath of allegiance. (Dzintra
Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.)

POLAND ADOPTS A NEW DEFENSE DOCTRINE. Poland's National Defense
Committee has adopted a new defense doctrine, PAP reported on
2 November. The committee is chaired by President Lech Walesa
and includes Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka, the ministers of
defense, finances, and foreign and internal affairs, in addition
to the Sejm and Senate speakers, the army's chief of staff and
other ranking officials. The document, entitled "Security Policy
and Defense Strategy of the Republic of Poland," lays the foundations
of a comprehensive Polish military policy. It says that Poland
considers its borders inviolable, sees no country as a foe, and
makes no territorial claims on any other country. While there
is no immediate threat of invasion, Poland needs its own security
system capable of responding to any potential threat. The doctrine
also restates Poland's preference for the establishment of an
international security system involving Europe, the United States
and Canada. (Jan de Weydenthal).

DIVISION OF CZECHOSLOVAK ARMY IN FULL SWING. Based on agreements
between the governments of the Czech Republic and Slovakia, the
Czechoslovak army began moving a considerable part of its technical
equipment from Western parts of the country to Slovakia. General
Karel Pezl, Chief of the Czechoslovak General Staff was quoted
by CSTK on 2 November as saying that equipment which was located
in forward positions along the German border was being moved
to new positions on Slovak territory. Although the transfer of
military equipment has been going on for some time, politicians
have urged the military to have most of it completed before the
dissolution of the country on 1 January 1993. Some 80% of the
army's assets were previously based on Czech and Moravian territory
but the leadership of both republics agreed to divide all assets
at a ratio of 2:1, to reflect the size and population of the
two countries. (Jan Obrman, RFE/RL Inc.)

MEETING OF BALTIC COUNCIL LEADERS ON 5 NOVEMBER. On 2 November
Radio Lithuania reported that Chairman of the Lithuanian Supreme
Council Vytautas Landsbergis would host his Estonian and Latvian
counterparts at a meeting of the Baltic Council on 5 November
in Vilnius. The three will discuss the internal political situation
in their countries as well as their policies on Russia's decision
to renegotiate the conditions of its troop withdrawals from the
Baltic States. The meeting had been first scheduled for 3 November,
but had been postponed "for technical reasons" to provide more
time for its preparation. (Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.)

LANDSBERGIS TALKS TO YELSTIN. On 2 November Lithuanian Supreme
Council Chairman Vytautas Landsbergis spoke to Russian President
Boris Yeltsin by telephone and was told that the final deadline
for the final withdrawal of the Russian troops from Lithuania,
the summer of 1993, remained unchanged, Radio Lithuania reported.
Yeltsin also told Landsbergis that Russia was satisfied with
the Lithuanian government's policy on minorities. (Saulius Girnius,
RFE/RL Inc.)

BORDER DISPUTE CONTINUES. Russian Supreme Council Chairman Ruslan
Khasbulatov told local agencies on 2 November that the upcoming
Russian Congress of People's Deputies would formally confirm
the current EstonianRussian administrative border as the interstate
border. Khasbulatov reportedly made the statement during his
weekend trip to Ivangorod and St. Petersburg. The Congress of
People's Deputies is set to meet on 1 December. In response,
Estonian Foreign Minister Trivimi Velliste told BNS that the
interstate border could not be declared unilaterally, but must
be drawn on the basis of a bilateral treaty. "The only treaty
concluded so far with Russia on this matter is the 1920 Tartu
Peace Treaty, all other questions between Estonia and Russia
can only be resolved in the course of negotiations." (Riina Kionka,
RFE/RL Inc.)

RUSSIA HANDS OVER VILJANDI BASE. Russian defense authorities
have handed over to Estonia all military properties located in
the central Estonian town of Viljandi, BNS reported on 2 November.
According to Deputy Defense Minister Toomas Puura, the fifteen
troops remaining in Viljandi are due to leave within days. Viljandi
was reportedly the site of a former Soviet military intelligence
gathering base. (Riina Kionka, RFE/RL Inc.)

HUNGARIAN OFFICIAL THANKS EC FOR MEDIATION. Hungarian Foreign
Minister Geza Jeszenszky has thanked European Community officials
for mediation in Hungary's dispute with Czechoslovakia over the
controversial Gabcikovo dam on the Danube river. Although EC
experts have so far determined that the hydroelectric facility
meets technical specifications, their report also contains several
alternative suggestions for completion of the project. This and
another commission that has yet to report were set up on the
basis of an agreement reached between the two countries and the
EC in London on 28 October. On 2 November Hungarian domestic
media and foreign agencies reported the first signs of ecological
damage along the Danube after its recent diversion by Slovakia.
Water levels are in some places two meters below the previously
recorded low and some of the branches of the river have already
dried up causing serious ecological changes on both sides of
the river. Several wells have also dried up in both countries
and some of Hungarian communities are without drinking water.
(Judith Pataki, RFE/RL Inc.)

REPATRIATION OF ROMANIAN GYPSIES FROM GERMANY. In line with an
agreement signed between the Federal Republic of Germany and
Romania in late September, the German authorities have begun
processing documents aimed at speeding the repatriation of Romanians
who are in Germany illegally. A spokesman for the German interior
ministry told an RFE/RL correspondent on 2 November that reports
suggesting mass deportations of thousands of Romanians in the
near future were "fantasy." On 2 November Germany deported seventeen
Romanian asylumseekers. Human right groups in both Germany and
Romania have protested against the agreement. Most of those involved
are believed to be Gypsies. Radio Bucharest said on 30 October
that between 50,000 and 140,000 Gypsies who had illegally entered
Germany and did not have identity documents or whose request
for asylum had been rejected would be repatriated. (Michael Shafir).


CORRECTION: In the RFE/RL Daily Report no. 204 (22 October 1992),
the item "Yeltsin under Attack" stated mistakenly that the Civic
Union was involved in establishing the National Salvation Front
in Russia. Western and Russian news agencies quoted Russian State
Secretary Gennadii Burbulis as asserting this connection. Later,
however, Burbulis denied making this statement. [As of 1200 CET]
Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Anna Swidlicka


































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