Every custom was once an eccentricity; every idea was once an absurdity. - Holbrook Jackson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 204, 22 October 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

YELTSIN UNDER ATTACK. Hardliners will seek to impeach President
Boris Yeltsin and abolish the institution of the presidency at
the next Congress, Komsomolskaya pravda reported on 20 October.
The opposition is united in a newly created front of national
salvation: an organization that has already started to establish
its units on the local level. In Ekaterinburg, for example, the
front conducted a congress of workers, peasants and "labor intelligentsia"
of the Central Urals which called for Yeltsin's resignation.
The Civic Union, which apparently helped set up the front, has
now officially distanced itself from that organization. Yeltsin
and Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi have reportedly joined forces
to fight the Front. (Alexander Rahr)

CONGRESS WILL TAKE PLACE IN DECEMBER. The Russian parliament
has rejected the proposal made by President Yeltsin and the leaders
of the republics of the Russian Federation to postpone the Seventh
Congress of People's Deputies until spring 1993, ITAR-TASS reported
on 21 October. Observers believe that the Congress, which is
scheduled to start on 1 December, may seriously weaken the position
of Yeltsin and the reformist government. At the suggestion of
the Civic Union, parliament also summoned for testimony four
senior members of the Russian leadership (Gennadii Burbulis,
Andrei Kozyrev, Mikhail Poltoranin and Anatolii Chubais), who
at a press conference on 16-October had warned of an impending
coup attempt against the President by members of the legislature.
Parliament will demand that the ministers to explain their reasons
for issuing this warning. (Alexander Rahr)

ANOTHER WARNING OF HYPERINFLATION IN RUSSIA. Professor Jeffrey
Sachs has warned of hyperinflation in Russia, The Times reported
on 21-October. Speaking at a London conference on banking reform
in Eastern Europe organized by the European Bank for Reconstruction
and Development, Sachs stated that the Russian money supply had
ballooned by 150% since 1 July, from 1.5 trillion to 4 trillion
rubles. This has caused prices to accelerate by perhaps 10% a
week, that is, an annual rate of more than 14,000%. "There has
been no help from outside and Russia's problems are about to
explode." (Keith Bush)

RUSSIAN PARLIAMENT HIKES PENSIONS. On 21 October, the Russian
parliament enacted a bill "On Raising State Pensions in the Russian
Federation," Interfax reported. This stipulates an increase in
the minimum state pension from 900 rubles to 2,250 rubles a month,
effective 1 November. It also provides for indexing minimum pensions
every three months, starting on 1 February 1993. (On 19 October,
ITAR-TASS reported that the Russian government proposed to raise
the minimum wage from 900 to 2,250 rubles starting in January
1993). No price tag was put on the pension increase, but the
finance minister and the employment minister warned parliament
of the inflationary impact. (Keith Bush)

ILO PREDICTS STEEP RISE IN RUSSIAN UNEMPLOYMENT. The ILO has
carried out its second survey of industrial enterprises in Moscow
and St.-Petersburg, and is predicting that mass layoffs will
begin early in 1993, according to western agencies on 21 October.
The first survey covered 500 enterprises, and the second one,
carried out in mid-1992, covered 191, 109 of which were also
included in the earlier survey. After the first survey the ILO
predicted that unemployment figures would reach ten to eleven
million by the end of 1992. The numbers of unemployed registered
with the state employment service in September was however still
below 1 million. 40% of the enterprises covered by the second
survey claim that they will cut employment by mid 1993. (Sheila
Marnie)

KUCHMA ON ECONOMY, POLITICS. Newlyappointed Ukrainian Prime Minister
Leonid Kuchma told Le Figaro that Ukraine has been preoccupied
with politics rather than economics. Privatization, he asserted,
should have begun a long time ago. His remarks appear in an interview
published in the newspaper on 21 October. Kuchma argues that
privatization should be initially focused on the trade and service
sector and that farmers should be given the land to work. In
the industrial sector, small and middle-sized enterprises should
be privatized, but the nuclear, energy, and military industries
must remain under state control. Kuchma also told the newspaper
that he proposes the formation of a government of popular trust
that will be committed to the reform process. (Roman Solchanyk)


UKRAINE CAUTIONED ON SEPARATE CURRENCY. Ukrainian Central Bank
Chairman Vadim Hetman told a Kiev news conference on 21 October
that it was technically possible to launch the hrivnya by the
end of the year, but he advised against it, Reuters reported.
"Nowhere has it proven possible to introduce a new currency amid
catastrophic economic conditions." Hetman recommended that the
country first work out a coherent reform program based on privatization.
He repeated Ukraine's intention of paying its 16.37% share of
the debt of the former Soviet Union, and ruled out Russia's proposals
that Moscow assume full responsibility for the debt provided
that it inherited all former Soviet assets. (Keith Bush)

FOREIGN POLICY "CONCEPT" TO APPEAR SOON. The Russian Foreign
Ministry's long-awaited "concept" of Russian foreign policy-a
statement which is intended to map out Russia's overall foreign
policy goals and stances-is expected to appear soon. Nezavisimaya
gazeta reported on 21-October that the 53-page document is all
but complete and needs only President Yeltsin's stamp of approval.
According to the paper, the Foreign Ministry's report continues
to emphasize good relations with the "near abroad" (the former
republics of the USSR), and rejects the use of strong-arm tactics
in this region. The authors of the document emphasize the utility
of bilateral agreements, thus continuing a trend of Russian policy
toward the near abroad, which started in the spring of 1992,
and which is designed to hedge against the collapse of the CIS.
(Suzanne Crow)

YELTSIN TO SPEAK AT FOREIGN MINISTRY. Reports about the coming
publication of the Foreign Ministry concept coincide with reports
that President Yeltsin plans to address the Russian Foreign Ministry
in late October. His talk will be designed to show support for
the embattled policy line of Andrei Kozyrev, the Russian foreign
minister, Interfax reported on 20 October. The fact that this
speech will occur in the weeks preceding the Congress of the
People's Deputies is intended to send a message to legislators:
criticism of Kozyrev will not find sympathy with Yeltsin. It
is likely that the Russian president's speech will also be used
for christening the new Foreign Ministry concept for Russia's
foreign policy. (Suzanne Crow)

FINANCIAL VIOLATIONS IN GORBACHEV FOUNDATION DISPUTED. An article
in Moscow News (No.-43) asserts that President Yeltsin's closure
of the Gorbachev Foundation was an act of political oppression.
According to the article, in August 1992, Yeltsin sent to the
foundation an audit commission from the Russian Ministry of Finance
with instructions "to find illegal sources and uses of the income
and property by the Gorbachev Foundation." In fact, the commission
found no financial violations, only minor cases of confusion
that resulted from unclear instructions from the newly established
Russian fiscal agency. According to Moscow News, the Russian
government is trying to convince the public that the foundation's
employees have enriched themselves at the public's expense, but
this accusation is totally unfounded, since the Russian government
has not contributed a single ruble either to the foundation or
to the upkeep of its premises. (Julia Wishnevsky)

BELARUS RATIFIES THE CFE TREATY. The Supreme Soviet of the Republic
of Belarus ratified the Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty
at a closed session on 21 October, ITAR-TASS reported. The treaty,
which sets limits on five categories of conventional weapons
in Europe, came into force on 17 July this year. Armenia is now
the only one of the 29 signatories not to have ratified the treaty.
(Doug Clarke)

BLACK SEA FLEET APPOINTMENT. Interfax reported on 21 October
that Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev has appointed Vice
Admiral Petr Svyatashov Chief of Staff of the Black Sea Fleet.
The report provided no details as to the exact role that the
Admiral would play in the disputed fleet or whether his appointment
needed also to be approved by the Ukrainian side. (Stephen Foye)


OUTLINES OF THE NEW UKRAINIAN GOVERNMENT. The new Ukrainian cabinet
of ministers will retain Konstantin Morozov and Anatolii Zlenko,
the ministers of defense and foreign affairs, respectively, according
to remarks made by Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma to Interfax on
21 October. Kuchma also said that probably the ministers for
industry, the military-industrial complex, conversion (Viktor
Antonov), and health (Yurii Spizhenko) would also be included
in the new government. (Roman Solchanyk)

UKRAINIAN STUDENTS CONTINUE STRIKE. As of 19 October, 22 students
were continuing their hunger strike in Kiev as part of a campaign
to force new parliamentary elections and Ukraine' withdrawal
from the CIS. At the same time, more students have abandoned
their classrooms in support of the campaign. All institutes of
higher education in Lviv and Ivano-Frankivsk have gone on strike,
as well as the Luhanksk Pedagogical Institute, the Ukrainian
National Humanitarian Lyceum, individual departments of Kiev
State University, the Kiev Polytechnic, and the Kiev Agricultural
Institute. (Roman Solchanyk)

RUSSIAN-ABKHAZ TALKS. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev
and Abkhaz parliament chairman Vladislav Ardzinba met in Moscow
on 21-October. Ardzinba subsequently told journalists that the
talks had yielded a better understanding of the issues at stake
but no progress had been made on resolving the conflict. He affirmed
that Abkhazia was complying with the terms of the 3 September
ceasefire agreement and wanted a peaceful settlement, but insisted
that Georgia withdraw its troops from Abkhazia. Ardzinba also
accused Georgia of wishing to create "a new unitary state structure"
that would entail the abolition of any autonomy for Abkhazia,
ITAR-TASS reported. (Liz Fuller)

RUSSIAN COMMANDER WARNS GEORGIANS. Interfax reported on 21 October
that General Fedor Reut, commander of the Transcaucasus Military
District, has sent a letter to Eduard Shevardnadze warning him
that attacks on Russian military personnel in Georgia could lead
to unpredictable consequences. The report suggested that the
letter was not written in a hostile tone, and speculated that
Reut is himself bound by instructions from Russian Deputy Defense
Minister Georgii Kondratev and by a General Sigutkin, identified
in the report as the Russian Defense Ministry's special representative
in Abkhazia. (Stephen Foye)

ARMENIA, AZERBAIJAN SIGN PROTOCOL ON RAIL TRAFFIC. The ongoing
talks between Armenian and Azerbaijani defense ministry officials
on safeguarding rail traffic between the two states resulted
on 21 October in the signing of a protocol establishing security
zones along the frontiers between the two states from which all
armed formations and military hardware are to be withdrawn on
24-25 October, Radio Erevan reported on 21-October. Implementation
of the agreement will be monitored by Russian, Azerbaijani and
Armenian observers. (Liz Fuller)

WORSENING SITUATION IN TAJIKISTAN. Deputy Prime Minister Asmiddin
Sohibnazarov appealed to the world community for humanitarian
aid, saying on 21 October that there are now more than 200,000
refugees who have fled their homes to escape fighting in the
southern parts of Tajikistan. Most have gone to Dushanbe and
the Kulyab and Leninabad Oblasts, and local resources are nearly
exhausted. Sohibnazarov's appeal follows reports that the economic
situation of the country is disastrous. Much of Tajikistan's
cotton crop was not harvested, and several regions, including
Kulyab Oblast, face severe shortages of food. (Bess Brown)

RUSSIAN DIVISION GIVEN PERMISSION TO SHOOT. On October 21, ITAR-TASS
reported that the commander of the Russian motorized division
stationed in Tajikistan has authorized his men to shoot without
warning if their personal safety is threatened. An increase in
the number of attacks on division soldiers has been reported
recently. Tajik militiamen have also been authorized to fire
on vehicles ignoring an order to stop. The same day, ITAR-TASS
reported that acting President Akbarsho Iskandarov wants units
of the Russian division to take part in peacekeeping operations
and has submitted a plan to the representative of the Russian
Defense Ministry in Dushanbe. (Bess Brown)

MOLDOVAN PRESIDENT ON LEFT BANK'S STATUS. President Mircea Snegur
outlined Moldova's policy on the "Dniester" question to a visiting
party of fifty-six Russian journalists in Chisinau on 16 October,
as reported by Moldovapres and Interfax, and in an interview
with Nezavisimaya gazeta of 21 October. Moldova will continue
to resist its transformation into a "federation" of republics
and the creation of a "Dniester republic" with an army, security
services, border guards, and other attributes of statehood. Chisinau
is, however, prepared to grant the left bank of the Dniester
"self-government" with political, economic, and cultural autonomy,
within an "integral and indivisible" Moldova. Chisinau is also
ready to recognize the left bank's full right of self-determination
in the event of "a change in Moldova's status as a state" (that
is, unification with Romania, which the "Dniester" Russian leadership
professes to fear and which Moldova itself opposes). (Vladimir
Socor)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

UN STOPS RELIEF FLIGHTS TO SARAJEVO. The 22 October Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung reported that the UN had announced the previous
day that fighting between Croats and Muslims near Novi Travnik
had made it impossible to continue aid flights safely, and that
the missions would be stopped. The previous weekend, similar
fighting had prompted the UN to halt overland shipments from
Split. Sarajevo's food reserves are reportedly exhausted, and
tank shells recently put the city's vital flour mill out of action.
Meanwhile, an RFE/RL correspondent at the UN said on 21 October
that Milan Panic, prime minister of the rump Yugoslavia, had
offered to provide a secure overland relief route from Belgrade
to Sarajevo. Panic pledged 100 trucks with drivers and safe passage,
but it was not clear whether he could actually bring Bosnian
Serb leaders around to agree. Finally, the 22 October Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung quoted UN human rights envoy Tadeusz Mazowiecki
as reporting from Bosnia that it was not a question of refugees
surviving the winter, but of their surviving the autumn. (Patrick
Moore)

WHAT IS GOING ON IN BOSNIA? The 22 October Frankfurter Allgemeine
Zeitung said that Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic had told
UN mediator Cyrus Vance in Geneva that he approved dividing his
republic into 8 to 10 cantons set up on a geographic, not an
ethnic, basis. Izetbegovic said he would not stand for reelection
when his term runs out on 18-December, but he denied rumors in
the Croatian media that he had already been toppled by Vice President
Ejup Ganic in a coup allegedly aimed at uniting Bosnia with rump
Yugoslavia. Bosnian officials mocked the Croatian reports, calling
them "silly" and propagandistic. The 22 October New York Times
reported that the current wave of fighting between Muslims and
Croats might be the result of desperation by the Muslims, who
might well fear that the Croats and possibly Izetbegovic have
made a deal with Belgrade at their expense. Another theory suggested
that Izetbegovic was trying to rally Muslim troops serving in
Croatian units to turn on the Croats in a desperate lifeordeath
struggle. Finally, as if to add to the confusion, international
media on 21-October reported renewed fighting between Serbs and
Croats southeast of Dubrovnik. (Patrick Moore)

CONTROVERSY OVER INTERIOR MINISTRY CONTINUES IN BELGRADE. The
independent Belgrade daily Borba warned on 20 October that the
takeover by Serbian police of the Federal Interior Ministry in
Belgrade has heightened tensions between Serbia's President Slobodan
Milosevic and leaders of the federal rump Yugoslav government
and raised fears of the army's intervention. A statement by Serbia's
main opposition party, the Serbian Renewal Movement, described
the move as "Milosevic's foolish resolve to provoke war in Serbia"
adding that "to keep his own position, this man is prepared to
turn Belgrade into Sarajevo." A Serbian Interior Ministry statement
said that the federal administration had to move out because
a Belgrade court ruled the building was the property of the Republic
of Serbia. However, Bratimir Tocanac, head of that court said
he knew nothing about such a ruling, according to Radio Serbia
on 20 October. The Federal Interior Ministry relocated to the
federal government's Palace of the Federation building and announced
it would prosecute the Serbian police, who, according to Belgrade
media, were backed by Serbian militia from Croatia and Bosnia.
(Milan Andrejevich)

KOSOVO DEVELOPMENTS. Radio Serbia reported on 21 October that
19 ethnic Albanians had been convicted by a provincial court
of planning to use violent means to seek Kosovo's independence
from Serbia. The group, allegedly members of the National Front
of Albanians, were given sentences totalling more than 70 years.
International media reported that Bujar Bukoshi, Prime Minister
of the selfproclaimed Republic of Kosovo, has urged the US to
press Serbia to lift martial law and also asked the UN to impose
a "nofly" zone over Kosovo and take control of Serbian military
hardware there. Bukoshi added that such actions were necessary
in order to head off an imminent "massacre" of Albanians by heavily
armed Serbs. He made the remarks at the end of his three day
visit to the US on 21 October. Kosovo's Albanians, who make up
more than 90% of the province's population, reject Serbian domination
and seek independence. (Milan Andrejevich)

NEW ESTONIAN GOVERNMENT. President Lennart Meri named Prime Minister
Mart Laar's choices for the new government on 21 October, local
sources report. The new government, drawn from the strongly promarket
ruling coalition of Pro Patria, the Moderates and Estonian National
Independence Party, stands as follows: former deputy Foreign
Minister Trivimi Velliste (Pro Patria) for Foreign Affairs; Kiel
professor Hain Rebas (ENIP) for Defense; former dissident Lagle
Parek (ENIP) for Interior Affairs; Stockholm economist Madis
Uurike for Finance; former deputy speaker Marju Lauristin (Moderates)
for Social Welfare; agronomist Ain Saarmann (Pro Patria) for
the Economy; former Supreme Council deputy Kaido Kama (Pro Patria)
for Justice; poet PaulEerik Rummo (Pro Patria) for Culture;
agricultural engineer Jaan Leetsar (Moderates) for Agriculture;
former Transportation Ministry functionary Andi Meister (ENIP)
for Transportation; geographer and former Supreme Council deputy
Andres Tarand (Moderates) for the Environment. The two ministers
without portfolio include scientist and former Supreme Council
deputy Liia Hanni (Moderates) for Minister of Reform; and Toronto
energy executive Arvo Niitenberg for Energy, a post he held under
the previous government. (Riina Kionka)

LATVIAN GOVERNMENT SURVIVES VOTE OF CONFIDENCE. With the exception
of the Minister for Economic Reforms, the government of Prime
Minister Ivars Godmanis survived the vote of no confidence in
the Latvian Supreme Council, Baltic media reported on 21 October.
Votes were also taken against Foreign Minister Janis Jurkans
and Internal Affairs Minister Ziedonis Cever, but failed to force
their resignation. After these votes it appears unlikely that
the government will resign en masse. (Dzintra Bungs)

ELECTION LAW ADOPTED IN LATVIA. On 20-October the Latvian Supreme
Council adopted a new election law that stipulates that all citizens
of Latvia can vote, provided they are at least 18 years old and
have not been members of organizations opposing Latvia's independence,
such as the KGB, Radio Riga reported. (Dzintra Bungs)

BULGARIAN PREMIER ASKS FOR CONFIDENCE VOTE. On the evening of
21 October the Bulgarian government proposed that the National
Assembly take, on the following day, a vote of confidence on
the government's performance and policies, BTA reported. Prime
Minister Filip Dimitrov, who had been rebuked by parliament earlier
that day for his decision to send a political adviser to discuss
an arms deal with Macedonian leaders, told reporters that a government
could not continue to rule if it had been denigrated and its
arms and legs were tied. In a statement the UDF's governing body
accused President Zhelyu Zhelev of instigating recent attacks
on the government. Emergency talks between UDF leaders and their
MRF counterparts, who hold the balance of power in parliament,
carried on through the night. (Kjell Engelbrekt)

NO COALITION GOVERNMENT IN SIGHT IN ROMANIA. On 21 October Romania's
President Ion Iliescu ended two days of talks with political
party leaders on forming a government. Interviewed by Radio Bucharest,
Iliescu admitted that the talks had failed to produce a national
unity government, or a broadbased coalition involving the main
political parties. He added that the focus would now shift to
the possibility of forming a narrower coalition led by his Democratic
National Salvation Front (DNSF). Iliescu, who called for "a political
pact" in the parliament, proposed a parliamentary "moratorium,"
a period of grace during which the parties that did not join
the ruling coalition would not obstruct a DNSFled government.
(Dan Ionescu)

NEW DATE SET FOR DIVERSION OF DANUBE. Czechoslovak Foreign Minister
Jozef Moravcik said on 21 October that the planned diversion
of the Danube as part of the controversial Gabcikovo hydroelectric
project will take place on 3 November, CSTK reported. Moravcik's
announcement conflicts with earlier official Slovak statements
which said that the diversion would begin on 7 November. The
federal foreign minister also said that his government was ready
to take into consideration any recommendations of the EC as long
as they were presented by 2-November at the latest. He added
that the diversion of the Danube was not irreversible and that
even after the damming of the river the Danube can be diverted
to its original river bed. Meanwhile, Hungarian, Czechoslovak,
and EC officials are scheduled to discuss Gabcikovo in Brussels
today. They will consider the setting up of a tripartite commission
that would offer solutions for the current deadlock. (Jan Obrman)


SLOVAKIA COMMEMORATES DEPORTED JEWS. A memorial ceremony was
held on 21 October in the Slovak town of Nitra in remembrance
of Slovak Jews who were deported to death camps during the war.
The ceremony marked the 50th anniversary of the first group of
Slovak Jews to be sent to the camps. In the presence of Slovak
Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar, Slovak parliament Chairman Ivan
Gasparovic, and Israel's Ambassador to Czechoslovakia, Yoel Scher,
a monument was unveiled to commemorate the estimated 70,000 people
who were deported. Gasparovic told the 300 people who gathered
for the ceremony that there will be no room for racism and antiSemitism
in the new Slovak state. (Jan Obrman)

CZECH PARLIAMENT APPROVES LAW ON CZECH PRESS AGENCY. The Czech
National Council approved a law on the new Czech Press Agency
(CTK) on 21 October. The law makes provision for the introduction
of CTK as a legal public entity on 15 November and its full privatization
within the next two years. It stipulates that no government official
or Czech parliamentary deputy may become CTK's director or sit
on the 7member council that will oversee its activities. The
council will be elected by the Czech National Council. Unlike
its federal predecessor, CSTK, CTK will not be obliged to publish
official government statements. (Jan Obrman)

LIMITED CONVERTIBILITY FOR HUNGARIAN CURRENCY. Radio Budapest
reported on 21 October that the Hungarian government had accepted
the basic outline of a new law on the convertibility of the forint.
After the law is passed by parliament, Hungarian enterprises
will be able to freely convert their forints into foreign currency
for business purposes. This is an important step forward toward
the liberalization of the forint's convertibility and an indication
of Hungary's good foreign trade and balance of payment performance.
(Judith Pataki)

IMF APPROVES CREDIT FOR LITHUANIA. On 21-October the executive
board of directors of the IMF accepted the Lithuanian economic
reform program and approved credits of $82 million in the next
eleven months, Radio Lithuania reported. Part of the credits
will be paid out immediately with additional credits at the end
of February, May, and August. Lithuania will begin paying the
annual interest of 46% in 1994 with the deadline for paying
the balance of the loan in 1998. The board of the World Bank
is expected to discuss granting a $60 million import loan to
Lithuania on 22 October. (Saulius Girnius)

BICKAUSKAS PERPLEXED OVER RUSSIAN ANNOUNCEMENT. Lithuania's charge
d'affaires in Moscow Egidijus Bickauskas told Baltfax on 20-October
that he was perplexed over a Russian announcement to suspend
the troop withdrawals from the Baltic States. Recalling that
Russian officials had already signed several documents stipulating
31-August 1993 as the completion date for the troop pullouts
from Lithuania, Bickauskas expressed regret that "once again
[Russia] has unilaterally announced plans to break its own commitments"
and noted that such actions shed doubt on the sincerity of statements
of Russian representatives who said they were striving to resolve
these problems. (Dzintra Bungs)

LANDSBERGIS DOUBTS RUSSIAN MILITARY WITHDRAWAL FROM LITHUANIA
WILL BE SUSPENDED. On 21 October Lithuanian parliament chairman
Vytautas Landsbergis told reporters that he thought that the
statement of the Russian Defense Ministry on suspending the withdrawal
of troops from the Baltic States was "meant for inner use and
to calm down certain influential group assemblies of officers,
by showing a general concern for their social needs," BNS reports.
Noting that the texts of the agreements on the withdrawal made
provision for postponing the removal of units if preparations
for their settlement were not complete, he said that "as far
as he knew units from Lithuania were not being withdrawn to empty
fields," and had no reason "to believe that the army's withdrawal
from Lithuania was to be suspended or slowed down." (Saulius
Girnius)

RUSSIAN TROOP TRAIN TO LEAVE LATVIA FOR KALININGRAD? Radio Riga
reported on 21 October that preparations were being made to send
to Kaliningrad the Russian train carrying troops and weapons
that entered Latvia illegally on 19 October. The Latvian government
also decided not to confiscate the train's cargo in order to
show its good will to Russia and demonstrate its desire for a
speedy resolution of the troop withdrawal issues. Radio Riga
said that the next round of troop withdrawal talks was still
expected to start on 23 October in Moscow. (Dzintra Bungs)

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Anna Swidlicka


























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