Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 203, 21 October 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

WITHDRAWAL OF TROOPS FROM BALTIC SUSPENDED? The Russian Defense
Ministry announced on the morning of 21 October that the withdrawal
of Russian forces from the Baltic would be suspended for those
units scheduled to be redeployed to areas in Russia that lacked
adequate housing, Interfax reported. While Defense Minister Pavel
Grachev said that he would "not station forces in a bare field,"
he nevertheless suggested that the overall timetable for the
withdrawal would not be changed; the movement of individual sub-units
will apparently be altered to conform with the availability of
housing in Russia. Grachev said that the Defense Ministry had
issued the statement to draw the public's attention to the army's
housing shortage, but the obvious confusion in policy statements
suggests that military leaders may themselves be split over the
withdrawal issue. (Stephen Foye)

STANKEVICH ACCUSES, CHURKIN THREATENS BALTIC STATES. Sergei Stankevich,
an advisor to Russian President Boris Yeltsin, sent a letter
to the Council of Europe in which he accused Estonia and Latvia
of stripping their Russian residents of the possibility of becoming
loyal citizens of the two countries and of unspecified human
rights violations against the Russians, Interfax reported on
20 October. That same day Vitalii Churkin, identified by Interfax
as Russia's First Deputy Foreign Minister, said that despite
the fact that the European Community had advised against using
"power measures" to resolve human rights issues in Estonia and
Latvia, the Russian Supreme Soviet has not ruled out the possibility
of using economic sanctions against the two Baltic states. (Dzintra
Bungs)

GRACHEV ON MILITARY REDUCTIONS, RUSSIAN MINORITIES. In a wide-ranging
interview published by Rossiiskaya gazeta on 21 October, Russian
Defense Minister Pavel Grachev repeated Moscow's plans to stand-down
strategic missiles throughout the CIS. He also said that air
defense troops on the island of Novaya Zemlya would be significantly
reduced, while several radar units and fighter squadrons would
be transferred to the mainland. He said that there was now little
difference between nuclear and conventional war. Turning to the
former Soviet republics, he said that there were no immediate
plans to withdraw the 201st motor rifle regiment from Tajikistan,
the 345th parachute assault regiment (or any other troops) from
Abkhazia, or the 14th Army from Moldova. Russian assault troops
will be withdrawn in the very near future from South Ossetia,
he said. Grachev also defended orders he has issued for Russian
troops to protect themselves, saying that it was "not I who sent
the troops into our former republics, and it is not for me to
decide how and when to withdraw them." (Stephen Foye)

HARDLINERS RENEW CLAIM ON IZVESTIA. The Russian parliament has
renewed its claim to the newspaper, Izvestiya, ITAR-TASS reported
on 20-October. Both chambers of the parliament voted in favor
of taking over the founding rights for the Izvestiya publishing
house, and authorized the Presidium of the parliament to appoint
a new director. The bill calls on the parliamentary presidium
to confirm the publishing house's charter and to appoint its
director. The conservative-minded parliament had already made
an attempt last summer to take the newspaper under its jurisdiction,
but President Boris Yeltsin resisted the move by issuing a decree
confirming the paper's independence. Information Minister Mikhail
Poltoranin said that the Russian leadership will appeal the decision
to the Constitutional Court. (Alexander Rahr & Vera Tolz)

YELTSIN ACCUSED OF CURBING FREEDOM OF SPEECH. The former director
of St. Petersburg TV, Viktor Yugin, complained that President
Yeltsin's latest decree abolishing the independence of his TV
station by placing it under governmental control is aimed at
silencing criticism of Yeltsin's policies, Western news agencies
reported on 20 October. He said that the decree curbs freedom
of speech. Information Minister Mikhail Poltoranin had accused
St. Petersburg TV of favoring hardliners and nationalists. Yeltsin
decreed that the station, which broadcast on the fifth channel,
be transformed from a local into a federal Russian TV company
called Rossiya. (Alexander Rahr)

PARLIAMENT CHAMBER VOTES ON FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT BILL. The Russian
parliament's Council of Nationalities approved on the first reading
a draft law which gives citizens of Russia the right to freely
choose their place of residence within the Federation, ITAR-TASS
reported on 20 October. This draft eliminates the existing system
of residence permits according to which the authorities could
give or deny citizens the right to live in any city or village
of the country. ITARTASS said the Council of Nationalities called
for more revisions to the draft aimed at eliminating several
unclear points. (Vera Tolz)

RUBLE EXCHANGE RATE DROPS FURTHER. The ruble fell to 368 to the
US dollar at the 20 October trading session of the Moscow Interbank
Currency Exchange, Biznes-TASS reported. The rate on 15-October
had been 338 rubles to the dollar. The volume traded was $46.7
million, up from $37.9 million at the previous session. Contributory
factors cited included high inflationary expectations, the continuing
decline in output, and a government decision to oblige state
enterprises to convert 100% of their hard-currency receipts at
the market rate by the end of 1993. However, this last factor
may not be valid, as earlier government pronouncements suggested
that mandatory full conversion of hard-currency would be enforced
"soon." (Keith Bush)

USE OF FOREIGN CREDITS IN RUSSIA. On 20-October, the Russian
Government Collegium approved a draft directive on the use of
foreign credits, Interfax reported. The directive, which was
proposed by Deputy Prime Minister Aleksandr Shokhin, distinguishes
between trade and investment credits. To receive a trade credit,
an enterprise must pay its entire cost outright, either in hard
currency or in rubles at the market rate. To receive an investment
credit, the enterprise will have to pay 15% of the total value
in advance and undertake to repay the balance within the stipulated
period. The credits will be distributed on a competitive basis
through auctions instead of being administratively allocated.
(Keith Bush)

GORBACHEV WANTS TV TIME TO REPLY TO ZORKIN. On 20 October, former
Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev sent a letter to the chairman
of the Russian State TV and Radio Broadcasting Company, Oleg
Poptsov, requesting TV time to reply to accusations made against
him by Constitutional Court Chairman Valerii Zorkin. At a TV
press conference, Zorkin attacked Gorbachev for ignoring summons
to attend the constitutional court and described them as evidence
of Gorbachev's disrespect for the law. He said that Gorbachev
has deprived himself of the rights of Russian citizenship. Interfax
quoted Gorbachev's letter as saying that the press conference
cast doubt on Zorkin's objectivity and independence. On 20 October,
deputy prime minister and information minister Mikhail Poltoranin
reiterated that Russian authorities hold "very serious documents"
signed by Gorbachev that could incriminate the former Soviet
leader. (Vera Tolz)

NEW UKRAINIAN PRIME MINISTER PESSIMISTIC ON ECONOMY. Newly appointed
Ukrainian Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma says that Ukraine's economy
is in worse condition than he had suspected, Reuters reported
on 19 October. Kuchma is reported to have told the Ukrinform
news agency that he could not promise "an easy life" and that
the economic situation would grow worse. At the same time, he
promised that his government would work "conscientiously." Kuchma
is due to announce his cabinet next week. (Roman Solchanyk)

MEETING OF UKRAINIAN AND RUSSIAN INDUSTRIALISTS. Ukrainian and
Russian industrialists and entrepreneurs were scheduled to meet
in Belgorod on 20 October to discuss coordination of their activities,
Radio "Mayak" reported. It was expected that Arkadii Volsky and
Vasilii Yevtukhov, the heads of the Russian and Ukrainian organizations
of industrialists and entrepreneurs, would address the meeting.
(Roman Solchanyk)

NO PROGRESS IN ABKHAZ PEACE TALKS. Georgian Foreign Minister
Aleksandre Chikvaidze returned to Tbilisi on 20 October after
talks with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev in which no
progress was made on an Abkhaz peace settlement, Russian foreign
ministry spokesman Sergei Yastrzhembsky told Interfax. Parallel
talks took place behind closed doors in Sukhumi on 19 October
between members of the ethnic Abkhaz and Georgian factions within
the Abkhaz parliament, ITAR-TASS reported. Continued fighting
between Abkhaz and Georgian troops was reported near Sukhumi
and Ochamchire on 19-20-October. (Liz Fuller)

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE OFFICIAL GEORGIAN ELECTION RESULTS?
Ten days after the Georgian parliamentary elections, the central
electoral commission has apparently still not made public the
composition of the new parliament. On 20 October the unofficial
Iberia News Agency cited statistics on the distribution of 145
of the total 234 seats, which confirm earlier predictions that
the Mshvidoba (Peace) bloc, which is dominated by former Communist
Party apparatchiks, is the largest single faction within the
new parliament with 24 seats, followed by the moderate 11 October
and Unity blocs with 18 and 14 seats respectively. The Neue Zuercher
Zeitung reported on 14 October that 226 seats in the new parliament
had been filled. (Liz Fuller)

ARMENIA APPOINTS NEW DEFENSE MINISTER. Former Prime Minister
Vazgen Manukyan, who resigned over policy disagreements with
Levon Ter-Petrossyan in September 1991, shortly before the latter's
election as Armenian President, has been appointed Armenian Minister
of Defence, according to Armen-Press-TASS. Manukyan replaces
Vazgen Sarkisyan, who has been named special advisor to Ter-Petrossyan
and envoy to the Armenian raions bordering on Azerbaijan. (Liz
Fuller)

RESIGNATION OF VALERII TISHKOV. Valerii Tishkov, chairman of
Russia's State Committee for Nationality Affairs, has resigned
after only seven months in office, Radio Rossii reported on 19
October. Tishkov told Rossiiskie vesti (20 October) that one
reason was his inability to get a new building in the center
of Moscow or recruit the best people for the committee. More
important reasons were the senselessness of many Russian laws,
which were dictated by narrow political interests (Tishkov cited
in particular the laws on the rehabilitation of the repressed
peoples and the Cossacks which anyone aware of the situation
knew would only provoke conflicts) and the failure of the top
decision-making bodies to consult the committee. (Ann Sheehy)


YELTSIN AT OPENING OF YAKUT PERMANENT REPRESENTATION. Continuing
his wooing of the Russian Federation's republics, Yeltsin attended
the opening of the permanent representation of the republic of
Sakha (Yakutia) in Moscow on 20 October, ITARTASS reported.
Yeltsin said that the representations of the republics in Moscow
would have a special role to play in the development of new federal
relations. (Ann Sheehy)

CONFEDERATION OF CAUCASIAN PEOPLES' PARLIAMENT CALLS FOR DENUNCIATION
OF FEDERAL TREATY. The session of the parliament of the Confederation
of Caucasian Peoples in Groznyi on 18 October endorsed the decision
of the October Congress of the Mountain Peoples of the Caucasus
to call on the North Caucasian republics to denounce the federal
treaty with Russia, Interfax reported on 20-October. Interfax
said that the parliament also decided to send a delegation to
Baku to discuss the Lezgin question. The consequences of the
possible establishment of a state frontier between Russian and
Azerbaijan that would split the Lezgin people is to be discussed
at the 4th Congress of the Lezgin People in early November. (Ann
Sheehy)

SITUATION IN TAJIKISTAN. Tajik Foreign Minister Khudoberdy Kholiknazarov
and newly appointed State Advisor Davlat Khudonazarov met with
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev on 20 October to explore
ways to find a way to end the civil war in southern Tajikistan,
ITAR-TASS reported. None of the three described what concrete
proposals had been discussed, but Kozyrev said that Russian help
could not take the form of interference in Tajikistan's internal
affairs. Tajikistan's highest-ranking Muslim clergyman, Kazi
Akbar Turadzhonzoda, was reported by a Western news agency to
have said on 19 October that Russia could end the Tajik civil
war in two days if it wanted, by ending its support for fighters
in Kulyab Oblast who oppose the present Tajik government. (Bess
Brown)

LENINABAD OFFICIALS APPEAL FOR RUSSIAN HELP. Officials in Tajikistan's
Leninabad Oblast have issued an appeal for more Russian troops
to be sent to the country, Khovar-TASS reported on 20 October.
Leninabad, which has rejected the inclusion of opposition forces
in the government in Dushanbe and which is known for procommunist
sympathies, has succeeded in staying out of the armed conflict
that has ravaged southern Tajikistan since June. The oblast leadership
denied that arms from Leninabad have been supplied to forces
in the south that support deposed President Rakhmon Nabiev, who
is now living in Leninabad, and it offered to host meetings between
the opposing sides in the southern conflict. (Bess Brown)

EAST KAZAKHSTAN CANCELS CHECHEN DEPORTATION. The Deputy Chairman
of the East Kazakhstan Oblast Soviet, Mukhtar Nukeshev, told
an RL/RFE correspondent on 20 October that the council had reversed
its earlier order that all Chechens be expelled from the oblast.
The decision was reversed, according to Nukeshev, because a confrontation
between Kazakhs and Chechens in Ust-Kamenogorsk had ended. Kazakhs
had demonstrated for several days, demanding the expulsion of
the Chechens, after Chechens were implicated in the murder of
some Kazakhs. A commission was sent from Alma-Ata to examine
the legality of the deportation order, and Interfax reported
that a delegation from the Chechen parliament was on its way
to Ust-Kamenogorsk. (Bess Brown)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

TUDJMAN AND COSIC SIGN AGREEMENT. The New York Times reported
on 21 October that the presidents of Croatia and SerbiaMontenegro
had signed an agreement under UN sponsorship in Geneva a day
earlier. The agreement commits the two to some concrete goals,
such as opening the main BelgradeZagreb highway as well as liaison
offices in each other's capitals. An earlier agreement concluded
on 30 September has not been truly implemented, though one clause
was fulfilled on 20 October when Serbian forces completed their
withdrawal from Croatia's Prevlaka peninsula near Dubrovnik,
which is now under UN control. (Patrick Moore)

BOSNIAN UPDATE. The BBC reported on 21 October that UN armored
personnel carriers had succeeded in rescuing a relief mission
trapped by fighting between Muslims and Croats in the town of
Vitez between Sarajevo and Travnik. The two sides are nominal
allies in a fight against the Serbs, but the Muslims suspect
the Croats of having agreed to the partition of BosniaHerzegovina
with the Serbs and of now trying to consolidate their positions.
The Croats may well be keeping all options open. There have been
clashes between Muslims and Croats before, notably around Mostar,
and the Muslims wonder out loud why the Croats do not move up
from their strong positions in Herzegovina to break the siege
of Sarajevo. The BBC also said that UN human rights envoy and
former Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki had visited Serbian
and Muslim detention camps in Bosnia on 20 October. Mazowiecki
said that the difference between the two was one of "hell and
happiness," with hundreds of Muslims living in cramped conditions
on the floors of the Serb camp, while a smaller number of Serbs
had "proper beds and two regular meals per day" in the Muslim
facility. (Patrick Moore)

KOSOVO ALBANIAN STUDENTS POSTPONE PROTESTS. The Committee for
Albanian Education in Kosovo has suspended protests by ethnic
Albanian pupils and students until officials of the rump federal
Yugoslav and Serbian education ministries meet representatives
of Albanian educational associations on 22 October in Belgrade.
The committee warned the protests would continue if talks did
not yield "concrete results," Radio Serbia reported on 19-October.
Ibrahim Rugova, chairman of Kosovo's main party, the Democratic
League, reiterated in the latest issue of the Albanian weekly
Bujku his insistence on creating a "neutral and independent Kosovo,"
as the basis for all his talks with Serbian officials. Serbia
opposes any form of sovereignty for Kosovo whose population is
over 90% Albanian. (Milan Andrejevich)

WILL THERE BE EARLY ELECTIONS IN SERBIA? According to Radio Serbia
on 19 October, parliamentary caucus chairmen in Serbia's National
Assembly agreed at a closeddoor meeting with Assembly President
Aleksandar Bakocevic that early elections should be held in Serbia
by the end of this year. They also agreed that republican elections
should be held on the same day as federal elections. Proposals
on their organization and date are to be submitted by the end
of this week. A constitutional amendment allowing for early general
and presidential elections failed to win public approval in a
recent referendum. (Milan Andrejevich)

SLOVAKIA POSTPONES DIVERSION OF DANUBE... Slovakia announced
on 20 October that it would postpone the planned opening of the
Gabcikovo hydroelectric project which involves diverting the
Danube. A spokesman for the Slovak government said that the decision
was based on technical, rather than political considerations
and that the river would be diverted by November. The Czechoslovak
federal government will discuss the possibility of setting up
a threeparty commission of Czechoslovak, Hungarian, and European
Community experts to settle the dispute between Hungary and Slovakia.
Negotiations between the interested parties are beginning in
Brussels today. (Jan Obrman)

...AND ANTALL APPEALS TO WORLD LEADERS. Meanwhile, MTI reported
that Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall sent a letter to
leading politicians in Europe and North America (including Presidents
George Bush and Boris Yeltsin) in which he made it clear that
the diversion of the Danube "will seriously violate the interests
of the international community and create a new source of conflict
in Central Europe endangering stability and European cooperation."
Antall asked the statesmen to "help rationality to prevail" and
urge the Czechoslovak government to postpone the diversion "at
least until international inquiry and mediation proceedings are
completed." (Jan Obrman)

HUNGARY DENIES ALLEGED TROOP MOVEMENTS. Following a phone inquiry
from the Czechoslovak Ministry of Defense about alleged Hungarian
troops movements near Rajka on the SlovakHungarian border, Hungary's
Defense Ministry has stated that there was no military nor extraordinary
border guard activity in that area, MTI reported on 20 October.
Hungary's Deputy State Secretary of Defense Rudolf Joo called
in the Czechoslovak military attache in Budapest and proposed
setting up a joint monitoring group to strengthen mutual confidence
and reassure the local population, as well as to prevent misunderstandings.
(Alfred Reisch)

SLOVAK MINISTER REJECTS COMPLAINTS OF HUNGARIAN MINORITY. Slovak
Foreign Minister Milan Knazko accused Miklos Duray, the Chairman
of the predominantly ethnicHungarian opposition party Coexistence
of stirring ethnic tensions in Slovakia, CSTK reported on 20
October. Earlier, Duray told reporters that the new Slovak constitution
sharply curtailed minority rights and that Hungarians were in
many respects worse off now than under the communist regime.
Knazko said that these statements were "unfounded and baseless."
He added that Duray was a "militant, interpreting the constitution
in a twisted way to hurt ethnic relations in Slovakia for political
reasons." (Jan Obrman)

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY CHASTISED BULGARIAN PREMIER. After a closed
session which carried on past midnight, a narrow majority of
the Bulgarian parliament on 21 October chastised Prime Minister
Filip Dimitrov for his way of dealing with a Macedonian request
to buy arms from Bulgaria, BTA reported. Dimitrov was criticized
for actions that might have led to "lowering the country's prestige"
and "damage to national security." Parliament praised the investigation
led by head of counterespionage, General B. Asparuhov, but expressed
disapproval that he had stated publicly his suspicions of government
involvement in illegal arms deals. All UDF deputies boycotted
the vote in protest. A day earlier the UDF daily Demokratsiya
published what it claimed were the minutes of a 2 October meeting
between the Premier and President Zhelyu Zhelev, according to
which the two had agreed that Dimitrov had acted in an appropriate
manner. (Kjell Engelbrekt)

ILIESCU HOLDS TALKS ON FUTURE CABINET. On 20 October Romanian
President Ion Iliescu held talks on forming a government with
leaders of the parties represented in parliament. According to
Radio Bucharest, Iliescu received leaders of the Democratic National
Salvation Front (DNSF) which had backed him in the 27 September
elections; the National Peasant Party-Christian Democratic; the
Democratic Agrarian Party; the Civic Alliance Party; the Party
of Romanian National Unity; and the National Salvation Front
(NSF). NSF leader Petre Roman stated that he had offered support
for the rival DNSF in parliament on condition that it promised
to foster market reforms despite its pledges to the contrary
during the electoral campaign. He also said that the NSF might
join a coalition government that included the centrist Democratic
Convention. (Dan Ionescu)

NEW POLITICAL PARTY IN LATVIA. On 17 October, 98 delegates convened
in Riga for the formal founding of the Democratic Center Party.
The main speakers were Supreme Council Deputy Janis Skapars and
former Deputy Prime Minister Ilmars Bisers, who said that the
party would aim to steer a moderate course both politically and
economically and seek its adherents among all the nationalities
living in Latvia. Among the new party's activistists are former
liberal communists who supported and worked for the People's
Front of Latvia when it was founded in October 1988, Radio Riga
reported on 18 October. (Dzintra Bungs)

POLISH GOVERNMENT PROPOSES NEW BUDGET CUTS. Responding to the
Sejm's refusal to consider limiting costofliving increases
for pensioners in 1992, the Polish government approved new spending
cuts of 1.8 trillion zloty ($129 million) on 20 October. The
cuts, part of a package of revisions to the 1992 budget, would
reduce subsidies to the railways and defense industries, credits
for farmers, central investments and budgetary reserves. At the
same time, the government pledged to return to the pension issue
in the draft budget for 1993. Social security payments have in
recent years become a huge drag on the budget. They will amount
to 20% of expenditures in 1992 and, if unchecked, could rise
to 30% in 1993. Finance ministry officials argue that no normal
state can afford this burden. (Louisa Vinton)

RECORD VOLUME ON WARSAW STOCK MARKET. Trading reached record
levels on the Warsaw stock market on 20 October after most of
the firms represented reported positive economic results for
the first three quarters of 1992. Volume exceeded 55.1 billion
zloty ($4 million). Demand for shares in two firms-Prochnik and
Mostostal-was so great that trading in them had to be suspended.
Eight of the nine firms which announced their results before
the trading session opened (of the sixteen on the market) have
so far recorded profits in 1992; two others reported balances
in the black earlier in the month. (Louisa Vinton)

BULGARIA TO RECEIVE EC CREDITS. The finance ministers of European
Community countries agreed at a meeting in Luxemburg to release
100 million Ecu in credits to help Bulgaria overcome its present
balance of payments problems, Bulgarian and Western dailies wrote
on 20 October. The first of two installments will be made available
immediately, while the second part is to be provided when Bulgaria
has renegotiated its debt agreement with the Paris Club of creditors.
(Kjell Engelbrekt)

ROMANIA'S ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE IN SEPTEMBER. Romania's National
Statistics Board released on 20 October data on the previous
month's economic performance. Industrial production was up 5.5%
from August, but was still 23.5% below the level of September
1991. The trade balance registered a surplus of $68.2 million.
Compared to August, prices for consumer goods and staples were
10.1% and 12.1% higher, respectively. Compared with October 1990,
when price liberalization began, food prices were up 1,074%.
Over 869,000 people (7.7% of the labor force) were out of work.
The communique said that seasonal sowing was behind schedule,
with only 29% of wheat fields sown. (Dan Ionescu)

WALESA: SOVIET PARTY WAS "CRIMINAL ORGANIZATION." In an interview
with the Russian weekly Novoe Vremya on 20 October, Polish President
Lech Walesa took the part of Russian President Boris Yeltsin.
Walesa said the Soviet communists who enslaved Poland were a
"criminal organization." Resolving this question once and for
all through the release of documents on the Katyn massacres,
Walesa said, had opened the way for democratic relations between
the two nations. "Without Yeltsin," Walesa said, "this would
have been impossible." Walesa called the conflict between Yeltsin
and former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev a "contest over Russia's
future policies." Only Yeltsin had understood that revealing
the full truth about the criminal nature of the communist system
was the only way to keep Russia moving forward and to forestall
efforts by former communist leaders to pretend that the old system
"wasn't really so bad." "Other Soviet leaders knew the truth
but were afraid to reveal it," Walesa observed. (Louisa Vinton)


UPDATE ON RUSSIAN TROOP TRAIN. Radio Riga reported on 20 October
that in response to Latvian inquires about the illegal entry
of a Russian train transporting troops and missiles to Latvia
from Estonia, the Russian embassy and the Northwestern Group
of Forces leadership apologized, claiming that this was a "misunderstanding"
and that the Estonian authorities regretted that they had not
promptly informed Latvia of the Russian military's plans to send
the train. Minister of State Janis Dinevics said that a protest
note had been sent and that Latvia would seek a peaceful solution
to the incident. (Dzintra Bungs)

ESTONIAN OPPOSITION CALLS NEW GOVERNMENT NATIONALISTSOCIALIST.
Two opposition factions in the Estonian parliament are calling
the proposed ProPatriaModeratesENIP government "national socialist,"
BNS reports. The Coalition Party Alliance and the Rural Union
Alliance, which together formed the preelection coalition Secure
Home, circulated a statement criticizing the government program
approved on 20 October by the Riigikogu. The Secure Home coalition
is made up of former Savisaar government ministers and collective/state
farm directors. (Riina Kionka)


























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