We have to understand the world can only be grasped by action, not by comtemplation. The hand is more important than the eye....The hand is the cutting edge of the mind. - J. Bronowski
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 190, 04 October 1992



SUCCESSOR STATES OF THE USSR

UKRAINIAN PARLIAMENT VOTES OUT CABINET. The Ukrainian parliament
on 1 October overwhelmingly approved a motion of no confidence
in the cabinet of ministers, Western agencies reported. The decision
followed Prime Minister Vitold Fokin's request to step down as
head of government the day before. Ukrainian lawmakers gave President
Leonid Kravchuk ten days to appoint a new prime minister, who
then will work together with the President to form a new cabinet.
The fall of Fokin and his cabinet was the result of constant
charges by the opposition that the government was failing to
implement economic reforms in the country. (Roman Solchanyk)


KRAVCHUK VS CENTRALIZED CIS. Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk
told parliament on 30-September that Ukraine will never allow
itself to be subordinated to any kind of centralized CIS structures,
Ukrinform-TASS reported. Kravchuk said that these kinds of ideas
are currently being propagated, and that they are oblique references
to recent proposals for tighter CIS integration made by Kazakhstan
President Nursultan Nazarbaev. At the same time, Kravchuk emphasized
that as in the past, the closest possible ties will be maintained
with Russia. (Roman Solchanyk)

ADMIRAL KASATONOV REASSIGNED FROM BLACK SEA FLEET. Interfax on
1 October reported that the commander of the Black Sea Fleet,
Admiral Igor Kasatonov, has been reassigned to the position of
first deputy commander of the Russian Navy. The report indicated
that a Russian-Ukrainian group of officers would assume command
of the fleet in accord with a Russian-Ukrainian agreement to
place the fleet under joint command until the end of 1995. The
removal of Kasatonov had long been demanded by the Ukrainian
government, which recently accused him of illegally selling off
fleet assets to private concerns. (John Lepingwell)

RUSSIAN DEFENSE MINISTRY AFFIRMS KURIL WITHDRAWAL PLANS. Japan's
Kyodo news service reported on 30 September that the Russian
government has reaffirmed its commitment to withdraw all Russian
troops from the disputed Kuril islands. In a written reply to
a query from Kyodo, the Russian Defense Ministry stated that
the withdrawal, announced by President Yeltsin in May, will start
after "politicians' decisions." No timetable was given for the
withdrawal, although earlier Russian-Japanese talks had specified
a one to two year time period. The Russian Defense Ministry has
in the past opposed any such withdrawal. (John Lepingwell)

RUSSIAN SUBMARINE SALE TO IRAN STILL ON? A Russian submarine
is still sailing to Iran, the Washington Post reported on 2 October,
despite Russian indications that the submarine sale was cancelled.
The Post article indicated that the submarine was nearing the
English Channel en route to the Persian Gulf. In response to
the Russian sale, the US Senate on 1 October attached an amendment
to a foreign aid bill that would cut assistance to Russia if
it sells arms to Iran, Western news agencies reported. While
the final bill must still be coordinated with the House of Representatives,
the amendment was a sign of the seriousness with which the arms
sale was being viewed. (John Lepingwell)

CONTINUED STRIFE IN TAJIKISTAN. Fighting continued in southern
Tajikistan on 1 October, ITAR-TASS reported, and the Russian
division stationed there was taking additional measures to protect
its equipment, some of which supporters of deposed President
Rakhmon Nabiev have already stolen or otherwise acquired. Troops
of the Tajik Ministry of Internal Affairs and prison administrators
issued an ultimatum to the government and party leaders that
they will release the inmates of correctional institutions if
attacks on them are not stopped; armed groups have been raiding
prisons in order to obtain arms from the guards. Meanwhile, Russian
border guards reported more battles with persons seeking to cross
the Tajik-Afghan border illegally. (Bess Brown)

ABKHAZ FORCES LAUNCH NEW OFFENSIVE, TAKE STRATEGIC TOWN. A spokeswoman
for the Abkhaz Supreme Soviet told an RL/RFE correspondent in
Moscow on 1 October that the withdrawal from Abkhazia of volunteers
from the North Caucasus had been suspended because Georgian troops
were attempting to advance on Gudauta, where the Abkhaz leadership
is currently based. Abkhaz and North Caucasian troops subsequently
launched an attack on the coastal town of Kolkhida, ten kilometers
south of Gagra, using tanks and rocket launchers, and took the
town, inflicting heavy casualties on Georgian troops; they then
advanced towards Gagra. The Georgian State Council convened an
emergency session to discuss the situation. Whether State Council
Chairman Eduard Shevardnadze attended the session is unclear;
all scheduled sessions had been cancelled on 29 September because
Shevardnadze was sick, according to ITAR-TASS. (Liz Fuller)

RUBLE PLUNGES ON CURRENCY EXCHANGE. The ruble lost nearly 22%
of its value against the dollar in narrow trading on the Moscow
Interbank Currency Exchange on 1 October, Interfax reported.
The dollar rose from 254 rubles to 309 rubles. The fall in the
value of the ruble was generally attributed to fears of very
high inflation (an annual rate of over 2,000% is expected in
1992) or hyperinflation. Acting Russian Central Bank Chairman
Viktor Gerashchenko blamed the pending increase on the price
of energy-carriers. Government adviser Aleksei Ulyukayev promised
that the government would take unspecified joint measures with
the Russian Central Bank to stabilize the exchange rate of the
ruble, ITAR-TASS reported. And writing in Trud, Deputy Prime
Minister Vladimir Shumeiko called on the West to expedite the
$6 billion stabilization fund to "correct" the ruble exchange
rate. (Keith Bush)

RUSSIAN RUBLE TO BE INTRODUCED? The Acting Chairman of the Russian
Central Bank, Viktor Gerashchenko, told Interfax on 1 October
that while his bank favored the retention of the ruble zone,
Russia may have to introduce its own monetary and currency unit
if other CIS governments insist on pursuing different economic
policies and fail to agree upon and to coordinate policies. He
called for clear government agreements on the size of credit
emission in the ruble zone and on regulating credits provided
to importers of Russian goods. Many observers believe that the
ruble zone exists only on paper and that "Russian rubles" are
already distinct from "Moldovan rubles" or "Kazakh rubles." (Keith
Bush)

OTHER CURRENCY DEVELOPMENTS. Belarus replaced the ruble on 1
October with a special coupon system in areas near the Lithuanian
and Ukrainian borders, ITAR-TASS reported. A Belarusian National
Bank official explained that the move was made because the introduction
of non-ruble currencies in Lithuania and Ukraine could prompt
an unwanted influx of rubles into Belarus. Lithuania replaced
the ruble on 1 October with temporary coupons that will be used
until the new Lithuanian currency, the litas, is introduced,
Reuters reported. And Moldovan Economics Minister Sergiu Certan
was quoted by Interfax on 1 October as saying that it would be
a mistake to introduce a national currency now when Moldova is
in an economic crisis. (Keith Bush)

GORBACHEV ATTACKS YELTSIN. Former CPSU Secretary General Mikhail
Gorbachev told journalists that he is thinking about creating
his own political party as part of a political comeback, but
he added that the time for this was not yet right, Nezavisimaya
gazeta reported on 30 September. He called President Boris Yeltsin
"a loss," arguing that terrible mistakes had been committed in
foreign and economic policies. He said Yeltsin's privatization
plan was a "deception." He also criticized Yeltsin for not responding
to Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbaev's proposal for tighter
integration of CIS member states. Gorbachev recommended that
President Yeltsin and other Russian leaders welcome Gorbachev
advisors like Aleksandr Yakovlev into the inner circle of government
decision-makers. (Alexander Rahr)

FILATOV SUPPORTS YELTSIN. First deputy parliamentary speaker
Sergei Filatov has joined forces with the democrats and called
for an expansion of President Boris Yeltsin's executive powers.
In an interview with Stolitsa (no. 38) he warned that parliamentary
speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov is violating the constitution and
seeking to create an administrative-command system in parliament,
thereby restricting the rights of the deputies. He argued that
the president should be given the right to dissolve at least
part of the legislature, since parliament has the right to impeach
the president. He noted that at the moment, the balance of power
in Russia is distorted to the disadvantage of the executive branch.
(Alexander Rahr)

RYZHKOV TESTIFIES AT THE CPSU TRIAL. Speaking at the CPSU hearing
in the Constitutional Court on 1 October, former USSR Prime Minister
Nikolai Ryzhkov denied receiving instructions from the Communist
Party leadership, Russian TV reported. Since the abrogation of
the provision in the Soviet Constitution on the leading role
of the Communist Party, Ryzhkov said that he answered only to
the USSR President and his Presidential Council. However, Ryzhkov
said that Gorbachev, who had combined the post of the CPSU General
Secretary with that of the President, had often mixed up these
two roles. Ryzhkov denied that the CPSU was the sole cause of
the country's crisis. He said that immediately following the
election of Boris Yeltsin to be Speaker of the Russian parliament
in 1990, the CPSU in fact ceased to be the governing party, since
its largest component, the Russian communists, became an opposition
movement and could not act in the party's traditional manner.
Ryzhkov also denied any wrongdoings by his government during
the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986. (Julia Wishnevsky)

TWO CHERNOBYL REACTORS TO BE RESTARTED? The director of the Chernobyl
nuclear energy station told Reuters on 1 October that two of
the station's four reactors will be restarted soon. The No. 3
reactor will be restarted in October and the No. 1 in November
to meet increased demands for electric power in winter. Official
pronouncements on whether the Chernobyl reactors will be recommissioned
have been inconsistent and contradictory. The current intention
appears to be that all power generation at the Chernobyl station
shall be halted at the end of 1993 (see The Guardian, of 10 September).
(Keith-Bush)

KGB EXTERNAL SURVEILLANCE CODE MADE PUBLIC. The voice of the
right nationalist opposition, Den, (Numbers 37-39) has published
the complete instructions of secret surveillance methods employed
by the former KGB. The document describes the techniques and
equipment used by the KGB in overt and covert monitoring of its
victims and opponents. The weekly obtained the instructions from
former KGB officers, which left the agency because of "chaos
and uncertainty prevailing in the present state security organs."
Giving its own reason for the publication, Den wrote that the
instructions can be used in support of the so-called "patriotic
resistance" and underground activities in case pro-Western forces
attempt to impose a direct dictatorship". (Victor Yasmann)

SENATE RATIFIES START TREATY. On 1 October the US Senate ratified
the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) which calls for Russian
strategic to be reduced to approximately 6000 nuclear warheads,
Western news agencies reported. The agreement must still be ratified
by Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. Kazakhstan has ratified the
Lisbon protocol, which commits the former Soviet republics to
observe the treaty. A second US-Russian agreement to reduce Russian
warhead levels to approximately 3,000 by the year 2003 has not
yet been formalized as a treaty. (John Lepingwell)

UKRAINE PLANS TO RATIFY START TREATY. In Washington on 1 October,
Ukrainian Foreign Minister Anatoly Zlenko said he hoped that
Ukraine would ratify the START treaty but noted that there were
many opponents of ratification. Zlenko also met with U.S. Secretary
of Defense Richard Cheney to seek US assistance in dismantling
ex-Soviet nuclear weapons in Ukraine, according to RFE/RL correspondents'
reports. (John Lepingwell)

MILLENNIUM OF CHRISTIANITY IN BELARUS. The Belarusian Orthodox
church,the largest in the republic,is concluding celebrations
of its thousand year anniversary in Belarus, Radio Minsk reported
on 29 September. In addition to special church services, an international
conference in the Academy of Sciences was held, as well as a
festive gathering in Minsk attended by state leaders. Speaking
to journalists, Belarusian Metropolitan Filaret rejected accusations
that the church is an instrument of Russian imperialism, arguing
that priests are now encouraged to use the Belarusian language
in sermons. However, the Belarusian eparchy is still a part of
the Moscow Patriarchate.(Alexander Lukashuk)

ROMANIAN, MOLDOVAN PRESIDENTS ON MOLDOVAN STATEHOOD. Challenged
by an interviewer to speak out for the unification of Romania
and Moldova, Romanian President Ion Iliescu told ECO Magazin
(see the September-October 1992 issue ) that pro-unification
propaganda in Romania "has backfired in Moldova, and not just
among the Russian-speakers but among the Romanian Moldovans themselves.
During the last two years one has witnessed there a movement
away from unification...The [Moldovan] people's reservations
on the issue of unification have grown." Moldovan President Mircea
Snegur in turn told visiting Hungarian journalists on 30 September,
as cited by Moldovapres, that "Moldova's independence is the
choice of its people and no one has the right to conduct a policy
opposing that choice...The existence of a Moldovan independent
state is in the interest of all its neighbors, including Romania.
(Vladimir Socor)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

CZECHOSLOVAK PARLIAMENT REJECTS LAW ON MODES OF SPLIT-.-.-. On
1 October the Czechoslovak Federal Assembly failed to pass a
law on the modes of dividing the country. CSTK reports that in
each chamber of the parliament the measure fell just short of
the required three-fifths majority. The law would have allowed
the federation to be dissolved without a referendum, which would
represent only one four possible courses; the others would be
a Federal Assembly declaration, an agreement by the republican
parliaments, or unilateral declaration by one of the republics.
Currently, secession by one republic based on the results of
referendum held in that republic is the only "constitutional"
way of dissolving the country. (Jiri Pehe)

. . . AND ADOPTS RESOLUTION ON UNION. The Federal Assembly approved
a resolution calling for legislation to create a "Czech-Slovak
Union," which would replace the current federation. The resolution
proposes a union consisting of a president, legislature, and
governing council. The resolution was approved when deputies
representing Vladimir Meciar's Movement for a Democratic Slovakia
banded together with opposition parties in voting for the resolution.
Czech Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus opposes the idea of the union.
CSTK reports him as saying that the union "is not in the interest
of the citizens of the Czech Republic, and we will not create
it by any means." Klaus also sharply criticized the Movement
for a Democratic Slovakia for supporting the resolution. (Jiri
Pehe)

ETHNIC CLEANSING CONTINUES APACE IN BOSNIA. The 2 October New
York Times reports at length on the ethnic cleansing of some
Muslim neighborhoods in central Sarajevo by Serb militants under
the paramilitary leader known as Arkan. Their actions are in
violation of pledges made by Serbian leaders at the London Conference
in late August to halt the practice. The Washington Post adds
that detention camps continue to operate despite similar promises
by the Serbs to close them, although 1,500 Muslims were taken
by 35 buses from the Trnopolje camp to Croatia on 1 October,
the first such evacuation of inmates. Some of these refugees
told reporters about massacres at the camp, including one of
125 Muslim men between 14 and 40 from the village of Hambarina
near Prijedor in northwest Bosnia. Trnopolje has since been turned
into "a kind of gruesome sanitized tourist attraction" for foreign
visitors, but experts know of at least 21 other camps and suspect
that many more exist unknown to the outside world. (Patrick Moore)


SITUATION TENSE IN EASTERN CROATIA. A Russian colonel serving
with UNPROFOR in Sector East near Osijek, Croatia, persuaded
some 1,000 refugees not to continue a march to reclaim their
homes in what is now Serb-held territory. Croatian politicians
and the media have widely accused UNPROFOR, which they expected
to return Serb-held areas to Croatian control, of helping to
consolidate the Serbs' hold there instead. Osijek's outspoken
mayor Branimir Glavas told Reuters that "patience is at an end."
Meanwhile, international media said on 30 September that UN Secretary-General
Boutros Boutros-Ghali warned in a report that ghting could resume
in Sector East, given the determination of the Croats and the
presence of lawless armed bands of Serb militias, estimated at
16,000 men. One UN official called the situation "profoundly
insecure." (Patrick Moore)

PANIC RETURNS TO BELGRADE AFTER US VISIT. Milan Panic, Prime
Minister of the rump Yugoslavia, told reporters in Belgrade on
30 September that his trip to the US was "incredibly successful."
He said the US was supportive of his peace efforts and that his
request for oil imports for humanitarian purposes would be met
on time, i.e. before the winter. Panic described the Tudjman-Cosic
talks in Geneva, as positive and expressed hope that their agreement
will ease the way to a final peace agreement with Croatia. Regarding
Kosovo, Panic said Pristina University must be opened to the
Albanians and that a solution must be found to reinstate "the
several hundred professors" who were dismissed by Serbian authorities.
Panic also reiterated his call for democratic elections and a
free press. He proposed the "division" of Serbian TV, with its
first channel presenting the views of the federal government
and the second channel those of the Serbian government. Over
the past three years, Serbian opposition parties have waged an
intense struggle against the Socialist domination of TV editorial
policies. Radio Serbia reported Panic's remarks. (Milan Andrejevich)


ROMANIA'S OPPOSITION CHARGES ELECTORAL FRAUD. The Democratic
Convention , an alliance of 18 centrist parties and organizations,
stated on 1-October that it had "irrefutable proof" of manipulation
of election results in at least one county-Dolj. The DC said
it would ask prosecutors to annul the election and order a new
vote there. Rompres quoted other instances of possible fraud
from the Prahova and Dimbovita counties, where electoral officers
had reportedly campaigned in the polling stations and spoiled
ballots vanished before they could be verified. Meanwhile, the
DC launched a drive to win the rural vote for Emil Constantinescu,
its candidate in the 11-October presidential runoff. (Dan Ionescu)


ROMANIA REACTS TO MFN VOTE. President Ion Iliescu expressed bitterness
over the vote in the US House of Representatives against restoration
of most-favored-nation trade status for Romania. Radio Bucharest
quoted him as saying that the decision "protracts the discrimination
to which Romania is unfairly subjected." Iliescu accused Hungarian-born
US Congressman Tom Lantos of having "misinformed" the House on
the situation in Romania. In a separate statement, the Foreign
Ministry said that the House vote demonstrates both "a lack of
understanding" for the changes in Romania and the "virulence
of the anti-Romanian lobby in the US." (Dan Ionescu)

PRESSURE INCREASING ON BULGARIAN GOVERNMENT. Osman Oktay, Secretary
of the Movement for Rights and Freedoms (MRF), said in an interview
with RFE/RL on 1 October that his party is considering lodging
a vote of no confidence against the UDF minority government next
week. According to Oktay, the UDF should initiate a "joint analysis"
of the present political situation with the MRF or risk standing
alone in parliament. He also warned that the MRF has lost confidence
in Prime Minister Filip Dimitrov. Meanwhile, President Zhelyu
Zhelev told RFE/RL that the UDF cabinet under Dimitrov has gradually
been isolating itself in Bulgarian politics. (Kjell Engelbrekt)


OECD RECOMMENDS DEBT REDUCTION FOR BULGARIA. In a report released
in Paris on 2 October, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation
and Development suggests that Bulgaria be offered a "substantial
cut" in both its principal foreign debt and interest burden,
Western agencies report. Without debt reduction, the report argues,
Bulgaria can neither expect a significant inflow of foreign capital,
nor will it be able to consolidate its economic achievements
and speed up structural reforms. After a vote passed by the National
Assembly last Friday, Bulgaria will be paying some 25% of the
interest due for the last six months of 1992. (Kjell Engelbrekt)


HUNGARIAN PROSECUTOR REFUSES TO INVESTIGATE 1956 KILLINGS. The
head of the Military Prosecutor's Office in Gyor, Gyula Varadi,
says that the killings did not constitute war crimes and after
15-years, in 1971, fell under the statute of limitations. Members
of the Christian Democratic People's Party initiated proceedings
against those who ordered soldiers to fire into a crowd at Mosonmagyarovar
during the 1956 revolution. Some 100 died and 200-were injured.
A CDPP representative says that he will appeal the decision.
Defense Minister Lajos Fur commented that the killings should
be considered war crimes and called it "unacceptable to close
a case involving mass murder even if it took place 36 years ago,"
MTI reported on 1 October. (Edith Oltay)

WALESA VISITS FSM PLANT. Polish President Lech Walesa visited
the headquarters of the plant in Bielsko-Biala on 1 October.
Walesa said he is fulfilling an election campaign pledge to help
solve economic problems. He urged workers to take responsibility
for their own fate. Citing unofficial sources, Polish TV reported
that the president made Fiat's initiation of its formal takeover
of the plant a condition of his visit. The final agreement between
Poland and Fiat is now prepared, the TV report said, and will
be signed in a few days, to take effect on 1 October. PAP reports
that the plant's enormous debts were the sticking point in talks
with Fiat, and that the state treasury has stepped in to guarantee
nearly 2.5 trillion zloty ($180 million) in debts. (Louisa Vinton)


SEJM GRUDGINGLY APPROVES BIELECKI'S PERFORMANCE. By a margin
of 181 to 167 (25-abstentions), the Polish Sejm voted on 2 October
to accept the performance of Prime Minister Jan Krzysztof Bielecki's
government, which left office nearly a year ago. The vote had
no legal implications, but offered an occasion for a test of
strength between the opposition and the current government. Bielecki
and two of his ministers now sit on the cabinet. The Sejm budget
commission had recommended a disapproval vote, charging that
Bielecki had caused a "collapse of public finances." Bielecki
argued that no one could accuse him of shirking decisions and
that a budget deficit of under 4% of GDP was hardly a catastrophe.
The Center Alliance, which has been balancing between government
and opposition, supported Bielecki, a move that may signal readiness
to join the ruling coalition. (Louisa Vinton)

ABISALA ON POLISH-LITHUANIAN RELATIONS. At a press conference
on 1 October Lithuanian Prime Minister Aleksandras Abisala said
that results of his recent trip to Poland were better than he
expected, BNS reports. The talks were "correct, open, and friendly,"
and for the first time the problems of Lithuanians in Poland
were discussed at a high level raising hopes that more attention
will be paid to them. Polish Internal Affairs Minister Andrzej
Milczanowski will visit Lithuania on 2 October. He noted that
the ministries of justice should speed up the preparation of
an agreement on legal assistance and that a planned visit by
Polish businessmen should improve economic and trade cooperation.
(Saulius Girnius)

COUNCIL OF EUROPE CRITICIZES ESTONIA. Members of the Council
of Europe's Parliamentary Assembly have criticized Estonia for
not having allowed noncitizens to vote in the national elections.
According to Estonian delegation member and former deputy speaker
of the Estonian Supreme Council Marju Lauristin, quoted by BNS
on 1 October, even the conservatives "attacked us very sharply.
The psychological attack against Estonia has proved fruitful."
The Council of Europe delegation that monitored last week's election
has not yet filed its official report. (Riina Kionka)

RUSSIA DENIES ANTI-BALT CAMPAIGN. Foreign Ministry spokesman
Sergei Yastrzhembsky told BNS on 1 October that reports of an
aggressive anti-Baltic Russian diplomatic campaign in the spirit
of the Cold War are unfounded. "Such a campaign is just out of
the question," Yastrzhembsky said, adding that the Baltic response
to Russia's concern over the plight of Russians living in the
Baltic "reminds me of the former Soviet Union's reaction to criticism
for its violations of human rights." Earlier this week, Yastrzhembsky
said that the way Estonia and Latvia are currently treating non-Balts
could lead to a policy of "ethnic cleansing" along Serbian lines.
(Riina Kionka)

LATVIAN REPLY TO MAYOROV. In response to the protest note of
Col. Gen. Leonid Mayorov, commander of the Northwestern Group
of Forces, concerning Latvia's efforts to monitor the movements
of Russian military personnel in Riga and Jurmala, the Foreign
Ministry expressed regret about the inconvenience caused to R-Adm.
Shestakov when he was briefly detained and asked to show his
documents. The ministry pointed out that the guardsmen were acting
on valid instructions and said that monitoring would continue.
The incident occurred during the latest round of Latvian-Russian
talks on troop withdrawal in which Shestakov participated, local
media reported on 30 September. (Dzintra Bungs)

NATO NAVAL DELEGATION IN LATVIA. On 1-October eight ships from
five NATO member states arrived in Riga for a five-day visit.
During their stay, members of the NATO delegation are to get
acquainted with Latvia's defense and security situation, including
the problems resulting from the continued presence of Russian
naval forces. The arrival coincided with a conference on Latvia's
defense policies, plans, training facilities, and future plans
for foreign diplomats and specialists held by Latvia's Ministry
of Defense. (Dzintra Bungs)

FUTURE OF "NORTHERN TOWN" IN VILNIUS. The city government is
engaged in discussions on the future of Vilnius's so-called Northern
Town, 60 hectares of land now housing the 107th Motorized Rifle
Division of the Russian army, BNS reported on 1-October. According
to the 8 September agreement on troop withdrawal, the Russian
troops should depart from the territory by 30 November. All fences,
barracks, garages, and other worthless structures will be demolished
and replaced by a modern social and commercial center with offices,
conference halls, hotels, and restaurants. Since Lithuanian firms
will be unable to build everything on such a huge territory,
foreign investment is being sought. Depending on the pace of
foreign investment, the project should begin in 1993. (Saulius
Girnius)

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Hal Kosiba & Charles Trumbull


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

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