There is always one moment in childhood when the door opens and lets the future in. - Graham Greene
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 162, 25 August 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

SHEVARDNADZE ON ABKHAZIA, ELECTIONS. In a radio address on 24
August, Georgian State Council Chairman Eduard Shevardnadze reiterated
that negotiations with the Abkhaz leadership can begin only after
the withdrawal from Georgian territory of irregular military
units subordinate to the Confederation of Caucasian Mountain
Peoples, Interfax reported. Shevardnadze said that according
to unconfirmed reports, up to 500 such volunteers had gathered
in the Abkhaz coastal town of Gudauta to which parliament chairman
Vladislav Ardzinba fled on 18 August. Shevardnadze hinted that
further destabilization of the situation in Georgia could lead
to postponement of the parliamentary elections scheduled for
11 October, in which he is considering standing as a candidate
for the Mshvidoba (Peace) bloc. An apartment in Tbilisi adjacent
to that belonging to Georgian Defense Minister Tengiz Kitovani
was seriously damaged by an anti-tank missile on 24 August, according
to ITAR-TASS quoting Tbilisi police sources. (Liz Fuller)

YELTSIN TO INTERVENE IN ABKHAZ CONFLICT. Russian President Boris
Yeltsin told the Russian Security Council on 24 August that he
will take steps to end the Abkhaz conflict, and called on all
parties involved to open negotiations, ITAR-TASS reported. The
Security Council drew up unspecified measures aimed at stabilizing
the situation, and decided to send Russian State Secretary Gennadii
Burbulis to Sukhumi immediately, according to Radio Moscow. Burbulis
was scheduled to begin a four-day official visit to Turkey on
25 August. In a subsequent telephone conversation with Shevardnadze,
Yeltsin condemned the threatened military intervention by North
Caucasian irregulars, Interfax reported. (Liz Fuller)

RUSSIA SEEKS DEBT RESCHEDULING. Russian Deputy Prime Minister
Aleksandr Shokhin implied on 24 August that Russia will seek
the deferral of its foreign debt servicing at the weekend meeting
with G-7 representatives, Interfax reported. Shokhin was addressing
a meeting of government and local administration officials in
Moscow. He was quoted as saying that, even after the rescheduling
already granted in 1992, the servicing due this year is two to
three times higher than hard currency earnings anticipated from
Russia's exports. Russia's total hard-currency debt at mid-1992
was recently estimated to be about $74 billion. Principal and
interest payments originally due in 1992 were believed to amount
to some $20 billion. (Keith Bush)

RUSSIAN GRAIN RESERVE ESTABLISHED. President Yeltsin has signed
a decree establishing a federal grain reserve, Interfax reported
on 24 August. Grain for the reserve will be purchased from within
Russia, from the CIS nations, and from abroad. It is intended
to combat grain speculation and to improve the supply of grain
to those regions of Russia that cannot supply themselves, as
well as Moscow and St. Petersburg. It was not made clear how
this new reserve will differ from the state reserves that existed
throughout most of the existence of the USSR. (Keith Bush)

GAIDAR ON OIL PRICE INCREASES. Acting Russian Prime Minister
Egor Gaidar told Interfax on 24 August that wholesale prices
for fuel would not be liberated this year. He declined to disclose
when and by how much fuel prices would be raised as "advance
disclosure of price increases, in particular for oil, will cause
speculation and the subsequent disappearance of oil products."
There has recently been some confusion and imprecision concerning
Russian fuel price increases. The declared strategy of the Gaidar
administration is to continue to regulate the prices of energy-carriers
but gradually to raise these to world levels during the next
two to three years. (Keith Bush)

KHASBULATOV CONTRA YELTSIN. The chairman of the Russian parliament,
Ruslan Khasbulatov, has openly rejected conditions set by the
International Monetary Fund for Russia. ITAR-TASS on 21 August
quoted him as saying that the IMF's policy was "in principle
unaccaptable" for Russia and that Russian President Boris Yeltsin
now also understands that. He stated that the present government
has forced the IMF program on Yeltsin. He criticized parliament
for having granted Yeltsin too much power. In another statement,
broadcast by Radio Rossii on 22 August, Khasbulatov said that
during the days of the putsch, Yeltsin had at one time considered
moving from the "White House" to the nearby US Embassy, and that
he [Khasbulatov] was the one who convinced Yeltsin not to leave.
(Alexander Rahr)

BOOK SAYS COUP BROUGHT LOSS OF CONTROL OVER NUCLEAR WEAPONS.
A new book, authored by Russian Procurator Valentin Stepankov
and his assistant, Evgenii Lisov, claims that former Soviet President
Mikhail Gorbachev lost control over launch codes for Soviet nuclear
weapons during the failed August coup. The New York Times and
The Washington Post on 23 August cited excerpts from the book
which were published in Nezavisimaya gazeta. Stepankov and Lisov
also said that communications to Gorbachev's Crimean villa and
to the nuclear command center in Moscow were cut on 18 August,
and they asserted that it would have been possible for Soviet
commanders to have launched nuclear weapons without the president's
approval. (Stephen Foye)

KIEV'S INTELLIGENCE SCRUTINIZES GORBACHEV'S ROLE IN COUP. According
to the chief of the intelligence directorate of the Ukrainian
State Security Service, Georgii Kovtun, Mikhail Gorbachev was
not isolated at his dacha in Foros during last year's attempted
coup, Radio Rossii reported on 20 August. Kovtun based this statement
on information he obtained during an inspection visit of the
former KGB border guards in Crimea, who are now under the command
of the Ukrainian State Security Service. According to the guards
who were protecting Gorbachev during the coup, the former general
secretary CPSU enjoyed himself swimming and playing with his
granddaughter. Moreover, dozens of visitors entered Gorbachev's
dacha without restriction. (Victor Yasmann)

RUSSIAN/CHINESE MILITARY COOPERATION. Russian Defense Minister,
General Pavel Grachev will meet with his Chinese counterpart
on 25 August. He told ITAR-TASS on 24 August that the most promising
areas for military cooperation between the two countries were
bilateral arms reductions along their mutual border and technical
cooperation, particularly Russian arms sales to China. (Doug
Clarke)

MORE ON RUSSIAN NAVAL APPOINTMENT. Quoting a Russian Naval spokesman,
Western agencies reported on 24 August that Admiral Feliks Gromov,
who was recently named commander of the Russian Navy, will have
jurisdiction over Russia's Baltic, Pacific, and Northern Fleets,
and will share control over the Black Sea Fleet with Ukraine.
Gromov thus effectively replaces Admiral Vladimir Chernavin,
who had been serving as commander in chief of CIS Naval Forces.
Chernavin had adopted a highly confrontational style in negotiations
with Ukraine over the Black Sea Fleet, and his removal suggests
that Yeltsin may be trying to ease the way toward better relations
with Kiev. According to the reports, Chernavin has been appointed
by Yeltsin to head a commission tasked with preparing for the
300th anniversary celebration of the Russian Navy, a clear downgrading
of his status. (Stephen Foye)

ZIL PRIVATIZES. The workers' collective of the Likhachev automobile
works (ZIL) decided on 21 August to turn the factory into an
open joint stock company, Interfax reported. They chose the option
whereby 25% of nonvoting shares will be issued free to employees,
10% of voting shares will be sold to the workforce at a discount
of 30% on the nominal price of 1,000 rubles, and 5% will be sold
at full nominal price to the executives. A further 10% of ZIL
stock will be withheld from the market and reserved for foreign
investors. Many of the 108,000 ZIL workers are expected to use
their 10,000-ruble privatization vouchers to buy stock in their
factory. (Keith Bush)

UKRAINIANS CELEBRATE ONE YEAR OF INDEPENDENCE. Several days of
celebrations of the first anniversary of the declaration of Ukraine's
independence culminated on 24 August--the actual anniversary--with
parades, rallies, cultural exhibitions and musical performances
throughout the country. In Kiev, prayers for the newly independent
state were led in the 11th century cathedral of St. Sophia by
94-year-old Ukrainian Orthodox Patriarch Mstyslav, who as a young
Ukrainian soldier had witnessed the proclamation of Ukraine's
short-lived independence in 1918. Among other highlights were
the reopening after 175 years of the celebrated Kievan Mohyla
Academy, a parade in the Ukrainian capital by the the newly formed
Ukrainian National Guard and an open air rally. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


KRAVCHUK ON THE CIS AND RELATIONS WITH RUSSIA. In connection
with the independence anniversary celebrations, Ukrainian President
Leonid Kravchuk was interviewed live from Kiev on August 24 by
Russia's Radio Mayak. According to ITAR-TASS, Kravchuk maintained
that the main element in relations between members of the CIS
are the bilateral economic agreements between the individual
states. He said that he forsaw a process of integration proceeding
along the lines of the European Community. Interestingly, in
his speeches given during the anniversary celebrations, Kravchuk
refrained from criticizing Russia, though on the other hand he
did not seem to attach much significance to the CIS. (Bohdan
Nahaylo).

MOSCOW PATRIARCH PROTESTS TO KRAVCHUK. On 22 August, the Kiev
Russian-language newspaper Nezavisimost published a letter from
the Moscow Patriarch Alexii to Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk
expressing his concern about the religious conflict which has
arisen in Ukraine after the recent split of the Ukrainian Orthodox
Church into pro-independence and pro-Moscow camps. The former
head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan Filaret of
Kiev, has joined with leaders of the independent, and formerly
banned, Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church to form the Ukrainian
Orthodox Church of the Kievan Patriarchate, headed by Patriarch
Mstyslav; it is opposed by Metropolitan Volodymyr, who heads
the hierachy which has remained loyal to Moscow. A struggle over
church property and other issues has ensued. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


KAZAKHSTAN OPPOSITION SEEKS TO DEFEND JOURNALIST. The independent
Alma-Ata news agency Birlesu reported on 23 August that 20 of
Kazakhstan's political groups, including at least three with
primarily Russian membership but not the Kazakh nationalist Azat
Movement, have created a committee to defend the publicist Karishal
Asanov, who was arrested on 19 August on charges of repeatedly
slandering the president of the republic. The defense committee
is headed by the secretary of the Alma-Ata Helsinki group, Zhemis
Turmagambetova. Asanov has been unable to find a lawyer, because
local lawyers are unwilling to defend him. The case is another
indication of a hardening attitude on the part of President Nursultan
Nazarbaev's government toward the opposition, both Kazakh and
Russian. (Bess Brown)

TAJIKISTAN'S STATE PROSECUTOR KILLED. Tajikistan's State Prosecutor
Nurullo Khuvaidullaev and his chauffeur were killed by unidentified
gunmen in Dushanbe on 24 August, ITAR-TASS and Western agencies
reported. The attackers escaped in Khuvaidullaev's car. According
to ITAR-TASS, investigators said that there had been earlier
attempts on Khuvaidullaev's life, and in June unidentified persons
had broken into his office and demanded that he drop a bribery
case against the former mayor of Dushanbe, opposition sympathizer
Maksud Ikramov. Khuvaidullaev's connection to the Ikramov case
suggests that his murderers may be associated with the opposition,
which has been provoked in recent weeks by conservative President
Rakhmon Nabiev's attempts to remove opposition sympathizers from
the National Security State and Defense Committees. (Bess Brown)


CONFERENCE OF RUSSIAN GERMANS' "WIEDERGEBURT" SOCIETY. On 23
August a two-day conference of the Russian Germans' "Wiedergeburt"
society, the more radical of the two German organizations, ended
in Moscow with a compromise on the issue of emigration versus
recreation of the Volga-German republic, ITAR-TASS and Western
agencies reported. The chairman, Heinrich Groth, had proposed
that priority be given to emigration to Germany and that the
question of the restoration of the Volga-German republic be regarded
as dead, but delegates refused to abandon the slogan of recreating
the republic, which Russia has promised to do in stages. The
conference statement demanded full rehabilitation with material
compensation from Russia, and dual Russian and German citizenship.
(Ann Sheehy)

MOLDOVA GETS ANOTHER GAGAUZ WARNING. Delegates of the "Gagauz
republic" and "Dniester republic" have signed in the Gagauz administrative
center, Comrat, an "agreement of friendship and mutual assistance,
including military," whereby the Gagauz would support the "Dniester"
side if hostilities resume in eastern Moldova, Izvestiya reported
on 21 August. Although the Gagauz signatories were not identified,
it seems clear that they belong to the minority hardline faction
which has been defeated by Gagauz democrats in local elections
earlier this year but retains control of the "Gagauz defense
detachments." That faction has previously threatened to open
a second front against Moldova and has ambushed Moldovan security
patrols, killing some officers and turning some of the captives
over to Tiraspol. The "Dniester Republic's" decision to conclude
this agreement with the Gagauz is the latest in a series of moves
to strengthen its military potential during the current cease
fire. (Vladimir Socor)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

WESTERN ALLIES TO RULE OUT GULF-TYPE COALITION FOR BOSNIA? The
25 August Washington Post says that the US, Britain, and France
"have decided to abandon temporarily plans" for a coalition effort
to ensure humanitarian aid deliveries to Bosnia, and will back
a UN-sponsored approach instead. To date, few countries have
been willing to pledge troops for any Bosnian operation, even
for one under UN auspices and limited to the protection of aid
shipments. Meanwhile at the two-day UN General Assembly session
on the Bosnian crisis, the VOA on 24 August quoted Slovenia's
foreign minister as saying that the Serbian policy of "ethnic
cleansing" must be stopped. (Patrick Moore)

GROWING CONSENSUS FOR MAINTAINING A UNIFIED BOSNIAN STATE? The
25 August New York Times sees London and Paris drawing away from
the policy of dividing Bosnia and Herzegovina into ethnic cantons,
which is backed by most Serbs and many Croats. The paper says
the two key Western allies are moving closer to the American
and Bosnian governments' view that undermining Bosnia's unity
"would reward Serbian aggression and send the wrong message to
other armed ethnic groups across Europe and Asia." In Zagreb,
meanwhile, news agencies on 24 August quoted Bosnian President
Alija Izetbegovic as repeating his call for restructuring his
republic's government to include a balance of Muslims, Serbs,
and Croats, and for setting up a human rights' commission as
a watchdog. Most Serbs left the Bosnian government in opposition
to its moves toward independence in the spring. (Patrick Moore)


MAZOWIECKI DENIED ACCESS TO SERBIAN CAMP. The 25 August Washington
Post said that a UN Human Rights Commission team led by former
Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki was denied access the
previous day to the Serbian-run camp at Manjaca near Banja Luka.
Mazowiecki said: "The people who tried to harass us did themselves
a disservice because they showed their true face. Whatever they
were trying to cover up, they revealed to us." (Patrick Moore)


SANCTIONS REDUCE SERBIAN ECONOMY TO STATE OF VEGETATION' On 24
August the Belgrade daily Vecernje novosti stated that the United
Nations sanctions against Serbia and Montenegro imposed nearly
three months ago, have reduced the country's economy to a "state
of vegetation." According to a survey conducted by the Belgrade
Institute for Market Research, there is not a single company
in Serbia and Montenegro which does not project it will be without
any export orders in the next three months. The daily goes on
to say that even if the blockade were lifted now, exports would
continue to fall to around 40 percent below last year's level.
If the sanctions continue until the end of the year, exports
will be 70 to 80 percent lower than in 1991. Many firms have
completely or partially lost business and nearly 1,000,000 workers
stand to lose their jobs by the end of year because of the sanctions,
according to the survey. (Milan Andrejevich)

MECIAR REFUSES TO CONTINUE TALKS ON SPLIT. Czech Prime Minister
Vaclav Klaus announced to CSTK on 24 August that Slovak Premier
Vladimir Meciar had refused to participate in the talks on Czechoslovakia's
future scheduled for 27 August between his Movement for a Democratic
Slovakia and Klaus's Civic Democratic Party (ODS). The meeting
should have been the sixth in a series held since the 6 June
elections. The 27 August session was to discuss joint action
to prevent the deadlock of the Federal Parliament, fulfillment
of the 23 July political agreement between the two parties, and
the clarification of the first draft of legislation on the termination
of the federation. Meciar sent Klaus a letter on 21 August cancelling
the meeting; he cited the ODS's failure to fulfill the 23 July
political agreement between the two republics. (Paulina Bren)


KLAUS URGES MEETING TO PROCEED. On 24 August CSTK made public
the text of a letter sent that day by Czech Prime Minister Vaclav
Klaus to Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar. Klaus urged Meciar
to continue in talks on the future of Czechoslovakia, saying
that Meciar should not use marginal issues to derail the talks.
Meciar demanded, among other things, an apology for statements
made by members of Klaus' Civic Democratic Party, suggesting
that Meciar's Movement for a Democratic Slovakia was attempting
to orchestrate a political left-wing putsch. Speaking to reporters
in Prague, Klaus said that "an apology was out of question."
(Paulina Bren)

ROMANIAN OPPOSITION LEADER REGISTERS AS PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE.
Emil Constantinescu, who will run on behalf of Romania's Democratic
Convention in the forthcoming presidential race, officially registered
his candidacy with the Central Electoral Bureau on 24 August.
In an interview with Radio Bucharest Constantinescu, who is a
geology professor and rector of Bucharest University, appealed
to his fellow intellectuals to actively engage in politics. He
described the current electoral campaign as "a struggle between
the past and the future." The Democratic Convention is an alliance
of Romania's main opposition forces. It includes 18 parties and
organizations. (Dan Ionescu)

WARSAW PROTESTS GERMAN EXTRADITION. On instructions from Prime
Minister Hanna Suchocka, Poland's foreign ministry summoned German
ambassador Franz Bertele on 24 August to issue a "forceful protest"
against Germany's decision to extradite four Poles to the US.
Six Poles were arrested in Frankfurt on 10 March and charged
with illegal arms trade. Unofficial reports quoted by Polish
TV said that the six were accused of attempting to export 105,000
Kalashnikovs, 5,000 grenade launchers, 1,000 missiles, and two
MiG fighter planes to Iraq. The Polish government insists the
six violated no Polish or German law. The Polish foreign ministry
expressed "surprise and astonishment" at Germany's decision,
especially as Polish Foreign Minister Krzysztof Skubiszewski
made a personal appeal to his German counterpart, Klaus Kinkel,
to extradite the Poles to Poland. The foreign ministry statement
noted that one of the Poles, the deputy director of the Lucznik
plant in Radom, had been engaged in a legal search for export
prospects. (Louisa Vinton)

MORE AUTHORITY FOR ESTONIAN DEFENSE MINISTRY. The government
decided on 24 August to widen the authority of Estonia's defense
ministry with respect to troop withdrawal questions, BNS reports.
The ministry will reportedly have more say in negotiations, and
will be able to determine the logistics of the withdrawal. Questions
related to former Soviet military real estate have also been
handed over to the defense ministry. (Riina Kionka)

WARSAW'S URSUS ON STRIKE. The 7,000 workers at the Ursus tractor
factory near Warsaw went on strike on 24 August. The strike committee
is demanding wages equal to the national average, debt relief
for the firm, an effective restructuring plan, and credits to
enable farmers to purchase Ursus tractors. Solidarity's radical
Mazowsze region announced its support for the strike. At the
brink of insolvency in summer 1991, Ursus was the beneficiary
of a spectacular government bailout and intensive restructuring
efforts. The government's press office on 24 August rejected
the strikers' charges of official inaction and argued that the
efforts undertaken in 1991 had saved Ursus from bankruptcy. (Louisa
Vinton)

SHOWDOWN AT FSM AUTO PLANT. The directors of the FSM auto plant
in Tychy on 24 August began an attempt to wear down the participants
in the month-old illegal strike there. About 2,000 employees
willing to return to work responded to management's call to convene
at the factory's gates. The strikers, who number from 2,000-3,800,
refused to admit anyone into the plant, and attempted to drown
out the proceedings with loudspeakers. FSM's director said similar
assemblies will be held every morning until non-strikers are
permitted to take up their tools. Elsewhere, only a single Silesian
mine (Rozbark) remains on strike, but one miners' union is attempting
to form strike committees in seven new mines. Deputy prime minister
Henryk Goryszewski ordered an official investigation into how
indebted coal mines behind on their taxes could afford the wage
increases granted in July and August. (Louisa Vinton)

STOLOJAN DISCUSSES SUBSIDY CUTS WITH POLITICAL LEADERS. On 24
August Prime Minister Theodor Stolojan met with leaders of Romania's
main political parties. According to Radio Bucharest, the meeting
focused on cuts in subsidies for food and energy, planned for
1 September. Though all participants agreed that subsidies should
be gradually eliminated, most of them objected to the timing
of the next round of cuts. They said that the move would seriously
influence the forthcoming elections, and asked to postpone it
for sometime in November. Prices for staples are expected to
soar early next month, if subsidies are cut by 25%. A first reduction
in subsidies was operated in May this year. (Dan Ionescu)

ECONOMIC DECLINE CONTINUES IN ROMANIA. On 24 August the National
Statistical Board released data on the state of the Romanian
economy in July. According to Radio Bucharest, industrial production
dropped by 13.7% as against June, and was 32.9% lower than in
July 1991. Labor productivity was 11.1% lower in July as against
June. The number of unemployed on 17 August was 750,000 (6.7
of the labor force). Unemployment jumped by 11% in July as against
June. Though in July the trade balance registered a surplus of
22.2 million US dollars, the overall deficit for the first seven
months of the year amounts to 641 million US dollars. Over the
January-July period, Romania had to import 667,000 tons of wheat
and 192,000 of maize. (Dan Ionescu)

PROBLEMS BETWEEN THE IMF AND HUNGARY. Heti Vilaggazdasag reported
in its 22 August issue that so far Hungary did not utilize its
1992 IMF stand-by-credit. This followed a "common understanding"
with the IMF and was caused by the growing budget deficit, which
reached over 210 billion forint or 2.7 billion US dollars, which
is more than three times the amount planned for the entire year.
An additional factor was that Hungarian reserves reached 5.3
billion US dollars. The IMF is now waiting to see the government's
plans for the 1993 budget deficit and the proposals for reducing
the 1992 deficit. (Karoly Okolicsanyi)

LAND AUCTIONS STARTED. Radio Budapest reported on 24 August that
the first land auctions started across Hungary. The auctions
were made possible by the Compensation Law, which provides for
partial and symbolical restitutions in form of compensation bonds
for former land owners. Those willing to cultivate the land can
use their bonds in the land auctions started yesterday by the
agricultural cooperatives. Bidding prices yesterday did not exceed
the opening prices by much, and at the banks compensations bonds
sell at 77% of their face value. The long-awaited land auctions
will help to privatize Hungarian agriculture. (Karoly Okolicsanyi)


US DOUBLES ESTONIA'S CREDIT. The US has doubled Estonia's credit
limit for buying grain from 5 to 10 million dollars, BNS reported
on 24 August. (Riina Kionka)

OPIC GROUP IN TALLINN. An OPIC-sponsored delegation of American
investors began its week-long Baltic tour in Tallinn on 24 August,
BNS reports. The investors, representing some 20 companies, are
exploring the investment climate in all three Baltic states.
OPIC (Overseas Private Investment Corporation) was established
by Congress in 1969 to encourage investment in developing countries.
(Riina Kionka)

EC ENERGY CENTER OPENED IN VILNIUS. On 25 August the European
Community (EC) opened an Energy Center in Vilnius. The center's
purpose is to provide information and assistance on how to conserve
energy in industry, housing, and transportation, Radio Lithuania
reports. Similar centers were opened earlier this year in Moscow,
St. Petersburg, Warsaw, and Budapest and will be set up in Kiev,
Minsk, Riga, and Tallinn later this year.(Saulius Girnius)

CONFERENCE ON LITHUANIA AND ITS EMIGRANTS. On 24 August the Lithuanian
parliament press briefing was devoted to the results of the conference
"Lithuania -- Emigration: Ties and Unused Opportunities," held
in the town of Birstonas on 17-21 August, Radio Lithuania reports.
Ethnic Lithuanians from 14 countries in the East and West were
represented. Parliament deputy chairman Bronislovas Kuzmickas
presented the conference's final document, a 15-point appeal
that included suggestions that ethnic Lithuanians should have
one or two representatives in the Lithuanian parliament, and
the creation of an official institution solely dedicated to consolidating
relations between Lithuania and its emigrants. (Saulius Girnius)


POLICE CRACK DOWN ON CAR THEFTS IN HUNGARY. Police officials
announced a campaign to crack down on auto thefts by organized
crime, MTI reported on 24 August. Over nine thousand cars were
stolen in the first half of 1992. One problem is that the police
information system is inadequate, which makes it possible for
a large number of stolen cars to leave the country before the
border authorities are notified. An additional problem is that
Hungarians, even owners of luxury cars, do not provide their
cars with anti-theft devices, said the police. (Karoly Okolicsanyi)



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