The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited. - Plutarch
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 149, 06 August 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

UKRAINIAN CRITICISM OF YALTA AGREEMENT ON FLEET. The Ukrainian
Republican Party, led by Mykhailo Horyn, has criticized the recent
agreement between Ukraine and Russia on the division of the Black
Sea Fleet, the Ukrainian TV news program "Dnipro" reported on
4 August. The Republican Party characterized the agreement as
a further step in the direction of a "new association" along
the lines of the former Soviet Union. Specifically, they noted
that, according to the Ukrainian declaration of independence,
everything on the territory of Ukraine, including the Black Sea
Fleet, is the property of the people of Ukraine. The party has
appealed to the parliament to annul the agreement. (Roman Solchanyk)


KAZAKHSTAN OBJECTS TO YALTA AS WELL. The deputy chairman of Kazakhstan's
Supreme Soviet Committee for National Security and Defense, Sergei
Subbotin, has expressed doubt as to how far the agreement reached
by Yeltsin and Kravchuk to remove the Black Sea Fleet from the
jurisdiction of the CIS command corresponds to the general position
of the CIS countries, Radio Mayak reported on 4 August. A commentary
on the Yalta agreement on Radio Rossii on 4 August made the same
point, noting that most of the other CIS countries were not consulted.
The commentator also forecast that Georgia would take a sharply
negative view of the agreement. (Ann Sheehy)

RUSSIA, AZERBAIJAN SPLIT FLOTILLA. Interfax reported on 5 August
that Russia and Azerbaijan have agreed to transfer 30% of the
Caspian Sea Flotilla to Azerbaijan. Earlier reports had put the
figure at 25%. The chief of the naval headquarters of Azerbaijan,
Capt. Rafik Askerov, told a press conference in Baku on 4 August
that negotiations on the fleet's division would be completed
by 15 November and that Azerbaijan expected to get mine-sweepers,
anti-submarine vessels, and auxiliary and support ships. He also
said that the fleet was currently manned by only 70 officers
out of the normal complement of 1,000-1,500. (Stephen Foye)

AMERICANS TO HELP BELARUS DESTROY AMMUNITION. Radio Moscow reported
on 5 August that an American company had signed a contract to
help Belarus destroy ammunition once belonging to the former
Soviet army. The ammunition will be converted into materiel "for
use in the national economy" and the Belarusian government and
the (unidentified) American company will split the profits from
the joint venture. (Doug Clarke)

GEORGIA TO FORM BORDER FORCES. Col. Otar Gumberidze, the commander
of Georgian Border Forces, said that Georgia expects to complete
the creation of its border forces by May of 1994, Interfax reported
on 5 August. The report added that, according to an agreement
reached between Georgia and Russia, Russian border guards will
be responsible for training Georgian conscripts. (Stephen Foye)


FILATOV TO VISIT WESTERN GROUP OF FORCES. The first deputy chairman
of the Russian Supreme Soviet, Sergei Filatov, is scheduled to
visit the Eighth Guards Air Army in Germany on 8 August, ITAR-TASS
reported. Plans call for the army to be disbanded. Filatov sits
on the Russian Security Council and is also a member of the Russian
State Commission for the Creation of a Russian Defense Ministry.
He is expected to investigate preparations for the withdrawal
of the former Soviet forces in Germany. (Stephen Foye)

CONSTITUTIONAL COURT ASKS PARLIAMENT TO REVERSE IZVESTIYA DECISION.
The Russian Constitutional Court has asked the Supreme Soviet
to reverse its decision to take over control of Izvestiya. Sergei
Filatov, deputy supreme soviet chairman, announced the court's
request on 5 August, and added that the parliament cannot decide
on the request until after the parliament's chairman, Ruslan
Khasbulatov, returns from a visit to India, ITAR-TASS reported.
Khasbulatov had led the drive to re-register the leading daily
as an organ of the Supreme Soviet. The constitutional court's
request was in response to a lawsuit filed on 3 August by three
reformist members of the Russian parliament. (Kathryn Brown)


OPPOSITION IN CHECHNYA CRITICAL OF RUSSIA. Sultan Meduev, one
of the leaders of the "Daimokhk" (Fatherland) opposition movement
in Chechnya, has said that Russia is behaving in an unprincipled
manner towards Chechnya by halting all financial operations with
Groznyi in the hope of getting the population to rise up against
Chechen President Dzhokhar Dudaev, ITAR-TASS reported on 5 August.
In addition, Meduev accused the Chechen authorities of suppressing
criticism, but, as ITAR-TASS commented, "Daimokhk's" statements
are, in fact, frequently published in the press. "Daimokhk's"
members come mainly from the intelligentsia, but its ranks are
growing outside the capital. (Ann Sheehy)

KOZYREV UNDER FIRE. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev is
facing three major problems which may lead to his departure,
according to Megapolis-Ekspress on 5 August. The first is the
loss of influence by his former mentor, State Secretary Gennadii
Burbulis. The second is the lack of a policy concept for dealing
with Russian minorities in neighboring states. The third and
most serious problem is Kozyrev's personal image abroad. The
British and Indian foreign offices have apparently recently criticized
his performance. Kozyrev is also becoming increasingly isolated
within the Russian Foreign Ministry. (Alexander Rahr, Moscow)


REQUIEM FOR GAIDAR? The influential Nezavisimaya gazeta proclaimed
on the front page of its 5 August edition that "The Gaidar Era
is Over," the Los Angeles Times of 6 August and Western agencies
reported. It referred to the as yet unresolved deadlock between
some members of the Russian cabinet and the Russian Central Bank
over the forgiveness of interenterprise debts. "For half a year
there has been a war of nerves between the government and state
industry," the newspaper noted, but now "industry has won." It
speculated that members of a new "constructive opposition," including
Arkadii Volsky and Konstantin Borovoi, could soon be appointed
to a government of "new reforms." (Keith Bush)

GERASHCHENKO FOR PRESERVATION OF RUBLE ZONE. In a Moscow TV broadcast
on 5 August, Russian Central Bank Chairman Viktor Gerashchenko
called upon the former Soviet republics to remain in the ruble
zone, Reuters reported. He said that republics which issue their
own currencies "will soon see that this leads to a dead end."
Gerashchenko further said that Russia "naturally will spare no
effort in preserving the ruble zone... This is in the interests
not only of Russia but of our neighbors as well." (Keith Bush)


IMF APPROVES $1 BILLION CREDIT FOR RUSSIA. The IMF authorized
the first of an anticipated series of multi-billion-dollar Western
loans to aid Russia in its transition to a market economy, Western
agencies reported on August 5. This first billion dollars in
credit will be disbursed over the next five months. Meanwhile
the US Congress is expected to vote on a US aid package to Russia
on 6 or 7 August. The package includes an additional contribution
to IMF coffers to make further IMF loans possible. (Erik Whitlock)


MORE STATISTICS ON RUSSIAN ECONOMY RELEASED. New Goskomstat figures
on wages and prices appeared in the latest issue of Literaturnaya
Gazeta, Western agencies reported on 5 August. Personal incomes
in the nation grew 590% in comparison to last year at this time
while consumer prices grew at almost double that rate, 1170%.
The inflation rate for food products in June was 12.1%. It also
appears that projections on this year's total grain harvest have
dropped. The CIS statistical committee disclosed that harvests
will be down across the CIS except in Kazakhstan, Izvestiya reported
on 5 August. The Russian harvest is now expected to be 90-93
million tons, rather than the 96 million reported just two weeks
ago. (Erik Whitlock)

RUSSIAN FARMERS TAKE TO THE STREETS. State and collective farm
workers held demonstrations and picketed government buildings
in many cities throughout Russia on 5 August, ITAR-TASS and Interfax
reported. The action to mark a "day of unity of Russian peasants"
was the largest of its kind, but the turnout was not as high
as the organizers, the Russian Agrarian Union, had hoped. Among
the grievances displayed by the protesters were the adverse terms
of trade between agriculture and industry, the levels of state
purchase prices for agricultural produce, the non-payment of
bonuses for 1991 harvest results, the removal or threatened removal
of subsidies, and the high levels of value-added tax. (Keith
Bush)

AGRICULTURAL SITUATION "EXTREMELY TENSE." Russian Vice-president
Aleksandr Rutskoi held a meeting on 5 August of his "operational
staff for the organization and preservation of the harvest,"
ITAR-TASS reported. He described the situation in the agro-industrial
complex as "extremely tense." Of the production totals planned
for the year, so far only 3.1% of grain purchases and 29% of
potato purchases had been registered. Livestock inventories were
down by 27%. Rutskoi blamed the "completely incomprehensible
inactivity and irresponsibility" of many Russian ministries and
organizations,and he threatened to take "the most decisive measures."
Rutskoi had invited representatives from the farm workers' protest
to his staff meeting, but they declined. He also declined to
speak to one of the protest meetings. (Keith Bush)

DEFENSE INDUSTRY TO DEFEND ENVIRONMENT. A conference on "Global
Environmental Monitoring" will be held in Dubna, near Moscow,
according to a 5 August ITAR-TASS report. Representatives from
the military industrial complexes of Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russia
and Ukraine as well as from the aerospace industries of the United
States and other nations will participate. At a 4 August press
conference, chairman of the Council of Ecological Security of
the Foreign Policy Association, Rostislav Sergeev, announced
that a key topic for discussion will be the use of existing weapons
technology to develop a system of space-atmosphere-land environmental
monitoring equipment. (Brenda Horrigan)

RUSSIA PROPOSES KARABAKH PEACE TALKS. Following talks in Moscow
on 5 August with his Armenian counterpart Raffi Hovannisian,
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev proposed convening peace
talks between Armenia and Russia somewhere in southern Russia
in order to reach a cease-fire agreement in Nagorno-Karabakh,
Russian and Western media reported. Interfax quoted Kozyrev as
suggesting the deployment of a UN- or CIS-sponsored peacekeeping
force in Karabakh. Meanwhile, in Rome delegates to the CSCE-sponsored
Karabakh peace talks failed to come to any agreement on a fifth
round of negotiations after the fourth round ended in failure
on 4 August. (Liz Fuller)

KAZAKH-TURKISH OIL PIPELINE IN THREE YEARS. On August 5, President
Nursultan Nazarbaev, on the last day of a week-long official
visit to Turkey, announced that the planned pipeline to transport
Kazakh crude oil to Turkey will take three years to complete,
an RFE/RL correspondent reported. Last month, a Turkish firm,
Birlesmis Muhendisler Burosu, signed an energy deal worth $11.7
billion, and Kazakhstan's Energy Minister Kadir Baikanov indicated
that his country is soliciting Turkey's help to find foreign
credits, which would be repaid in oil. (Cassandra Cavanaugh)


NABIEV'S POSITION IN TAJIKISTAN ERODES FURTHER. Employees of
Tajikistan's National Security Committee, the successor to the
republican KGB, have declared their intent to stage a sit-down
strike if President Rakhmon Nabiev does not withdraw a decree
removing Committee Chairman Alizhon Solibaev from his post, ITAR-TASS
reported on 5 August. The declaration, which was published in
the Dushanbe press, accuses Nabiev of destabilizing the situation
in the country and creating preconditions for more "violence,
repression and social tension." Similar attacks on the president,
which have become more frequent as his attempts to end the fighting
in Tajikistan have failed, have previously come from opposition
figures. The protest by security personnel suggests that dissatisfaction
with Nabiev is spreading to his former supporters. (Bess Brown)


ANOTHER NEW PARTY FOR UZBEKISTAN. Russian TV reported on 5 August
that another political party, calling itself the "Fatherland
Progress" Party, held its founding congress in the capital of
Tashkent. The party, which has been officially registered, claims
4,000 members, mostly from the Uzbek intelligentsia. The poet,
Usman Azimov, was elected chairman. Azimov was one of the founding
members of the Democratic People's Front "Birlik," before being
lured away by a seat on President Karimov's Presidential Council
in 1991. Azimov describes the party as liberal-democratic, advocating
parliamentary democracy, complete independence of Uzbekistan,
and a market economy. (Cassandra Cavanaugh)

MORE DEATHS THAN BIRTHS IN UKRAINE, ST. PETERSBURG. In the first
half of 1992 deaths exceeded births by more than 65,000 in Ukraine,
according to the Ukrainian Ministry of Statistics, Ukrinform-TASS
reported on 3 August. Ukraine has one of the lowest birth rates
of any of the republics of the former Soviet Union. In St. Petersburg
more than 17,000 babies were born in the first six months of
1992, but over 31,000 people died, ITAR-TASS reported on 5 August,
citing Izvestiya. (Ann Sheehy)

RUSSIAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM FAILS NEWBORNS. Health department
experts believe that a locally produced glucose solution administered
to newborn babies in a Bryansk maternity hospital may have caused
14 babies to fall ill, and six to die, according to ITAR-TASS
on 5 August. Low standards of health care and a lack of medicines
are in large part to blame for the high infant mortality rate
in Russia17.3 per 1,000 live births in 1990. (Sarah Helmstadter)


CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

US CALLS FOR INVESTIGATION OF BALKAN WAR CRIMES. Major US dailies
on 6 August report that a State Department spokesman released
a statement the previous day signed by Acting Secretary of State
Lawrence Eagleburger calling for an investigation of war crimes
in the former Yugoslavia. Measures include reports by the UN
Human Rights Commission, appeals to the Serbs, Croats, and Muslims
to open "any and all prisons and detention centers" to neutral
observers, and involvement by the EC, Russia, the CSCE, and the
UN Security Council. It is not clear what exactly this would
lead to, however. In recent days media and political pressures
have increased rapidly on the Bush administration for it to be
seen as being more assertive in light of reports on Serb death
camps, with the media making graphic comparisons with Nazi concentration
camps. Meanwhile at the UN, Bosnia's representative Muhamed Sacirbey
charged that UN officials have failed to act on month-old reports
about the camps, and went on to present a list of 105 alleged
Serbian camps and prisons in the former Yugoslavia. (Patrick
Moore)

FRANCE PLEDGES TROOPS FOR UN STRIKE FORCE. Once again displaying
a high profile in matters relating to the Bosnian crisis, Paris
has pledged 2,000 troops for a UN rapid-reaction force that could
be used to "stop wars" in local conflicts, Reuters said on 5
August. UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali told a German
reporter that "if 20 other countries were ready to do that, I
would be in much better position" to handle regional disputes.
Elsewhere, French president Francois Mitterrand told parliament
that, in Bosnia, "all humanitarian convoys must be protected,
all camps must be inspected, monitored, and opened," AFP reports.
(Patrick Moore)

PANIC ON THE OFFENSIVE. Radio Serbia reports on 5 August that
the federal government of the rump Yugoslavia has issued a declaration
calling for a series of roundtable talks after 15 August among
political parties represented in parliament as a "precondition"
for holding elections in Yugoslavia sometime at the end of November.
The declaration, signed by Prime Minister Milan Panic, also stipulates
that the participants will decide whether political parties and
citizens' groups not represented in government and parliament
may take part. On 4 August Panic said he will ask the UN to monitor
Yugoslavia's borders in order to prove that it is not sending
troops and arms to Bosnia-Herzegovina. He also said that he has
agreed with Bosnian foreign minister Haris Silajdzic on the formation
of an elite Serb-Croat-Muslim antiterrorist unit to try to eliminate
snipers, terrorists, and criminals whom Panic regards as the
main obstacles to peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Responding to
widespread reports of concentration camps, Panic said that there
are camps and some have refugees who have been forcibly sent
there. On the diplomatic front Panic said he will soon travel
to Greece and Albania. On 7 August he is scheduled to meet Croatia's
Prime Minister Franjo Greguric in Budapest to discuss mutual
recognition, prisoner exchanges, and the reopening of the Belgrade-Zagreb
highway. (Milan Andrejevich)

RUSSIA RECOGNIZES MACEDONIA. Making good on President Boris Yeltsin's
pledge in Sofia on 4 August, Russian deputy foreign Minister
Vitalii Churkin delivered a note on the 5th to the leadership
of the Republic of Macedonia extending formal recognition. Bulgaria,
Turkey, and a few other countries also recognize the ex-Yugoslav
republic, and last week Milan Panic announced that the rump Yugoslavia
might also do so. Athens strongly objects to the use of the name
Macedonia and has been trying to block recognition by the European
Community and other countries. In a foreign ministry statement
released on 5 August Greece deplored Russia's "hasty unilateral
act." The Russian Foreign Ministry in turn took umbrage at the
tone of the Greek message and stated that Russia finds it "impermissible
to protract the resolution of the so-called Macedonian issue
and leave a dangerous vacuum in the heart of the Balkans." Tanjug,
Greek Radio, ITAR-TASS, and Western agencies carried the story.
(Charles Trumbull)

SLOVAK PREMIER OPPOSES REFERENDUM. On 5 August Vladimir Meciar
told the Slovak Parliament that a referendum to decide whether
or not Czechoslovakia should split as planned "is against Slovakia's
interests." In Meciar's opinion, a referendum would only complicate
the question of the so-called successor rights of the two new
states. According to CSTK, Meciar also said that if a referendum
were held and a majority of the electorate voted for the preservation
of the federation, new elections would not be necessary. (Paulina
Bren)

ELECTION OF SLOVAK PRESIDENT. According to Michal Kovac, the
head of the Federal Assembly, the election of a Slovak president
will take place at the beginning of next year at the latest.
At a meeting of the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS),
HZDS chairman Meciar said that his party would not, however,
consider Alexander Dubcek for the post because "he had done more
harm than good for Slovak politics." According to various media
reports, Meciar further added that he himself will not seek the
post of Slovak president. (Paulina Bren)

STOPGAP SOLUTION TO ROMANIAN PREFECT CRISIS? On 5 August Prime
Minister Theodor Stolojan briefed Romania's government on his
talks with representatives of the Hungarian Democratic Union
of Romania conducted on the previous day in Sfintu Gheorghe and
Miercurea-Ciuc. The talks aimed at defusing tension provoked
by Stolojan's recent dismissal of the ethnic Hungarian prefects
of Harghita and Covasna counties, where Hungarians are in the
majority. Radio Bucharest reports that Stolojan decided to appoint
two caretakersone ethnic Romanian and one ethnic Hungarianfor
each of the two counties, until final nominations are made. Gheorghe
Funar, the nationalist mayor of Cluj, strongly criticized Stolojan
for the compromise. (Dan Ionescu)

BALTIC FOREIGN MINISTERS MEET, PREP FOR MOSCOW. The three Baltic
foreign ministers met in Riga on 5 August to unify positions
for their meeting with Russian foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev
on 6 August. In a communique issued at the end of the meeting,
Estonia's Jaan Manitski, Latvia's Janis Jurkans and Lithuania's
Algirdas Saudargas said they regarded the Moscow meeting as "an
opportunity for Russia to begin practical implementation of the
commitments" made at the CSCE summit in Helsinki. According to
reports from Moscow, Kozyrev is expected to present an accelerated
withdrawal timetable. ITAR-TASS reports that Russia also plans
to discuss territorial claims and the treatment of ethnic Russians
living in the Baltic States. In an interview with the VOA Lithuanian
Service, Lithuanian Supreme Council Chairman Vytautas Landsbergis
said that the 6 August meeting can not substitute for direct
negotiations between Russia and the individual republics. Noting
that Russia did not hold joint troop withdrawal talks with Poland,
Czechoslovakia, and Hungary, Landsbergis sees no reason for the
three Baltic States to do so simply because the Russian army
troops were united under the Northwest Group of Forces. (Riina
Kionka & Saulius Girnius)

ESTONIAN COMMUNISTS FORM ELECTION COALITION. The Estonian Communist
Party announced on 5 August that it has formed an election coalition
called Leftist Opportunity. The coalition will field 15 candidates13
of them ECP membersin next month's parliamentary election. Unlike
all the other coalitions in the race, Leftist Opportunity will
not field its own presidential candidate. ECP secretary Harry
Roots told the RFE/RL Estonian Service on 5 August that there
are those among the candidates already nominated by other coalitions
who are, by virtue of their many years of demonstrated loyalty
to the CPSU, more than suitable to Leftist Opportunity. (Riina
Kionka)

ESTONIA PROTESTS NARVA BEATINGS. The Estonian Foreign Ministry
on 5 August sent its Russian counterpart a formal note protesting
what it says was a violation by Russia of the Narva River border
point on 2 August. That day, a group of 30 intoxicated men wearing
Russian marine uniforms assaulted guards at the Estonian border
checkpoint on the bridge. According to Paevaleht of 4 August,
the men beat up the Estonian border guards and then forced their
way across the bridge to Narva. It is not certain that the men
have returned to Russia. Estonian police are investigating. (Riina
Kionka)

WALESA NAMES NEW GENERAL STAFF CHIEF. President Lech Walesa appointed
Gen. Tadeusz Wilecki as chief of the Polish armed forces General
Staff on 5 August. Wilecki, 47, previously served as Silesian
Military District commander. He replaces Gen. Zdzislaw Stelmaszuk,
who held the post for two years. Early in 1992, the appointment
of the General Staff chief became a major source of conflict
between Walesa and the ousted government of Prime Minister Jan
Olszewski. The president had proposed Wilecki for the job, but
Olszewski's defense minister had insisted on retaining Stelmaszuk.
Wilecki's appointment is a further sign of good relations between
Walesa and the current defense minister, Janusz Onyszkiewicz,
whose constitutional right it is to nominate the candidate for
the General Staff post. (Louisa Vinton)

POLISH PRIMATE IN MOSCOW. Cardinal Jozef Glemp met in Moscow
with Russian Orthodox Patriarch Aleksei II on 5 August. Glemp
said afterward that the talks created a good climate for better
relations between the Catholic and Orthodox Churches, but that
it was too early to speak of a breakthrough. Tensions have recently
arisen over the right of the Catholic Church to seek new followers
in parts of the former Soviet Union. According Gazeta Wyborcza
on 6 August, Orthodox Metropolitan Kirill told a press conference
that while the Orthodox Church supports religious freedom for
Catholics, it objects to attempts to proselytize among the Orthodox
population. On 6 August Glemp begins a pastoral visit to Polish
communities in Kazakhstan. (Louisa Vinton)

POLISH STRIKES REACH IMPASSE. Meeting with unionists from the
former official OPZZ federation on 5 August, Labor Minister Kuron
said that "all possibilities of negotiation in the conflict at
the [Polska Miedz] copper combine have been exhausted." Workers
at the combine have been on strike for 17 days, and fourteen
of them are now staging a hunger strike. Kuron criticized the
"every man for himself" attitude of strikers. Speaking at the
same meeting, Privatization Minister Janusz Lewandowski described
that the strike now underway at the FSM auto plant in Tychy as
a "strike against the work force," as its continuation could
undermine the factory's purchase by Fiat. (Louisa Vinton)

FOREIGN INVESTMENT IN SLOVAKIA INCREASING. Data released by Slovakia's
State Statistical Office on 5 August reveal a sharp rise in foreign
investment in the republic. While foreign investment had totalled
3,000 million koruny by April 1992, it reportedly increased by
47.1% by the end of June. CSTK quoted Rudolf Krc, head of the
Statistics Office, as saying that 117 foreign companies have
negotiated new investments in Slovakia since April, the leading
companies being German, Austrian, and American. Currently 2,129
joint ventures with foreign capital participation are registered
in Slovakia. (Paulina Bren)

22,300 ENTERPRISES REGISTERED IN LATVIA. BNS reported on 5 August
that so far 22,300 enterprises have been registered in Latvia
of which 1,163 include foreign investments, 1,165 are state enterprises,
and 14 are enterprises leased from the state. The lion's share
(15,800) of the enterprises are registered in Riga. Comparing
the total number of enterprises to Latvia's population, there
is currently one enterprise for every 120 residents. These figures
indicate great interest in private business on the part of the
population but obviously give no clue as to the viability of
such a large number of businesses. (Dzintra Bungs)

LATVIAN-UKRAINIAN TRADE ACCORD. On 4 August in Kiev Latvia's
prime minister Ivars Godmanis and his Ukrainian counterpart Vitold
Fokin signed a bilateral trade and economic accord, BNS reports.
The two leaders also discussed agriculture, energy, relations
with international organizations, and experience with instituting
their own currency. (Dzintra Bungs)

GERMAN TOXIC WASTE SHIPMENT STOPPED IN ROMANIAN PORT. On 4 August
Romanian customs inspectors stopped a German barge carrying toxic
wastes in the Danube port of Moldova Veche after they discovered
its papers were not in order. According to members of the crew,
the shipment consisted of more than 400,000 kg of plastic wastes
loaded at Regensburg and headed for Bulgaria. Rompres said that
Romanian officials will not allow the barge into Romanian territorial
waters until proper documents are presented. This is the latest
in a series of incidents resulting from attempts to dump West
Europeanmostly Germantoxic wastes in the Balkan area. (Dan Ionescu)



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