Silence is the real crime against humanity. - Nadezhda Mandelstam
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 142, 28 July 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

GENERALS OPPOSE KURILE ISLAND CUTS. The Japanese agency Kyodo,
reported on 27 July that the Russian General Staff had submitted
to the Supreme Soviet a document calling for a freeze in proposed
troop reductions on the four disputed Kurile Islands. The action
came a day before closed hearings on the islands were scheduled
to begin and amid speculation that Boris Yeltsin planned to announce
more troop cuts on the islands. According to the report, troops
levels have already been cut from approximately 10,000 to 7,000.
The General Staff document reportedly warned that concessions
to Tokyo on the islands would encourage Japan and other neighboring
countries to make fresh territorial claims on Russia. (Stephen
Foye)

CHERNAVIN ON RUSSIAN NAVY. In an interview broadcast by Radio
Rossii on 27 July, Admiral Vladimir Chernavin (who was commander
in chief of CIS naval forces, but who now apparently holds that
position in the Russian armed forces) said that the Russian navy
currently consists of all four fleets and that he himself sits
on the Russian Ministry of Defense Collegium. Chernavin said
that the Baltic Fleet would remain in the Baltic, and that the
fleet command hoped to secure bases in Tallinn, Estonia, and
in Liepaja, Latvia, as well as several other places. He also
said that the Russian navy would be smaller than the Soviet navy,
with old vessels to be retired and manpower reductions totaling
100,000 men to be effected by 1995. Finally, he praised the Yeltsin
government for having raised the salaries of naval officers and
said that Yeltsin had ordered regional leaders at a recent meeting
to provide more housing for military personnel. (Stephen Foye)


MOST WARSHIPS NOW FLYING RUSSIAN NAVAL FLAG. The Navy Day holiday
on 26 July was the occasion for most warships of the ex-Soviet
Navy to haul down the hammer-and-sickle naval ensign and replace
it with the flag of St. Andrews, traditionally flown on Russian
warships since 1699. Russian and western agencies reported that
the ceremony was skipped in the Black Sea Fleet and the Caspian
Flotilla, both of which are bones of contention between Russia
and various other republics. (Doug Clarke)

BELARUS TO SELL ARMS. Belarusian First Deputy Prime Minister
Mikhail Myasnikovich said on 27 July that Belarus intended to
sell surplus armsparticularly tanksoverseas, Interfax reported.
He emphasized, however, that Minsk had no intention of selling
weapons to support particular regimes or to countries that either
violated human rights or that were on the verge of hostilities
with neighbors. He also said that Belarus would not peddle nuclear
arms systems. (Stephen Foye)

SS-25S TO BE CONVERTED TO CIVILIAN LAUNCH VEHICLES. The Russian
Army's SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles will now be
used as launch vehicles for communications and other civilian
satellites, Radio Rossii reported on 24 July. According to Lev
Solomonev, a top official involved in the construction of the
SS-25s, 75 of the missiles had previously been destroyed with
US inspectors looking on. This conversion project, he argued,
represents a far better use of the vast resources invested in
building the missiles than does simple destruction. (Chris Hummel)


STANKEVICH TO BECOME CIS MINISTER? Presidential advisor, Sergei
Stankevich, is the most likely candidate for the post of minister
of CIS affairs, Radio Rossii on 27 July quoted "informed government
sources" as saying. The new ministry will be created on the basis
of the present CIS department at the Russian Foreign Ministry.
The decision to set up the CIS ministry was taken at a meeting
of the Russian Security Council on 1 July, but that decision
has still to become legal through a presidential decree. Government
sources also reported that there is strong opposition within
the Russian leadership to such a ministry, and Yeltsin may postpone
the decree. (Alexander Rahr)

RADICAL WING OF DEMOCRATIC RUSSIA HOLDS CONGRESS. A radical wing
of the Democratic Russia movement, headed by Professor Yurii
Afanasev and St. Petersburg activist Marina Sale, organized an
extraordinary congress in Moscow over the weekend, the Russian
media reported on 26 July. The leadership of the movement as
a wholeLev Ponomarev, Ilya Zaslavsky and Gleb Yakuninwere against
the congress. Many regional Democratic Russia organizations also
refused to participate in the congress. On 27 July, "Vesti" reported
that Marina Sale announced that the St. Petersburg branch of
the movement would become a formal opposition group to the Yeltsin-Gaidar
leadership, which Sale accused of moving away from democratic
reforms. In contrast, Ponomarev, Zaslavsky and Yakunin intend
to transform Democratic Russia into a presidential party. (Vera
Tolz)

BUKOVSKY WILL NOT RUN FOR MOSCOW MAYOR. Former Soviet dissident
Vladimir Bukovsky has rejected the offer of several Moscow City
Council deputies to run for the post of Moscow mayor in December,
according to ITAR-TASS on 27 July. Speaking at the Moscow City
Council, he argued that he cannot see a broad socio-political
base of support for his candidacy, criticizing Muscovites for
their lack of political activity and blaming the Yeltsin-Gaidar
government for failing to destroy the old communist system. He
said that if a new popular prodemocratic movement is founded,
he would be prepared to return to Moscow and participate in the
political process, but not necessarily as mayor. (Alexander Rahr)


WITNESSES AGAINST THE CPSU BEGIN TESTIMONY. Witnesses called
by Yeltsin's lawyers to support the ban on the Communist Party
began to testify before the Russian Constitutional Court on 24
July, Russian and Western agencies reported. Vladimir Solodin,
former deputy director of Glavlit, gave details on the level
of censorship and the banning of publications up until the agency
was abolished in July 1991. For example, despite the introduction
of Glasnost in 1986, Glavlit was instructed to launch a "special
campaign" to control information on the Chernobyl nuclear accident.
Izvestiya correspondent and former Central Committee member,
Otto Latsis, also testified that Party hardliners had begun planning
for Gorbachev's removal long before the August 1991 coup attempt,
DR-Press reported. Other witnesses included a former prosecutor,
Viktor Belov, who testified on Party interference in the judicial
process. (Carla Thorson)

KGB OFFICIAL TESTIFIES IN CONSTITUTIONAL COURT. On 27 July, more
witnesses were called by the Russian president's lawyers in the
Russian Constitutional Court, Russian and Western agencies reported.
Viktor Ivanenko, former chairman of the Russian Republican KGB,
testified that the KGB had shadowed Russia's top leaders, including
President Yeltsin, for two years prior to the August 1991 coup
attempt. Ivanenko also said that former Soviet KGB Chairman Vladimir
Kryuchkov had ordered telephone wire taps on top Soviet state
officials, including Aleksandr Yakovlev and Eduard Shevardnadze,
and even on fellow coup leaders in the days leading up to the
coup attempt. Ivanenko noted that he thought Gorbachev was aware
of these surveillance operations, and cited documentary evidence
that Gorbachev knew of the wire tapping. (Carla Thorson)

MORE DETAILS ON RUSSIA'S ASSUMING SOVIET DEBT. Russian plans
for assuming the foreign debt obligations of other former Soviet
republics became clearer on 27 July. As quoted by ITAR-TASS,
Deputy Foreign Minister Viktor Shillin said that "Russia hopes
the obligations of a number of sovereign states to pay the external
debt of the former USSR will be maintained." However, in the
event that a state refuses to pay its share of the debt, Russia
will assume the obligation and register the sum as a Russian
loan to the non-paying republic. Russia is presently making payments
on 61% of the Soviet foreign debt which a total of eight republics
of the former USSR had promised to assume jointly last year.
(Erik Whitlock)

GAIDAR MEETS WITH DEFENSE INDUSTRY LEAGUE. In a meeting with
Egor Gaidar, Russia's acting prime minister, on 24 July, the
presidium of the League of Russian Defense Enterprises demanded
the development of a national policy on conversion and the protection
of the country's military, scientific, and technical capability,
as reported by ITAR-TASS. The league, which represents over 600
enterprises and organizations, did announce its support for the
economic reforms being carried out by the government but also
expressed concern over the state of affairs in the defense industryin
particular the continuing decline of production and the growing
threat of undermining the country's scientific and technical
potential. (Chris Hummel)

RUBLE EXCHANGE RATE DOWN. The value of the ruble fell to 156
rubles to the dollar at the Moscow interbank auction on 23 July,
despite intervention by the Russian Central Bank, Western agencies
reported. At a news conference on 24 July, government economic
adviser, Aleksei Ulyukaev, said that the Russian government has
given up hope that the ruble can become fully convertible in
1992 at a rate of around 80 to the dollar. He suggested that
a more realistic rate might be closer to the current auction
level. Ulyukaev attributed the decline to inflation and to the
loose credit policies of the other former Soviet republics. (Keith
Bush)

SOME HARD-CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS REMOVED. The Russian Central
Bank announced on 27 July that it was lifting restrictions on
the purchase of foreign currency by Russian citizens, Interfax
and RFE/RL's Moscow correspondent reported. For amounts of up
to $500, no documentation will be required. To purchase larger
sums, the individual will have to present a passport or other
means of identification, but will no longer have to show a foreign-travel
passport or an exit visa. However, private citizens who travel
abroad will be forbidden to take more than $500 out of the country
without special authorization. (Keith Bush)

VNESHEKONOMBANK TO REOPEN FROZEN ACCOUNTS. Russia's First Deputy
Minister of Finance Andrei Vavilov announced that the accounts
of Vneshekonombank USSR would be unfrozen by the end of this
year, Ekho Moskvy reported on 26 July. Accounts at the troubled
bank, which conducted foreign currency transactions for the state,
enterprises and private individuals during the Soviet period,
had been inaccessible for several months. On 21 July, according
to Interfax, Deputy Supreme Soviet Chairman Yurii Voronin had
suggested that the bank would be reorganized or its operations
transferred to the Central Bank or the Foreign Trade Bank of
Russia. (Erik Whitlock)

TUVINIAN INDEPENDENCE CAMPAIGN HALTED. The Popular Front of Tuva,
which decided at its first congress on 20 June to collect signatures
to hold a referendum on the independence of Tuva, has suspended
its campaign in the face of local opposition, DR-Press reported
on 25 July. It has been proposed instead that the new Tuvinian
constitution should include the right of the republic to secede
from Russia. The Tuva Republic is located near Mongolia. (Ann
Sheehy)

CRIMEAN TATARS DEMAND STATEHOOD. The leader of the Crimean Tatar
Assembly (Mejlis), Mustafa Dzhemilev, has called upon the Ukrainian
authorities to define their position on the Crimean Tatars, ITAR-TASS
reported 25 July. Dzhemilev repeated the Crimean Tatars' demand
for the restoration of their statehood in Crimea within Ukraine
and warned of civil disobedience if their demands are ignored.
(Roman Solchanyk)

MOLDOVAN LEADERSHIP DEFUSES PROTESTS. The several hundred protesters,
including over 100 armed volunteer soldiers, demonstrating since
24 July outside the parliament and government buildings in Chisinau,
dispersed peacefully on 26 July after their spokesmen were received
by President Mircea Snegur and other Moldovan leaders. The leaders
pledged never to accept territorial losses or a return of communists
to power in Moldova and to continue to press for the withdrawal
of Russia's troops; but they refused to give in to most of demonstrators'
demands (see Daily Report, 27 July) on the grounds that these
issues can only be resolved in parliament and by "taking into
account the views of all sections of society," Moldovan media
reported. (Vladimir Socor)

CEASE-FIRE IN TAJIKISTAN? A cease-fire was agreed upon at a meeting
in the town of Khorog attended by leaders of Tajikistan's political
parties, the armed bands that have been fighting in the country's
southern regions, members of the clergy and leaders of all the
country's oblasts, ITAR-TASS reported on 27 July. The cease-fire
was to go into effect on 28 July, but Russian TV's evening news
reported the previous day that the leader of the Kulyab "self-defense
units," that have played a major role in the continuing violence,
announced that his followers would not surrender their weapons
until the coalition government of Communists and oppositionists
in Dushanbe resigns. (Bess Brown)

COUNCIL OF EUROPE FINDS UZBEKISTAN LEAST DEMOCRATIC. ITAR-TASS
provided a summary of a 27 July Le Monde commentary on Council
of Europe General Secretary Catherine Lalumière's recent visit
to five former Soviet republics. Lalumière met with opposition
representatives in Kazakhstan, and with Kyrgyz President Askar
Akaev, particularly respected for his commitment to democracy.
In contrast, while in Uzbekistan the delegation met only with
the ruling People's Democratic Party (formerly Communist), which
continues to use force to suppress the opposition. Though observer
status for the Central Asian states is not yet under serious
consideration, Le Monde ex-pressed doubt about Uzbekistan's eligibility,
arguing that it is the "furthest away from Strasbourg," the headquarters
of the council. (Cassandra Cavanaugh)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN PEACE TALKS RESUME IN LONDON. Leaders of the three warring
factions in the Bosnian civil war returned to London on 27 July,
but little progress is reported. EC mediator José Cutilheiro
has adopted a new strategy for the negotiations, trying to forge
an agreement on a new constitutional arrangement for Bosnia-Herzegovina
instead of focusing on achieving a ceasefire first. Cutilheiro
told reporters that "I believe that a political settlement would
stop the war." Bosnian Foreign Minister Haris Silajdzic, however,
has refused to negotiate about any future arrangements, and is
calling instead for international military intervention to end
the war. International media carried the reports. (Gordon Bardos)


BOSNIAN SERBS DEFINE BORDERS. Before the London talks, the assembly
of the Serbian Republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina defined the "indisputable
borders of the Serbian Republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina." Velibor
Ostojic, minister of information of the Serbian Republic, explained
the borders were drawn only on the basis of ethnic criteria and
majorities. The Serbs (with one-third of the population) claim
some two-thirds of Bosnia-Herzegovina. Muslim areas are not defined.
Ostojic traced the external borders of the Serbian Republic including
a small outlet to the Adriatic at Neum, a predominantly Croat-populated
area, which, Ostojic said, is based on Serbia's historic access
to the Adriatic. The internal borders which Ostojic stressed
are still open to negotiationwould run along the lines of ethnic
contact between the Serbian nation and Bosnia's Croats and Muslims.
The report was carried by Radio Serbia on 26 July. (Milan Andrejevich)


MORE ON REFUGEES. On 26 July the last of the current group of
5,600 Bosnian refugees arrived in Germany and went on to centers
in the north and east. German politicians demanded that other
EC members carry a fairer share of the burdeneven without a formal
policy agreementof what is expected to be a continuing flood
of desperate people fleeing their homes. Reuters, however, quotes
other West European officials as charging their German counterparts
with playing domestic politics to an electorate that feels that
Germany bears a disproportionately high share of the costs in
European affairs, and one which shows more than a few signs of
"compassion fatigue." Tanjug says Serbia wants international
help for caring for what it claims are 400,000 refugees. In Brussels
the G-24 group of major industrialized nations pledged $100 million
for international relief, although that is only equivalent to
what Croatia alone spends on refugees in 50 days. (Patrick Moore)


BULGARIA CLAIMS MOSLEMS DEPORTED TO MACEDONIA. Referring to a
source in the office of UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Bulgaria's
newly appointed UN ambassador Slavi Pashkovski on 26 July accused
Serb irregulars of having deported some 30,000 Moslems to Macedonia,
near Bulgaria's western border. Speaking on Bulgarian radio,
Pashkovski said Serbia's "ethnic cleansing" policy threatens
to alter the population balance in Macedonia and plant "explosive
material" in the vicinity of Bulgaria. In an interview published
yesterday in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Prime Minister
Filip Dimitrov warned that the consequences of involving Macedonia
in the Balkan conflict could be "unforeseeable." (Kjell Engelbrekt)


ROMANIA AGAIN DENIES BREAKING EMBARGO. Foreign Ministry spokesman
Traian Chebeleu told RFE/RL on 24 July that if embargo violations
are taking place on Romanian territory, they are being carried
out without the government's knowledge. Minister of transportation
Traian Basescu told a press conference on the same day the consequences
of Romania's observance of the embargo are "very serious." He
said ten thousand employees are "technically unemployed" as a
result of diminished traffic on the Danube and revenues have
dropped. On 25 July Rompres quoted a political attaché of the
US embassy in Bucharest visiting Galati as saying the West is
"concerned over Romania's failure to observe the embargo." (Michael
Shafir)

TUDJMAN SLIPS IN CROATIAN POLL. Croatia holds elections for the
lower house and the presidency on 2 August. President Franjo
Tudjman has held a comfortable lead over all challengers throughout
the campaign, but a poll run by Vecernji list on 26 July suggests
that Liberal challenger Drazen Budisa has narrowed the gap between
them from 23 points to 14 in the course of the past two weeks.
Tudjman now has 39% to Budisa's 25%, and during this time the
percentage of undecided voters has dropped by half. The national
campaign has been overshadowed by the war, and questions of Croatia's
future development have largely taken a back seat. Tudjman's
party has stressed continuity, while other mainstream parties
simply claim that they could do the same job better. Regional
personalities and issues are expected to dominate the legislative
vote. Women and minorities are generally poorly represented on
the party slates, even though Savka Dabcevic-Kucar is a presidential
candidate with 7.7% in the latest poll. (Patrick Moore)

NEGOTIATIONS ON THE DIVISION OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA. On 27 July Czech
and Slovak parliamentary leaders Milan Uhde and Ivan Gasparovic
met in Bratislava to discuss the prospective split of Czechoslovakia
into two countries, CSTK reported. They agreed to establish a
number of commissions that will deal with issues related to the
economy, foreign policy, defense, and civil rights. Until 14
August the commissions will be composed only of experts; after
that date, the experts will be joined by deputies from both republican
parliaments. The two leaders hope to complete the negotiations
on the division of Czechoslovakia by the end of September. (Jiri
Pehe)

CANDIDATES FOR CZECHOSLOVAK PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS. Three candidates
have met the registration deadline and will compete in the third
round of Czechoslovak presidential elections on 30 July, CSTK
reports. They are Zdenek Prochazka of the Republican Party, Zdenek
Pinta of Movement 90, and Marie Kristkova of the Liberal-Social
Union. All three candidates were proposed by individual deputies
rather than by political parties. Vaclav Havel's reelection bid
was defeated in the first round of the presidential elections
on 3 July. Miroslav Sladek, chairman of the extreme right-wing
Republican Party, failed to win the election two weeks later.
Czechoslovakia has been without a president since Havel's resignation
on 17 July. (Jiri Pehe)

MECIAR WARNS HUNGARY. In a 25 July radio statement, Slovak prime
minister Vladimir Meciar warned Hungary to expect "negative consequences"
in bilateral relations if Budapest meddles in Bratislava's minority
policy, Radio Budapest reported on the same day. Meciar was reacting
to an earlier statement by a leader of Slovakia's Hungarian Christian
Democratic Movement to the effect that his movement would turn
to the Hungarian government and to international organizations
should minority rights not be observed in an independent Slovakia.
(Alfred Reisch)

SLOVAKIA NO THREAT TO HUNGARY. According to an analysis by Hungary's
Security Policy and Defense Research Center published on 25 July
in Magyar nemzet, a breakup of Czechoslovakia and the emergence
of an independent Slovak army would not represent an increased
threat to Hungary's security. The experts say Slovakia could
become a natural ally of Hungary and the latter should seek to
reduce Bratislava's mistrust by proposing an "open skies" agreement
similar to the one between Hungary and Romania. (Alfred Reisch)


CASUALTIES IN RUSSIAN-ESTONIAN INCIDENT. Two Russians were wounded
on 27 July when a group of 30 Estonian soldiers temporarily took
over a building in Tallinn housing a subunit of the former USSR
navy, ITAR-TASS reports. Twenty-four Estonians were arrested.
Russian sources say the Estonians opened fire. Local agencies,
however, say the move was part of a prearranged transfer of military
property but that the building had been leased to a business
that was actually a front operation for the former Soviet military.
Estonian sources claim the Estonian soldiers had no ammunition,
so the two must have been wounded by "friendly fire." Both sides
have protested the action, and Estonian Defense Minister Ulo
Uluots characterized the incident as "a groundless provocation."
(Riina Kionka)

ESTONIAN FOREST BRETHREN ASK FOR RECOGNITION. A group of former
Forest Brethren gathered last weekend in Adavere to call for
immediate and full rehabilitation and to ask that they be allowed
to set up their organization again, BNS reported on 27 July.
The Forest Brethren was a postwar partisan armed opposition movement
that was more or less eliminated by Soviet intelligence forces
by the late 1950s. A number of Russian and Western observers
have recently alleged that the Forest Brethren have been reconstituted
under the guise of Estonia's official civil militia, the Defense
Union (Kaitseliit), but the appeal for official reinstatement
would seem to belie that claim. (Riina Kionka)

WALESA BATTLES CORRUPTION. Meeting with Justice Minister Zbigniew
Dyka on 27 July, President Lech Walesa expressed concern at the
limited effectiveness of Poland's justice system in fighting
corruption and economic crime. "The rule of law cannot be simply
a declaration," Walesa said. He proposed increasing prosecutors'
powers and televising major trials to show Poland's determination
to fight financial scandals. Dyka stressed that economic crimes
were not unique to Poland. "We must not create an atmosphere
of panic [by suggesting] that Poland alone faces a massive wave
of economic crime," he added. (Louisa Vinton)

NICU CEAUSESCU TO BE RESENTENCED. Romania's Supreme Court has
revised the charges against Nicu Ceausescu, Radio Bucharest announced
on 27 July. The son of the former dictator has served 31 months
of a 16-year sentence on the charge of genocide. The court accepted
an appeal by the prosecution to drop the genocide charge and
substitute for it that of "instigation to murder under aggravating
circumstances." Ceausescu will remain in prison and the prosecution
will prepare new charges against him. (Michael Shafir)

KOSTOV TALKS TO THE WORLD BANK, IMF. Returning from negotiations
with the World Bank and the IMF, Bulgarian finance minister Ivan
Kostov expressed satisfaction with the understanding reached.
In Demokratsiya on 27 July, Kostov said he expected Bulgaria's
general macroeconomic program and budget for 1993 to be accepted
by mid-September, paving the way for a more extensive agreement
with the World Bank. In particular, Bulgaria is hoping for assistance
in dealing with its creditor banks, to which it owes over $12
billion. (Kjell Engelbrekt)

UNEMPLOYMENT STILL ON THE RISE IN LATVIA. New figures reported
in Diena on 22 July indicate that 22,614 persons are looking
for jobs, 11,235 (compared with about 8700 at the beginning of
the month) have been registered as unemployed, and 9362 are receiving
unemployment compensation. A sizable contingent of the job seekers
are women with higher education. A further rise in the number
of unemployed is anticipated because several enterprises are
expected to declare bankruptcy. (Dzintra Bungs)

SEJM REJECTS LIBERAL ABORTION DRAFT. In a long-postponed debate
the Sejm on 24 July rejected a draft bill that would have allowed
abortion in a few specific cases: when the woman's health or
life is endangered, when the fetus is damaged, when the pregnancy
is the result of a crime, or when the pregnant woman finds herself
in "extremely difficult life conditions." A proposal for a national
referendum on the issue was also rejected. The Sejm opted instead
to continue work on a more stringent draft that would impose
a total ban on abortion, give the fetus the legal status of a
person,and provide for two years imprisonment for anyone committing
an abortion. (Louisa Vinton)

CZECHOSLOVAK-DANISH DISPUTE OVER KURDISH REFUGEES. A dispute
over the fate of thirteen Kurdish refugees stranded in Czechoslovakia
seems now to be resolved, CSTK reports. The refugees flew to
Copenhagen on 24 July after their private chartered plane stopped
in Prague to refuel. Danish officials deported the refugees back
to Prague on an SAS airliner. But Czechoslovak officials refused
to accept them and grounded the plane when the pilot refused
to take the refugees back to Denmark. Several Danish policemen
who escorted the refugees were also detained. On 28 July Denmark
agreed to allow the refugees to return to Copenhagen. Danish
Justice Minister Hans Engell told Danish TV the refugees should
not become "a political football." (Jiri Pehe)

MEXICAN PRESIDENT IN HUNGARY. Mexican President Carlos Salinas
de Gortari arrived on 27 July for a three-day official visit
to Hungary. He met with President Arpad Goncz and Prime Minister
Jozsef Antall, and signed bilateral agreements on technical and
scientific cooperation and tourism. Both sides stressed the need
for expanding bilateral economic ties. (Edith Oltay)

LITHUANIAN-UKRAINIAN TALKS. On 27 July Deputy Lithuanian Foreign
Affairs Minister Rokas Bernotas told Radio Lithuania about his
recent visit to Kiev where he held talks with Ukrainian officials
on the preparation of 16 to 20 accords, the most important of
which is an intergovernmental friendship and cooperation treaty.
(Saulius Girnius)


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

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