Самая большая трата, которую можно сделать, - это трата времени. - Теофраст
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 110, 11 June 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

YELTSIN ON ROLE OF RUSSIAN MILITARY. In his speech to the Russian
military high command on 10 June, Russian President Boris Yeltsin
vowed that Russia would maintain an army commensurate with its
status as a great nuclear power, and echoed his generals by asserting
that Russian troops would not withdraw in disarray from other
former Soviet CIS states. According to Western and CIS reports
of the closed meeting, Yeltsin also said that he had signed a
decree on 10 June that will increase pay significantly for all
military ranks. By the tone of his remarks, Yeltsin is apparently
trying to shore up support within the disgruntled Russian high
command. (Stephen Foye)

. . .ON NUCLEAR ARMS ACCORD. According to Russian and Western
accounts, Yeltsin also told his top military leaders that Russia
supported the idea of strategic nuclear parity with the United
States, while the recent American proposals on further arms cuts
would leave the US in a more advantageous position. Yeltsin was
still hopeful that he and US President George Bush would be able
to sign an agreement on the framework for further arms cuts during
their upcoming Washington summit. He was quoted by Radio Rossii
on 10 June as saying the positions of the two sides have not
yet been clarified, and revealed that he had sent Bush a letter
that day on this issue. (Doug Clarke)

. . .ON RELATIONS WITH UKRAINE AND THE BLACK SEA FLEET. The Russian
president also reportedly said that talks with Ukraine over the
future of the Black Sea Fleet were proceeding with difficulty,
but that both sides had agreed not to take any unilateral actions
until a compromise has been worked out. According to ITAR-TASS,
he expressed the hope that Russia and Ukraine would be be able
to move from confrontation to dialogue on the issues that divide
them. At the same conference, however, Russian Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev continued to go against Yeltsins declared position
that the Black Sea Fleet be divided between Ukraine and Russia
by insisting that it be regarded as part of the CIS armed forces,
RIA reported. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

THE AFGHAN CONNECTION. Yeltsins 10 June appointments to the top
posts in the Russian Defense Ministry and General Staff were
a clear sign that generals who served in Afghanistan will oversee
the construction of the new Russian army. Defense Minister Pavel
Grachev was a much decorated hero of the war in Afghanistan,
while new appointees Viktor Dubynin, Valerii Mironov, Grigorii
Kondratev also served in the 40th army in the 1980s, Dubynin
as the armys commander. According to Radio Rossii, in fact, all
five of the new appointees held command posts in Afghanistan.
(Stephen Foye)

ESTABLISHING RUSSIAS FRONTIERS. Yeltsin told journalists in Moscow
on 10 June that Russia was taking immediate steps to establish
state frontiers with the Baltic States and also with Azerbaijan,
which has virtually abolished visas for entry from Turkey and
Iran, ITAR-TASS reported. He also noted that goods were leaving
unchecked for Latvia and Estonia and that foreign intelligence
services were gaining free access into Russia from the two Baltic
States. Yeltsin said that, if the situation improved in Georgia,
he might agree to a semi-transparent frontier with Georgia. The
question of establishing a Russian-Kazakhstan frontier depended
on whether or not the Central Asian republicswhich have no frontier
with Russiaended entry without visas from other countries of
the region. Yeltsin said that the most difficult question was
that of the frontier with Ukraine. The setting up of a real Russian-Ukrainian
state frontier would greatly complicate bilateral relations,
but Russia would create one if Ukraine introduced its own currency.
(Ann Sheehy)

RUSSIAN PARLIAMENT DISCUSSES LAW ON REPRESSED PEOPLES. The Council
of Nationalities of the Russian parliament discussed the implementation
of its 1991 law on the rehabilitation of repressed peoples on
10 June, ITAR-TASS reported. The report on the governments activity,
given by the Chairman of the State Committee for Nationalities
Policy Valerii Tishkov, came in for heavy criticism. Chechen
deputy Aslanbek Aslakhanov said Tishkov, the director of the
Academy of Sciences Institute of Ethnography, was not on top
of the subject and further discussion would be useless. There
was general agreement that the law was not being implemented.
Economics Minister Andrei Nechaev said it had been adopted chiefly
as a political gesture and needed to be amended. (Ann Sheehy)


RUSSIAN MINISTER CRITICAL OF INDEPENDENCE MALAIS. . . Russian
Information Minister Mikhail Poltoranin, told the Kyodo News
Service in an interview on 10 June that the new states which
emerged as a result of the collapse of the USSR have fallen ill
with independence, but that after they had recovered from this
national measles they would begin to unite again. Poltoranin
singled out Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk, accusing him
of bathing in nationalism. The Russian information minister predicted
that in three to four years the dust will settle and that Russia,
Ukraine, and a number of other republics...will be something
single. Earlier this year, in speech shown on Ukrainian TV, Kravchuk
had accused Poltoranin of Russian great-state chauvinism and
of interfering in Ukraines internal affairs. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


. . . AND OF THE COMMONWEALTH. In the same interview, the Russian
information minister also said that the CIS is not viable and
cannot survive. He described it as an attempt to restore, recreate
that former Union built by Communists who made different civilizations
live under one roof. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

GOVERNMENT OFFENSIVE AGAINST GORBACHEV. In an interview published
in an Italian daily LUnita on 9 June, Russian Information Minister
Mikhail Poltoranin levelled additional accusations of international
terrorism against former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev.
According to Poltoranin, Gorbachev prolonged the Afghan war for
five years and squandered the Soviet Unions resources to assist
the communist regimes in Ethiopia, Cambodia, Nicaragua and Afghanistan.
Today we can bury Gorbachev with one blow, Poltoranin said. (Julia
Wishnevsky)

GORBACHEV WILL NOT STAND TRIAL FOR COUP. The volume of compromising
materials gathered by the Russian prosecutors office on the August
1991 coup attempt are not sufficient to try Mikhail Gorbachev,
Russian TV reported on 10 June. Russian General Prosecutor Valentin
Stepankov made this announcement during a press conference on
the case against Vasilii Starodubtsev, one of the coup leaders
who was released from prison a few days before. (Julia Wishnevsky)


UKRAINIAN ECONOMICS MINISTER MEETS WITH EC OFFICIALS. On 10 June,
Ukrainian Economics Minister Volodymyr Lanovy met in Brussels
with European Community officials to discuss Ukraines request
for a bigger share of the technical assistance budget for reform
in the new CIS states, Reuters reported. An aide to Lanovy said
that the Ukrainian delegation was pleased with the response and
announced that it had also been agreed that a group of EC financial
experts would visit Ukraine at the end of July. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


NEW UKRAINIAN POLITICAL PARTY. The Ukrainian Conservative Republican
Party was formed at its constituent conference in Kiev on 7 June,
Radio Ukraine reported. The new grouping, which is headed by
the well-known radical-minded peoples deputy, Stepan Khmara,
represents a splinter group of the Ukrainian Republican Party
(URP), until recently headed by Levko Lukyanenko. Lukyanenko
is the new Ukrainian ambassador in Ottawa. The split in the URP
occurred at its recent third congress. At the time, Khmara accused
the partys leadership of supporting with the Kravchuk administration.
(Roman Solchanyk)

MINING DISASTER IN EASTERN UKRAINE. Residents of the eastern
Ukrainian coal mining town of Krasnodon are mourning the deaths
of 49 miners who were killed on 9 June by a powerful gas explosion,
Reuters reported. Safety standards in the Donbasss outdated mining
industry have long been a source of concern. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


RUSSIA TO INTRODUCE HEALTH INSURANCE? Russian Minister of Health
Andrei Vorobev stated at a 9 June parliamentary hearing that
the speedy introduction of medical insurance is the cure for
the current crisis in public health care. He foresees an increase
in the volume of ambulatory care provided by independent physicians
practicing general and family medicine. Vorobev stated that this
care will be financed by the local governments. (Sarah Helmstadter)


HEALTH CARE CRISIS AFFECTS INVALIDS. ITAR-TASS reported on 8
June that 200 invalids picketed the White House, protesting the
closing of the Central Prosthesis Institute. Patients were discharged
without treatment or prostheses and many workers were fired or
sent on leave without pay, when the Institutes financing was
cut. The Institute was the central office for conducting scientific
work and production of prostheses. Most patients had turned to
the Central Institute after they were denied artificial limbs
by regional offices. Its closing is representative of the bankruptcy
in health care throughout the CIS. (Sarah Helmstadter)

MORE RUSSIAN UNEMPLOYMENT STATISTICS. The 4 June issue of Delovoi
Mir reports a decrease in the number of employed persons in the
majority of industrial sectors throughout the Russian Federation.
The greatest decrease in workers occurred in sectors where wage
increases were the lowest. Employment dropped by 3% in meat and
dairy industries, 4.2% in the fish industry, 4.4% in medical
services, 4.5% in machine building, and 5.5% in the metal processing
industry. The number of workers increased in areas where wages
had gone up the most: namely the energy sector, with the exception
of oil processing. Komsomolskaya pravda of 9 June reported that
70% of the unemployed in Russia are women, more than 85% are
city dwellers, and less than 15% are inhabitants of rural areas.
(Sarah Helmstadter)

UKRAINE TO CUT SUBSIDIES ON STAPLE GOODS. Ukrainian officials
announced on 10 June that prices for milk, butter, vodka, and
other staple goods would be freed as of 11 June. They did not
mention whether subsidies for bread would be cut. By bringing
Ukrainian prices into line with Russian prices, Deputy Economic
Minister Viktor Kalnik hopes to stem the flow of goods from Ukraine
to Russia caused by large price differentials. The government
will assist 16 million people with income supplements. (Sarah
Helmstadter)

MISHAP WITH BACTERIOLOGICAL WEAPONS IN 1979. Komsomolskaya pravda
on 10 June carried a story saying that an anthrax epidemic around
Sverdlovsk in 1979 was caused by an accident during secret tests
of bacteriological weapons and not by the sale of tainted meat
as officialsincluding Boris Yeltsinclaimed at the time. The paper
said that the outbreak of the disease followed an explosion at
the 19th Secret Military City in the Chkalovski region near Sverdlovsk.
Yeltsin was then the First Secretary of the Sverdlovsk communist
party. The city has since been renamed Ekaterinburg. (Doug Clarke)


DEMOS RESUME IN DUSHANBE. Activists of Tajikistans opposition
coalition are again picketing the Presidential Palace in Dushanbe,
ITAR-TASS reported on 10 June. Prior to the May agreement between
government and opposition, the opposition demonstrators were
demanding President Rakhmon Nabievs resignation, but now they
are demanding that he use his powers to stabilize the situation
in Kulyab and Leninabad oblasts, which refuse to recognize the
new government created under the agreement. The picketers claim
that more than 100 people have been killed in fighting in Kulyab,
and have warned Nabiev that they will defend the integrity of
the country if he cannot. (Bess Brown)

OPPOSITION DEMANDS IN KAZAKHSTAN. The chairman and four members
of the unregistered Kazakh nationalist Jeltoqsan Party are staging
a hunger strike in Alma-Ata, accusing the authorities of repressing
dissidents and criticizing President Nursultan Nazarbaev for
agreeing to give up Kazakhstans strategic missiles, Vesti reported
on 10 June. Batirhan Darimbetov, editor of the moderate Azat
Movements press organ, told the RFE/RL Kazakh Service on 10 June
that the hunger strike is also in protest against the arrest
of three Jeltoqsan members who attacked a statue of Dzerzhinsky.
Jeltoqsan, Azat and its associated Republican Party are demanding
a coalition government and the division of Communist Party assets
among Kazakhstans registered parties. (Bess Brown)

RUSSIANS TO REMAIN IN TURKMENISTAN. In an interview published
in the 23 May issue of Turkmenskaya iskra, Archbishop Vladimir
of Tashkent and Central Asia commented that Turkmenistan has
always remained the calmest and most stable republic within the
bishopric. In his discussions with Orthodox parishioners during
his annual tour of the bishopric, he found none who planned to
leave the region, a reflection of unusual quiescence; other former
Soviet Central Asian republics have witnessed massive out-migration
of European minorities. (Cassandra Cavanaugh)

Insect infestations threaten Russian grain IMPORTS. On 5 June,
the Canadian government lifted a ban on port calls by Russian
grain ships, an RFE/RL Ottawa correspondent reported. The ban
had been imposed at the end of March after gypsy moth eggs were
discovered in several ships coming from Siberia. The gypsy moth,
very harmful to foliage, is commonly found in Russias far eastern
forests. Interfax reported that the moths in the Pacific ports
were causing serious difficulties in shipping grain. Far Eastern
ports of Russia have been infested by gypsy moths, forcing grain
imports to be rerouted to western ports. (Sarah Helmstadter/Carol
Macivor)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

PROTESTS AGAINST MILOSEVIC. Radio Croatia reports on 10 June
that more than 5,000 students rallied in Belgrade demanding the
resignation of Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic, the replacement
of Serbias parliament and government by a government of national
salvation, and calling for multiparty elections to a constitutive
assembly. Organizers stated that if the demands are not fulfilled
the students will call a general strike at Belgrade University
on 15 June. Meanwhile Vuk Draskovic, leader of the Serbian Renewal
Movement, told reporters on 10 June that an antigovernment rally
scheduled for 21 June will be democratic and will last as long
as it is necessary to bring down Milosevic and his regime. He
is calling for an interim government, including some socialists
and representatives of national minorities, to guarantee a radical
democratic transformation. The ruling Socialist party has condemned
the activities of the opposition saying there will be a civil
war if power is handed over to them. Radio Croatia reports on
11 June that Milosevic is rumored to have left Belgrade unexpectedly.
(Milan Andrejevich)

NEW SERBIAN OPPOSITION PARTY FOUNDED. On 10 June four small Serbian
opposition parties formed a coalition party in Belgrade called
the Civic League of Serbia (GSS). Its specific aim is to pacify
Serbia and free the republic from nationalism. The GSS wants
to establish normal relations with the former Yugoslav republics,
begin negotiations on the rights and status of Serbs in these
states, resolve the autonomy and status of Kosovo and Vojvodina,
and form a transitional government in Serbia without Socialist
representatives. Belgrades circle of independent intellectuals,
the Center for Antiwar Action, and the Civil Movement of Resistance
will also participate in GSS activities. Radio Serbia carried
the story. (Milan Andrejevich)

MORE TALK ON MILITARY INTERVENTION IN BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA. Western
agencies on 10 June quoted Serbian chief of staff Gen. Zivota
Panic as saying that Serbia must prepare for outside intervention,
and that low-intensity attacks on Serbian military sites are
the most likely possibilities. On 11 June the Washington Post
and Boston Globe have lengthy articles reviewing the discussion
in American policy-making circles about a possible US military
role in the conflict, including a call by Senator Richard Lugar
for NATO to demand that Serbia observe a cease-fire or face sufficient
military force to ensure its certain and swift defeat. Finally,
Western media report that on 10 June the US recommended that
Serbia and Montenegro should not be allowed automatically to
claim Yugoslavias UN seat, but rather should first have to prove
that they meet certain standards of internationally acceptable
behavior. (Patrick Moore)

KOSOVO ALBANIANS REJECT TALKS WITH SERBIA. On 10 June representatives
of Kosovos Albanian parties and associations rejected another
offer from the Serbian government to start talks on the situation
in the province, Radio Serbia reports. Most parties say they
did not receive invitations. The influential Independent Trade
Union of Kosovo says they feel slighted because in their invitation
Albanians were repeatedly treated as an ethnic minority. The
Social Democratic Party of Kosovo said the talks can only be
held with international mediators and on neutral territory. The
Committee for the Protection of Human Rights and the Democratic
Alliance of Kosovo, the largest party, also found the invitation
one-sided and demeaning. (Milan Andrejevich)

TALKS ON CZECH-SLOVAK RELATIONS CONTINUE. On 11 June the second
round of talks between the Czech election winner, Vaclav Klaus,
and his Slovak counterpart Vladimir Meciar will focus on building
up a broad coalition government and the division of powers between
the federal government and the two republics to prevent a breakup
of the country. Meciars party (HZDS) wants a sovereign Slovak
state with weaker links with Prague, while Klaus party (ODS)
favors a strong federation. Meciar said on 10 June that he would
not meet personally with Havel to discuss the future of the country
but would send a delegation to meet with him on 11 June. Meciars
refusal to see Havel was his personal response to what he considers
Havels interference with party politics after the elections,
Western media report. President Vaclav Havel reaffirmed that
he will be candidate for the presidential elections on 3 July.
(Peter Matuska)

CZECHOSLOVAKIA SAYS DANUBE DAM ACCORD STILL VALID. Reacting to
the Hungarian parliaments decision of 9 June declaring the 1977
Czechoslovak-Hungarian treaty on the Gabcikovo-Nagymaros dam
project invalid, Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry spokesman, Zdenek
Zikmund, said on 10 June that his country views the treaty as
still valid. Zikmund said his ministry will continue efforts
to form an international commission of experts to analyze all
technical aspects of the projects construction, an RFE/RL correspondent
reports. Slovak Prime Minister Jan Carnogursky said on 10 June
that the Hungarian parliaments action is just as illegal as the
treatys cancellation by the Hungarian government in May. Czechoslovakia
has continued work on its (Gabcikovo) side of the project and
has demanded that Hungary compensate it for cancelling the treaty.
(Peter Matuska)

YELTSIN ON TROOP WITHDRAWAL. At a meeting of senior Russian military
commanders in Moscow on 10 June, President Boris Yeltsin said
the solution to the troop pullout from the Baltic States is possible
only on the basis of realism; we reject any ultimatums, ITAR-TASS
reports. He added that the Baltic appeals to the CSCE and UN
on this matter cause bewilderment, and maintained that Russia
has no secret political aims that would be implemented by means
of its troops stationed in the Baltic States. Yeltsin also insisted
that the problem of withdrawal is mostly a technical one: we
cannot pull out troops into an open field and we would never
agree that the withdrawal resemble fleeing. He added that the
pullout process could be accelerated if the other side contributes
to the resettlement of troops. (Dzintra Bungs)

RUSSIA PROTESTS TREATMENT OF MILITARY. The Russian Foreign Ministry
has joined the Defense Ministry in protesting the treatment of
Russian troops serving in the Baltics. In a statement to ITAR-TASS
on 8 June, the Russian Foreign Ministry said that characterizing
military units stationed in areas previously part of the USSR
as occupiers is incorrect, especially given deliberate provocations
against Russian troops . The statement said Russia does not intend
to stand idly by in the face insulting treatment against Russian
troops and will defend their interests in the most decisive manner.
The statement added that provocative statements are hindering
the progress of troop withdrawal talks. Because this is the strongest
stand the Foreign Ministry has taken regarding treatment of military
personnelrather than civiliansthe statement suggests that the
two agencies may now be coordinating policy on the Baltic issue.
(Riina Kionka)

RUSSIA: NO NEED FOR GO-BETWEENS. Russian chief negotiator Vasilii
Svirin does not think Estonian-Russian talks need an intermediary
to speed them along, as proposed earlier this week by Estonian
Deputy Foreign Minister Trivimi Velliste. In a 11 June article
in Paevaleht Svirin said Estonia must take into account the realistic
situation in talks and reiterated that Russian troops must first
be withdrawn from Germany and Poland before the Baltics. (Riina
Kionka)

LATVIA REJECTS OFFER TO SECURE STABILITY. Radio Riga reported
on 10 June that Latvias Defense Council has rejected an offer
by Col. V. Kandalovsky to protect the Latvian government from
possible attempts to overthrow it. The Latvian Defense Council,
noting that the political situation in Latvia is stable and that
the government is in control, considered such an offer inappropriateit
smacks of a desire to interfere in Latvias internal affairs.
Kandalovsky is chairman of the Coordinating Council of Servicemen
of the Baltic Region, an organization that has consistently resisted
Baltic independence. Moreover, since the fall 1991 Kandalovsky
has been a point man in efforts by ex-USSR officers in the Baltic
to resist rapid withdrawal from the region. (Dzintra Bungs &
Stephen Foye)

ROMANIA CRITICIZES KOZYREV ON MOLDOVA. Romania strongly criticized
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev for suggesting the Dniestr
dispute could be solved by breaking up Moldova or creating a
federation, Romanian and foreign media report on 11 June. A Romanian
Foreign Ministry spokesman said Kozyrevs comment, which appeared
in Le Monde of 9 June, runs counter to European security accords
and could spark a wider conflict. (Crisula Stefanescu)

ROMANIAN ELECTIONS SET FOR SEPTEMBER. On 11 June President Ion
Iliescu announced that leaders of the main political parties
have agreed, after a three-hour meeting, to hold parliamentary
elections on 27 September. Although Iliescu favored delaying
the elections until the fall, he admitted that any further delay
would cause uncertainty and tension, Romanian and foreign media
report. The meeting failed to settle differences on whether presidential
polls should be held at the same time as parliamentary elections,
as favored by Iliescu. (Crisula Stefanescu)

MORE ON BULGARIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH CONFLICT. On 10 June a rally
was held in front of Alexander Nevski Cathedral in support of
the new Holy Synod, which had been registered on 25 May and had
taken over the synod building on 1 June. The rally was organized
by the Union of Priests, which sides with the new body. Earlier
the same day the main figure in the new Synod, newly appointed
Bishop Hristofor Makariopolski (former Father Hristofor Sabev)
read over Bulgarian Radio a number of decisions taken by the
new Synod involving dismissals and appointments of leading priests.
The name of Patriarch Maksim is no longer to be mentioned in
church services, and prayers are to include the name of late
Tsar Boris III. Bishop Hristofor reaffirmed an opinion he had
expressed the previous day, calling for observance of the old
Tarnovo constitution and return of ex-Tsar Simeon to the throne.
(Rada Nikolaev)

BCP SUPPORTED INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM. In an announcement quoted
by BTA on 10 June, the Ministry of the Interior said that documents
had been found in its archives implicating the former Bulgarian
Communist Party in organizing and aiding international terrorism
and interfering in the internal affairs of sovereign states.
In 1974 the Greek CP was supported through illegal transfer of
persons and material across the border, via a secret radio link,
and with money. In 1984 political asylum was given to seven Turkish
terrorists and hijackers. Various other BCP decisions involved
training of security agents from Angola, Mozambique, Nicaragua,
Yemen, Cuba, Tanzania, and Ghana and providing them with money
and arms. (Rada Nikolaev)

HUNGARYS UNEMPLOYED. According to figures released by the Ministry
of Labor, unemployment rose in May to 9.7% of the work force,
up from 9.3% in April, MTI reports. Preliminary figures indicate
that in May 522,700 people were registered as unemployed. The
largest number of unemployedover 63,000were registered in the
northern county of Borsod-Abauj-Zemplen, where 16.3% of the work
force is jobless. (Edith Oltay)

ROMANIA, LITHUANIA SIGN TRADE AGREEMENT. On 10 June Romanian
Trade Minister Constantin Fota and Lithuanian Economics Minister
Albertas Simenas signed an agreement in Bucharest for economic
and commercial cooperation, granting each other most-favored-nation
trading status, Reuters reports. A protocol on goods supplies,
services, and payments was also signed. No details about the
goods in the 1992 list were announced, but payments would be
made in hard currency at market prices. (Saulius Girnius)

EC TO PROVIDE $80 MILLION TO POLAND. On 8 June EC Commissioner
for Regional Policy Bruce Milan announced that the European Community
will provide $80 million in aid to Poland this year under the
program for regional restructuring. Polish Minister for European
Integration and Foreign Aid Jacek Saryusz-Wolski said Warsaw
will identify which regions require most help and allocate the
money accordingly, AFP reports. (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

POLES WATCH ILLEGALLY IMPORTED TV SETS. On 8 June Foreign Trade
Minister Adam Glapinski said that over 400,000 Western TV sets
were smuggled into Poland last year, AFP reports. He told a press
conference that the treasury lost over $250 million last year
because some importers of electronic equipment provided falsified
receipts to customs officials. He said that new antifraud legislation
will be introduced at the end of next month. Under the legislation,
electronic equipment imported into Poland will have to come through
specified entry points for checking by specialized teams. (Wladyslaw
Minkiewicz)



[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Carla Thorson and Charles Trumbull



The RFE/RL Daily Report is produced by the RFE/RL Research Institute
(a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Inc.) in Munich,
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