Fear of life in one form or another is the great thing to exorcise. - William James
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 109, 10 June 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

MOLDOVAN GOVERNMENT RESIGNS. The majority of the Moldovan government
voted at a session on 8 June to hand in their resignations, Moldovan
and Western agencies reported. The Ministers of Defense, Internal
Affairs, National Security, and Culture decided to stay on. Opening
a new session of the Parliament on 9 June, President Mircea Snegur
read the statement submitted by the resigning Ministers, who
contended that the governments economic reform program could
not be implemented in the face of popular discontent and insufficient
support by parliament. Snegur, who cancelled his planned attendance
at the Earth summit in Rio de Janeiro because of the government
crisis, gave himself and parliament two weeks to assemble a new
government. (Vladimir Socor)

NO US-RUSSIAN AGREEMENT ON NEW ARMS CUTS. Russian Foreign Minister
Andrei Kozyrev and US Secretary of State James Baker failed to
agree on the terms of a new strategic arms reduction treaty during
two days of talks in preparation for the 16-17 June summit meeting
of Presidents Yeltsin and Bush. Western agencies reported that
both sides had agreed to cut their strategic nuclear arsenals
to roughly 4,700 warheads, but could not agree on the mix of
weapons that would be allowed. The United States wants to ban
all land-based multiple-warhead missiles, and the Russians have
balked at giving up all their SS-18s and SS-24s. Reuters reported
that Russian journalists indicated Baker would visit Moscow on
12 June in a last attempt to forge an agreement prior to the
summit. (Doug Clarke)

YELTSIN NAMES RUSSIAN DEFENSE CHIEFS. Following his appearance
before the Russian high command on the second of a two-day conference
in Moscow, Russian President Boris Yeltsin announced the appointment
of Colonel General Viktor Dubynin as chief of staff of the Russian
army and first deputy defense minister, ITAR-TASS reported on
10 June. According to the same report, Dubynins deputy will be
Colonel General Miihail Kolesnikov, while Colonel Generals Vladimir
Toporov, Valerii Mironov, and Georgii Kondratev were named deputy
defense ministers. Dubynins appointment was especially surprising.
He had been serving as commander of the Northern Group of Forces
in Poland, and his erratic and at times insulting behavior toward
the Poles did not seem to mark him for future promotion. (Stephen
Foye)

RUSSIAN-TURKMEN DEFENSE ACCORD. The Russian defense minister
visited the Turkmen capital of Ashgabat on 7 June for talks on
a plan for military cooperation between the two countries that,
according to Grachev, had been proposed earlier this year by
Turkmen leaders, ITAR-TASS reported on 5 June. On 8 June the
two sides signed an agreement whereby Turkmenistan would build
its own armed forces on the basis of former Soviet units in the
republic, but those forces would be controlled jointly by Russia
and Turkmenistan, Interfax reported. The protocol to the agreement
calls for certain air defense and air force units to remain under
Moscows command. Moscow will also provide some financing and
technical supply during an unspecified transition period, while
Turkmenistan will insure proper living conditions and supply
for the military units. (Stephen Foye)

GEORGIA TO HAVE ARMY, BUT NO BLACK SEA FLEET? Tornike Papava,
identified as the chief of the Georgian Defense Ministry personnel
department, said on 7 June that Georgia would build an army of
some 20,000 men, AFP reported (quoting Interfax). Papava added
that the army would have approximately 2,000 officers who will
be paid at least 3,000 rubles per month. He suggested that Georgia
had made offers to some 2,000 Georgian officers still serving
in other CIS states, and said that the Georgian army would be
prepared to cooperate with Moscow should an external threat arise.
Meanwhile, Interfax reported on 5 June that leading members of
the right-wing parliamentary group Russian Unity had sent a telegram
to Boris Yeltsin and the military command that condemned plans
to allocate to Georgia a part of the Black Sea Fleet. The authors
claimed that such a step would lead to a bloody fratricidal war
in the Caucasus. (Stephen Foye)

RUSSIAS PLANS FOR UKRAINE. The Kiev newspaper Vechirnii Kyiv,
on 12 and 28 May, published excerpts perportedly from a classified
document prepared for the Russian leadership outlining several
scenarios for Russian policies towards Ukraine. In the Conclusions
and Proposals, among other things, the document recommends that
Moscow pursue a policy aimed at restricting Ukraines economic
growth and independence. In the political arena, it proposes
that Ukraine be isolated as much as possible, that its political
influence and its ability to receive foreign aid be circumscribed
to the maximum extent. Ukrainian politicians, it continues, should
be put under international fire by creating an image of an authoritarian-nationalistic
and neocommunist regime in Ukraine. (Roman Solchanyk)

UKRAINE WANTS TO ATTEND G7 SUMMIT. A Ukrainian Foreign Ministry
spokesman on 9 June contested Russias position as the Wests main
diplomatic partner. Reiterating Ukraines position that Russia
is not the sole successor state to the Soviet Union, the spokesman
maintained that if Russian President Boris Yeltsin is to be invited
to the forthcoming G7 summit in Munich, the same courtesy should
be extended to Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. The spokesman
also questioned Russias right to negotiate further strategic
arms cuts without consulting Kiev. (Roman Solchanyk)

U.S. AMBASSADOR ARRIVES IN KIEV. The first U.S. ambassador to
Ukraine, Roman Popadiuk, arrived in Kiev on 8 June, Radio Ukraine
reported. Popadiuk, who is of Ukrainian origin, served as deputy
White House press secretary before assuming his new post. Upon
arriving in the Ukrainian capital, the U.S. ambassador said that
he greeted the Ukrainian people and the independent state. Popadiuk
presented his credentials to President Leonid Kravchuk on 9 June.
(Roman Solchanyk)

INDUSTRIAL LOBBY AGAINST GAIDARS RESIGNATION. The Industrial
Union seems to be satisfied with the appointment of its representatives
as deputy prime ministers and has stopped attacking the Russian
government. A leader of the industrial lobby, Arkadii Volsky,
told Interfax on 5 June that the resignation of First Deputy
Prime Minister Egor Gaidar would be an unforgivable mistake,
and the new government should be supported. A new deputy prime
minister in charge of agriculture is also expected to be appointed
soon. (Alexander Rahr)

PRO-YELTSIN PARTY SET UP BY AFGHAN VETERANS. A new political
group, called the Peoples Patriotic Party of Russia, was set
up in Moscow on 6June on the basis of the Union of Afghan Veterans,
ITAR-TASS reported. The party announced its full support for
President Yeltsins reforms and criticized the absolute majority
of Russias political organizations that oppose presidential policies.
The head of the new party, Aleksandr Kotenev is the leader of
the Union of Afghan Veterans and an advisor to the Russian government
on links with various political and social organizations. At
a press conference on 6 June, Kotenev rejected suggestions made
by some journalists that the Peoples Patriotic Party might become
an official presidential party. Various leaders of the Russian
Federation have called for the establishment of a presidential
party. (Vera Tolz)

MOSCOW COUP PLOTTER RELEASED FROM JAIL. One of the members of
the emergency committee that led the August 1991 coup attempt
was released from prison pending trial, Interfax reported on
6 June. The agency quoted sources in the Russian prosecutors
office as saying that Vasilii Starodubtsev, former head of the
Soviet Peasants Union, was set free from Moscows Matrosskaya
Tishina prison. Interfax said that fourteen other men arrested
after the coup, would also ask to be released. Starodubtsev reportedly
had been freed because he was the first of the accused to have
finished reading the case against him. The rest are still at
work on the evidence. (Vera Tolz)

RUSSIAN GOLD OUTPUT FALLS. The head of Russias state gold and
diamond company, Valerii Rudakov, told Izvestiya on 6 June that
the federations gold output is expected to drop by 30% in 1992
and by a further 50% in 1993, Reuters reported. Rudakov said
that the situation in this industry has acquired a catastrophic
character. The anticipated drop in production was attributed
to a decrease in state financing that made it impossible for
extraction teams to start work this spring. (Keith Bush)

PRICE CONTROLS EASED ON BREAD AND DAIRY PRODUCTS IN MOSCOW. Retail
price controls on bread and dairy products were eased in Moscow
on 6 June, Interfax and Western agencies reported. Retailers
were not allowed to mark up the prices of bread by more than
25%, and a maximum profit margin of 10% was set for dairy products.
Western agencies reported that most prices rose by four or five
times. A Moscow official was reported as saying that the citys
1.2 million pensioners and single mothers would be given 100
rubles a month as compensation. Special distribution centers
are also to be set up to supply milk to mothers with young children.
(Keith Bush)

LATEST FORECAST OF UNEMPLOYMENT IN RUSSIA. The head of the Russian
Labor Ministry Committee on Unemployment, Fedor Prokopov, told
a news conference on 8 June that the number of unemployed could
rise to 4 million by the end of 1992, Western agencies reported.
Prokopov gave the official tally of unemployed in Russia on 1
May as 151,000, of whom 70% were women. But he conceded that
this figure was artificially low, as it did not include thousands
of workers who are not working but who are listed as employed
because no bankruptcy law has been passed that would force loss-making
enterprises out of business. Prokopov said that the number of
jobless could be swelled by privatization and by demobilization
of servicemen. (Keith Bush)

PRICE RISES HIT PENSIONERS ESPECIALLY HARD. Pensioners interviewed
in Moscow indicated that they would continue to buy milk, but
in smaller quantities, Western agencies reported on 6 June. Pensions
have risen along with prices, salaries, and inflation, but many
pensioners have not been receiving the full amount because of
cash shortages and disarray in the social security agencies.
Although monthly pensions were raised to 900 rubles in May, many
pensioners receive as little as 235 rubles a month. (Sarah Helmstadter)


YELTSIN URGES TANK SALES? On 8 June Boris Yeltsin told workers
at the Uralvagonzavod in Nizhnyi Tagil that they should try to
export their primary product, the T-72 tank, according to an
ITAR-TASS report of the visit. Yeltsin reportedly said at the
impromptu meeting that the factory could keep 80% of the hard
currency earned from any such sales. (Stephen Foye)

NO PAY FOR THE NORTHERN FLEET? In a report broadcast by Novosti
from the northern city of Murmansk on 4June, a seamen was quoted
as saying that he had not been paid since February of this year.
He also said that a protest by seamen over the situation had
been hushed up by the military leadership, and added that the
crew of his ship had considered going on strike (Stephen Foye)


GRACHEV MEETS WITH SOLDIERS MOTHERS. Russian Defense Minister
Grachev met with activists of the movement Soldiers Mothers of
Russia, which has been protesting for the last week against the
noncombat deaths of their sons and the allegedly unlawful acts
committed in the army. ITAR-TASS reported on 6 June that Grachev
offered the group representation in the formation of the Russian
Defense Ministry. By including the mothers organization, Grachev
hopes to add credibility to the process. (Chris Hummel)

NON-COMBAT DEATHS IN VOLGOGRAD OBLAST. The press center of the
North Caucasus Military District has denied an ITAR-TASS report
alleging that 714 conscript soldiers from Volgograd Oblast have
died non-combat deaths since 1985. The press center claimed that
the death toll for that period of time was actually 175, and
that in the entire period since the end of WWII only 576 conscripts
from the oblast had died non-combat deaths in the armed forces.
(Stephen Foye)

CONCERN ABOUT NATO PRESENCE IN BARENTS SEA. The press center
of the CIS Northern Fleet complained on 4June about the high
level of NATO military activity in the Barents Sea. As reported
by ITAR-TASS, the statement said that within the preceding week
British and Norwegian maritime patrol aircraft had flown near
Russian territorial waters, and two foreign nuclear submarines
had been detected. Norwegian and French warships were also operating
in the Barents Sea. The press center added that the region abounds
in naval test ranges and important communication lines. (Doug
Clarke)

UZBEK OPPOSITION ADOPTS PROGRAM. At its first congress as a registered
political movement, the Uzbek Popular Front Birlik criticized
the governments of the CIS and of some Western countries for
choosing to support President Karimov in hopes of warding off
Islamic fundamentalists, Moskovskie Novosti reported on 31 May.
Birlik adopted an extensive program of political and economic
reforms, including the limitation of presidential power by parliament;
though it favors a secular government, it supports a social and
educational role for Islam. The congress also criticized Karimov
for signing the recent CIS collective security agreement (without
consulting parliament), and for apparently supporting Armenia
against Azerbaijan in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. (Cassandra
Cavanaugh)

PATRIARCH ON CATHOLIC-ORTHODOX RELATIONS. ITAR-TASS quoted an
interview with Patriarch Aleksii II in the 8 June issue of Il
Messagiero. The Patriarch said that brotherly contacts between
the Russian Orthodox and the Catholic Church must continue in
spite of all the difficulties. He welcomed the Popes decision
to postpone a visit to Russia as a wise move. (Oxana Antic)

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

CZECHOSLOVAKIA: ONE COUNTRY OR TWO. On 9 June, after the first
round of talks between the Czech election winner, Vaclav Klaus,
and his Slovak counterpart Vladimir Meciar, President Vaclav
Havel said the situation in his country is very serious but it
is premature to conclude the country is destined to split apart.
He added everything depends on the outcome of political negotiations
in coming days, Western correspondents report. Klaus told reporters
the differences notably concern the future of the federal president.
Klauss party (ODS) supports Vaclav Havel, but Meciar said that
while he could support a Czech as head of state, he would not
back Havel for another term. On 9 June Meciar released a statement
saying he does not believe it possible to form a new government
by 5 July, the deadline set under the law governing elections.
He noted that his decision to join or not to join a coalition
will be based solely on the political program of the proposed
government. Klaus and Meciar will meet again on 11 June. (Peter
Matuska)

...AND FROM WITHIN. Twelve deputies of the ruling Socialist party
(SPS) in the national assembly have threatened to leave the party
and form a new Social Democratic Party if fundamental changes
are not made immediately. Jovan Cvetkovic said his group has
the support of another 38 deputies from the SPS. This is the
first time that the SPS has publicly revealed a split and threatens
the SPSs majority voting block in the parliament. Radio Serbia
carried the report. (Milan Andrejevich)

OUTSIDE PRESSURE AMOUNTING AGAINST MILOSEVIC ... Over the past
two weeks a coalition of political forces, the Serbian Orthodox
Church, and trade unions have been pressing for Serbian President
Slobodan Milosevics resignation. The moves are in direct response
to the 30 May UN sanctions against Yugoslavia for its aggression
in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Radio Serbia reports on 9 June that the
4-party opposition coalition Democratic Movement of Serbia (DEPOS)
called for Milosevics immediate resignation and for replacing
him with an interim government until multiparty elections can
be held. DEPOS is giving Milosevic eight days to resign, otherwise
the coalition will call a peace rally on 21 June to launch a
national democratic assembly. DEPOS says Milosevics resignation
would prevent the outbreak of civil war in Serbia, and replacing
his regime, which has brought Serbia to the edge of abyss, is
the lowest price to pay. The coalition also believes that if
it were called in to control the demonstration, the army would
likely side with the protesters. (Milan Andrejevich)

DID MILOSEVIC SEEK TO PARTITION MACEDONIA? The 9 June Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung says that Greek Prime Minister Constantine
Mitsotakis told that paper that six months ago Milosevic suggested
that the two countries divide Macedonia between themselves. Mitsotakis
said he firmly rejected the idea and informed the EC about it.
(Patrick Moore)

NO US AIRBORNE INTERVENTION. Western media on 9 and 10 June quote
a State Department spokesman as saying that Washington is not
discussing the Bosnian presidents appeal for the US Air Force
to bomb Serbian positions around Sarajevo, where fighting continues.
Washington also feels that airdrops of food and medical supplies
could easily fall into the wrong hands and hence would not be
the most effective means of getting help to those who need it.
(Patrick Moore)

YUGOSLAV DIPLOMATIC PRESENCE IN BUDAPEST REDUCED. On 9 June,
the Hungarian Foreign Ministry summoned the Yugoslav ambassador
in Budapest and asked the Yugoslav government to reduce by two
the number of its diplomats for the duration of the UN embargo
against Yugoslavia. The request was made following consultations
with Czechoslovakia and Poland, MTI reports. (Edith Oltay)

ROMANIA WILL BREAK SOME UN SANCTIONS. Romania confirmed on 9
June that it is allowing oil shipments to reach neighboring Serbia
despite UN sanctions. Deputy Transport Minister Valentin Mirescu
told Western agencies that stopping oil shipments would be a
catastrophe for Romania. According to Constantin Fota, the Minister
of Commerce and Tourism, the losses resulting from the application
of the embargo would amount to $3 billion. He said that these
losses and the derogation of certain sanctions will be listed,
and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs will present the list to
the United Nations and to European bodies and ask for compensation.
(Crisula Stefanescu)

HUNGARIAN PARLIAMENT INVALIDATES GABCIKOVO-NAGYMAROS TREATY.
On 9 June the Hungarian parliament voted to invalidate the 1977
treaty between Hungary and Czechoslovakia on the construction
of the joint hydro-electric dam project, MTI reports. The Hungarian
government cancelled the treaty on 25 May. Czechoslovakia refuses
to recognize the cancellation and vows to continue construction.
Hungary suspended construction work on the project in 1989 out
of concern for environmental damage. (Edith Oltay)

ROMANIA CALLS ENVIRONMENT INTOLERABLE. Environment Minister Marcian
Bleahu told the UN Conference on Environment and Development
in Rio de Janeiro that although Romanias ecological situation
is scandalous and intolerable, it cannot simply choose between
between the environment and development, because closing polluting
factories and stopping cutting of forests would result in serious
social problems, an RFE/RL correspondent reports. According to
Bleahu, Romania is overburdened with dead rivers, degraded soil,
and devastated forests. Man and the environment, he said, were
the greatest victims of communism. (Crisula Stefanescu)

CREDITS FOR BULGARIAS PHONE SYSTEM UPGRADE. Stefan Sofiyanski,
Chairman of the Committee on Communications and Information,
was quoted by Western agencies on 9 June as saying that Bulgaria
will receive loans of $160 million for a complete modernization
of its phone system. He said the loan has been approved by the
European Investment Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction
and Development, and the World Bank, and they had decided to
release the first $50 million next month. Bids to carry out the
work are expected from Siemens of Germany, Ericsson of Sweden,
and AT&T. A completely new phone system is planned by the year
2006, while a cellular phone network would be in place by 1996.
(Rada Nikolaev)

BULGARIAN INFLATION FIGURES. The National Statistical Institute
has announced that inflation in May was 11.93%, BTA reported
on 8 June. The prices of foodstuffs increased by 11.68%, of nonfood
items by 5.42%, and of services by 28.46%. Earlier it was reported
that after a 20% increase of prices in the first half of May,
in the second two weeks the increase was only 0.23%. According
to PlanEcon, the average monthly inflation rate in Bulgaria between
April 1991 and February 1992 has been 4.8%. (Rada Nikolaev)

POLISH PREMIER HOPES FOR BROAD COALITION. Waldemar Pawlak told
Western and Polish wire service reporters he hopes to form a
broad-based cabinet and pledged to end the ruthless rivalry between
the prime ministers office and President Lech Walesa. On 9 June
he held talks aimed at forming a government with leaders of the
Democratic Union (UD), the Liberal-Democratic Congress (KLD),
the Polish Economic Program (PPG) and the Confederation for Independent
Poland (KPN). Although the talks hit a snag when key participants
disagreed over economic policy, party leaders said the reservations
expressed mainly by the KPN did not mean the negotiations had
failed. But KPN chairman Leszek Moczulski said chances for agreement
are extremely limited, since participants remain very divided
on proposed economic policies. (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

VAGNORIUS CANT QUIT. On 9 June Prime Minister Gediminas Vagnorius
repeated his request to the Lithuanian Supreme Council to accept
his resignation, since a majority does not support his government.
The unruly session, broadcast live by Radio Lithuania, showed
the indecision of the deputies. Both a secret ballot vote (59
to 12 with 3 abstentions) and an open vote (51 to 46 with 5 abstentions)
failed to gain the necessary margin, so Vagnorius remains in
office. Due to a boycott by deputies of the Sajudis Coalition
For a Democratic Lithuania, a full quorum was not present for
the secret ballot, and the necessary 65 votes could not be mustered.
The open vote needed the approval of 54 deputies, the majority
of the 107 registered as attending deputies. It is not clear
why 8 deputies voting to accept his resignation in the secret
ballot did not do so in the open vote. (Saulius Girnius)

PROGRESS IN SETTING SEIMAS ELECTION DATE. On 9 June the Supreme
Council agreed to hold elections to the new Lithuanian parliament,
seimas, between the end of September and early November, Radio
Lithuania reports. A referendum on the draft constitution would
be held the same day. In case the parliament were unable to agree
on one draft, the voters would be asked to choose between two
drafts. The parliament was also obligated to prepare a new election
law and fix a definite date for the elections by 30 June. (Saulius
Girnius)

MOLDOVAS DRUC TAKES ROMANIAN CITIZENSHIP. Former Moldovan prime
minister Mircea Druc, president of the Christian-Democratic Popular
Front in the Republic of Moldova, acquired Romanian citizenship
on 4 June, Rompres reported on 8 June, quoting sources in the
leadership of the Ecology Movement of Romania (MER). The MER
Congress of 3-4 May nominated Mircea Druc for the presidency
of Romania. (Crisula Stefanescu)

CPSU DOCUMENT SLAMS FOREIGN INFLUENCE IN BALTIC. The most recent
edition of the official Russian government newspaper has published
a secret CPSU Central Committee document alleging a significant
Western role in fostering the Baltic Popular Front movements.
The document, dated 14 January 1989, names several well-known
Baltic figures in the Westincluding RFE Estonian Service chief
Toomas Ilves, Latvian journalist Juris Kazas, and VOA Lithuanian
Service director Romas Sakadolskisfor traveling to the Baltic
States, meeting with the political and cultural figures, and
making media appearances. The document, sent by the CC to several
relevant USSR ministries and agencies, appears in Rossiiskie
vesti of 5 June (no.16, 62). (Riina Kionka)

RUSSIA BRINGING IN MORE TROOPS. Russia is secretly bringing new
recruits into Estonia and Latvia, according to Rahva Haal of
10 June. Last week, a Russian military ship anchored off the
coast of Riga dispatched some 170 new recruits there, probably
replacements for troops previously withdrawn. The ship then sailed
to Paldiski and Tallinn in Estonia, dropping off about 50 recruits
in each port. The action, which was not cleared with local authorities,
not only violates Estonian and Latvian immigration laws and NWGF
commander Mironovs orders that former Soviet soldiers adhere
to local border regulations, but also further undermines currently
stalled Russian-Baltic consultations over troop withdrawals.
(Riina Kionka)

WHATS AT BOLDERAJA? Latvias Minister of Internal Affairs Ziedonis
Cevers told Diena on 8 June that the following vessels of Russias
Baltic fleet are currently docked at the naval base in Bolderaja:
2 small guided-missile craft, 5 minesweepersthe sixth minesweeper
has been sent to Tallinn for repairs and the seventh has been
amortizedthe Latvian coast guard would like to purchase it. Cevers
said that in mid-June a Varshavyanka-type submarine would be
ready to depart for Iran, which has bought it. Another submarine
is located there for training purposes. In addition, there are
5 Whiskey-class submarines, 7-8 small antisubmarine cutters,
as well as tankers, cranes, and other boats and equipment. (Dzintra
Bungs)

LATVIAN-RUSSIAN TREATY DISCUSSED. Sergei Zotov, head of the Russian
delegation for talks with Latvia, told 25 high-ranking Russian
military, government, and parliament representatives at Moscows
White House on 8 June that the Russian Supreme Soviet must not
further delay in the ratification of the Latvian-Russian treaty,
which was endorsed by Yeltsin on 13 January 1991. Zotov argued
that once the treaty is ratified, Russia could ask the CSCE to
examine the human rights aspects of certain Latvian laws, Diena
reports. Russias First Deputy Foreign Minister Fedor Shelov-Kovedyaev
told Interfax on 9 June that Russia had put off the ratification
of the treaty last December till the problem of violations of
the ethnic Russians rights is solved. Latvians believe, however,
that Russia is playing up human rights in order to deflect international
interest in the troop withdrawal issue from the Baltics. (Dzintra
Bungs)

IN ESTONIASHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO? Just over 5,000 hopefuls
have submitted applications for Estonian citizenship, ETA reports
on 10 June. Meanwhile, the RFE/RL Estonian Service reports that
a total of 2,190 people from the largely Russian-speaking northeast
have moved out of Estonia in the first five months of this year.
(Riina Kionka)

POLISH, GERMAN INTELLIGENCE SERVICES TO COOPERATE. Following
talks in Warsaw between President Lech Walesa and German Minister
of State, Bernd Schmidbauer, Warsaw and Bonn agreed to stop spying
on each other and instead to cooperate in the fight against terrorism
and drug trafficking, an RFE/RL correspondent in Bonn reports.
(Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by Carla Thorson & Charles Trumbull



The RFE/RL Daily Report is produced by the RFE/RL Research Institute
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