We are all apt to believe what the world believes about us. - George Eliot
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 107, 05 June 1992



SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

YELTSIN GOVERNMENT WAVERING ON REFORM? After the Russian cabinet
meeting on 4 June, economic advisor, Aleksei Ulyukaev, told reporters
that the new deputy prime ministers will bring "tactical changes"
but will not harm the course of economic reform, Western agencies
reported. He said that the three industrialists were not conservatives.
Ulyukaev added that relations between the first deputy prime
ministers, Egor Gaidar and Vladimir Shumeiko are pretty good.
There has been speculation that the cabinet reshuffle will neutralize
impotent the Gaidar team of reform-minded economists. (Keith
Bush)

INDUSTRIAL LOBBY ON THE RISE. ITAR-TASS reported on 4 June, that
the parliamentary faction "Industrial Union" is arguing that,
up to now, the government had failed to combine the interests
of workers, businessmen and the state, but now industrial leaders
must become the leading force in correcting the government's
policy. Three of the five new cabinet members are representatives
of the Industrial Union. The Union is also reportedly seeking
to appoint its representative as prime minister, although one
of its leaders, Arkadii Volsky, denied, in an interview with
Interfax on 4 June, that he would fight for that job. (Alexander
Rahr)

A TURN TO THE RIGHT? Meanwhile, the parliamentary factions, "Radical
Democrats" and "Democratic Russia," have criticized the recent
government changes as a "turn to the right," ITAR-TASS reported
on 4 June. At a meeting with leaders of the two factions, Russian
President Yeltsin stated that he supports Gaidar's economic reform
bloc and will not side with the industrial bloc. At the same
time, Yeltsin's economic advisor, Aleksei Ulyukaev, was quoted
by The Los Angeles Times on 5 June as saying that the new government
would not be primarily concerned with whether or not the IMF
approves Russian economic policy. He alleged that the IMF's support
was important but not vital, and that the key to resolving problems
lies within the country. (Alexander Rahr)

SALTYKOV: NEW DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER. Former Russian Minister
of Science, Higher Education and Technological Policy Boris Saltykov,
has been appointed deputy prime minister, "Novosti" reported
on 4 June. He will apparently be placed in charge of the government's
education policy. Yeltsin said that, with the latest government
appointments, the "limit of the compromise" with parliament has
been reached and that he does not intend any further changes.
Egor Gaidar was quoted by ITAR-TASS as saying that the present
government consists of a "multi-party coalition" of economists
and some "powerful social groups." (Alexander Rahr)

OPPOSITION INCREASES PRESSURE ON YELTSIN. In the lead up to the
Constitutional Court hearings on the CPSU in early July, the
pro-Communist opposition in Russia is trying to increase pressure
on Yeltsin to resign. Radio Rossii reported on 4 June that the
coordinator of the opposition bloc "Russian Unity," People's
Deputy Sergei Baburin, is demanding that the Constitutional Court
take up the issue of Yeltsin's constitutional violations and
his betrayal of Russia's interests. Baburin was quoted as saying
that Yeltsin has brought Russia to the brink of national catastrophe
and therefore should be forced to step down. (Vera Tolz)

RUSSIAN CENTRAL BANK CHAIRMAN TO STAY ON. On 4 June, the Russian
parliament rejected the resignation of Russian Central Bank Chairman
Georgii Matyukhin, "Vesti" reported. Matyukhin and his deputy,
Vladimir Rasskazov, had submitted their resignations on 1 June.
During the joint parliamentary session, Matyukhin claimed that
he had tendered his resignation because of the government's failure
to solve the key issues of money flow and interest rates. He
advocated the temporary freezing of prices and wages. Matyukhin
made the withdrawal of his resignation conditional on parliament
granting more independence to the bank and to himself. It was
not clear whether Rasskazov also had retracted his resignation.
(Keith Bush)

YELTSIN STRENGTHENS RUSSIAN BORDER CONTROLS. In what appears
to be part of a broader strengthening of its internal security
apparatus and a toughening in its relations with other CIS states,
the Russian Federation announced on 4 June that it would introduce
formal border controls with at least five neighboring republics.
According to Izvestiya, a decision was reached at the 3 June
meeting of the Russian Security Council to create Russian Border
Forces that will be subordinate to the Ministry of Security and
separate from those that already exist within the CIS framework.
There will reportedly be a parallel strengthening of customs
services, particularly with the Baltic republics. State borders
will also be created with Ukraine and Azerbaijan, while a customs
border will be created with Georgia. The moves were described
as part of an effort to fight rising levels of interstate crime
within the CIS. (Stephen Foye)

UKRAINE ENLARGES ITS BORDER TROOPS. Meanwhile, at the end of
its session on 4 June, the Ukrainian parliament approved an increase
in size of the republic's border troops, Radio Ukraine reported.
There was no indication, however, of the extent of the increase.
(Bohdan Nahaylo)

DRAFT RUSSIAN DEFENSE LAW APPROVED. On 3 June, a joint session
of the Russian Supreme Soviet approved, on the first reading,
a draft law "On Defense," ITAR-TASS reported. While details of
the draft law were not available, it reportedly sets out the
organizational structure of the future Russian defense establishment
and includes articles on the delineation of functions between
the Defense Ministry and the general staff, on reductions in
general forces and in the army's central administration, on insuring
civilian control over the armed forces, and on weapons development
policy under existing economic conditions. According to ITAR-TASS,
the draft was prepared by the Supreme Soviet Committees for Defense
and State Security, for Legislation, the President's Legal Administration,
the CIS central military command, and by the Ministries of Defense,
Security, and Internal Affairs. (Stephen Foye)

KRAVCHUK RECEIVES FORMER WESTERN LEADERS. On 4 June Ukraine's
President Leonid Kravchuk received two former Western leaders
who are currently on private visits to Kiev: former US President
Gerald Ford and former British Prime Minister James Callaghan.
During the meeting, Radio Ukraine reported, Kravchuk cautioned
Western politicians against viewing the CIS as "a continuation
of the USSR with Russia in the dominant role." Commenting on
the pace of economic reforms in Ukraine, Kravchuk said that they
were not yet proceeding very quickly. But he added that Ukraine's
specific conditions had to be taken into account as well as the
danger of "social explosions" if reforms were "rushed too much."
(Bohdan Nahaylo)

UN WELCOME TO INVESTIGATE SITUATION IN CRIMEA. During his meeting
with Gerald Ford and Lord Callaghan, Kravchuk also said that
the Crimean issue had been deliberately stirred up and that he
was prepared to allow a UN-sponsored commission to investigate
what he said were false accusations being made by some politicians
in Moscow about alleged violations of the rights of Russians
living in Crimea. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

OSSETIAN NUCLEAR BLACKMAIL THREAT DISCOUNTED. On 4 June, Colonel
Dolgachev, head of the press service of the Transcaucasus Military
District, rejected claims made by South Ossetian separatist Alan
Chochiev (confirmed by the chairman of the South Ossetian Council
of Ministers, Oleg Teziev) in a statement published in Nezavisimaya
gazeta on 3 June that South Ossetia possesses a tactical nuclear
warhead that it is prepared to use "in self-defense." Dolgachev
stated that there were no nuclear warheads stationed in the Caucasus,
and that even if the South Ossetians had managed to obtain one
they could not fire it without the necessary launching facilities.
His remarks were reported by Radio Mayak, citing the Georgian
Iprinda news agency. (Liz Fuller)

CHECHNYA TO FORM ARMY. Chechen president Dzhokhar Dudaev announced
on 4 June at a meeting of the Cabinet of Ministers that the republic
was determined to create a regular, national army, ITAR-TASS
reported. According to Dudaev, the army would number just over
7,000 men, already recruited in this spring's military draft,
and would be deployed in garrisons evacuated by the former Soviet
troops. Dudaev also said that success in parliamentary talks
between Chechnya and Russia had been precluded by the intransigence
of the Russian side, and that Chechnya would henceforth pursue
negotiations with the Russian government. (Stephen Foye)

TER-PETROSSYAN'S NEW KARABAKH PEACE PROPOSAL. In an interview
published in the Turkish newspaper Cumhuriyet on 4 June, Armenian
President Levon Ter-Petrossyan proposed a two-step approach to
resolving the Karabakh crisis; following the deployment of an
international peacekeeping force to guarantee the security of
the Armenian population, a mechanism would be created for discussing
all aspects of the problem within the framework of the CSCE.
Ter-Petrossyan said Armenia would accept any peace settlement
that had already been accepted by the administration of the Nagorno-Karabakh
republic. Meanwhile NATO foreign ministers meeting in Oslo issued
a statement expressing concern at the situation in Karabakh and
affirming NATO's readiness to assist the CSCE sponsored peacekeeping
effort by facilitating the deployment of civilian observers in
the region, Western agencies reported on 4 June. (Liz Fuller)


MINERS IN KAZAKHSTAN STRIKING AGAIN. Less than six months after
Kazakh Prime Minister Sergei Tereshchenko settled the last coal
miners' strike in Karaganda Oblast, eight mines are again on
strike, Central TV reported on 4 June. Several thousand people
participated in a 45-kilometer march from Shakhtinsk to the headquarters
of the oblast administration to press their demands for higher
pensions, job guarantees, a wage agreement with the independent
miners' union, and the creation of a free economic zone authorized
last year by Kazakhstan's Supreme Soviet. Disruption of production
in the Karaganda coal basin represents a major threat to President
Nursultan Nazarbaev's plans for an industrialized Kazakhstan.
(Bess Brown)

ANNIVERSARY OF OSH VIOLENCE IN KYRGYZSTAN. The 5th of June marks
the second anniversary of the Uzbek-Kyrgyz conflict in Kyrgyzstan's
Osh Oblast. "Vesti" reported on 3 June that calls for revenge
are being heard in Osh, as well as demands for the cities of
Osh, Uzgen and Alaba to be transferred to Uzbekistan. The report
noted that up to 70,000 Russians per year have left Kyrgyzstan
since the disturbances occurred in Osh, and carried a clip of
a Russian warning that Kyrgyzstan is losing good specialists.
(Cassandra Cavanaugh)

MOLDOVAN FOREIGN MINISTER CONFERS WITH KIEV. Following his talks
in Moscow, Moldovan Foreign Minister Nicolae Tiu visited Kiev
on 4 June for talks with his Ukrainian counterpart Anatolii Zlenko,
Radio Ukraine and Ukrinform-TASS reported. Both sides agreed
that Ukrainian-Moldovan relations represent an important factor
in maintaining regional stability and that a bilateral treaty
between the two states should be concluded. The Moldova foreign
minister reiterated that the conflict in the Trans-Dniester region
be resolved on the basis of negotiations involving Moldova, Ukraine,
Romania and Russia. According to The Financial Times, Tiu stressed
that "his government appreciated the neutral stance taken by
Ukraine and that distrust for Russia remained high." (Bohdan
Nahaylo)

RUSSIAN ARMY RESUPPLIES "DNIESTER" FORCES. Moldova's Defense
Ministry on 4 June released intelligence data documenting transfers
of arms and ammunition in recent days to the "Dniester" Russian
insurgent forces from Russia's 14th Army. The data trace the
movement of the consignments to "Dniester" units in the combat
zone by military trucks from the 14th Army's largest munitions
depot, situated at Kolbasa in northern Trans-Dniester. (Vladimir
Socor)

"DNIESTER REPUBLIC" OFFERS PROTECTION TO RUSSIAN ARMY. Reacting
to Yeltsin's recent statement suggesting a future withdrawal
of the 14th Army from Moldova, the self-styled "Dniester republic
Supreme Soviet" has resolved that "all servicemen of this Army
on the territory of the Dniester republic are under that republic's
protection," "Vesti" reported on 4 June. (Vladimir Socor)

MOLDOVAN PRESIDENT ON SETTLING THE CONFLICT. Moldovan President
Mircea Snegur told AFP on 4 June, as cited by Moldovapres, that
remaking Moldova into a federation of 3 republics--Moldovan,
"Dniester," and Gagauz--as suggested by the "Dniester" insurgents
lacks any ethnic, historic, or legal basis and would be unacceptable.
He would rather resign and lead a "national liberation movement"
if a solution along those lines were imposed on Moldova, Snegur
said. He reiterated Chisinau's offer to negotiate over forms
of territorial autonomy short of any federalization. He also
expressed the hope that the impending session of the Moldovan
Parliament would decide on additional measures to reassure the
Dniester Russians. (Vladimir Socor)







CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

SEJM DISMISSES OLSZEWSKI. Early on 5 June the Sejm voted to oust
Prime Minister Jan Olszewski, shortly after President Lech Walesa
formally asked for his immediate removal, Western and Polish
media report. After a chaotic 16-hour session, deputies voted
273-119 with 33 abstentions to dismiss the 5-month-old minority
government, Poland's third post-communist cabinet in three years.
Olszewski refused to resign, making an emotional last-minute
defense of his government's actions on TV. He linked the move
to dismiss him to plans to publish the names of people said to
have collaborated with the communist secret police (see below).
Walesa has already asked Waldemar Pawlak, chairman of the Polish
Peasant Party (PSL) to succeed Olszewski and try to form a new
cabinet. In a separate vote, the Sejm also accepted the dismissal
of Finance Minister Andrzej Olechowski. (Wladyslaw

MONTENEGRO RECONSIDERING RELATIONS WITH SERBIA. Signs that the
Republic of Montenegro may be rethinking its relationship with
Serbia were shown by Momir Bulatovic on 4 June. The Montenegrin
President expressed his republic's readiness to meet demands
set by the UN sanctions and urged that "new, politically uncompromised
figures be found to represent the new Yugoslav republic." Borba
carried the report on 4 June. Radio Serbia reported on 4 June
that Bulatovic has called a special session of parliament to
discuss a reexamination of Montenegro's relations with Serbia
and raised the possibility that the tiny republic may hold a
new referendum to decide whether to remain in a federal Yugoslav
state with Serbia if the sanctions continued into the fall. Bulatovic
told reporters on 4 June that Montenegro will continue its relations
with Serbia but acknowledged past mistakes and said that the
"course is going to be generally corrected." Earlier signs of
cracks in the relationship came in October 1991, when Montenegrin
leaders affirmed the republic's sovereignty and approved a plan
for a new Yugoslav state based on an association of sovereign
republics. (Milan Andrejevich)

PROTESTS AGAINST MILOSEVIC CALLED. There is growing pressure
from influential circles in Belgrade for the resignation of Serbian
President Slobodan Milosevic. Radio Serbia reports on 4 June
that 46 Serbian academicians signed a petition calling for Milosevic's
resignation. Vuk Draskovic, leader of the main opposition party,
has called for massive peaceful demonstrations to force Milosevic
out of office. Several opposition leaders are predicting that
Milosevic will resign in a matter of weeks. Vojislav Kostunica,
Democratic Party vice president and a leader of the newly founded
coalition Democratic Movement of Serbia said that a coalition
of political, religious and economic forces [trade unions] are
going to push Milosevic out. (Milan Andrejevich)

BOSNIA NEAR STARVATION; SEEKS MILITARY INTERVENTION. Local and
Western media report on 4 June that certain parts of Bosnia-Herzegovina,
notably Sarajevo, are near starvation or famine. Bosnia's foreign
minister Haris Silajdzic appealed for military intervention to
help save tens of thousands of civilians trapped in the city
and the surrounding area by Serb irregulars. He added that the
people can not wait for the UN sanctions because they only have
a few days of food left and pleaded for at least foreign troops
to escort supplies. (Milan Andrejevich)

CZECHOSLOVAKIA, BULGARIA APPROVE SANCTIONS. On 4 June the two
governments approved the implementation of UN Security Council
sanctions imposed on Serbia and Montenegro on 30 May. Czechoslovak
Foreign Minister Jiri Dienstbier told reporters that the cabinet
is presenting to parliament draft legal measures for applying
the sanctions. Sofia dailies on 5 June are reporting that air,
river, and railway transport has been stopped, BTA reports. Trud
says Bulgaria stands to lose $50-60 million a month, or $400
by the end of the year. 24 chasa said that the Foreign Ministry
would send a letter to the UN asking for compensation for the
losses. Prague is also concerned about the costs. Dienstbier
told CSTK that the sanctions will cause "considerable harm" to
Czechoslovakia's economy in the areas of transport, bilateral
trade, and nonreceipt of Serbian debt payments. (Barbara Kroulik
& Rada Nikolaev)

NATO AGREES ON PEACEKEEPING. Western reports on 4 June say that
NATO foreign ministers meeting in Oslo have approved the concept
of using its military forces for peacekeeping missions outside
the borders of NATO member states. The ministers also stated
that Serbia, Montenegro, and the federal army are mainly responsible
for the worsening situation in Bosnia-Herzegovina, but did not
specifically mention Yugoslavia as a possible theater for NATO
peacekeeping operations. (Milan Andrejevich)

NATO URGES FASTER WITHDRAWAL FROM BALTICS. After their one-day
meeting the NATO foreign ministers also issued a statement urging
"the states concerned to conclude agreements soon, establishing
firm timetables for the early withdrawal of former Soviet forces,"
Reuters reports. The ministers noted that they were aware of
the practical problems, but added, "these cannot affect the application
of the basic principle of international law that the presence
of foreign troops on the territory of a sovereign state requires
the explicit consent of that state." (Saulius Girnius)

RUSSIA: SPEEDY WITHDRAWAL OUT OF QUESTION. A pullout of former
Soviet troops from Estonia by the end of the year is completely
out of the question, according to Russian chief negotiator Vasilii
Svirin. Svirin told ETA on 4 June that the withdrawal of all
troops by the end of 1992--per Estonia's wishes--is impossible.
Svirin's remarks came a day after Estonia temporarily broke off
talks during the third round of consultations. BNS reported on
4 June that the next round is scheduled for 30 June-2 July near
Moscow. (Riina Kionka)

ESTONIA: RUSSIA HAS NEW WORLD VIEW. The Estonian side ended the
latest round of troops consultations by reiterating that no substantive
progress has taken place, BNS reported on 4 June. The Estonian
statement also referred again to Russia's new global view that
states are divided into two categories: the "Near Outside World"
and the "Far Outside World," the Baltics belonging in the former
category. Earlier reports from Estonia suggested this formulation
was merely Estonian negotiator Endel Lippmaa's subjective impression
of Russian views, but subsequent accounts of the talks make it
clear that the Russian delegation itself is using this formulation.
(Riina Kionka)

RUSE-GIURGIU ECOLOGICAL CONFLICT FINDING SOLUTION? During a session
of the joint Bulgarian-Romanian commission on regional environmental
problems in Ruse on 4 June, Paul Florea, the deputy mayor of
Giurgiu, announced that the Romanian government is considering
moving the chlorine plant away from his city, BTA reports. The
installation was ordered closed by the Romanian authorities last
April, in part because of repeated Bulgarian complaints that
emissions were causing lung ailments among the population of
Ruse. Florea mentioned that another suspected source of pollution--a
machine-building plant--has been shut down, and that another
chemical factory has stopped manufacturing hazardous products.
(Kjell Engelbrekt)

HUNGARIAN WORKERS SUPPORT BANKRUPT FOUNDRY. Some 10,000 workers
demonstrated in Miskolc and Diosgyor demanding government subsidies
for the bankrupt DIMAG foundry in Diosgyor, MTI reports. The
demonstrators urged the government to fund the long-term operation
of DIMAG and to work out a new industrial policy aimed at fighting
unemployment in the region. DIMAG was one of the largest state-owned
firms under communism and still employs over 9,000 people. It
was forced into receivership by a tough new bankruptcy law that
took effect in April. The Russian and Austrian managers of the
222-year-old foundry say it could be run profitably if the government
froze DIMAG's 18-billion-forint debt. (Edith Oltay)

DATA ON HUNGARIAN ECONOMY. Figures released by Hungary's Central
Statistical Office indicate that the gross national product declined
by more than 10% in 1991 compared with 1990, MTI reports. The
dramatic drop in production by large firms was the main reason
for the decline. At the same time there was a sharp increase
in production and in the number of small enterprises, whose output
represented nearly 10% of the GDP. Foreign investment in Hungarian
firms more than doubled in 1991; 57% of the foreign capital was
invested in industry, 16% in trade, and 16% in services. (Edith
Oltay)

BALTIC COUNCIL MEETS TO DISCUSS FINANCIAL MATTERS, CSCE. Top
leaders from Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania are meeting on 5
June at Jurmala to coordinate their positions on issues expected
to be discussed at the CSCE conference in Helsinki in July. Also
attending are Baltic bank presidents, finance ministers, and
experts who will be focusing on financial reforms and emission
of new banknotes, Radio Riga reported on 4 June. (Dzintra Bungs)


INFLATION CONTINUES TO RISE IN LATVIA. As of 1 June, bread prices
rose by about 25%, owing to higher prices of flour, yeast, and
fuel. The minimum wage was increased to 1,500 rubles a month,
while minimum pensions were increased to 1,200 rubles a month.
On 25 May Diena reported that according to Social Welfare Ministry
data, the per capita subsistence level income was already 1,574
rubles a month. (Dzintra Bungs)

CZECHOSLOVAK ELECTIONS. On 5 and 6 June Czechoslovaks will choose
from among more than 8,000 candidates from 40 parties standing
for seats in the federal parliament and the regional Czech and
Slovak parliaments. The outcome is expected to have an effect
on Czech-Slovak relations and on the nature of the federal arrangement.
Some Slovak parties favor a declaration of sovereignty. President
Vaclav Havel has appealed to voters to support candidates who
favor national unity. (Barbara Kroulik)

NAMING OF POLISH "AGENTS" UNDER FIRE. On 4 June the Polish Interior
Ministry distributed to parliamentary leaders confidential lists
of politicians and other officials suspected of collaborating
with the former communist secret police. Although none of the
names was made public and deputies declined to give details,
Stefan Niesiolowski of the Christian National Union said the
list included government ministers and members of most major
parties. Interior Minister Antoni Macierewicz said there is no
confirmation that those implicated--reportedly between 24 and
100 names--were agents. Walesa also condemned the circulation
of the list, saying the ministry files have been used "selectively."
Charging that "the documents they contain are in large part fabricated,"
he said the procedure chosen for exposing alleged collaborators
is outside the law, allows for political blackmail, and destablizes
the state. (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

HEARING ON PRUNSKIENE'S KGB TIES. On 4 June the Lithuanian Supreme
Court began hearings on former Prime Minister Kazimiera Prunskiene's
alleged ties with the KGB, Radio Lithuania reports. Prunskiene
was represented at the hearing by her brother, who won a postponement
until 25-26 June because Prunskiene will be abroad until 23 June.
Deputies Virgilijus Cepaitis and Jokubas Minkevicius lost their
seats in the parliament earlier this year after the Supreme Court
found that they had cooperated with the KGB. (Saulius Girnius)


ROMANIAN OPPOSITION PARTY OFFICIALS QUIT. A Romanian opposition
politician, Dinu Patriciu, a steering committee member of the
Young Liberal Party, has quit the party leadership following
allegations that he was involved in fraudulent activity. He denied
the allegations but said he was resigning to avoid damaging the
party before the general elections. The fraud charges surfaced
last week when Bucharest mayor Crin Halaicu, a member of the
rival National Liberal Party, accused Patriciu's construction
firm of offenses that caused losses to the city of 1,000 million
lei. Radu Boroianu, another YLP member, resigned his party post,
but said it was due to health reasons, Romanian media report.
(Crisula Stefanescu)

POLICE RETRIEVE STOLEN URANIUM. Romanian TV said that police
have retrieved 10 kilograms of uranium stolen from a Romanian
nuclear materials firm last year. Eleven people were arrested,
including a company engineer who was preparing to steal another
200 kilos to sell to a customer in Hungary at $2,300 a kilo.
(Crisula Stefanescu)

ILLEGAL SHIPMENT OF TANK PARTS. Polish customs officials intercepted
an illegal shipment of spare parts for Czechoslovak-made tanks
en route to Syria. The provincial prosecutor's office in Szczecin
said on 4 June that 290 crates were seized. The cargo was transported
from Czechoslovakia by the Polish-German-Czechoslovak firm Intersped.
PAP says that false documents claimed the parts were for cars.
(Barbara Kroulik)

ROMANIAN-CANADIAN MILITARY COOPERATION. Canada's military chief
of staff, Gen. John de Chastelain, returning from a three-day
visit in Romania, told reporters that the two countries are working
out a military cooperation agreement. Canada has signed agreements
with Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary, an RFE correspondent
reported on 4 June. (Crisula Stefanescu)









(END)



The RFE/RL Daily Report is produced by the RFE/RL Research Institute
(a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Inc.) in Munich,
Germany, with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division (NCA). The report is available Monday through Friday,
except holidays, at approximately 0800 US Eastern Time (1400
Central European Time) by fax, post, or e-mail. The report is
also posted daily on the SOVSET computer network.

For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions, or additional
copies, please contact:

In USA: Mr. Jon Lodeesen or Mr. Brian Reed RFE/RL, Inc., 1201
Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20036. Telephone: (202)
457-6912 or -6900 fax: (202) 457-6992 or -202-828-8783;

or in Europe:

Mr. David L. Troyanek or Ms. Helga Hofer Publications Department,
RFE/RL Research Institute Oettingenstrasse 67 8000 Munich 22
Telephone: (-49 89) 2102-2631 or -2642 fax: (-49 89) 2102-2648







[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole