Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 103, 01 June 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

RUSSIAN GENERALS DIGGING IN ON MOLDOVA? Russian President Yeltsin's
proposal to withdraw the 14th Army from Moldova continued to
meet with opposition from military officials. The 14th Army's
commander, Maj. Gen. Yurii Netkachev, expressed "doubt that the
withdrawal would be easy to accomplish [because] more than half
of the units' personnel consist of local inhabitants," CIS TV
reported on 28 May. The overwhelming majority of this Army's
servicemen are known to come from the other former Soviet republics,
primarily Russia. Maj. Gen. Nikolai Stolyarov, head of the CIS
command's Committee on Personnel Issues, claimed that a withdrawal
"is not realistic and not possible" owing to lack of apartments
in Russia and also because "the people" (i.e. Russians) in the
Dniester region "place great hopes on the army," ITAR-TASS reported
on 29 May. (Vladimir Socor)

"DNIESTER REPUBLIC" NOT WORRIED BY WITHDRAWAL PROSPECT. Self-styled
"Dniester republic president" Igor Smirnov told The Financial
Times of 29 May that he expects "soldiers and officers of the
14th Army to remain in the region and join the Dniester armed
forces" in the event of a withdrawal. Smirnov felt confident
that "entire units" would do so. Admitting to the high financial
costs of his "republic's" military operations, Smirnov claimed
that the funds came "from Russian enterprises and from individuals."
He also told The Times of 30 May that "volunteers from every
corner of the former Soviet Union" were prepared to defend the
"Dniester republic" in the event of the Army's withdrawal. Tiraspol
leaders also noted that they had received "top-level assurances
from the Russian Defense Ministry that there would be no withdrawal
before the conflict was settled." (Vladimir Socor)

MOLDOVA CAUTIOUSLY OPTIMISTIC. Interviewed by The Financial Times
of 29 May, Moldovan President Mircea Snegur described Yeltsin's
announcement as "a victory for common sense" but expressed apprehension
that "Russian hardliners might block the withdrawal." On 30 May,
Snegur told Danish TV, as cited by Moldovan media, that he hoped
that Yeltsin would stick to his announced decision despite military
opposition, as the 14th Army was the main obstacle to a peaceful
political settlement. Should Russia not withdraw its forces,
"it would have to bear the consequences arising from continuing
flagrant intrusion into an independent state," Snegur said. (Vladimir
Socor)

GRACHEV ACCUSES ROMANIA OF DELIVERING ARMS TO MOLDOVA. Interviewed
by CIS TV on 30 May, Russia's defense minister, General Pavel
Grachev, confirmed recent Russian media reports which cited what
they termed "available data" on Romanian deliveries of arms and
armored vehicles to Moldova. Grachev said that such deliveries,
while allowed under international law, were "improper and incorrect"
considering the situation in Moldova. Grachev failed to mention
however, the arming of the "Dniester" Russian forces since the
autumn of 1991 under successive USSR, CIS, and Russian auspices.
On the same day, Moldova's Defense Minister, Lt. Gen. Ion Costas,
told a news conference in Chisinau that Moldova did not need
arms from the outside since the arms and equipment it has inherited
from ex-Soviet forces other than the 14th Army were "more than
enough to handle the separatist forces." (Vladimir Socor)

ROMANIA PROTESTS RUSSIAN ACCUSATIONS. A spokesman from the Foreign
Affairs Ministry protested the allegations of Russian Defense
Minister Pavel Grachev that Romania is supporting Moldova. The
spokesman said that Romania firmly supports the peaceful settlement
of the Moldova conflict, Rompres reported on 31 May. The statement
also noted that there are no Romanian military advisers in Moldova
and that no arms shipments have been made. The only deliveries
that have been made--notice of which was communicated to the
Russian military attache--involved trucks and pontoon bridges.
(Mihai Sturdza)

GRACHEV ON RUSSIAN MILITARY. In a wide-ranging interview broadcast
by "Ostankino" TV on 31 May, Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev
again emphasized his view that, at least at present, a professional
officer should head the Defense Ministry because a civilian could
not handle the problems currently besetting the Russian armed
forces. He also criticized Ukraine for having earlier "unilaterally"
taken over the three military districts located in the republic,
with all their weaponry and equipment, and stressed the importance
of rapid reaction forces in the emerging Russian army. He suggested
that the Russian Navy and Air Force face no major restructuring.
Grachev expressed dismay over the disintegration of the Russian
defense industrial sector and called for defense plants to split
their production evenly between civilian and military goods.
(Stephen Foye)

CRITICISM OF DIVIDING BLACK SEA FLEET. Both Grachev and the commander
of the joint CIS forces, Marshal Evgenii Shaposhnikov, criticized
efforts by Ukraine to take control of the Black Sea Fleet, ITAR-TASS
reported on 30 May. Shaposhnikov said that Ukraine does not need
a large fleet, while Grachev said that the fleet should be subordinated
to the CIS joint forces. (Stephen Foye)

YELTSIN REPEATS CALL FOR ABOLISHING OF CONGRESS. Russian President
Boris Yeltsin emphasized during his trip to Buryatiya that he
wants to abolish the Russian Congress of People's, "Vesti" reported
on 29 May. He asserted that a referendum should be held not later
than this fall. He maintained that since the Congress will never
agree to a constitution which would lead to its own abolishment,
he must appeal to the population and collect the necessary one
million signatures to petition for a referendum. The chairman
of the parliament, Ruslan Khasbulatov, without mentioning Yeltsin
by name, called appeals for the abolishment of the Congress "unconstitu-tional"
and "directed against the people." (Alexander Rahr)

SHAKHRAI DOES NOT BELIEVE IN SUCCESS OF MULTI-PARTY SYSTEM. Sergei
Shakhrai, who recently resigned from the Russian Government,
told ITAR-TASS on 25 May that he does not believe in the creation
of a multi-party system in Russia and therefore will refrain
from joining a party or become involved in the creation of a
party. Shakhrai asserted that he is leaving the government because
of disagreements with certain figures in Yeltsin's entourage.
He specifically mentioned the head of the presidential administration,
Yurii Petrov. (Alexander Rahr)

RUSSIAN BUSINESSMEN FOUND NEW PARTY. Leading Russian industrialists
met in Moscow on 30 May to found a new political party--the All-Russia
League of Renewal, ITAR-TASS and "Ostankino" TV reported. The
League calls itself a pragmatic, nonideological "centrist party"
and has pledged itself to work out a new economic reform strategy.
Its entry onto the Russian political scene is an important event.
Commentators call it a party of technocrats: the founding congress
was attended by directors of leading state-owned enterprises
and by members of the scientific elite such as Evgenii Velikhov
and leading figures from Russian local government. The League's
president is Aleksandr Vladislavlev; its eminence grise, Arkadii
Volsky, told a TV interviewer on 31 May that he was not taking
an official post in the new party. (Elizabeth Teague)

RUSSIAN ENERGY COMPLEX GETS NEW HEAD. Vladimir Lopukhin has been
released from his post as Russian minister of fuel and energy,
ITAR-TASS reported on 30 May. A new post of Russian deputy prime
minister for fuel and energy has been created. The 54-year-old
former Soviet minister for the gasoline industry, Viktor Chernomyrdin,
was appointed to this position. This move by Russian President
Boris Yeltsin apparently represents an attempt to appease the
conservative industrial lobby in the parliament. (Alexander Rahr)


LITTLE PROGRESS IN RUSSIAN-CHECHEN TALKS. The second meeting
of experts of the Russian Federation and the Chechen republic
on developing relations ended on 29 May with little in the way
of results, the Russian media reported. The leader of the Chechen
group, Zelimkhan Yandarbiev, noted that the draft treaty put
forward by the Russian delegation was virtually identical with
the federal treaty the Russian Federation signed with its constituent
republics on 31 March and there could be no question of discussing
it. On the other hand, the head of the Russian delegation, Viktor
Zhigulin, maintained that the talks had laid a foundation for
closing the gap between the two sides. The next meeting is scheduled
for the end of June. (Ann Sheehy)

UNION OF GERMANS OF FORMER USSR SETS OUT ITS GOALS. A three-day
congress of the Union of Germans of the former USSR ended on
30 May with the adoption of a resolution stating that its main
aim was the step-by-step restoration of German statehood, ITAR-TASS
reported. The Union, which represents those Germans who wish
to remain in the former USSR, decided to change its name to the
Interstate Union of Russian Germans. The congress set up an economic
council to coordinate the activity of German entrepreneurs, noting
that the Germans must do more to help themselves since Russia
was, as yet, taking few practical steps, and the German government
was not "rich enough to solve their national problem." (Ann Sheehy)


MONEY SUPPLY TO SOAR. Russian First Deputy Premier Egor Gaidar
told CIS TV on 31 May that cash emission in July is to increase
to 142 billion rubles. This compares with 89 billion rubles during
the whole of 1991 and 79 billion rubles during the first quarter
of 1992. Starting in August, it is planned to issue 270-280 billion
rubles a month. Higher denomination banknotes of 5,000 rubles
should be in general use by August. The shortage of cash has
led other CIS member-nations to prepare the issue of alternative
and/or parallel currencies. In a somewhat rash pre-diction that
may come back to haunt him, Gaidar said that the monetary situation
will stabilize by July "un-less there is some unpredictable cataclysm."
(Keith Bush)

MORATORIUM ON FOREIGN DEBT? Jacques Delors, president of the
European Community Commission, told a news conference on 30 May
that Russia has proposed a five-year moratorium on paying interest
on its foreign debt, Western agen-cies reported on 31 May. Delors
said that the mora-torium had been proposed by Egor Gaidar during
a Kremlin meeting at which Yeltsin was present. Presumably, Gaidar
was referring to Russia's 61% share of the total debt of the
former USSR (thought to have amounted to about $65 billion by
the end of 1991). Delors reportedly gave a noncommittal reply
to this proposal. (Keith Bush)

BIG REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN RUSSIAN CONSUMER PRICES. An interview
with economist V. Shprygin (Ekonomika i zhizn no. 21) contains
some observations on regional trade barriers that are hindering
flows of goods within Russia as well as between CIS states. While
projecting first-half 1992 consumer prices at 15 times that of
the same period in 1991, and consumption levels 45% down, Shprygin
noted the wide regional variation around these averages. He attributed
the price differences to local authorities' blocking the shipment
of consumer goods from their regions. He refers to inter-city
price ratios (maximum to minimum) of 4:1 for meat, 5:1 for bread
and 11:1 for fruit and vegetables. (Philip Hanson)

ARMENIAN OPPOSITION PARTIES CALL FOR RECOGNITION OF NKR. The
National Democratic Union, the Association for National Self-Determination,
the Armenian Revolutionary Party (Dashnaktsyutyun) and the Hramkavar-Azatakan
Liberal Democratic Party intend to submit to the Armenian parliament
a draft document calling for official recognition of the self-proclaimed
Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, "in order to substantiate the historic
military victories of the NKR self-defense forces with corresponding
steps in the diplomatic sphere," ITAR-TASS reported on 27 May.
Armenian President Levon Ter-Petrossyan has consistently argued
that Armenia should not be the first country to recognize Karabakh's
independence. (Liz Fuller)

UN OBSERVER REJECTS CHARGES THAT ARMENIANS HAVE USED CHEMICAL
WEAPONS. Speaking at a news conference in Erevan on 28 May, UN
Karabakh observer Francesco Vendrell rejected as unfounded repeated
Azerbaijan allegations that Ar-menian forces had used chemical
weapons in Nagorno-Karabakh, Western agencies reported. (Liz
Fuller)

DRAFT CONSTITUTION PUBLISHED IN TAJIKISTAN. ITAR-TASS reported
on 31 May that the official draft of Tajikistan's new constitution
has been published in Russian. The Tajik-language version had
already appeared during the recent political unrest in the Tajik
capital. A new constitution was one of the demands of anti-government
protesters. The draft declares that the president is the head
of state and the National Assembly (Milli Mejlis) will be the
highest legislative organ. All citizens are guaranteed equal
rights regardless of national origin or religious belief. The
draft is to be discussed by the newly-created Mejlis and submitted
to a popular referendum. (Bess Brown)



CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

UN IMPOSES SWEEPING SANCTIONS ON YUGOSLAVIA. The UN Security
Council imposed a wide range of economic and political sanctions
against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in an effort to stop
the fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Resolution 757 was adopted
on 30 May with only China and Zimbabwe abstaining. The resolution
includes a ban on all trade including oil, restrictions on air
traffic, a reduction of all Yugoslav diplomatic missions, the
freezing of all Yugoslav assets abroad, a ban on Yugoslav athletes
from international events, and suspension of cultural and S&T
exchanges. The resolution demands an immediate cease-fire an
end to ethnic displacements, withdrawal of Serbian and Croatian
troops from Bosnia-Herze-govina, creation of a security zone
around Sarajevo and its airport, and guarantees from all combatants
to permit distribution of aid. Exemptions to the em-bargo were
made for shipments of food and medicine, the transit of goods
through Yugoslavia, and humanitarian aid relief flights. (Milan
Andrejevich)

REACTIONS TO UN SANCTIONS. Yugoslav foreign economics relations
minister Bozo Jovanovic said the sanctions will bring some sectors
of the economy to a standstill and predicted "enormous shortages."
Gasoline ration cards have already been issued in Yugoslavia.
Yugoslavia's promising national soccer team has expressed bitter
disappointment at not being able to participate in the European
Cup championships. France said it has disassociated itself from
the UN ban on sporting events. Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic
warned that sanctions will not stop the fighting, saying that
the Bosnian crisis can only end through political negotiations
or "by the defeat of one side." Kosovo Albanian President-elect
Ibrahim Rugova appealed for an exemption for the predominantly
Albanian populated Serbian province. Kosovo declared independence
in October 1991. (Milan Andrejevich)

HUNGARY, CZECHOSLOVAKIA SUPPORT UN. In a statement issued on
31 May the Hungarian government declared it will fully enforce
the sanctions imposed by the UN Security Council against Serbia
and Montenegro, MTI reports. Warning that the crisis endangers
European security and has resulted in the greatest wave of refugees
since World War II, the government urges that "all possible means
be taken to prevent further bloodshed." On the same day Czechoslovak
Foreign Minister Jiri Dienstbier told CSTK that his country will
support UN sanctions as well. (Edith Oltay & Barbara Kroulik)


BELGRADE PROTESTS; ELECTIONS IN YUGOSLAVIA. Radio Croatia reports
on 31 May that as many as 50,000 protesters marched in Belgrade
calling for an end to the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina and demanded
the resignation of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic. Students
formed a kilometer-long chain of black paper to mourn the dead.
Vuk Draskovic, the leader of Serbia's main opposition party,
told the crowd that "Serbia wants peace and an end to war," adding
that Serbia's enemies are not abroad but "right here in Belgrade."
Milosevic said that the war is the "price we have to pay for
supporting Serbs outside Serbia." The protesters also described
local and federal elections on 31 May as a farce designed to
keep the current Socialists (former communists) in power. The
Serbian and Montenegrin government said that 60% of the electorate
had voted; final results are expected on 3 June. All major opposition
parties boycotted the elections, however, and Serbia's Council
of Bishops last week denounced the Serbian government and called
for the establishment of a national salvation government. (Milan
Andrejevich)

BOSNIA AND CROATIA UPDATE. Fighting has eased in the Bosnia capital
of Sarajevo and in the Croatian port-resort of Dubrovnik. Radio
Bosnia-Herzegovina describes the evening of 31 May as the quietest
in the three-month war. Another cease-fire agreement has been
reached by the warring parties and is to take effect at 6:00
p.m. today. Three days of heavy shelling by Serb forces ended
in Dubrovnik after UN officials negotiated a truce. Fighting
in several areas of Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina was reported,
however. Belgrade Radio reported on 29 May that the government
of the Serbian Republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina proposes a "family
for family" exchange in order to carry out a mass migration of
the three ethnic groups in the republic. The Bosnian Serbs explained
that such a plan would enable regions of the republic to become
"ethnically pure" without resorting to violence. (Milan Andrejevich)


FERVOR OVER MACEDONIA. On 29 May, Interfax reported that Russia
is prepared to recognize the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia.
Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev sent a note to Greek Prime Minister
Constantine Mitsotakis saying that delaying recognition no longer
makes sense and that it could lead to a deterioration of the
current peaceful situation in Macedonia. Greece responded on
30 May with a stern warning that recognition would be an "unfriendly
act" towards Greece. On 31 May as many as 20,000 Greek-Americans
protested in Washington against the use of the name Macedonia,
demanding that the US not recognize the republic unless it changes
its name. (Milan Andrejevich)

MACEDONIAN FOREIGN MINISTER VISITS BULGARIA. Denko Maleski, Minister
of Foreign Relations of the Republic of Macedonia, paid a one-day
official visit to Sofia on 30 May. His talks with his counterpart
Stoyan Ganev were described by BTA as "very open, frank, and
concrete," while the purpose of the visit was to "clear the ground
for cloudless, friendly relations." Bulgaria recalled its position
on ethnicity to be governed by self-determination for each individual.
Maleski expressed hope that Macedonia will soon be recognized
by the EC and that Bulgaria will be the first to establish diplomatic
relations. Economic relations were also discussed and Bulgaria
proposed agreements for trade, abolition of double taxation,
and protection of investments. (Rada Nikolaev)

EAGLEBURGER IN BULGARIA, ALBANIA. US Deputy Secretary of State
Lawrence Eagleburger concluded his tour of Russia and Eastern
Europe with a visit to Sofia on 29-30 May and a stop in Tirana
on the 30th. In Bulgaria he held talks with President Zhelev,
Prime Minister Dimitrov, and Foreign Minister Ganev, and opened
an office of the US International Trade Service. According to
BTA and a TV interview with Ganev, Bulgaria's concern over a
possible expansion of the Yugoslav crisis figured prominently
in the talks. The guest said US interest in investing in Eastern
Europe is "unexpectedly high," but insisted that an agreement
on protection of investments should be signed. BTA said various
US aid options were also discussed as was taking Bulgaria off
the COCOM list. Eagleburger's visit to Albania is the first by
a high-ranking US official since the noncommunist government
took over this spring; he pledged $10 million in food aid to
Albania. (Rada Nikolaev & Charles Trumbull)

IMF LOAN TO ROMANIA. National Bank Gover-nor Mugur Isarescu said
that the IMF on 29 May approved the 1992 agreement with Romania
intended to support Romania's reform program. IMF loans will
amount to some $500 million. At the same time a $440 million
stand-by loan was approved, to be repaid over five years, Romanian
media report. (Mihai Sturdza)

WORLD BANK LOAN TO CZECHOSLOVAKIA. The World Bank approved $246
million to modernize power generation facilities and cut pollution
in northern Bohemia. The bank says air pollution, principally
from coal-fired power plants, is causing severe health problems
and environmental damage throughout the country. The loan will
help fund a $557.5-million project that includes new equipment
and training, an RFE/RL correspondent reports. (Barbara Kroulik)


CZECHOSLOVAK ELECTIONS. In his regular Sunday radio address,
on 31 May Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel again expressed
his opposition to the division of the country, the main issue
in the 5-6 June elections. Such an event, Havel said, would cause
"very serious geopolitical destabilization" in all Central Europe.
In a pastoral letter Roman Catholic bishops have also appealed
for Slovak Catholics to reject candidates who oppose economic
and political reforms and called for believers to vote for candidates
who support reform of abortion laws and the return of church
property. Polls show that the nationalist Movement for a Democratic
Slovakia of populist Vladimir Meciar is likely to win in that
republic. In the Czech lands the conservative Civic Democratic
Party of Finance Minister Vaclav Klaus leads, but left-wing parties
are seen to be gaining in both parts of the country, Western
agencies report. (Barbara Kroulik)

POLAND'S OPPOSITION: NO CONFIDENCE IN OLSZEWSKI. On 29 May 65
deputies from the Democratic Union, the Liberal-Democratic Union,
and the Polish Economic Program submitted a motion to the Sejm
calling for a vote of no-confidence in the Olszewski government,
Western and Polish media report. The deputies said there has
been a lack of government will to cooperate with parliament and
the president. On 31 May President Lech Walesa said "this government
must not be allowed to exist in its present form." He told reporters
that he is considering submitting a formal motion calling for
Olszewski's dismissal but did not exclude restructuring the present
cabinet with the Confederation for Independent Poland. Asked
if he would accept his former adversary Lech Kaczynski as candidate
for premiership, Walesa replied: "There have been enough misfortunes
in this country; I do not propose yet another." (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)


WALESA AMBIVALENT ON EXPOSING AGENTS. On 29 May Walesa expressed
support for a parliamentary resolution demanding exposure of
former communist security service agents. He also warned, however,
that the action could turn into a "great disaster for Poland"
if approached in haste and said if it is used for political fights,
"it will be a great victory for the former security service."
Interior Minister Antoni Macierewicz assured Walesa he would
make sure "nobody will be accused without reasonable grounds."
He said his ministry has already been verifying the lists. Meanwhile,
a group of 50 deputies who claim the resolution is illegal, appealed
to Poland's Constitutional Tribunal to rule on it. By 31 May
Walesa had somewhat modified his stance on the resolution, saying
it was "irresponsible and ill-prepared," Western and Polish media
report. (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

VLIKas FORMALLY ENDS ACTIVITIES. On 30 May in Vilnius VLIKas
(Supreme Committee for the Liberation of Lithuania), founded
in 1943 and subsequently continuing its activities in exile,
has formally ended its activities, Radio Lithuania reports. Supreme
Council Chairman Vytautas Landsbergis, Prime Minister Gediminas
Vagnorius, Sajudis chairman Juozas Tumelis and many leaders of
Lithuanian organizations in the US thanked VLIKas for its work
on behalf of Lithuanian independence. At the ceremonies the organization's
last chairman, Kazys Bobelis, outlined the committee's history,
Bishop Juozas Tunaitis celebrated a commemorative Mass on 31
May, and the government held a formal reception for VLIKas leaders.
(Saulius Girnius)

BALTIC ASSEMBLY MEETS. On 29-31 May parliamentarians from Estonia,
Latvia, and Lithuania met in Palanga for the second gathering
of the Baltic Assembly, local media report. On 31 May they formally
demanded the prompt withdrawal of ex-USSR troops and border guards,
while its presidium also noted that despite numerous Baltic demands
in the past for the pullout of troops, the withdrawal has practically
not started. They appealed to the CSCE for assistance. The presidiums
of the Baltic Assembly and the Nordic Council signed a treaty
outlining greater parliamentary cooperation in political, economic,
and cultural areas as well as nuclear safety. The assembly also
approved documents with recommendations for the regulations of
the Baltic juridical bureau, greater cooperation in education,
science, and communications and urging their parliaments and
governments to prepare an agreement on greater economic cooperation.
The next meeting of the Baltic Assembly will be in Estonia in
November. (Saulius Girnius & Dzintra Bungs)

BALTIC ASSEMBLY PROTESTS DOBELE INCIDENT. On 29 May the assembly
officially qualified the recent actions of the Russian troops
stationed near Dobele as impudent and provocative; they termed
the incident a crude violation Latvia's sovereignty and demanded
its investigation and punishment of the perpetrators, Baltic
media reported on 30 May. (Dzintra Bungs)

GRACHEV: PULLOUT TO START IN 1994? Russian Defense Minister Pavel
Grachev told Ostankino TV on 31 May that the ex-USSR troops could
be pulled out from the Baltic States only after "we have withdrawn
the Western Group of Forces and the Northern Group of Forces."
Stressing the necessity of normal living conditions for the troops,
he added: "If the Baltic countries can allocate the relevant
funds and, even better, if they can build housing for servicemen
in those places that we are proposing that they do--I am prepared
to withdraw the forces tomorrow. As for the existing situation,
the realistic timetable for the start of the withdrawal process
is the end of 1994." (Dzintra Bungs)

ROMANIAN MILITARY BRIEFS. Canada's Chief of Defense Staff, Gen.
John De Chastelain is visiting Romania from 31 May to 3 June
at the invitation of his Romanian counterpart, Gen. Dumitru Cioflina.
A delegation from the NATO Defense College in Rome headed by
Lt. Gen. Castelo Branco also arrived on 31 May. Romanian and
foreign sources say the agenda includes talks on Romanian-NATO
cooperation, including military training. De Chastelain and Branco
will address students at the Academy of Higher Military Studies
and visit several military institutions. (Mihai Sturdza) [As
of 1200 CET] Compiled by Carla Thorson & Charles Trumbull









(END)

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