We are all apt to believe what the world believes about us. - George Eliot
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 98, 22 May 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

RUSSIAN PARLIAMENT CHALLENGES UKRAINE OVER CRIMEA. On 21 May,
the Russian parliament, meeting in closed session, voted to declare
the transfer of Crimea in 1954 from the Russian Federation to
Ukraine invalid, and to insist that Russia be involved in talks
on the peninsula's future, Western and CIS agencies reported.
A milder resolution describing the transfer as "unconstitutional"
was rejected. Before the voting, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev had warned on Russian TV that "this is playing with fire
and there could be a chain reaction." (Bohdan Nahaylo)

CRIMEAN PARLIAMENT OPTS FOR COMPROMISE. Meanwhile, backing away
from outright confrontation with Kiev, the Crimean parliament
voted on 21 May to repeal its declaration of independence of
5 May by 111 votes to 25, Ukrinform-TASS reported. It also suspended
preparations until 10 June for a local referendum on the issue
of the peninsula's status which was scheduled to occur on 2 August.
(Bohdan Nahaylo)

BLACK SEA SAILORS TAKE HARD TACK. Radio Ukraine reported on 21
May that 55 sailors in the Black Sea Fleet have gone on hunger
strike to protest what they claim is discrimination against them
by their commanders because they have sworn an oath of loyalty
to the Ukrainian people. The sailors have appealed to the Ukrainian
authorities to protect them. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

CHANGES IN THE RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT. The economic advisor to Boris
Yeltsin, Aleksei Ulyukaev announced that the newly appointed
Russian deputy prime minister, Georgii Khizha, has been placed
in charge of administrative and personnel management within the
Russian government, Interfax reported on 21 May. Deputy Prime
Minister Aleksandr Shokhin, who is responsible for social affairs,
has now been placed in charge of foreign economic issues as well.
Another deputy prime minister, Valerii Makharadze, has been assigned
to supervise regional economic issues and trade with other CIS
states. A first deputy prime minister in charge of industry has
still to be named. (Alexander Rahr)

RUTSKOI'S PRESS SECRETARY SPEAKS OUT. Vice President Aleksandr
Rutskoi's former press secretary, Nikolai Gulbinsky, wrote in
Moskovskie novosti (No. 20) that Russian State Secretary Gennadii
Burbulis had, from the very beginning, opposed Rutskoi's inclusion
in the inner circle of power and ultimately succeeded in creating
enmity between Yeltsin and Rutskoi. Gulbinsky also claimed that
some politicians have made several attempts to drag Rutskoi into
the opposition's camp. (Alexander Rahr)

FOUR RUSSIAN POLITICAL GROUPS CREATE UMBRELLA ORGANIZATION. Four
Russian political groups have decided to form a coalition called
"Civic Union," ITAR-TASS reported on 21 May. The groups are:
Russian Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi's Free Russia People's
Party (NPSR), Nikolai Travkin's Russian Democratic Party, Arkadii
Volsky's "Renewal" Party, and the parliamentary faction "Smena--
New Policy." During a press conference, spokesmen for the new
Civic Union criticized the Russian government but stressed their
adherence to democratic political and economic reforms in Russia.
A leading member of the Free Russia People's Party, Petr Fedotov,
said the time had come to organize reformist forces dedicated
to constructive and realistic principles (implying that the Gaidar-Yeltsin
reforms have been unrealistic). (Vera Tolz)

GORBACHEV REMEMBERS. Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev told
a meeting of the Russian Academy of Sciences that the military-industrial
complex had been his major opponent during perestroika, according
to Reuters on 21 May. He indicated that former Prime Minister
Nikolai Ryzhkov had been a major supporter of the military, and
that significant opposition also came from "hundreds of thousands
of hired propagandists who built their careers on the premise
that there could be no real peace with the capitalist West."
Gorbachev also admitted that he had to wage a private struggle
with himself to break with "class ideology." (Alexander Rahr)


POLISH PRESIDENT IN MOSCOW. Polish President Lech Walesa arrived
in Moscow for a two-day visit on 21 May--his first official visit
to Moscow. Walesa's schedule for 22 May includes meetings with
Russian President Boris Yeltsin, industrialists, and par-liament
chairman Ruslan Khasbulatov, ITAR-TASS reported. Moscow and Warsaw
are expected to sign a treaty of friendship and cooperation,
and their foreign ministers are to sign accords related to the
withdrawal of an estimated 40,000 ex-Soviet troops from Poland
by mid-November. (Suzanne row)

WALESA'S COMMENTS ON TRIP. Walesa told Pravda on 21 May that
East European countries should stand by each other as reforms
are carried out. He said the democracies must "help each other
to foster reforms, develop existing ties and restore severed
contacts." He also noted that Eastern European countries must
look after themselves because "the West will not help us." Expressing
his dissatisfaction with the general state of Polish-Russian
relations, Walesa told the Moscow daily that there are "huge
possibilities for cooperation" which are not being explored.
(Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

TATARSTAN REJECTS CONCEPT OF FEDERAL TAXES. The Tatarstan parliament
decided on 21 May that in future all taxes will be paid into
the republican budget, and the republic will make payments to
the Russian Federation only to fund those functions delegated
to the Federation, ITAR-TASS reported. Tatarstan is thus acting
in the same way towards Russia as Russia did towards the USSR.
This latest step is in keeping with Tatarstan's determination
that its relations with Russia should be of a confederal rather
than a federal nature. (Ann Sheehy)

STATE OF EMERGENCY DECLARED IN DAGESTAN. The presidium of the
Supreme Soviet of Dagestan has imposed a state of emergency for
one month in the capital, Makhachkala, and the town of Kizilyurt,
ITAR-TASS reported on 20 May. The step was taken as a reaction
to the lawless behavior of members of the Shamil Popular Front
who had taken the public prosecutor of Makhachkala hostage to
demand the release of three of their members. Since the release
of these men, the front had been celebrating its victory by continually
firing weapons in the air. The situation in Dagestan seems to
be generally lawless and there have been several terrorist attacks
on officials in recent months. (Ann Sheehy)

RUSSIA AND ARMENIA DISCUSS SECURITY ISSUES. Russian State Secretary
Gennadii Burbulis led a Russian government delegation to the
Armenian-Russian talks in Erevan which began on 21 May, ITAR-TASS
reported. The Russian defense minister, Pavel Grachev, is also
a member of the delegation. The talks are taking place behind
close doors, and focus on economic reform and the impact of the
collective security agreement, which was signed recently by Russia,
Armenia and four other CIS states in Tashkent. (Alexander Rahr)


RUSSIAN INVOLVEMENT IN NAKHICHEVAN? Following talks with Armenian
President Levon Ter-Petrossyan in Erevan on 21 May, Burbulis
asserted that Russian troops stationed in Armenia would, if necessary
take action to protect Armenia's security, but at the same time
dismissed the possibility of Turkish military in Nakhichevan,
Russian media reported. Meanwhile ITAR-TASS quoted a spokesmen
for CIS border troops stationed in Nakhichevan as stating that
these forces had been put on a higher stage of alert, but that
they would not intervene in fighting between Armenian and Azerbaijani
units. Meanwhile, Nakhichevan parliament Chairman Geidar Aliev
criticized CIS Commander in Chief Shaposhnikov's warning of a
potential new world war as "thoughtless" and a reflection of
"old thinking," Azerinform-TASS reported. (Liz Fuller)

NAZARBAEV ON NAGORNO-KARABAKH. At a press conference at the UN
on 21 May, following a meeting with UN Secretary-General Butros
Ghali, Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbaev appealed for a greater
UN role in settling the conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, Western
agencies and ITAR-TASS reported. Last year Nazarbaev committed
Kazakhstan to an active role in trying to solve the dispute.
Nazarbaev also told the press conference that lack of agreement
on economic policy within the CIS has caused serious problems,
and those agreements that have been signed do not function because
there are no coordinating organs and no sanctions for nonfulfillment.
He also mentioned the close relations between Russia and Kazakhstan,
saying that Russians and Kazakhs have no cause for conflict.
(Bess Brown)

RASTOKHEZ APPEALS FOR UNITY IN TAJIKISTAN. The Rastokhez Popular
Front of Tajikistan, one of the members of the opposition coalition
that won concessions from President Rakhman Nabiev last week,
has issued an appeal to the people of Tajikistan to preserve
the territorial integrity of the country and to work together
to solve Tajikistan's problems, ITAR-TASS reported on 21 May.
The Rastokhez appeal was presumably a response to recent threats
by the authorities in two of Tajikistan's oblasts to secede from
the country. (Bess Brown)

REASSURING RUSSIANS IN TAJIKISTAN. The news agencies NEGA and
Ekspres-khronika reported on 19 May that members of the Tajik
government had met with representatives of the Russian population
of Tajikistan to discuss ways to reassure the Russians and persuade
them to remain in the country. Large-scale emigration of Russians
from Tajikistan, which began after the 1990 disturbances in Dushanbe,
has already affected health-care and education. The continued
flight of Tajikistan's Russian population will also cause serious
problems in industry, where the Russians constitute the majority.
(Bess Brown)

MORE ON RUSSIAN MILITARY INVOLVEMENT IN DNIESTER FIGHTING. Moldovan
military officials told the RFE/RL Research Institute on 21 May
that uniformed servicemen of Russia's 14th Army continued to
fire on Moldovan positions on both banks of the Dniester. An
additional armored convoy moved out of Army barracks in Tiraspol
and took up fighting positions in Grigoriopol raion, securing
new areas for the "Dniester" forces. After announcing on 19 May
that he had lost control of elements of his 14th Army, who were
disobeying orders to observe neutrality, Maj. Gen. Yurii Netkachev
retracted that on Russian TV on 20 May. Nevertheless, unidentified
"Russian military spokesmen" quoted by The Washington Post on
21 May "acknowledged that soldiers had been ordered out of the
barracks to 'defend' Russian-speaking areas." (Vladimir Socor)


MAKASHOV EMERGES AS MILITARY ADVISER TO "DNIESTER REPUBLIC."
Col. Gen. Albert Makashov, a pro-communist and Russian ultranationalist,
arrived in the self-styled "Dniester republic" on an "inspection
visit" and was appointed military adviser to "Dniester" president
Igor Smirnov, Moscow media reported on 16-17 May. Makashov was
again reported in Tiraspol by ITAR-TASS correspondents in Moldova
on 20 May. His continued presence there opens the possibility
that the former commander of the Ural-Volga military district
has had a hand in the planning and conduct of the "Dniester"
offensive. (Vladimir Socor)

PAN-RUSSIAN POLITICAL, MILITARY GROUPS MOBILIZE FOR "DNIESTER
REPUBLIC." Moscow media reported on 16-17 May on a meeting of
the Russian ultranationalist staffs of the newspaper Den and
of the television program "600 seconds," at which such figures
as Colonel Viktor Alksnis and Aleksandr Nevzorov expressed vocal
support for the "Dniester republic." Communist and "national-patriotic"
political groups in Russia have formed a "Russian National Committee
to Support the Dniester Republic" and launched a recruiting drive
for volunteers to be sent to the Dniester, ITAR-TASS reported
on 19 May. Russian Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi charged on
19 May that Russians in Moldova were facing a "genocide," Interfax
reported. Meanwhile, cossacks in the Kuban are preparing to send
additional fighters to the Dniester, ITAR-TASS reported on 20
May. (Vladimir Socor)

"DNIESTER" AND CRIMEAN RUSSIAN LEADERS SAID TO CONFER. Le Monde
reported on 20 May that Russian leaders in Tiraspol and Simferopil
are meeting intermittently and that one topic of discussion is
the "Novorossiia" project for a Russian-oriented state that would
stretch from the Crimea to the Dniester. Le Monde also quoted
a leader in Tiraspol as confidently predicting that the Russian
army would only withdraw from eastern Moldova "some time during
the twenty-first century." (Vladimir Socor)

MOLDOVA'S DNIESTER UKRAINIANS URGE KIEV TO HELP THEM. On 20 May,
representatives of the Union of Ukrainians in the Trans-Dniester
held a press conference in Kiev to draw attention to the plight
of the Ukrainians caught up in the bloody conflict on the left
bank of the Dniester between Moldovan forces and the "Dniester
republic." Accusing the Ukrainian government of ignoring its
blood brothers in a region where today the Ukrainians actually
outnumber the Russians, they announced that during the last three
months more than 50 Ukrainians had been killed and more than
100 wounded in the fighting. The speakers asked for humanitarian
aid and called on Kiev to do more to promote a peaceful settlement
of the conflict. (Bohdan Nahaylo)



CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

YUGOSLAV AREA UPDATE. Radio Bosnia-Herzegovina reports on 21
May that the thousands of Muslim refugees held by Serb militiamen
for two days have been released in exchange for safe conduct
for federal army troops from their besieged barracks in Sarajevo.
Bosnian officials, however, said Gen. Ratko Mladic, the local
federal army commander, has no intention of pulling out and that
the Serbs released the refugees in exchange for food and medical
supplies. Federal army officials have ordered the soldiers out
and have sent a high-ranking officer to Sarajevo to enforce the
order. There were no reports of heavy fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
Bosnian Serb leaders on 21 May ordered a general mobilization
of men between the ages of 18 and 60 and women 18-55. EC-sponsored
talks in Lisbon between the warring parties in the republic have
been postponed because Muslim representatives are unable to attend
for security and political reasons. (Milan Andrejevich)

UN MISSION IN JEOPARDY; EC BEGINS MASSIVE RELIEF OPERATIONS.
The federal army said it is suspending its withdrawal from eastern
Croatia for two days after Croatian forces attacked withdrawing
columns. The decision slows implementation of UN peacekeeping
plans in Croatia. The UN Security Council has issued "an urgent
demarche" to the Yugoslav government, saying the UN mission in
Croatia is in jeopardy because UN troops are not being allowed
to deploy in Serb enclaves as previously agreed. The EC said
on 21 May that it has started a humanitarian aid program for
the nearly 1.5 million people displaced by the war in the former
Yugoslavia. Aid worth $8.3 million will be delivered to Belgrade
and Zagreb for distribution. (Milan Andrejevich)

KOSOVO EXTREMELY TENSE. Radio Croatia reports on 21 May that
Serbian security forces have been placed on high alert in the
province of Kosovo, where the Albanian majority plans to hold
legislative and presidential elections on 24 May. Serbia calls
the elections unconstitutional, but a spokesman for the leading
Albanian Democratic League insists they are legal and will be
conducted in the open and monitored by international observers.
(Milan Andrejevich)

BUNDESTAG RATIFIES CZECHOSLOVAK, HUNGARIAN TREATIES. The German
Bundestag ratified the overall treaty with Czechoslovakia in
Berlin on 20 May, over the opposition of some Christian Democrats.
The treaty confirms existing borders but does not deal with property
issues. The Bundestag also approved a resolution calling for
expellees and other Germans to have the opportunity to settle
in Czechoslovakia. Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel welcomed
the ratification and stressed that Czechoslovakia alone cannot
meet the property demands of the Sudeten Germans. The resolution
was criticized by some German and Czechoslovak deputies for paying
too much heed to German claims and downplaying Nazi crimes against
Czechoslovakia. In Budapest Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall
greeted the Bundestag's unanimous ratification of the Hungarian-German
friendship treaty, calling it of great importance that Germany
pledges to support Hungary's admittance to the EC and will help
its economic development, MTI reports on 22 May. (Barbara Kroulik
& Edith Oltay)

PROTESTS OVER RUSSIAN TROOPS IN MOLDOVA. On 21 May the Romanian
parliament unanimously protested the "brutal intervention" of
the Russian-controlled former Soviet 14th Army in Moldova and
called for outside help to stop it. He suggested that the 150-million-lei
election campaign fund should be distributed to the victims of
"Russian imperial power" in Moldova. On 20 May the Romanian Foreign
Ministry called on Russia to withdraw its troops and on 21 May
Patriarch Teoctist, head of Romania's Orthodox Church, called
on Patriarch Aleksei II of Russia to intervene to the same end.
Also on the 21st, the presidium of the Lithuanian Supreme Council
issued a statement strongly condemning the army actions as unwarranted
interference in the internal affairs of a sovereign state and
a dangerous precedent, Radio Lithuania reports. In response to
the appeal by Moldovan President Mircea Snegur on 20 May, the
presidium called on all the involved parties to avoid the further
use of force and urged Russia to order its forces to return to
their bases. (Mihai Sturdza & Saulius Girnius)

BULGARIA, GREECE SIGN COOPERATION TREATY. On 21 May Bulgarian
and Greek prime ministers Filip Dimitrov and Constantine Mitsotakis
signed a friendship and cooperation treaty that calls for improved
bilateral contacts in areas such as business, environment, and
science and technology. Parallel agreements to protect investments
and establish ties between the armed forces were signed at the
same time. Mitsotakis said Bulgarian-Greek relations "constitute
one of the strongest foundations for establishing stability and
progress in the Balkans." The two also discussed regional problems
and agreed that unchanged borders, including those within ex-Yugoslavia,
remain a "condition for peace and stability." Bulgarian-Greek
differences regarding the ex-Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia were
discussed, but without progress. Bulgaria was the first country
to recognize the Republic of Macedonia, but Greece holds the
view that use of the name Macedonia implies territorial claims
on the northern Greek province of the same name. (Kjell Engelbrekt)


CZECHOSLOVAK ELECTION APPEAL TO HUNGARIAN PRESS. In a letter
of 20 May, Valtr Komarek and Frantisek Sebej, chairmen of the
parliamentary foreign affairs committee, asked their Hungarian
counterparts to see that the Budapest media "refrain from involvement
in the Czechoslovak election campaign," specifically by not taking
sides or discriminating against any political party or movement,
either intentionally or unintentionally, CSTK reports. Three
of the 40 parties running for seats in the federal, Czech, and
Slovak parliaments represent citizens of the half-million ethnic
Hungarians, most of whom live in Slovakia. The campaign for the
5-6 June elections officially began on 13 May. (Peter Matuska)


POST-ELECTION AGENDA OF THE CZECHOSLOVAK FEDERAL ASSEMBLY. On
20 May the federal parliament's presidium said that on 25 June,
after the elections, separate constituent sessions of the parliament's
two houses will be held to select their organs and officers.
The federal government is expected to resign on the 25th or 26th,
although it could remain in power through 5 October according
to the constitution. The presidium said it would be desirable
for a new government to be appointed by President Vaclav Havel
before the end of his term, but Havel himself did not think the
coalition talks would be concluded before 3 July, when the election
of a new president is scheduled to start, CSTK reports. (Peter
Matuska)

HAVEL LOSES ANOTHER AIDE. On 20 May Mlada fronta dnes said Vera
Caslavska, an Olympic multiple gold medalist (in 1964 and 1968)
and advisor to President Vaclav Havel since 1990, wants to quit
because of the "heavy physical and psychic burden" of her job.
Four advisors have already left in recent months to join the
election campaign: Jiri Krizan, Ladislav Kantor, Ivan Gabal,
Miroslav Kusy. The Prague daily observed that the level of Havel's
personal confidence in his old associates "often exceeded their
professionalism; it seems he has changed his view." (Peter Matuska)


ANTALL ON HUNGARIANS IN UKRAINE. Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef
Antall proposed to his Ukrainian counterpart Vitold Fokin on
21 May in Budapest that "some kind of autonomy" be created for
ethnic Hungarians living in the Transcarpathian region, MTI reports.
ITAR-TASS quotes Fokin as replying that Antall's proposal is
worthy of consideration, but he believes such moves toward autonomy
are not in keeping with the current trend toward unification
in Europe. Antall stressed that the question of minority rights
plays a "very important" role in Hungarian-Ukrainian relations,
and that the situation of the Hungarian minority in Ukraine serves
as an example of the proper treatment of minorities. This is
the first official visit to Hungary by a Ukrainian Prime Minister.
(Edith Oltay)

KRAVCHUK TO ESTONIA. Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk is set
to visit Estonia on 25 May, principally to sign an agreement
furthering bilateral cooperation in political, economic, and
cultural spheres, ETA reports. (Riina Kionka)

RUSSIAN ENVOY ACCREDITED IN LATVIA. On 21 May Aleksandr Rannikh
presented his credentials to Latvian Supreme Council Chairman
Anatolijs Gorbunovs. He told the press afterwards that working
out a schedule for the withdrawal of ex-USSR troops from Latvia
is complicated by both strategic and economic factors, stressing
that the troops should not be seen as occupation forces. He said
that the failure of Russia to honor its economic accords with
Latvia is due to economic problems in Russia rather than a policy
of economic sanctions, and emphasized the need for continued
economic cooperation. Rannikh added that the choice of citizenship
of Russians living in Latvia should be determined by whatever
factors ease their residence in Latvia, BNS reported on 21 May.
(Dzintra Bungs)

GRACHEV: TROOP WITHDRAWAL FROM BALTICS COMPLETED BY 1994? Russian
Defense Minister Pavel Grachev described to Izvestia of 21 May
his impressions of the Russian Security Council session of 20
May, were, among other things, the withdrawal of Russian troops
from neighboring lands was discussed. He said: "The withdrawal
of troops from the Baltic States can realistically be completed
in 1994 together with the withdrawal of the Western Group of
Forces from Germany." This is the first indication by a top Russian
official of when the troop pullout might be finished; a withdrawal
schedule still remains to be negotiated. (Dzintra Bungs)

FINLAND COMPENSATES ESTONIAN SOLDIERS. Estonian volunteers who
fought with Finnish forces against the USSR in 1943-44 will finally
be compensated for their service. According to Paevaleht of 22
May, Estonian and Finnish state banking officials agreed on 21
May that some 300 "Finnish boys" (Soomepoisid) who live in Estonia
and who deposited their combat pay in two Finnish banks will
receive the pay--plus interest--that has been waiting for them
since the Soviet annexation. About $86,000 will be transferred
from Helsinki to the Estonian Bank, which will distribute the
money to the soldiers or their beneficiaries. Of some 3,700 Estonian
men who fought in the Finnish Army, about 600 are estimated to
be living. (Riina Kionka)

ROMANIAN BROADCAST UNIONS STRIKE. Some 3,400 of the 5,000 workers
at the state-owned radio and television company went on a two-hour
warning strike on 21 May over unresolved wage and labor demands.
Union leader Dumitru Iuga claimed that Romanian Radio and TV
"remains the same old bastion of diehard communists" and are
under the control of the authorities. Foreign and local media
carried the story. (Mihai Sturdza)

POLISH WORKERS PLAN STRIKE OVER FIAT DEAL WITH FIAT. On 21 May
a trade union leader at the state-owned FSM automaker in Tychy,
near Katowice, said workers are considering a strike to protest
the 5,500 layoffs envisaged by a deal reached this week with
the Italian car manufacturer. Kazimiera Glogowka, a Solidarity
Union presidium member, told newsmen that three unions at the
plant had begun a strike alert. Western and Polish wire services
carried the story. (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

ESTONIAN INTERIOR MINISTER UNDER FIRE. On 21 May a group of 27
deputies in the Supreme Council asked that their colleagues take
a vote of no-confidence in Interior Minister Robert Narska, Rahva
Haal reports on 22 May. The group, led by prominent members of
former Prime Minister Edgar Savisaar's leftist-nationalist People's
Center Party, criticized both Narska's performance in his three
months as minister as well as his work as chairman of the government
commission charged with preparing voter and citizenship lists.
Deputy Vello Pohla accused Narska of sympathizing with the politics
of the Committee of Estonia. Given Narska's short tenure, the
stated reasons for yesterday's move seem thin and the call for
a no-confidence vote is likely a new offensive by Savisaar and
his supporters in their jockeying to regain power. (Riina Kionka)


MOTIEKA PUBLICLY SPLITS FROM LANDSBERGIS. On 21 May at the session
of the Lithuanian Supreme Council, broadcast live by Radio Lithuania,
its deputy chairman Kazimieras Motieka read an appeal by 34 deputies
of various factions that condemned the increased radicalization
in the republic. The appeal stated that the 23 May referendum
on the president was thrust upon Lithuania by a "political grouping
seeking to speak in the name of the nation" and called for the
rapid passage of a new constitution and the holding of parliamentary
and presidential elections in the fall. It deplored the failure
to reach an agreement of holding all the referendums the same
day. It is rumored that Motieka might decide to run against Landsbergis
for president. (Saulius Girnius) [As of 1200 CET] Compiled by
Carla Thorson & Charles Trumbull











(END)



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