If you're sure you understand everthing that is going on, you're hopelessly confused. - Walter Mondale
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 78, 23 April 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

IMF SEES HYPERINFLATION, RECESSION IN FORMER SOVIET ECONOMIC
AREA IN 1992. The International Monetary Fund's annual World
Economic Outlook report issued on 23 April forecasts disastrous
economic developments in the republics of the former Soviet Union.
According to Western reports, the IMF anticipates consumer price
inflation rates in excess of 1000%, and declines in net material
output (the traditional Soviet equivalent of gross national product)
of approximately 17.5%, by the end of the year. This comes on
the heels of production declines of similar magnitude, as well
as 86% inflation, in 1991. Michael Mussa, IMF Research Department
director, told Western agencies yesterday that inflation exceeded
400% during the first quarter of 1992 alone. (Ben Slay)

CHANGES IN RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT EXPECTED. "Changes in the composition
of the Russian government are expected tomorrow," announced "Vesti"
on 22 April. Earlier that day, the Russian president met members
of the "Industrial Union," a parliamentary faction which consists
of factory directors. Yeltsin assured the directors that there
would be no "avalanche of privatization" of state-owned military
industries in Russia in the near future. Yeltsin said he would
appoint three or four ministers to supervise the various industries.
(Julia Wishnevsky)

TAJIK PARLIAMENT CHAIRMAN RESIGNS. The Tajik parliament deputies
taken hostage on 21 April were released unharmed on the morning
of 22 April. Meanwhile, parliament Chairman Safarali Kendzhaev
resigned "in order to preserve the unity of the nation and prevent
bloodshed," and after talks between parliament and opposition
representatives, the parliament acceded to the demonstrators'
demand to remove censorship regulations and set a date for ratification
of a new constitution, ITAR-TASS reported. Tajik President Rakhmon
Nabiev signed a decree promising that demonstrators would not
be prosecuted for activities before 23 April, the date by which
they undertook to disperse. (Liz Fuller)

CENTRAL ASIAN, KAZAKH LEADERS MEET. The presidents of Kyrgyzstan,
Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan began a two-day meeting
in Bishkek on 22 April; Tajikistan was represented by a deputy
president as President Rakhmon Nabiev was reportedly ill. The
agenda covered economic relations and the situation in Afghanistan.
A package of agreements including one on a common investment
fund and others on pricing policies and border issues were agreed
to in principle and are scheduled to be signed today, ITAR-TASS
reported. (Liz Fuller)

MOLDOVAN PRESIDENT ON "MOSCOW REACTIONARIES'" STRATEGY. Moldovan
President Mircea Snegur told a visiting group of French parliamentary
deputies that the Dniester conflict is "being directed by reactionaries
in Moscow," Moldova Suverana reported on 17 April. Pointing to
Russian Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi's recent inflammatory
statements in both eastern Moldova and Ukraine and to statements
by other Russian political figures questioning both Moldova's
and Ukraine's borders, Snegur said that their strategy in Moldova's
Dniester region appears to seek "the creation of a springboard
in the rear of Ukrainian forces in the event of a serious conflict
between Russia and Ukraine." (Vladimir Socor)

SNEGUR ON RELATIONS WITH RUSSIA AND TROOP WITHDRAWAL. Receiving
the newly-accredited Canadian Ambassador, Snegur commented that
"in contrast to a large part of the Russian parliament, Yeltsin
remains a realist" on questions of relations with the newly-independent
states. Snegur said that he had just written Yeltsin and cabled
Marshal Evgenii Shaposhnikov urging that Russia's 14th Army,
which is stationed mostly in eastern Moldova, be either dissolved
under Russia's program to reduce military forces or "speedily
withdrawn from the territory of Moldova," Moldovapres reported
on 22 April. Numerous letters and cables from the Moldovan leadership
to Russia's political and military leaders in connection with
the Russian insurgency in eastern Moldova in recent months have
remained unanswered, however. (Vladimir Socor)

"DNIESTER" LEADER ON CONDITIONS FOR SETTLEMENT. In an extensive
interview in Nezavisimaya Gazeta of 21 April, the self-styled
"Dniester republic" Vice President, Aleksandr Karaman, reiterated
said that unless a "Dniester republic" is accepted and recognized
in eastern Moldova through Russia's intercession, "there can
be no question of putting an end to the conflict." He also ruled
out any disarmament of the "Dniester" military forces as part
of a cease-fire. The Russian Cossack detachments serve under
the command of "Dniester" forces and will only be sent back to
Russia if "there will be no longer a need for them." The "Dniester
republic" would be prepared to recog-nize Moldova's borders "within
the framework of the Moldovan Soviet Socialist Republic." (Vladimir
Socor)

CRIMEAN PARLIAMENT SETS DATE FOR DECISION ON REFERENDUM. The
Presidium of the Crimean parliament has decided to convene a
session of parliament on 5 May to decide whether or not a local
referendum should be held on the issue of Crimea's secession
from Ukraine, Radio Ukraine reported on 22 April. This is heightening
tension in the peninsula. Opponents of such a referendum are
warning that it could lead to civil war, and, as "Vesti" reported
on 22 April, advocates of the referendum--who gathered around
250,000 signatures in support of it--are preparing "anti-Ukrainian
demonstrations" stressing that "the Black Sea Fleet, Crimea,
and Russia are one." Meanwhile, in Kiev, the Ukrainian parliament
has adopted a law delineating powers between Ukraine and the
autonomous Crimean republic, Ukrinform-TASS reported on 22 April;
this law was also approved by the Crimean parliament recently.
(Bohdan Nahaylo)

UKRAINE WANTS TO BE A PARTY TO START. Ukrainian officials have
repeated their demand that Ukraine should be an equal party to
the 1991 Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), signed by the
United States and the Soviet Union. Interfax on 22 April quoted
a Ukrainian Foreign Ministry spokesman as saying that Russia's
aim to be the only CIS party to the treaty was "unacceptable"
to Ukraine. The same day, Ukrainian Defense Minister Konstantin
Morozov told a news conference that Ukraine was ready to implement
all the START commitments but it insisted on having the status
of an "equal side," ITAR-TASS reported. START accountable weapons
and facilities in Ukraine include 176 strategic missiles, 2 strategic
bomber bases, and a bomber repair plant. (Doug Clarke)

NAGORNO-KARABAKH REJECTS PROPOSED DATE FOR NEW PEACE TALKS. Officials
in Stepanakert have informed Russian Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev that they cannot attend the planned peace talks with
Azerbaijan to be held in Mineralnie Vody on 23-24 April as 24
April is the day on which Armenians commemorate the 1915 genocide,
Inter-fax reported on 22 April. Speaking in Paris, Armenian Prime
Minister Gagik Arutyunyan claimed that Azerbaijan was concentrating
troops on the border of Nagorno-Karabakh, and called for the
UN Security Council to discuss the conflict and for the dispatch
of UN peacekeeping troops and observers to the region, Western
agencies reported on 22 April. (Liz Fuller)

LENIN'S 122TH BIRTHDAY. For the first time in many decades, there
was no celebration of Lenin's birthday on 22 April. Russian TV
marked this day with movies and discussions unmasking the cruelty
of the founder of the Soviet state. Both his admirers and opponents
met in the Lenin Museum to question historians, in an effort
to create an "objective" picture of this controversial figure.
Demonstrations by orthodox Leninists were modest; about 3,000
die-hards, shouting abusive remarks about Yeltsin, Gorbachev,
the CIA, and Freemasons, gathered in Moscow's Gorky Park, while
another 400 or 500 celebrated Lenin's 122th anniversary in his
native city of Ulyanovsk (former Simbirsk). (Julia Wishnevsky)


PRESS CONFERENCE ON THE RUSSIAN MEDIA. Russian TV on 22 April
broadcast reports of a news conference given by Russian Minister
of the Mass Media Mikhail Poltoranin, along with the directors
of both Russian television channels, Egor Yakovlev and Oleg Poptsov.
Poltoranin viewed the outcome of the Congress of People's Deputies
as a failure by the reactionary forces to launch an unarmed
coup d'etat against the reformist Russian government. According
to Poltoranin, despite criticism voiced by some opposition members,
the media in Russia would remain free; he singled out the Russian
president as the chief champion of free speech. Yakovlev expressed
even greater optimism, saying that lawmakers come and go while
journalists remain. Poptsov, however, confessed that he was afraid
of the upcoming debate in parliament on the performance of the
state-owned electronic media. (Julia Wishnevsky)

EXECUTIONS DOWN IN RUSSIA. In summer 1991,the Soviet parliament
abolished the death penalty for non-violent crimes, but the appropriate
changes had not been made in the criminal codes of the various
Soviet republics before the USSR ceased to exist. Nonetheless,
figures released by Russia's Ministry of Justice show that the
number of criminals executed in Russia fell in 1991 for the third
successive year (Izvestiya, 10 April 1992). Although the number
of those in the Russian Federation found guilty of crimes potentially
carrying the death penalty rose from 2,814 in 1989 to 4,977 in
1991, the number of those actually put to death dropped from
93 in 1989 to 59 in 1991. (Elizabeth Teague)

MOSCOW GAS PRICES INCREASE 400%. Hard-pressed Muscovites took
another jolt on 20 April, when gasoline prices increased dramatically.
According to ITAR-TASS, the price for a litre of regular gasoline
increased from 1.20 to 6 rubles, while the diesel fuel price
increased from .70 to 5 rubles. Although the price increases
were limited to Moscow, Russian Energy Minister Alexander Titkin
told Interfax last week that price controls on energy would be
removed later in the year. While higher gasoline prices are undoubtedly
painful for motorists, the price increases still leave Moscow
gas prices at only a fraction of world market levels. (Ben Slay)


RUSSIAN MINIMUM WAGE TO ALMOST TRIPLE. The Russian parliament
voted on 21 April to raise the monthly minimum wage from 342
to 900 rubles per month as of 1 May. While this 163% increase
will further fuel the inflationary fires now burning in the Russian
economy, ITAR-TASS reported on 22 April that the increase will
still leave the lowest paid workers well below the "subsistence-minumum"
of 1500 rubles per month. (Ben Slay)

UKRAINE APPEALS FOR MORE AID TO OVERCOME CHERNOBYL CONSEQUENCES.
The Chernobyl nuclear accident caused considerably more death
and illness in Ukraine than either the official figures given
at the time or subsequent Western estimates indicated, the Ukrainian
minister for the Chernobyl clean-up, Georgy Gotovchits, claimed.
At a press conference held in Kiev on 22 April on the eve of
the sixth anniversary of the disaster, the minister said that
between 6,000 to 8,000 deaths had been attributed to this, the
world's worst nuclear accident, Radio Ukraine and Western agencies
reported. He appealed for more international help to deal with
the consequences. The Ukrainian authorities are due to close
the Chernobyl nuclear plant in 1993. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

TIGHT UKRAINIAN BUDGET ANNOUNCED. In an attempt to satisfy demands
by the IMF for fiscal stringency, Ukrainian Finance Minister
Hryhori Piatachenko on 21 April unveiled a proposed state budget
with a deficit target of 2% of gross national product for 1992.
The Financial Times of 22 April described this target as "ambitious,"
in part because Kiev exceeded its 1991 deficit limit by a factor
of five. According to Piatachenko, the deficit is to be reduced
through a combination of lower spending on social programs and
enterprise subsidies, as well as higher taxes. Subsidies to state
enterprises will still comprise the largest budgetary category
(some 25% of total expenditures) followed by military expenditures
(16%). The budget must receive parliamentary approval to become
law, and the IMF must give its imprimatur prior to granting large-scale
aid to Ukraine. (Ben Slay)

SPAIN OFFERS UKRAINE CREDITS. Spain is to grant Ukraine a credit
line worth $250 million to encourage bilateral trade. The Spanish
foreign minister, Francisco Fernandez Ordonez, made the announcement
in Madrid on 21 April on the eve of his official visits to Moscow
and Kiev, ITAR-TASS reported. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

NEW BELARUSIAN DEFENSE MINISTER. Lieutenant General Pavel Kozlovsky
has been appointed Belarusian defense minister, ITAR-TASS reported
on 22 April. Until now, he was the first deputy commander and
chief of staff of the Belarus military district. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


APPEAL FROM SOLDIERS' MOTHERS. The "inter-governmental council
of soldiers' mothers" issued an appeal to the Russian parliament
on 18 April that claimed some 40,000 soldiers have died over
the past six years and called for the creation of an independent
commission to conduct an investigation into the deaths, ITAR-TASS
reported. The appeal chastised military leaders, claiming that
they falsely attributed many of these peace-time deaths to suicide
or accidents. It also urged that parents of deceased soldiers
receive at least 50,000 rubles in compensation, together with
a pension, and warned that the group would conduct hunger strikes
at the Kremlin walls if its demands were not met. (Stephen Foye)


MORE SUICIDES IN THE ARMY? On 16 April the Chairman of the CIS
command's Committee for Work with Army Personnel told ITAR-TASS
that the suicide rate in the armed forces has risen dramatically
since 1989. According to Colonel Aleksandr Zyuskevich, suicides
accounted for 1.9% of all causes of death among servicemen in
1989, with the rate rising to 21.9% in 1991 and to 38% in the
first quarter of 1992, the highest since the purges of 1937.
He said that a conference on the problem was planned for 23 April
in Moscow. (Stephen Foye)

RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH ABROAD DENIES LINKS WITH PAMYAT. Nezavisimaya
gazeta, which reported in March on a conference organized by
a priest of the Free Russian Orthodox Church and "Pamyat" leader
Dmitri Vasiliev, has now published a response (8 April) by Bishop
Mark of Berlin and Germany of the Russian Orthodox Church abroad.
Bishop Mark said in this statement that "the opinion of some
priests cannot represent the views of the whole Russian Church."
Sobesednik commented on this statement by saying that obviously
hierarchs and clergy born and raised abroad comprehend better
than some Moscow priests with whom one should and should not
deal in Russia. (Oxana Antic)

CARDINAL HUME TO VISIT RUSSIA. The Observer reported on 19 April
that Cardinal Basil Hume of Westminster would travel to Moscow
and St. Petersburg this week. The newspaper indicated that the
cardinal would make an attempt to improve strained Orthodox-Roman
Catholic relations. (Oxana Antic)

RUSSIAN STUDENTS VISIT "MOONY" COURSES. Three female students
described in Sobesednik no. 15, a two-week course conducted by
followers of Reverend Moon in the Crimea. The young women criticized
the seminar for lack of spontaneity, the polished routine of
the instructors, and fanaticism. (Oxana Antic)

CORRECTION: In "Members of Russian Defense Commission" published
in the Daily Report of 22 April, the number of commission members
holding the rank of Col. Gen. or above is incorrectly stated.
In fact, 17 members hold the rank of Col. Gen.or above, while
all uniformed members of the commission hold a rank of at least
Maj.Gen. (Stephen Foye)



CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

"DRAMATIC" ESCALATION OF FIGHTING IN SARAJEVO. This was Austrian
TV's description of the combat in the Bosnia capital on 22 April.
The broadcast said it was the heaviest fighting Sarajevo had
seen to date, with most of the action concentrated in the southern
part of town near the airport and the suburb of Ilidza on the
road to Mostar. Radio Sarajevo announced that the Bosnian authorities
had begun to reorganize the republic's government, with priority
going to clearing the roadblocks that have strangled economic
activity. The 23 April Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung said that
the Territorial Defense Forces, loyal to the elected authorities,
have issued a call to arms in the face of Serbian aggression.
(Patrick Moore)

MORE CALLS FOR INTERNATIONAL ACTION IN BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA. Austrian
TV reported on 22 April that Chancellor Franz Vranitzky called
for the UN and the EC to start dealing directly with the Serbian-dominated
army instead of with politicians, since it appears that the army
is the real power in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The military has extensive
properties, factories, and other installations in the republic
and is unlikely to give them up easily. Elsewhere, sources as
different as Austrian President Kurt Waldheim and New York Times
editorial of 23 April pointed out that the international community's
response to Serbian aggression in Bosnia is pitifully inadequate
compared to its reaction to Saddam's seizure of Kuwait, even
though the principle involved is the same. The Times wondered
if the responses would have been different if Bosnia had oil.
(Patrick Moore)

DEFENSE MINISTER TO RESIGN? According to a BTA report on 22 April
Prime Minister Filip Dimitrov asked Defense Minister Dimitar
Ludzhev to resign from his post. BTA said the information was
confirmed by parliamentary sources. However, on 23 April Trud
quoted Ludzhev as saying in a phone conversation that he would
not resign "because they want to remove me for having my own
opinions and for not letting the army to be used to suppressing
public protests." (Rada Nikolaev)

NATO OFFICIAL VISITS BULGARIA. The report about a possible resignation
of Bulgaria's Defense Minister coincided with the arrival on
22 April of Admiral Jeremy "Mike" Boorda, commander of NATO's
southern flank, on an official visit to the country. BTA said
the visit is in fulfillment of the London declaration of 1990
and the Rome declaration of 1991 of the NATO Council on contacts
with military authorities of the former socialist countries.
It said it is a follow-up of the visit last December of General
Dieter Klaus, Deputy Commander-in-Chief of NATO's forces in Europe.
(Rada Nikolaev)

SOCIALIST PARTY ON THE MOSLEM GROUP. Jean Videnov, Chairman of
the Bulgarian Socialist Party (BSP) which had lodged a suit contesting
the legal status of the Movement for Rights and Freedoms (MRF),
a mainly Moslem political party, said in an interview with Bulgarian
Radio on 22 April that the BSP recognizes the ruling of the Constitutional
Court that granted legality to the MRF but its attitude to the
Moslem group will be determined by the latter's behavior in the
parliament. (Rada Nikolaev)

CZECHOSLOVAK-GERMAN TREATY RATIFIED. The Czechoslovak parliament
ratified on 22 April a Czechoslovak-German friendship treaty
by the vote of 144 out of 226 deputies present. Western agencies
reported that some protesters demonstrated against the ratification
outside the parliament building. Czechoslovak President Vaclav
Havel and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl signed the treaty in
February 27. German Bundestag will vote on ratification next
month. The treaty recognizes existing Czechoslovak-German border
and sets out conditions for bilateral economic and cultural ties.
It was criticized by smaller parties at both ends of the political
spectrum in Czechoslovakia, for allowing too large a role for
German capital in Czechoslovakia's economy, and for no provisions
for German wartime reparations. (Barbara Kroulik)

US COMPANY BUYS INTO CZECH CIGARETTE INDUSTRY. US cigarette maker
Philip Morris is to acquire 30% of the Czech cigarette manufacturer
Tabak Kutna Hora at a price of $104 million. A Prague economic
daily Hospodarske noviny on 22 April quotes Czech Deputy Premier
Jan Strasky as saying Philip Morris has committed itself to invest
a further $140 million to update Kutna Hora's equipment. The
Czech government will maintain 35% of the stock, with 27% of
stock to be distributed to the public under the coupon privatization
plan. The deal is subject to the government's approval. (Barbara
Kroulik)

CZECH GOVERNMENT TO PUBLISH STB NAMES? The Czech government decided
to ask the federal parliament to publish the names of thousands
of former agents and senior officials of the secret state police
(STB). Federal Interior Ministry spokesman Martin Fendrych told
CSTK on 22 April that the government has a list of about 90,000
names of former agents and high officials of the STB. (Barbara
Kroulik)

MERI MOVES ACROSS THE BAY. Former Foreign Minister Lennart Meri
presented his credentials to Finnish President Mauno Koivisto
this morning (23 April), the RFE/RL Estonian Service reports.
Meri was named Ambassador to Finland after he left the Foreign
Ministry last month.(Riina Kionka)

NEW COMMISSION RESPONDS TO NARVA. In response to demands from
Narva energy workers, the Estonian Supreme Council on 21 April
established a new commission to deal with the "Problems of Legal
Status among Non-Citizens," BNS reported the next day. The joint
government-parliamentary commission, headed by Deputy Speaker
Marju Lauristin, will take up the citizenship and economic concerns
that prompted the Narva workers to threaten a strike for today
(23 April). (Riina Kionka)

RUSSIAN CITIZENSHIP POPULAR IN ESTONIA. The Russian Embassy in
Tallinn has already received around 8000 applications for Russian
citizenship, according to Russian Federation representative in
Estonia Oleg Popovich. Popovich named the figure when he told
BNS on 22 April that Russia would open a consulate in the predominantly
Russian-speaking city of Narva on 28 April. There are some 475,000
ethnic Russians--just over 30% of Estonia's total population--currently
living in Estonia. (Riina Kionka)

HUNGARIAN AND SLOVAK FOREIGN MINISTERS MEET. Hungarian Foreign
Minister Geza Jeszenszky and his Slovak counterpart Pavol Demes
held talks on 22 April in Budapest on international issues and
bilateral economic and cultural relations, MTI reported. Jeszenszky
stressed the importance of a dialogue with Slovakia where some
600,000 ethnic Hungarians live, and expressed satisfaction that
issues such as the education of the Hungarian minority and the
need to open new border crossings could now be discussed freely.
Demes said that Slovakia's nationality policy conformed to European
norms. The joint Gabcikovo-Nagymaros hydroelectric power project,
a major bone of contention, was not discussed. (Edith Oltay)


HUNGARIAN DEMOCRATIC FORUM ON TOEKES. In a statement issued on
22 April the presidium of the Hungarian Democratic Forum, Hungary's
largest governing party, protested over continuing attacks in
the Romanian media and parliament against the ethnic Hungarian
Reformed Bishop Laszlo Toekes. Recalling that Tokes sparked the
1989 uprising against Ceausescu, the presidium said that the
attacks were directed against a man who symbolized the solidarity
of the Romanian and Hungarian peoples, and were conscious attempts
to damage relations between the two peoples. (Edith Oltay)

LATVIA OPENS CONSULATE IN ISRAEL. On 22 April the Israeli foreign
ministry announced that Latvia had opened a consulate in Tel
Aviv, Western agencies report. It is thus the first of the Baltic
States to open a diplomatic mission in Isreal, which has also
established formal diplomatic relations with Russia, Ukraine,
Azerbaijan, Uzbekhistan, Kyrgystan, and Tajikistan. (Saulius
Girnius)

LANDSBERGIS IN FRANCE. On 23 April Lithuanian Supreme Council
Chairman Vytautas Landsbergis will return to Vilnius after a
three day visit to Paris during which he and French President
Francois Mitterrand signed an investments' protection agreement
to help promote French investments in Lithuania, Radio Lithuania
reports. On 22 April he spoke at the opening session of the East-West
conference "Whither Eastern Europe" at the Sorbonne, strongly
urging the immediate removal of former Soviet troops from his
country. He discussed Lithuania's economic problems with Mitterrand
and French Foreign Minister Roland Dumas in an hour long meeting
and talked with other government officials and parliamentarians.
Presidential aide Pierre Morel announced that Mitterrand will
visit Lithuania in mid-May to sign a friendship and cooperation
treaty. (Saulius Girnius)

LITHUANIAN CURRENCY THIS YEAR. On 22 April Lithuanian Prime Minister
Gediminas Vagnorius sent a letter to IMF Managing Director Michel
Camdessus stating that Lithuania plans to introduce its own currency,
the litas, in the second half of this year, Reuters reports.
Vagnorius wrote that the Lithuanian government supported the
IMF's proposals for developing a program to stabilize the country's
economy. The program prepared by IMF experts, who are visiting
Lithuania, should be ready in June. Lithuania is one of 14 former
USSR republics whose applications to join the IMF are expected
to be approved at next week's semi-annual meeting of the IMF
and World Bank in Washington. (Saulius Girnius)

COALITION BID FAILS IN POLAND. After six weeks of negotiations,
involving ten post-Solidarity political parties, attempts to
broaden the government coalition had failed, Polish and Western
media reported. The talks broke down when, following a five-hour
meeting in Warsaw on 22 April, Prime Minister Jan Olszewski refused
to redistribute cabinet seats in accordance with each party's
parliamentary strength. Olszewski later told reporters that a
total reshuffle "would mean breaking the continuity which no
government can afford." An agreement on forming a coalition of
all those parties was regarded as a way to ensure acceptance
by the Sejm of an austerity budget, which the government presented
to the Sejm on 3 April. (Roman Stefanowski)

KUWAIT'S INTEREST IN POLAND INCREASES. Polish Deputy Foreign
Minister Jan Majewski told PAP on 22 April that the 1992 trade
turnover between Kuwait and Poland may equal or even exceed the
pre-Gulf War level. Kuwait businessmen were said to have been
interested in joint-ventures, in investments in the petro-chemical
industries, and the possibilities for opening gasoline stations
in Poland. Majewski also announced a visit in June of the Kuwait
trade delegation with "a big group of businessmen and persons
in charge of the government's foreign investments." (Roman Stefanowski)
[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Carla Thorson & Jan de Weydenthal




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