There is always one moment in childhood when the door opens and lets the future in. - Graham Greene
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 76, 21 April 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

CIS AGREEMENT RATIFIED, BUT THE USSR STILL EXISTS IN RUSSIA.
On 20 April, the Russian Congress of People's Deputies ratified
the Minsk agreement on the establishment of the Commonwealth
of Independent States, according to Russian TV. After an emotional
debate, the Congress voted 548 in favor of the CIS agreement
with 158 against. A few days earlier, however, the Congress'
leadership failed to persuade the necessary two-thirds majority
to eliminate references to the USSR from the Russian Constitution.
The Soviet Union therefore still exists de jure as far as the
Russian Federation is concerned; and some conservative speakers
told the Congress that the references to the USSR could enable
Russia to claim Russian-populated enclaves in other former union
republics. (Julia Wishnevsky)

CONCEPT OF THE DRAFT RUSSIAN CONSTITUTION APPROVED. On 18 April,
the Congress voted to approve "the general concept and basic
proposals" of the new Russian Constitution drafted by the parliamentary
commission chaired by Russian President Boris Yeltsin. Attempts
to get the Congress to approve the project "in principle" failed.
However, the Congress rejected the alternative drafts: two drafts
prepared by various Communist factions and that of St. Petersburg
Mayor Anatolii Sobchak and a group of leading jurists. Instead
of offering yet another draft Constitution, Yeltsin's legal adviser,
Sergei Shakhrai, proposed amendments to the official draft aimed
at strengthening the power of the Russian president at the expense
of parliament. If the Congress fails to adopt the new Constitution
at its next session this fall, "Vesti" predicted, Yeltsin's supporters
may call for a referendum to adopt a Constitution transforming
Russia into a presidential republic. (Julia Wishnevsky)

YELTSIN PLANS TO RESHUFFLE HIS CABINET. At a meeting with representatives
of 13 factions in the Congress held on 20 April, Yeltsin said
that, unlike his supporters, he had never intended to urge that
the Congress be disbanded. Yeltsin added that he plans changes
in the government to get rid of the "most odious members" of
his entourage. (Later that day, the Congress agreed to view a
statement signed by 305 deputies which attacked Yeltsin advisers
Gennadii Burbulis, Galina Starovoitova and Gavriil Popov.) Yeltsin
also noted his intention to remove the majority of his counsellors
and to concentrate more power in the government. "Vesti" cited
Deputy Prime Minister Aleksandr Shokhin as saying that Vladimir
Shumeiko (now Russian parliamentary deputy chairman) will be
appointed as first deputy Prime Minister, in addition to Gaidar.
(Julia Wishnevsky)

RUSSIA GETS TWO NAMES. Russia retained its name "Russia" for
24 hours. On 16 April, following several days of argument, the
Congress opted for "Russia," as the country's official name,
and this decision was met with a standing ovation [see Daily
Report, 16 April]. Representatives of non-Russian republics protested
the lack of any reference to Russia's federal status, however.
As a result, the deputies spent the entire morning on 17 April
discussing the President's suggestion to adopt two names for
the state--Russian Federation and Russia. After a number of unsuccessful
attempts, the Congress agreed that these two names would have
equal status according to the Constitution. (Julia Wishnevsky)


CONGRESS REJECTS FREE SALE OF LAND. On 17 April, the Congress
failed to adopt a Constitutional amendment aimed at allowing
the peasants to buy and sell land. Later that day, a group of
Yeltsin supporters--"Coalition for Reform"--held a news conference,
at which they called for a referendum to approve the free sale
of land. Yeltsin and his team of reformers have been trying to
push this proposal through the Congress' conservative agricultural
lobby since its second session held in late-1990; then it was
decided that local soviets could lease land for ten years and
thereupon decide whether to sell it to the tenant. This year,
Yeltsin issued a decree permitting the free sale of land, but,
as one conservative deputy pointed out, such sales violate the
Constitution and therefore would be ruled illegal by any court.
(Julia Wishnevsky)

MUSCOVITES RALLY FOR AND AGAINST YELTSIN. Supporters of the Yeltsin
government rallied on 19 April in Moscow to urge that the Russian
Congress be disbanded. The organizers argued that the current
Russian deputies were elected in 1990, under communist rule,
and consist of Party diehards who oppose market-oriented reforms.
Estimates of the number of participants varied from 20,000 (Western
agencies) to 70,000 (Russian TV). Among other demands, the protesters
called for almost unlimited powers to be given to President Yeltsin,
the right to buy and sell land, and the election of a constituent
assembly to adopt a new Russian constitution. A few thousand
communists, "Novosti" noted, also met on the other side of Red
Square with "diametrically opposed slogans" marking the 122th
anniversary of Lenin's birth. (Julia Wishnevsky)

ENTREPRENEURS URGE POPOV'S RESIGNATION. On 18 April, Russian
TV broadcast reports on a rally held by the Moscow Convention
of Entrepreneurs and some radical politicians who oppose Mayor
Gavriil Popov. The participants argued that the Popov administration
consists of representatives from the old Party nomenklatura and
is thoroughly corrupt. The speakers, led by prominent businessman
Konstantin Borovoi, urged that Popov and his deputy, Yurii Luzhkov,
resign and be put on trial. Some newscasts quoted Borovoi as
saying that Russian President Boris Yeltsin would meet the same
fate as the [ousted Georgian President Zviad] Gamsakhurdia unless
he breaks his ties with "the corrupt" Moscow leadership. One
broadcast also cited a letter by thirteen Moscow entrepreneurs
to a city newspaper which protested against the rally. (Julia
Wishnevsky)

KOMSOMOL REVIVED. About hundred delegates from various parts
of the former Soviet Union met on 18 April in a village near
the Moscow suburb of Zelenograd to revive the young communist
league that was dissolved by the last Komsomol congress last
fall, according to Russian TV. The participants termed their
gathering "The Twenty-Third Restoration Congress" and voted to
preserve the organization's tradition name--"The All-Union Leninist
Communist Union of Youth." Former Politburo conservative Egor
Ligachev attended the congress as a guest of honor. (Julia Wishnevsky)


SOUTH OSSETIA CALLS FOR RUSSIAN SOVEREIGNTY. ITAR-TASS reported
on 17 April that the South Ossetian parliament had called on
the Russian Congress to extend Russian sovereignty to South Ossetia
and grant its population Russian citizenship. On 20 April South
Ossetian parliament chairman Torez Kulumbegov reiterated the
appeal and said that South Ossetia has called for the dispatch
of a UN peacekeeping force to the disputed region, where 500
people have died in armed clashes. On 18 April the Georgian provisional
government had proposed the withdrawal of Russian MVD troops
from South Ossetia, according to ITAR-TASS. (Liz Fuller)

RUSSIA, AZERBAIJAN CALL FOR NEW TALKS ON NAGORNO-KARABAKH. Foreign
Minister Sergei Kozyrev met in Moscow on 20 April with his Azerbaijani
counterpart, Hussein-Aga Sadykhov, and called for new multilateral
peace talks on Nagorno-Karabakh within the next few days, ITAR-TASS
reported. Kozyrev indicated that Azerbaijan would drop its objections
to the participation of a delegation from Karabakh. ITAR-TASS
quoted an Armenian parliament spokesman as stating that the preliminary
investigation into the circumstances of the death of Nagorno-Karabakh
parliament chairman Artur Mkrtchyan pointed to "careless handling
of weapons" and rejected Azerbaijani allegations of internal
political feuding within the Nagorno-Karabakh parliament. (Liz
Fuller)

FOREIGN MINISTERS' MEETING IN CHISINAU. The foreign ministers
of Moldova, Russia, Ukraine, and Romania conferred on 17 April
in Chisinau on the conflict in eastern Moldova, following up
on their meeting of 6 April also in Chisinau. The ministers adopted
recommendations on the disengagement of the forces in conflict;
the disarming of irregular formations; and "maintaining the neutrality"
and "defining the status" of Russia's 14th Army deployed in the
area. The ministers further resolved to set up three quadripartite
bodies: a "group of military observers" to monitor the cease-fire;
a "group of human rights rapporteurs" (demanded particularly
by Moldova); and a "mission of conciliation and mediation" to
work out political solutions to the conflict. (Vladimir Socor)


RUSSIA DIFFERS ON MOLDOVA SETTLEMENT TERMS. The foreign ministers'
recommendations are unlikely to lead to a settlement of the Moldovan
conflict. Russia urges the use of the 14th Army as a peacekeeping
force, the inclusion of the self-styled "Dniester republic" in
the negotiations, and the granting of "political status" to the
Dniester area in Moldova as prerequisites to any settlement,
all of which is unacceptable to the other three countries. Given
the 14th Army's open support for the "Dniester" insurgents, Chisinau
supported by Romania and Ukraine demands its withdrawal from
Moldova. The proposed quadripartite bodies seem likely to be
paralyzed in major decisions by the differing interests of Russia
on one side and Moldova, Ukraine, and Romania on the other. The
"separation of forces" is already being interpreted by the "Dniester"
insurgents and their supporters in Russia as meaning the withdrawal
of Moldovan police from areas on both banks of the Dniester held
by the insurgents. (Vladimir Socor)

FIVE MOLDOVAN POLICE KILLED IN CEASE-FIRE VIOLATIONS. Five Moldovan
policemen were killed and at least as many wounded on 18 April,
the day after the foreign ministers' meeting, in two attacks
on the right bank of the Dniester by Russian insurgents who lost
one killed and two wounded. The major attack occurred in the
city of Bendery where Moldovan police have been under siege in
their headquarters since December. The attacks illustrate the
recent tendency of "Dniester" forces to extend their operations
from the left bank, where they are based, onto the right bank.
(Vladimir Socor)

KRAVCHUK WARNS AGAINST CRIMEAN REFERENDUM. On 20 April, Ukrainian
President Leonid Kravchuk issued an appeal to lawmakers and residents
of Crimea not to support a local referendum on secession from
Ukraine, which he claimed was being promoted by "separatists"
intent on "destabilizing the situation and sowing discord between
Crimea and Ukraine," and "those who to set Russia against Ukraine
by playing the Crimean card." According to Radio Ukraine, Kravchuk
assured the Crimeans that they would enjoy broad autonomy and
the economic benefits of remaining with Ukraine, and that there
would be no forced Ukrainization. On the other hand, he stressed
that the rights of Crimea's Ukrainian and Crimean Tatar minorities
would have to be respected and that Ukraine was committed to
helping the Crimean Tatars return to their Crimean homeland.
(Bohdan Nahaylo)

UKRAINIAN RECESSION AND BUDGETARY CRISIS. Ukraine's national
income during the first quarter of 1992 was 20% lower than during
the corresponding period of 1991, according to official data
cited by Reuters of 17 April. Industrial output was down by 15%
and food output declined by 34%. On 16 April, the Ukrainian parliament's
economics commission refused to approve the fifth draft budget
of 1992, reportedly because the punitive tax levels it prescribed
would stifle enterprise while leaving a budget deficit of nearly
70 billion rubles. (Keith Bush)

TRANSFER OF NUKES FROM UKRAINE RESUMED. Nykola Mykhailchenko,
an advisor to Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk, told Reuters
on 17 April that the transfer of tactical nuclear weapons to
Russia for disposal was being resumed that day. On 14 April AFP
quoted Ukrainian Foreign Minister Anatoly Zlenko as saying that
some 2,000 short-range weapons remained in Ukraine. Ukraine's
defense minister, Konstantin Morozov, told a Washington press
conference on 14 April that Ukraine was still insisting on international
control of the destruction of these weapons. The acting Belarusian
defense minister, Petr Chaus, was reported by ITAR-TASS on 18
April to have said that experts from his republic should also
take part in monitoring the elimination of nuclear weapons withdrawn
from Belarus. (Doug Clarke)

KRASNOYARSK RADAR DEMOLITION HALTED. Radio Rossii on 17 April
reported that Arkadii Vetrev, the head of the Krasnoyarsk Krai
administration, had ordered that the demolition of the former
Krasnoyarsk radar station be halted. In 1989, the then Soviet
Union had agreed to dismantle this radar since it contravened
the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty. The report said
that all the radar equipment had been dismantled and 70% of the
building had been destroyed. However, some 60,000 square meters
remained, which the local government wished to see turned into
a furniture manufacturing plant. (Doug Clarke)

MILITARY REACTORS TO BE SHUTDOWN. Reuters, on 20 April, reported
that the Russian government had told the military to shut down
two underground nuclear reactors at a plant near Krasnoyarsk.
There are three reactors at the plant, which produces plutonium
for nuclear warheads. A spokesman for the Russian state committee
charged with inspecting nuclear facilities cited a new environ-mental
protection law and the declining demand for plutonium as the
reason for the shutdown order. One reactor is to close down by
1 June and the second by 1 September. (Doug Clarke)

GAIDAR TO HEAD ARMS SALES COMMISSION. In a decree signed on 11
April and published by Rossiiskaya gazeta on 16 April, Boris
Yeltsin ordered the creation of a Russian Federation Export Control
Commission to oversee and coordinate the sale to foreign countries
of weaponry and military-related materials, technology, and expertise.
The commission, to be headed by Deputy Prime Minister Egor Gaidar,
will include deputy leaders of the Russian Ministries of Foreign
Affairs, Defense, Econo-mics, Science, Industry, and others.
Gaidar was given a month to prepare a draft statute on the activities
and personnel of the new commission. The decree clearly seems
to be aimed at establishing state control over the increasingly
chaotic export of Russian arms and military technologies. (Stephen
Foye)

GEIDAR ALIEV TO RUN FOR AZERBAIJANI PRESIDENT. Nakhichevan parliament
Chairman and former Azerbaijani CP First Secretary Geidar Aliev
has been nominated as a candidate for the Azer-baijani presidential
elections in June, although at the age of 69 he is technically
not eligible given the age limit of 65, Interfax reported on
18 April. Clashes were reported last week by Russian Radio on
the border between Nakhichevan and Armenia, and on 20 April ITAR-TASS
reported that CIS soldiers detained four out of eight persons
trying illegally to cross the border from Nakhichevan to Iran.
(Liz Fuller)

CENTRAL ASIAN REACTION TO AFGHANISTAN EVENTS. Speaking in New
Delhi on 19 April while on an official visit to India, Turkmen
President Saparmurad Niyazov affirmed that his republic would
abide by a policy of noninterference in Afghanistan's internal
affairs, and called for a peaceful political solution to the
crisis there, ITAR-TASS reported on 19 April. A statement by
the Uzbek Foreign Ministry issued on 20 April and carried by
Radio Mayak expressed concern over the situation in Afghanistan
and said there was no alternative to a political solution to
the Afghan conflict. (Liz Fuller)

TAJIK DEMONSTRATORS ISSUE ULTIMATUM. On 17 April the Tajik parliament
acceded to opposition demands for a new constitution and new
elections in return for a three-week moratorium on demonstrations,
ITAR-TASS reported. The parliament convened on 20 April and agreed
to hold talks with opposition leaders, but rejected their demands
to fire its chairman, Safarali Kendzhaev, whereupon thousands
of protesters gathered outside the parliament building issued
an ultimatum for his removal by midday local time on 21 April.
(Liz Fuller)



CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

US MAY BREAK RELATIONS WITH BELGRADE. Austrian TV said on 20
April that Washington is considering suspending diplomatic ties
to Serbia in protest against Belgrade's aggression in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
Western news agencies quoted a State Department spokesman as
saying that Serbian forces are apparently trying to overrun much
of that troubled republic. He also criticized Serbia for its
anti-Western propaganda. On 18 April USAF C-130 transport aircraft
launched a relief mission to Sarajevo, despite shelling of the
airport area by Serbian forces. US Deputy Assistant Secretary
of State Ralph Johnson was aboard the first plane and began a
diplomatic mission by meeting with President Alija Izetbegovic
in the Bosnian capital. On 20 April Austrian TV reported that
Serbian forces, including the federal army, were shelling the
old town of Mostar. (Patrick Moore)

CENTRAL EUROPEAN COOPERATION COM-MITTEE SET UP. The ministers
of international economic relations of Hungary, Czechoslovakia,
and Poland on 17 April in Budapest signed the founding document
of the Central European Cooperation Committee. The major task
of the committee is to eliminate economic and trade barriers
between the three countries, and to speed up their entry into
the EC. The three countries are expected to sign a free trade
agreement this year, eliminating over a period of ten years tariffs
on all their industrial and agricultural products. (Edith Oltay)


BULGARIAN UNIONS JOIN IN PROTEST AGAINST GOVERNMENT. The formerly
official Confederation of Independent Trade Unions (CITUB) and
the formerly oppositional Confederation of Labor Podkrepa put
aside their differences and on 16 April issued a joint statement,
saying that they would discontinue contacts with "the present"
government. They complained that the government offered to discuss
the liberalization of prices and compensation for the population
only after it had already decided its policies. According to
BTA reports, the unions accepted the liberalization of prices
but insisted on adequate compensation and demanded regular consultations
on social and economic policies. (Rada Nikolaev)

GOVERNMENT CHANGES FORTHCOMING. According to BTA reports, Prime
Minister Filip Dimitrov said on 20 April that he would continue
during this week consultations about changes in the structure
of the government. Among likely changes, BTA has mentioned the
appointment of Minister of the Interior Yordan Sokolov to a new
post of a Deputy Prime Minister and the splitting of the Ministry
of Industry and Trade into two or three. (Rada Nikolaev)

IMF CREDIT FOR BULGARIA. On 20 April Western agencies reported
from Washington that the International Monetary Fund had granted
Bulgaria $212 million credit to support its economic reform program.
The credit was subject to conditions set by the fund that involved
the freeing of prices and the beginning of a privatization of
the economy. The prices have been freed and the voting on the
final chapters of the privatization law is set for 21 April.
(Rada Nikolaev)

PROPERTY TO BE RETURNED TO ETHNIC GERMANS. Despite government
objections, the Czech parliament approved on 15 April a law which
would return some property seized from ethnic Germans after World
War II. The measure applies to Czechoslovak citizens of German
origin who still live in Czechoslovakia, Reuter reports. The
post-war seizure was ordered to punish ethnic Germans for their
support of Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia. The new law does
not recognize property rights of some three million ethnic Germans
who were moved out of the country after the war and also excludes
people who collaborated with the Nazis. For the first time, property
confiscated before 1948 will be returned. (Barbara Kroulik)

MANY JOURNALISTS SAID TO HAVE COLLABORATED WITH COMMUNISTS. Federal
authorities drew up a list of 262 alleged former secret police
(STB) agents working as journalists, following the screening
of members of the Journalist's Guild, the Mlada fronta daily
reported. The list was handed over by the Federal Security and
Information Service to Czech Premier Petr Pithart. The daily
quoted officials in the Federal Information Service as saying
that although the journalists stopped being agents with the advent
of democracy and the collapse of the STB, some still "try to
misinform and negatively influence public opinion." According
to legislation passed in 1991, publishers have the right to screen
their staff for possible STB links, to boost the credibility
of their paper. (Barbara Kroulik)

INCIDENTS AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. In the past year a total of
327 incidents are reported to have occurred in Czechoslovakia's
four Soviet-made nuclear power plants. Zdenek Kriz, Chief of
the Czechoslovak Atomic Authority, told journalists on 17 April
that of these 320 would not have represented a threat to people
and the environment. Six were described as "deviations from normal
operations." Only at one plant, Jaslovske Bohunice, radioactive
water leaked within the compound. (Barbara Kroulik)

PRIME MINISTER ASSERTS CONTROL OVER THE MILITARY. Interviewed
on Warsaw TV on 18 April Polish Prime Minister Jan Olszewski
said that although the president has the overall command of the
military, "it is the Defense Ministry and its civilian minister
who are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the army
." Olszewski also said that the government needs support from
both the public and the parliament to implement effectively its
economic policies. (Roman Stefanowski)

ECONOMIC STATISTICS. On 17 April PAP reported that at the end
of March the number of unemployed in Poland reached 2,238,400,
or 12.2% of the total workforce. The agency said that the figures
released by the Main Statistical Office (GUS) showed a slight
improvement in industrial production: in March it was 91% of
the 1991 monthly average, compared with 77.9% in February and
82% in January. The average salary in March was 2,309,000 zloty,
only a fraction above the December 1991 figure. (Roman Stefanowski)


AGRICULTURAL PROTESTS CONTINUE. The Polish Farmers' Trade Union
"Self-Defense" continues its two-week long sit-in strike at the
Ministry of Agriculture and the Food Industry. According to PAP
reports, by 20 April the demonstration involved some 400 persons,
11 of whom were on a hunger strike. They demanded that the government
cancel their investment debts and create cheap credits. They
also demanded the dismissal of the Agriculture Minister Gabriel
Janowski. (Roman Stefanowski)

FORMER COMMUNIST OFFICIALS SENTENCED TO PRISON. The Romanian
Supreme Court sentenced 21 high-ranking officials of the Ceausescu
regime to prison terms ranging from 8 to 16 years, local and
foreign media reported on 20 April. They were convicted of "complicity
in extremely grave murder" for their support of the attempt to
suppress the anti-Ceausescu revolution in December 1989. The
sentences cannot be appealed. (Crisula Stefanescu)

OPPOSITION WANTS LOCAL OBSERVERS TO MONITOR THE GENERAL ELECTIONS.
Several thousand opposition supporters, demonstrated in Bucharest
on 17 April, demanding that the local observers be allowed to
monitor upcoming general elections to prevent vote fraud. The
elections are expected in June or July, although a date has not
yet been set. (Crisula Stefanescu)

ESTONIAN PROTEST TO RUSSIA. The Estonian Foreign Ministry has
sent a note to Russia protesting recent border intrusions, BNS
reported that day. The 16 April note asks for explanations on
two specific incidents from last week--one in which four Russian
planes crossed unannounced into Estonian airspace, the other
in which four military vehicles tried to enter southern Estonia
without authorization. There has been no reported reaction in
Moscow yet to the note. (Riina Kionka)

ESTONIAN PRIVATIZATION LAW. The Estonian Supreme Council passed
a law on 16 April governing the privatization of state and municipal
residential properties, BNS reported that day. The law grants
citizens with permanent residence state capital certificates
in which one square meter in a modern apartment house is equivalent
to one year in the labor market. Work status will be counted
starting January 1, 1945. The certificates may be passed on to
relatives who have lived in Estonia for 5 years, and may be cashed
in--allowing residents to buy their own apartments--in four years
time. The government will outline procedures for implementing
the new privatization law in subsequent directives. (Riina Kionka)


LATVIA FORMS NAVY? Latvia is forming a navy of about 11 ships
and 1,000 sailors out of its former coast guard and commercial
fishing fleet, according to Krasnaya Zvezda on 17 April. The
new Latvian Navy will reportedly patrol the coastline and combat
drug trafficking and other smuggling. (Riina Kionka)

LITHUANIAN MINISTERS TENDER RESIG-NATIONS. On 20 April Lithuanian
Prime Minister Gediminas Vagnorius told the RFE/RL Lithuanian
Service that several members of his cabinet have tendered their
resignations or intend to do so. Deputy Prime Minister Vytautas
Pakalniskis and government secretary Kestutis Cilinskas had submitted
their resignations while Deputy Prime Minister Algirdas Dobravolskas
and Finance Minister Elvyra Kuneviciene are intending to do so.
The four were among the most active supporters of a decree by
Vagnorius slashing the staff of ministries and other government
agencies by 30-50% that the parliament subsequently revoked.
Vagnorius has not signed any of the resignation applications
by the ministers who said that they supported Vagnorius's reform
efforts, but did not see any opportunity to "work fruitfully."
(Saulius Girnius)

US SENATOR HURT IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT IN VILNIUS. On 19 April
US Senator Robert Kerrey arrived in Vilnius as part of a Senate
Intelligence Committee delegation that also included Senator
Bill Bradley, Radio Lithuania reported. While traveling from
the airport, the automobile in which he was riding collided with
a taxi. Kerrey's left leg was cut and he was flown to a US military
hospital in Germany from which he returned to his home state
of Nebraska on 20 April. (Saulius Girnius)

[As of 1200 CET]

Compiled by:

Carla Thorson & Jan DeWeydenthal







(END)





The RFE/RL Daily Report is produced by the RFE/RL Research Institute
(a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Inc.) in Munich,
Germany, with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division (NCA). The report is available Monday through Friday,
except holidays, at approximately 0800 US Eastern Time (1400
Central European Time) by fax, post, or e-mail. The report is
also posted daily on the SOVSET computer network.

For inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions, or additional
copies, please contact:

In USA: Mr. Jon Lodeesen or Mr. Brian Reed RFE/RL, Inc., 1201
Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20036. Telephone: (202)
457-6912 or -6900 fax: (202) 457-6992 or -202-828-8783;

or in Europe:

Mr. David L. Troyanek or Ms. Helga Hofer Publications Department,
RFE/RL Research Institute Oettingenstrasse 67 8000 Munich 22
Telephone: (-49 89) 2102-2631 or -2642 fax: (-49 89) 2102-2648







[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole